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Stop Feeling So Damn Depressed: A CBT-Based Guide For Men Who Want to Overcome Depression

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30 review for Stop Feeling So Damn Depressed: A CBT-Based Guide For Men Who Want to Overcome Depression

  1. 5 out of 5

    Bob

    Stop Feeling So Damn Depressed is the perfect book for the average male who struggles with symptoms of depression. It offers a concise, an easy to digest, and an evidence-based summary of the nature of depression ("the beast"), as well as the cognitive-behavioral interventions that "starve the beast." The book urges men to take severe depression seriously, which is vital given that middle age men die by suicide more than any other age group. Recognizing the men may minimize and invalidate their Stop Feeling So Damn Depressed is the perfect book for the average male who struggles with symptoms of depression. It offers a concise, an easy to digest, and an evidence-based summary of the nature of depression ("the beast"), as well as the cognitive-behavioral interventions that "starve the beast." The book urges men to take severe depression seriously, which is vital given that middle age men die by suicide more than any other age group. Recognizing the men may minimize and invalidate their symptoms, the book suggests men "treat it with deep respect." The book also conjures up helpful images to help men make sense of depression, including gems like seeing severe depression "like carrying a two-ton monkey on your back everywhere you go." Unfortunately, untreated depression can quickly become an "all-consuming syndrome that seeks to feed itself." The book outlines healthy, productive ways to cope with depression, including methods of behaving, thinking, managing emotions, and self-care (e.g., healthy diet, regular exercise, and proper sleep). Given that many men choose to drink or use other drugs, the book shares essential concerns about using alcohol or other drugs when depressed, as well as advice for seeking appropriate treatment for substance use disorders. The book carefully describes critical concepts relevant to the treatment of depression, including cognitive distortions (e.g., catastrophizing, fortune telling, overgeneralizing, black-or-white thinking), mindfulness, and acceptance. The advice regarding avoidance, procrastination, and perfectionism is constructive and consistent with research showing a steady increase in perfectionism among adults and teens over time. Given the tendency of men to isolate or avoid intimacy and openness when depressed, the book focuses extensively on the value of deep interpersonal connections. Several strategies aim to help free men from the possible prison of social isolation that often coincides with depression. I found the approach for assertive speaking helpful because it recognizes the value of asking for help and support. The book wraps up by providing a helpful overview of the potential avenues for treatment of depression, including medication and psychotherapy. Useful websites and books for readers offer a path for readers to go deep or seek help. Thanks to the publisher for letting me enjoy this ride via Net Galley before it officially debuts with the public this fall.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Marcus Rosen

    This book is ostensibly for men who are first confronting their severe depression. Many of the strategies outlined within (exercise, dietary changes, social outreach) are extremely helpful, but will not be new to the seasoned depressionaire. What is fresh about Horwitz's approach is the strategy of visualizing, personifying, and naming an individual's depression, placing it outside of himself. This process not only creates an adversarial tack that motivates action; it also creates, perhaps uninte This book is ostensibly for men who are first confronting their severe depression. Many of the strategies outlined within (exercise, dietary changes, social outreach) are extremely helpful, but will not be new to the seasoned depressionaire. What is fresh about Horwitz's approach is the strategy of visualizing, personifying, and naming an individual's depression, placing it outside of himself. This process not only creates an adversarial tack that motivates action; it also creates, perhaps unintentionally, a powerful method of psychoanalysis. The name and shape men give their depression will vary, and a dive into that constructed other could prove fruitful in treating patients.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Janice

    This book is written primarily for men with severe depression. The suggestions should also appeal to women. It is pretty basic, but easy to read and offers simple yet useful behavioral interventions for managing depression. There is nothing earth-shattering here and I imagine that most people struggling with depression for many years know and have used most of theses strategies—daily exercise, volunteer work, setting very small goals, challenging irrational thoughts with CBT strategies, getting This book is written primarily for men with severe depression. The suggestions should also appeal to women. It is pretty basic, but easy to read and offers simple yet useful behavioral interventions for managing depression. There is nothing earth-shattering here and I imagine that most people struggling with depression for many years know and have used most of theses strategies—daily exercise, volunteer work, setting very small goals, challenging irrational thoughts with CBT strategies, getting into a reasonable sleep routine, and staying away from alcohol and drugs. It may be useful in terms of further understanding how the brain works and how to “feed or starve” depression (his terms). Although I screened this to see if it might be useful for some of my clients, there was a strategy mentioned that I have put into place for myself. It is to take an avoided task (in my case, sorting through piles of papers), and commit to doing it for no more than 5 minutes a day. I combined this with a habit tracker app, and it has worked (only on my first week, though!)

  4. 5 out of 5

    Russ

    Brief, but very practical. He boils down much more comprehensive and detailed methods of dealing with depression (and anxiety), to dealing with the “Beast.” I like this, as it easily parallels the spiritual forces of the world, the flesh, and the devil (Ephesians 2:2–3).

  5. 4 out of 5

    Akibsi

    Written in a very accessible language, this is not a classical self-help book. Very well documented, it gradually takes you through many of the issues about depression in men, and the consequences of substance abuse, among other important aspects related to severe depression men. The author shares pragmatic solutions to beat the “beast”. He goes all the way to discuss alternative help from professionals and states clearly the confidential aspects of his practice. As a Co-Active coach I found some Written in a very accessible language, this is not a classical self-help book. Very well documented, it gradually takes you through many of the issues about depression in men, and the consequences of substance abuse, among other important aspects related to severe depression men. The author shares pragmatic solutions to beat the “beast”. He goes all the way to discuss alternative help from professionals and states clearly the confidential aspects of his practice. As a Co-Active coach I found some similarities on the way he tackles the way to get rid of severe depression (saboteur and allies, leader within, life purpose, values, etc). And as I face people suffering from severe depression as potential clients that reach out to me, I follow the ICF ethical code that ask coaches to refer the client to the specialist that he or she actually needs. Coaches can help, there’s almost always a part of the client that is “coachable”, but the real solution to severe depression is the work of psychologists and psychiatrists. I found useful this following of some of the symptoms a man can endure if in severe depression: 1. You have lost interest in doing things, and almost nothing makes you happy. 2. You have little energy and you are often exhausted. 3. Your ability to concentrate is short. 4. You feel irritable a lot of the time and may have angry outbursts. 5. You experience all kinds of physical problems. 6. Your appetite is screwed up. 7. Your sleep cycle is impaired. 8. You have low self-esteem and profound feelings of guilt. 9. You may have thoughts of suicide.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    This book really succeeds at what it is trying to do: provide a clear, easy to understand tools for men to understand their depression and combat it effectively. The central exhortation of the book boils down to "do something to combat your depression every day", and Dr. Horwitz spends the various chapters elaborating on the specific actions you can take to do this. The emphasis on visualizing and personifying your depression is a particularly useful mindset to adopt. I think the only flaw is may This book really succeeds at what it is trying to do: provide a clear, easy to understand tools for men to understand their depression and combat it effectively. The central exhortation of the book boils down to "do something to combat your depression every day", and Dr. Horwitz spends the various chapters elaborating on the specific actions you can take to do this. The emphasis on visualizing and personifying your depression is a particularly useful mindset to adopt. I think the only flaw is maybe in marketing the book specifically to men. A lot of this advice probably transcends the gender identity of the folks reading it. At any rate, I have been recommending this to my friends of all genders.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Rohit Goswami

    There are but two cardinals sent perpetrated by the author. The first is that the book fails to extricate itself from the quagmire of books which serve as advertisements for psychology. Secondly, it's rather sexist. Of course there is nothing even vaguely special or useful in terms of content, except that whatever ails you, a psychologist probably knows how to help. Joy. The only saving grace is that the illustrations are nice and the book begins in a rather charmingly self depreciating way. There are but two cardinals sent perpetrated by the author. The first is that the book fails to extricate itself from the quagmire of books which serve as advertisements for psychology. Secondly, it's rather sexist. Of course there is nothing even vaguely special or useful in terms of content, except that whatever ails you, a psychologist probably knows how to help. Joy. The only saving grace is that the illustrations are nice and the book begins in a rather charmingly self depreciating way.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Joshua Dew

    A matter-of-fact guide promoting mindfulness by depersonalizing depression and viewing it as an adversary rather than an inescapable feeling. Offers lots of good advice on lifestyle changes, modes of thinking, interpersonal relationships, psychotherapy, and how they relate to depression. It probably won't "cure" your depression but the perspective and coping mechanisms it offers will hopefully make you feel less isolated and more optimistic about your suffering. A matter-of-fact guide promoting mindfulness by depersonalizing depression and viewing it as an adversary rather than an inescapable feeling. Offers lots of good advice on lifestyle changes, modes of thinking, interpersonal relationships, psychotherapy, and how they relate to depression. It probably won't "cure" your depression but the perspective and coping mechanisms it offers will hopefully make you feel less isolated and more optimistic about your suffering.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Adam Buccafusco

    A good starting point for those dealing with depression. This book is also a good refresher for those who have been fighting the good fight for years.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Mikia

    Everyone should read this!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jericho Eames

    I am not my depression and it's time to drain energy from the beast. I am not my depression and it's time to drain energy from the beast.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Julian

    A fresh new perspective to tackle the "beast". I'll be starving the beast around me on a daily basis. A fresh new perspective to tackle the "beast". I'll be starving the beast around me on a daily basis.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Vijay Swain

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. True as Heart. Sometimes my beast corrupts me.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Alex Merrill

    Absolutely amazing. Real, honest and true advice and the author knows just how to relate to real depression in men. I suggest bookmarks and annotations so you can go back and re-read sections that were particularly helpful, as this book was as easy to read and utilize as a LEGO manual.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Patrick Smith

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ivan

  17. 5 out of 5

    Carol

  18. 5 out of 5

    Joshua Snapp

  19. 5 out of 5

    Todd

  20. 4 out of 5

    Chris

  21. 5 out of 5

    Håkan Fleischer

  22. 4 out of 5

    L

  23. 5 out of 5

    Soodaroo

  24. 4 out of 5

    John

  25. 4 out of 5

    SuperDustin83

  26. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jordan Mcculloch

  28. 4 out of 5

    jerry

  29. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

  30. 4 out of 5

    Esraa

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