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Cry for Passion

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A brand-new, intensely erotic romance from a USA Today bestselling author known for her "sizzling"(Booklist) novels. Married twelve years to a man who does not desire her, Rose Clarring is dying of loneliness. She seeks the help of renowned barrister Jack Lodoun to challenge English Parliament and win her a divorce. Cynical and haunted by personal tragedy, Jack will only t A brand-new, intensely erotic romance from a USA Today bestselling author known for her "sizzling"(Booklist) novels. Married twelve years to a man who does not desire her, Rose Clarring is dying of loneliness. She seeks the help of renowned barrister Jack Lodoun to challenge English Parliament and win her a divorce. Cynical and haunted by personal tragedy, Jack will only take the case if Rose can prove to him that there exists a passion that supersedes marital vows. And so meeting by meeting...touch by touch...the two embark on a journey of discovery that leads to intimacies neither could have imagined: sex that knows no sin; love that has no limitations; a carnal bond which heals both grief and guilt. Together Rose and Jack will explore the ultimate in pleasure, but what must they sacrifice to claim the passion they so desperately desire?


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A brand-new, intensely erotic romance from a USA Today bestselling author known for her "sizzling"(Booklist) novels. Married twelve years to a man who does not desire her, Rose Clarring is dying of loneliness. She seeks the help of renowned barrister Jack Lodoun to challenge English Parliament and win her a divorce. Cynical and haunted by personal tragedy, Jack will only t A brand-new, intensely erotic romance from a USA Today bestselling author known for her "sizzling"(Booklist) novels. Married twelve years to a man who does not desire her, Rose Clarring is dying of loneliness. She seeks the help of renowned barrister Jack Lodoun to challenge English Parliament and win her a divorce. Cynical and haunted by personal tragedy, Jack will only take the case if Rose can prove to him that there exists a passion that supersedes marital vows. And so meeting by meeting...touch by touch...the two embark on a journey of discovery that leads to intimacies neither could have imagined: sex that knows no sin; love that has no limitations; a carnal bond which heals both grief and guilt. Together Rose and Jack will explore the ultimate in pleasure, but what must they sacrifice to claim the passion they so desperately desire?

30 review for Cry for Passion

  1. 5 out of 5

    Meg

    I picked this one up on a whim, mainly because I was curious to find out whether this author’s work would live up to its reputation. I can confirm that the rumors are true: this is a haunting story and the most disquieting historical romance/erotica I’ve ever come across. Ruthlessly realistic, focused on character study and the significance of sex rather than romance (though the latter is present and its nature is discussed at length), and written in a minimal and terse style, this book wasn’t a I picked this one up on a whim, mainly because I was curious to find out whether this author’s work would live up to its reputation. I can confirm that the rumors are true: this is a haunting story and the most disquieting historical romance/erotica I’ve ever come across. Ruthlessly realistic, focused on character study and the significance of sex rather than romance (though the latter is present and its nature is discussed at length), and written in a minimal and terse style, this book wasn’t a pleasant or particularly easy read. The characters in this story are neither heroic nor particularly good people and perhaps for that reason I found myself sympathising with everyone, even the antagonists. I would recommend it to anyone who wants to try something that breaks many of the rules of HR.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Audrey

    The writing style, namely the prose, was very distinct from other books I have read. I've read Robin Schone before, but I don't think I remembered that. The word "auroeled" was used several times. Too often, in the beginning, the main character would feel the sensation in their testicles or womb, when they were not being actually touched there. Also, there was dialogue like this: "Look, Mama, it's Mrs. Clarring!" wafted over the dual bells. (a sentence actually from the novel) This book is erotic The writing style, namely the prose, was very distinct from other books I have read. I've read Robin Schone before, but I don't think I remembered that. The word "auroeled" was used several times. Too often, in the beginning, the main character would feel the sensation in their testicles or womb, when they were not being actually touched there. Also, there was dialogue like this: "Look, Mama, it's Mrs. Clarring!" wafted over the dual bells. (a sentence actually from the novel) This book is erotica, but it's a discovery of the erotic in ways and descriptions that aren't hot or sexy. I wished that Rose and Jack (took me till page 131 to realize that they have the names of the Titanic lovers) said "I love you" once during this book; however, they and others repeatedly asked them if they loved each other, and the answer was always no (but it was too soon then). I didn't like how anti-having kids Rose was because it felt like a reaction to her husband's desires. Originally, it had seemed like she wanted kids. And then the secretary of Rose's husband was like the guy with the pale purple eyes and that beautiful blonde woman would make such beautiful children together. It's a woman's right to decide to have kids or not, but I don't like reading in a romance novel how hard the woman is trying not to have a kid that we literally have a scene of her getting a contraceptive inserted inside her and backup pills if that fails. I'm super biased, but accidental pregnancy is one of my favorite tropes in romance. It's crazy how little rights women had back then, even in the late 1800s. A man could forcibly detain his wife in his house, it was hard for a woman to get a divorce, etc.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jill Dunlop

    Cry for Passion is the second book in Robin Schone's Men and Women's Club Series. Rose Clarring seeks out Jack Lodoun to help her divorce her husband of twelve years. Jack refuses to aid her in a divorce, because the law does not support it. Jack and Rose begin an affair to ease their loneliness and grief and guilt. What began as passion quickly turns to love. Cry for Passion was a most unusual book, in that it seemed like it had a split-personality disorder. The first half of the book was writt Cry for Passion is the second book in Robin Schone's Men and Women's Club Series. Rose Clarring seeks out Jack Lodoun to help her divorce her husband of twelve years. Jack refuses to aid her in a divorce, because the law does not support it. Jack and Rose begin an affair to ease their loneliness and grief and guilt. What began as passion quickly turns to love. Cry for Passion was a most unusual book, in that it seemed like it had a split-personality disorder. The first half of the book was written in the most unusual prose. The writing was short and choppy and it flowed more like a poem, than a novel. It was jarring and unusual, which left me struggling to follow along with the story. The second disconcerting thing about this book, were the sexual metaphors constantly interspersed with normal everyday life. Common items were constantly described in sexual terms. It was as if everything was sexual; a hairbrush, a cup of tea, even a button on a coat. It was too much. That leads me to the next issue I had, which was the prose. I don't think I have ever read a book where the prose was so purple. Good Lord. I lost count of how many times a vagina or a cock was weeping in this book. Even though the first half of the book was a train wreck, there were some redeeming qualities that were more prominent in the second half of the book. The prose was less choppy and purple and the focus was less on the sex and more on Jack and Rose's struggle with the law. The subject matter of women's rights at the turn of the century was very well researched. Robin Schone was meticulous in researching this era and was accurate down to the last rich detail. Cry for Passion was based on an actual court case that had happened and was one of the catalysts for changing the laws specific to married women. It really was eye opening to legally see just how little the law was on a woman's side. It is very sad to think what lengths had to be taken before the law could be changed. Because of the extreme differences between the first and second part of the book, I had difficulty giving it a grade. Had I not finished this book I would have rated it a D-, and believe me it crossed my mind once or twice to put it down and not pick it back up. Yet, had I done that I would never have imagined that the second part would have been as strong as it was. Honestly, it was like two different books. I would have given the second part a B+. So that leaves me to rate it somewhere in the middle with a C.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Pamela

    Review courtesy of Romance Junkies Rose Clarring's husband is sterile and she will never be able to give him the child he wants. And truthfully, she doesn't want children. She wants to be wanted for more than her birthing abilities and she can't live with a man who can only love her if she bears him a child. Twelve long, lonely years of her life she has spent with one man who has no true desire for her. Rose's new mission in life is to find real passion. As a first step, Rose joins a controversial Review courtesy of Romance Junkies Rose Clarring's husband is sterile and she will never be able to give him the child he wants. And truthfully, she doesn't want children. She wants to be wanted for more than her birthing abilities and she can't live with a man who can only love her if she bears him a child. Twelve long, lonely years of her life she has spent with one man who has no true desire for her. Rose's new mission in life is to find real passion. As a first step, Rose joins a controversial club for men and women that discuss topics that are considered inappropriate by others. Rose realizes she must break free from the marriage so she is no longer living a lie and breaking free involves divorcing her husband. When Rose is subpoenaed to court, she feels she must do her duty to help a member of the club, no matter what it does to her reputation. Rose leaves her husband and moves into her own home as the town speaks crudely of her. She seeks out Jack Lodoun, a barrister, to get her a divorce. Jack knows a divorce will never be won, but he agrees to take her case if she can prove to him that a woman's passion is worth a man's reputation. To me, Ms. Schone has always had an extreme talent for making you feel hooked on her characters. They are always confident, strong-willed, and have a lot of backbone. Jack and Rose were a couple I'll never forget. CRY FOR PASSION was an amazingly sad love story. I couldn't put this one down. The club picketing for her had me shedding several tears. Those people, not to mention her own family, offered her a lot of support in the end. This is a time period when divorces were unacceptable and to see things changed, it really touched my heart. Ms. Schone took reading to a new level with CRY FOR PASSION.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Eliza

    I need a cigarette…phew! Ok, so this book was chocolate cake. Dense and rich. The kind that sticks to the spoon and you have to wash down with cold milk (or red wine in my case). Sigh. Alright, I have gathered my thoughts...kinda. Not really. Anyway, you really need to be in the right head space to read a Robin Schone book. You have to be able to concentrate and shut the world out. Robin’s books are heavy. Fair warning. This book was what I would call a sad love story- you can’t have the love wi I need a cigarette…phew! Ok, so this book was chocolate cake. Dense and rich. The kind that sticks to the spoon and you have to wash down with cold milk (or red wine in my case). Sigh. Alright, I have gathered my thoughts...kinda. Not really. Anyway, you really need to be in the right head space to read a Robin Schone book. You have to be able to concentrate and shut the world out. Robin’s books are heavy. Fair warning. This book was what I would call a sad love story- you can’t have the love without the pain. At first I thought Rose and Jack were really strange together. They carried on conversations while doin’ the dirty and initially that put me off, but after giving it some time, I get why Robin did this. R & J were lonely for so long. Rose was denied by her husband for years (physically and mentally) and Jack was left with only his heartbreak for company. So when these two lost souls connected, every minute was devoted to asking questions, familiarizing themselves with each other, getting lost in each other’s pleasure. And I thought that was beautiful. I would be lying if I said that I wasn’t conflicted with who I thought Rose should be with. Her husband was dealt a bad hand. The wife and mother in me so wanted him to have what he wanted so fervently. That helped me relate to him and to Rose. On the other side of it, it consumed him- and that’s when he lost my vote. Robin has an incredible talent for describing her characters. What they feel, what they see, what the smell. You become those characters. The conversations they have with one another are so deep and personal. I’m rambling now, but I’m on a book high so I get an excuse. I'll probably revisit and edit this review, but for now this is all I got!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Bridget

    I just LOVE Robin Schone's books. She writes much like Thea Devine, whom I also adore. This is a sequel to "Scandalous Lovers". Jack Loudon, the prosecuting attorney in that story, resigns his position as Attorney General. He has lost several cases to Barrister James Whitcox, up to then with a perfect record. As he walks out of the courthouse, one of the witnesses in the case, Rose Clarring, stops him, pleading for help in trying to divorce her husband. Rose is a member of the Men and Women's Cl I just LOVE Robin Schone's books. She writes much like Thea Devine, whom I also adore. This is a sequel to "Scandalous Lovers". Jack Loudon, the prosecuting attorney in that story, resigns his position as Attorney General. He has lost several cases to Barrister James Whitcox, up to then with a perfect record. As he walks out of the courthouse, one of the witnesses in the case, Rose Clarring, stops him, pleading for help in trying to divorce her husband. Rose is a member of the Men and Women's Club, that played such a lurid role in the trial for another club member. The United Kingdom in the 1880's, grants the husband, father or brother of women, who are not legally independent, the right to imprison those women, or even force them into insane asylums. This was not as rare as you might think and occurred in the United States as well. At any rate, Rose is tied in an unhappy marriage and needs legal help. This request eventually leads to Rose and Jack falling in love. A wonderful story; exciting and emotive.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Mitzi

    Book 3 (if you count the short story in anthology) in The Men and Women's Club. Loved it. This book is about Rose Clarring wanting to divorce her husband, but the law does not allow it. She asks Jack Lodoun for help (who was the prosecutor in Scandalous Lovers. Book 3 (if you count the short story in anthology) in The Men and Women's Club. Loved it. This book is about Rose Clarring wanting to divorce her husband, but the law does not allow it. She asks Jack Lodoun for help (who was the prosecutor in Scandalous Lovers.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    Fantastic! This book provides keen insight into the marital "rights" of women in England during the 18th and 19th centuries. Warning: Hot Sex Fantastic! This book provides keen insight into the marital "rights" of women in England during the 18th and 19th centuries. Warning: Hot Sex

  9. 5 out of 5

    KatLynne

    Another great read from one of my favorite authors!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jenny

    Good Book---great author

  11. 4 out of 5

    Kim

    This has to be one of the top ten stories I have read in my life - fascinating, profound, heartbreaking, and real.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jan

    It is SO frustrating that Nook only offers a few of this author’s books!! Enjoyed this book but I wish I could have read the first two books of the series...Nook is seriously pushing me to another type of e-reader:(

  13. 5 out of 5

    Caroline

    I wept. I laid in my bed and wept over this book. It is wonderful.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Garden

    The Men and Women's Club books are really eye opening. Such a strong female character that let nothing stand in her way to get what she wanted. The Men and Women's Club books are really eye opening. Such a strong female character that let nothing stand in her way to get what she wanted.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Cherie Clark

    Started reading with reservations like the book is a little difficult at times but still I would give it about a 4 rating. I will read more of her books. ☆☆♡♡☆☆☆☆☆

  16. 4 out of 5

    C Joy

    Well, that was heavy. This is another quality read from Robin Schone that tells a woman's story, coupled with issues still relevant today - women's right to suffrage, empowerment, equality, and adultery. This is not the type of adultery that shall be condemned though, Rose was driven to it. Rose and her husband, Jonathon (who makes little appearance) love each other, but since contracting the mumps, Jonathon became sterile, shattering his dreams of having a big family. He saw rose as someone to gi Well, that was heavy. This is another quality read from Robin Schone that tells a woman's story, coupled with issues still relevant today - women's right to suffrage, empowerment, equality, and adultery. This is not the type of adultery that shall be condemned though, Rose was driven to it. Rose and her husband, Jonathon (who makes little appearance) love each other, but since contracting the mumps, Jonathon became sterile, shattering his dreams of having a big family. He saw rose as someone to give him children, but he didn't love her for herself and her wonderful qualities. The story started with the end of a trial where Jack Lodoun lost to his rival James Whitcox. Rose approached him for help in filing a divorce, which was impossible that time. It was really unfair for women to take the blame when husbands are sterile, that it's always the woman's fault if they can't have children, and Rose carried this secret as a burden for 12 years. Rose's character, though fictional, is a true-to-life one; an epitome of women all over the world who suffer the same plight, who're powerless against their abusive husbands, who have no choice but to turn to another man for passion, and their need to be held, touched, and loved are turned against them, just because of a "reasonable" law. The author's writing style is exceptional. She brings the senses to life with her vivid descriptions - the characters' eye color, the feel of their skin, the scent and taste of their arousal, their erotic dialogue - questions and answers, how they tell the other what they want to do, and do it - I loved all of it, the eroticism, the way they expressed their passion and needs, how they comforted each other, not the tender or romantic type, but in the way they know how. Theirs is a mutual exchange. Rose took pleasure in the little things she and Jack shared, that she deemed intimate - watching another's morning rituals, feeding each other, and watching the other bathe, and just being in each other's presence. I liked how the simple things could be turned sensual, like drinking a fine glass of brandy, and how Ms Schone compared a lot of the usual things to a man and a woman's genitals. I don't consider this romantic in any way, they might as well have been fuck buddies since they used that term to describe what they were doing in their first meetings. Both of them were in need of each other and they paid the price for it. It still is open ended, Ms Schone is the type of writer who captivates you one moment, and leaves everything to your imagination the next. There were scenes that moved me. I got emotional when Rose's mother came to visit her in her new home, and took her shopping. I was moved when her mother stood by her decision in loving another man, unlike other conventional mothers who follow the dictates of society. The most riveting scene was Jack asking James Whitcox's help to liberate Rose. That action in itself proves that he loves her, or if it can't be called that, he cares for her deeply and wants to be with her, share things with her, because he felt he's already part of her. They have a small victory in the end, but a victory nonetheless. There's the biggest knot that's tied, and this story paved the way for women's rights. I'm glad to be living in a time where women are almost equal to men, that a wife could say "no" to her husband, and a husband who forces himself on his wife could be jailed for rape. I gave this a four because of the slow pace, but it undeniably has top-rated erotica. The scenes weren't dragging, they explore and arouse, and it's an emotional ride. This is marginally better than the other full-length novels I've read (The Lover, Gabriel's Woman), but "The Lady's Tutor" is still my favorite. I'm still a big fan of this author and would like to read more of her works.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Vanessa

    This was a strange book, but interesting in some ways. I kept asking myself why I was reading it, and yet something about it made it hard for me to leave it unfinished. The dialog was choppy, reading almost like a play or poem instead of a novel. There were a lot of questions and statements followed by one word responses. The metaphors used in the book to describe sexual parts were strange, verging more on the poetic. I like poetic at times, but in this book I felt it was overdone. There was act This was a strange book, but interesting in some ways. I kept asking myself why I was reading it, and yet something about it made it hard for me to leave it unfinished. The dialog was choppy, reading almost like a play or poem instead of a novel. There were a lot of questions and statements followed by one word responses. The metaphors used in the book to describe sexual parts were strange, verging more on the poetic. I like poetic at times, but in this book I felt it was overdone. There was actually more talking and less action here in the way of the sex scenes. This is the 2nd book I've read by this author, and that seems to be her style. Although the sex scenes are limited, the 2nd half of this book was more interesting than the 1st. The writing became more fluid and the plot and characters began to develop a little more. Even more interesting is that fact that this story is based on an actual court case in 1891, dealing with the rights, or rather lack of them, specifically in regards to her husband, or in some cases, a male relative. Parts of it made me sad and angry, and for that it gets three stars instead of two.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Kim

    Robin Schone has a knack for writing about unusual heroes and heroines involved in unusual situations, both personal and romantic. And this, the last of The Men and Women's Club series, is no exception. But as Cry for Passion went on, the unusual aspects of Jack's and Rose's lives served less to invest me in their emotions, fears, and cares and more to distance me from them. While they possessed distinct personalities and hopes and needs at the beginning of the book, all ripe with potential, by t Robin Schone has a knack for writing about unusual heroes and heroines involved in unusual situations, both personal and romantic. And this, the last of The Men and Women's Club series, is no exception. But as Cry for Passion went on, the unusual aspects of Jack's and Rose's lives served less to invest me in their emotions, fears, and cares and more to distance me from them. While they possessed distinct personalities and hopes and needs at the beginning of the book, all ripe with potential, by the end they seemed mere actors on the stage of England's historical battle for women's and wives' rights. Not that such a history isn't important or interesting, but the plot and characters were so caught up in legal machinations that the romance and the connection between the hero and heroine fell by the wayside. I finished the book feeling as if I understood the English legal system under Queen Victoria's rule far better than why the hero and heroine belonged together.

  19. 5 out of 5

    La La

    This was a really emotional read for me. The heroine loves her husband, but ever since he contracted mumps that made him sterile he no longer touches her. Now that she realizes that she has a passionless marriage she has decided to seek the hero, a prominent barrister, to help her get a divorce. On her quest to gain her freedom from her marriage she starts a torrid affair with the barrister that leads to betrayal and death. Throughout this book I rooted for the hero and heroine. The heroine wante This was a really emotional read for me. The heroine loves her husband, but ever since he contracted mumps that made him sterile he no longer touches her. Now that she realizes that she has a passionless marriage she has decided to seek the hero, a prominent barrister, to help her get a divorce. On her quest to gain her freedom from her marriage she starts a torrid affair with the barrister that leads to betrayal and death. Throughout this book I rooted for the hero and heroine. The heroine wanted someone to make her feel like a woman and not just a brood mare. The hero never knew what it felt like to truly love someone since he put his career before his wife and family. This was one of the few Robin Schone story where the hero and heroine were getting to know each other and not be about teaching someone about good sex and passion.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Catherine

    I do love Robin Schone as an author . Though this is not one of my favorite books of hers. There is great passion, great sex, intelligent writing, depth to the characters which is what I love about Robin's writings. This story was terribly sad though and honestly a little confusing at moments. I would have to reread something to see who this prospective was from. And suddenly in chapter 25 we see for the 1st time the husbands point of view even though we have already encountered other lesser cha I do love Robin Schone as an author . Though this is not one of my favorite books of hers. There is great passion, great sex, intelligent writing, depth to the characters which is what I love about Robin's writings. This story was terribly sad though and honestly a little confusing at moments. I would have to reread something to see who this prospective was from. And suddenly in chapter 25 we see for the 1st time the husbands point of view even though we have already encountered other lesser characters points of views before his. And I felt somewhat Jack our man to love never quite did find the closure he needed or rather I needed from his dead lover. What exactly did happen to her? Where were her witnesses? Just I found it all rather sad though yes of the times but a lot left open at the end.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Shannon Adamson

    Another historical romance under my belt. I'm starting to like them, but they take me longer to read.. Anyway, this story wasn't bad at all. I combined the need for love and passion, as well as the women's rights issues back in the 1800's London. I found it ironic that the two main characters were named Jack and Rose (Titanic anybody?!?!??!). Jack sounds like a HOT man! It just makes me glad of the rights women have now days. I do not think I could handle living back then when I know what I know Another historical romance under my belt. I'm starting to like them, but they take me longer to read.. Anyway, this story wasn't bad at all. I combined the need for love and passion, as well as the women's rights issues back in the 1800's London. I found it ironic that the two main characters were named Jack and Rose (Titanic anybody?!?!??!). Jack sounds like a HOT man! It just makes me glad of the rights women have now days. I do not think I could handle living back then when I know what I know now.... But, if I did live back then and didn't know any better, I think it wouldn't be too bad........

  22. 4 out of 5

    Diana

    Well, this is not the bodice-ripping romance I thought it was....and it really gets one thinking about the appalling situation of women's rights, or lack thereof, in the not-so-distant past. I have read some of Ms. Schone's other works, but this one was quite different and very political. I guess I will investigate the other installments in the Men's & Women's Club series. Not your run of the mill romance. Quite a bit more explicit, written in very abrupt, short prose. An interesting style, but if Well, this is not the bodice-ripping romance I thought it was....and it really gets one thinking about the appalling situation of women's rights, or lack thereof, in the not-so-distant past. I have read some of Ms. Schone's other works, but this one was quite different and very political. I guess I will investigate the other installments in the Men's & Women's Club series. Not your run of the mill romance. Quite a bit more explicit, written in very abrupt, short prose. An interesting style, but if you were expecting The Lady's Tutor, you will be disappointed.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Romina

    Due to the sleazy cover, I expected the typical bodice-ripper, but I couldn't have been more wrong. Granted, there are a lot of steamy scenes, but Robin Schone's ability to tell this story, *SPOILERS* which is based on an actual court case in Victorian England in which a woman was actually abducted by her husband when she decided she no longer wanted to be with him and he had the LEGAL right to do so, was an interesting read. Highly recommended for those readers who prefer more 'grit' in their hi Due to the sleazy cover, I expected the typical bodice-ripper, but I couldn't have been more wrong. Granted, there are a lot of steamy scenes, but Robin Schone's ability to tell this story, *SPOILERS* which is based on an actual court case in Victorian England in which a woman was actually abducted by her husband when she decided she no longer wanted to be with him and he had the LEGAL right to do so, was an interesting read. Highly recommended for those readers who prefer more 'grit' in their historical romance.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Diane

    This was a beautifully written account of how love can hurt. And still win out in the end. Since it was written about a time in history when women virtually had no rights, I am truly thankful for those who fought, and lost everything, so that we can now take them for granted. Perhaps it would be better if we still had to fight a little harder, so we appreciated those that came before us. Somehow the struggle for equal pay doesn't equate with what these women went through and lost. This was a beautifully written account of how love can hurt. And still win out in the end. Since it was written about a time in history when women virtually had no rights, I am truly thankful for those who fought, and lost everything, so that we can now take them for granted. Perhaps it would be better if we still had to fight a little harder, so we appreciated those that came before us. Somehow the struggle for equal pay doesn't equate with what these women went through and lost.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Manuela

    This was different to love novels I usually read, more realistic I think as it deals with adultery and porn as part of life and the double standards of society in regards to women and men and their roles. Unthinkable nowadays that women used to belong to men, not being on the same level in a relationship. It is not a book to escape from daily life (too realistic) but it is a good read.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Karmen

    The book premise is great. The double standard in being able to getting a divorce in England. The delivery unfortunately reads very clinical and cold. I finished the book but did not vested in the characters at any time.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Alina

    2.5 Read so closely after "Scandalous Lovers," this book becomes redundant and annoying. Not to mention the cold relationship between the protagonists and the clinical, rather than erotic, personal encounters. 2.5 Read so closely after "Scandalous Lovers," this book becomes redundant and annoying. Not to mention the cold relationship between the protagonists and the clinical, rather than erotic, personal encounters.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Cardyn Brooks

    Cry For Passion is a lushly written, poignant story about two heartbroken people. Like all R.S. stories, this one spotlights adults who have been romantically and sexually disappointed by life. It's not feel-good erotica, but it is compelling in its sadness. Cry For Passion is a lushly written, poignant story about two heartbroken people. Like all R.S. stories, this one spotlights adults who have been romantically and sexually disappointed by life. It's not feel-good erotica, but it is compelling in its sadness.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Andi

    Wow, what an... Emotional rollercoaster ride. Robin gives you these poignant moments of emotion that make you want to cry, yell, and sometimes break things. I could not put it down. I fell asleep with it because I didn't want to stop reading. I cannot wait to get more! Wow, what an... Emotional rollercoaster ride. Robin gives you these poignant moments of emotion that make you want to cry, yell, and sometimes break things. I could not put it down. I fell asleep with it because I didn't want to stop reading. I cannot wait to get more!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Nicole

    Schone's books are about real people (abeit regency) in anguish. Interesting reading about separation vs divorce, and Rose and Jack (and Jonathan)'s situation. Schone's books are about real people (abeit regency) in anguish. Interesting reading about separation vs divorce, and Rose and Jack (and Jonathan)'s situation.

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