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Worlds Enough & Time: Five Tales of Speculative Fiction

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An extraordinary artist with few rivals in his chosen arena, Dan Simmons possesses a restless talent that continually presses boundaries while tantalizing the mind and touching the soul. Now he offers us a superb quintet of novellas -- five dazzling masterworks of speculative fiction, including "Orphans of the Helix," his award-winning return to the Hyperion Universe -- th An extraordinary artist with few rivals in his chosen arena, Dan Simmons possesses a restless talent that continually presses boundaries while tantalizing the mind and touching the soul. Now he offers us a superb quintet of novellas -- five dazzling masterworks of speculative fiction, including "Orphans of the Helix," his award-winning return to the Hyperion Universe -- that demonstrates the unique mastery, breathtaking invention, and flawless craftsmanship of one of contemporary fiction's true greats. Human colonists seeking something other than godhood encounter their long-lost "cousins"...and an ancient scourge. A devastated man in suicide's embrace is caught up in a bizarre cat-and-mouse game with a young woman possessing a world-ending power. The distant descendants of a once-oppressed people learn a chilling lesson about the persistence of the past. A terrifying ascent up the frigid, snow-swept slopes of K2 shatters preconceptions and reveals the true natures of four climbers, one of whom is not human. At the intersection of a grand past and a threadbare present, an aging American in Russia confronts his own mortality as he glimpses a wondrous future.


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An extraordinary artist with few rivals in his chosen arena, Dan Simmons possesses a restless talent that continually presses boundaries while tantalizing the mind and touching the soul. Now he offers us a superb quintet of novellas -- five dazzling masterworks of speculative fiction, including "Orphans of the Helix," his award-winning return to the Hyperion Universe -- th An extraordinary artist with few rivals in his chosen arena, Dan Simmons possesses a restless talent that continually presses boundaries while tantalizing the mind and touching the soul. Now he offers us a superb quintet of novellas -- five dazzling masterworks of speculative fiction, including "Orphans of the Helix," his award-winning return to the Hyperion Universe -- that demonstrates the unique mastery, breathtaking invention, and flawless craftsmanship of one of contemporary fiction's true greats. Human colonists seeking something other than godhood encounter their long-lost "cousins"...and an ancient scourge. A devastated man in suicide's embrace is caught up in a bizarre cat-and-mouse game with a young woman possessing a world-ending power. The distant descendants of a once-oppressed people learn a chilling lesson about the persistence of the past. A terrifying ascent up the frigid, snow-swept slopes of K2 shatters preconceptions and reveals the true natures of four climbers, one of whom is not human. At the intersection of a grand past and a threadbare present, an aging American in Russia confronts his own mortality as he glimpses a wondrous future.

30 review for Worlds Enough & Time: Five Tales of Speculative Fiction

  1. 5 out of 5

    Will

    This is the first collection of short fiction I have read by Dan Simmons, and it did not disappoint. As usual, Dan's writing style is one of the strengths of the collection. It's so easy to read and he sucks you in to each story and you don't want to come out. My ratings of each story are: Looking for Kelly Dahl - 4* Orphans of the Helix - 5* The Ninth of Av - 4* On K2 with Kanakaredes - 4* The End of Gravity - 3* I was excited to read Orphans of the Helix as it is set after the final novel of the Hyp This is the first collection of short fiction I have read by Dan Simmons, and it did not disappoint. As usual, Dan's writing style is one of the strengths of the collection. It's so easy to read and he sucks you in to each story and you don't want to come out. My ratings of each story are: Looking for Kelly Dahl - 4* Orphans of the Helix - 5* The Ninth of Av - 4* On K2 with Kanakaredes - 4* The End of Gravity - 3* I was excited to read Orphans of the Helix as it is set after the final novel of the Hyperion Cantos, The Rise of Endymion. And it was just as good as the novels. A superb story! On K2 with Kanakaredes was a pleasant surprise. I was a bit dubious when I first heard about this as it is literally about climbing Mt K2 and I know nothing about climbing. But it was my second favorite story of the collection. I loved the characters and K was just great! Overall, a really strong collection that I nearly gave a 5* rating. The last story made me give it a 4*. This is a must read for sci-fi fans, and anyone who wants to try something new!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Midu Hadi

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Looking for Kelly Dahl: ★★★ A teacher, a drunkard, a grieving father finds solace by dealing with his guilt. Orphans of the Helix: ★★★ Different races following different faiths help each other out. The Ninth of Av: ★★ Persecution knows no boundaries. On K2 With Kanakaredes: ★★★ How men (and I use that term loosely) bond with each other over their assault on Mount Everest. The End of Gravity: ★★ A female cosmonaut who's the wrong gender and a writer recovering from his father's death find each other. Looking for Kelly Dahl: ★★★ A teacher, a drunkard, a grieving father finds solace by dealing with his guilt. Orphans of the Helix: ★★★ Different races following different faiths help each other out. The Ninth of Av: ★★ Persecution knows no boundaries. On K2 With Kanakaredes: ★★★ How men (and I use that term loosely) bond with each other over their assault on Mount Everest. The End of Gravity: ★★ A female cosmonaut who's the wrong gender and a writer recovering from his father's death find each other.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Craig

    This collection of five science fiction stories is one of Simmons' most overlooked titles. It contains one story in the Hyperion universe and one in the Ilium universe, but all work quite well as stand-alones. Too, each piece has a very interesting introduction. Simmons is a terrific writer at these shorter lengths, though his reputation as a novelist overshadows the fact. My favorite was On K2 with Kanakaredes, even though I knew nothing about climbing. This collection of five science fiction stories is one of Simmons' most overlooked titles. It contains one story in the Hyperion universe and one in the Ilium universe, but all work quite well as stand-alones. Too, each piece has a very interesting introduction. Simmons is a terrific writer at these shorter lengths, though his reputation as a novelist overshadows the fact. My favorite was On K2 with Kanakaredes, even though I knew nothing about climbing.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Mark Tallen

    I have thoroughly enjoyed this excellent collection of five stories by Dan Simmons. Each story is brilliantly written, the prose is excellent as usual with Simmons. My favourite story in the collection is 'Orphans Of The Helix' which is set in Simmons' Hyperion Cantos universe, that story is a five star read in my opinion. I have no reservations in recommending this collection to fans of science fiction and speculative fiction. I have thoroughly enjoyed this excellent collection of five stories by Dan Simmons. Each story is brilliantly written, the prose is excellent as usual with Simmons. My favourite story in the collection is 'Orphans Of The Helix' which is set in Simmons' Hyperion Cantos universe, that story is a five star read in my opinion. I have no reservations in recommending this collection to fans of science fiction and speculative fiction.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Redsteve

    Sadly, I think that I would have enjoyed this five-story collection better if all of them had been stand-alones. While all of the tales CAN be read without any previous knowledge, two of them are set in the "worlds" of Simmons' series. "Orphans of the Helix" is set in the "Hyperion/Endymion" universe, and, while I liked to story OK, I feel that I would have gotten more out of it if I had read those four books (which ARE on my To Read shelf). "The Ninth of Av," on the other hand, is set on Earth Sadly, I think that I would have enjoyed this five-story collection better if all of them had been stand-alones. While all of the tales CAN be read without any previous knowledge, two of them are set in the "worlds" of Simmons' series. "Orphans of the Helix" is set in the "Hyperion/Endymion" universe, and, while I liked to story OK, I feel that I would have gotten more out of it if I had read those four books (which ARE on my To Read shelf). "The Ninth of Av," on the other hand, is set on Earth prior to the events in Illium and Olympos, a duology that I enjoyed at the beginning but had become heartily sick of by about 1/3 of the way through the second volume. "Looking For Kelly Dahl" was an interesting story, with a certain "Weird Tales" vibe. I also enjoyed "On K2 with Kanakaredes" which felt like re-visiting Abominable (a later Simmons' book), but set in a future with insectoid aliens. The last story "The End of Gravity" was readable, but seemed short and the weakest (plot-wise) of the bunch. I do recommend that you be sure to read Simmons' introductions to each story as well; all are interesting. Totaling the pluses and minuses, I give this an extremely low 3.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Florin Constantinescu

    • Looking for Kelly Dahl (novella): 3* The author's alter-ego professor character is forced to chase a young student through a parallel Colorado where all the people have vanished. Cute set-up, but it's missing that extra something to make it really good. • Orphans of the Helix (novella): 5* This is an epilogue to his most famous series, Hyperion Cantos, and, since it features the return of a couple of his most interesting characters, together with some new angle on past events, this can only be a • Looking for Kelly Dahl (novella): 3* The author's alter-ego professor character is forced to chase a young student through a parallel Colorado where all the people have vanished. Cute set-up, but it's missing that extra something to make it really good. • Orphans of the Helix (novella): 5* This is an epilogue to his most famous series, Hyperion Cantos, and, since it features the return of a couple of his most interesting characters, together with some new angle on past events, this can only be a 5*. • The Ninth of Av (novelette): 3* If previous story served as the epilogue to one series, I was surprised to find here a sort of "warm-up" to another of his series, this time the Hockenberry - Ilium/Olympos series. It features a completely different set of characters, and the concepts are a bit different, but undeniably served as the launching point for Ilium. • On K2 with Kanakaredes (novelette): 3* A group of humans helps an intelligent alien in the shape of a locust reach K2 mountain. This can also be seen as a kind of warm-up to another of his novels, this time The Abominable, here the author trying his hand on mountaineering terms, which obviously abound. • The End of Gravity (novelette): 3* This is a story without any fantastic or futuristic elements. An American reporter visits Russia's space program and chats with various individuals. Pretty well-written though.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Lilly

    Dan Simmons has recently become one of my favorite authors because of his range and depth in creating works of horror, science, and speculative fiction. However this was the first time I encountered his writing in the format of short stories and I've got to say I was somewhat disappointed. Don't get me wrong, the stories themselves were weird and scary and in particular I enjoyed the part where two giant evangelizing bugs climb a volcano (who wouldn't) but I yearn to be closer to the world of Hy Dan Simmons has recently become one of my favorite authors because of his range and depth in creating works of horror, science, and speculative fiction. However this was the first time I encountered his writing in the format of short stories and I've got to say I was somewhat disappointed. Don't get me wrong, the stories themselves were weird and scary and in particular I enjoyed the part where two giant evangelizing bugs climb a volcano (who wouldn't) but I yearn to be closer to the world of Hyperion and despite dipping briefly into this universe, felt disconnected from these creepy and half-baked world of the novelles. Honestly part of what I love about Simmons writing is the slow and poetic pace of his work, but when crammed into 60 pages the whole thing feels kind of flattened out. That said I know he has written screenplays and poetry as well so that might just come through as my preference for massive, sludgy books that take up your weekends and hijack your subconscious.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Chak

    For as much as the first two books of the Hyperion Cantos astounded me with their brilliance and passion, Worlds Enough & Time kind of didn't make an impression, and that in itself is pretty puzzling. I was really looking forward to reading this book, and from the first "tale of speculative fiction," there was an increasing sense of "meh" building. The stories weren't bad, and clearly, Dan Simmons knows how to write, but... well... meh. Truly, I'm shocked that I didn't absolutely love this c For as much as the first two books of the Hyperion Cantos astounded me with their brilliance and passion, Worlds Enough & Time kind of didn't make an impression, and that in itself is pretty puzzling. I was really looking forward to reading this book, and from the first "tale of speculative fiction," there was an increasing sense of "meh" building. The stories weren't bad, and clearly, Dan Simmons knows how to write, but... well... meh. Truly, I'm shocked that I didn't absolutely love this collection, because I fully expected to love it.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Raj

    I mostly enjoyed the stories in this collection. It pulls together five longer stories, more or less of novella length, along with introductions for each one. As I say, the stories are generally quite enjoyable, but the introductions are another matter. They seem to lack the discipline and editing that goes into the stories, feeling bloated and self-indulgent. The exception to this is the introduction to my favourite story in the collection, Orphans of the Helix, a story set in the universe of t I mostly enjoyed the stories in this collection. It pulls together five longer stories, more or less of novella length, along with introductions for each one. As I say, the stories are generally quite enjoyable, but the introductions are another matter. They seem to lack the discipline and editing that goes into the stories, feeling bloated and self-indulgent. The exception to this is the introduction to my favourite story in the collection, Orphans of the Helix, a story set in the universe of the Hyperion Cantos. Set some years after the end of Rise of Endymion, it was nice to return to that universe, following a group of colonists of the Amoiete Spectrum Helix, looking for a planet to settle well outside existing human space who encounter a distress signal en-route. Of the other stories, I probably enjoyed On K2 with Kanakaredes the most, about a small group of mountain climbers who climb the world's second-highest mountain with an alien, even if a lot of the actual mountain-climbing bits left me cold. I felt there was lots of context in The Ninth of Av that I wasn't getting. It's a story about the end of the world, as the post-humans get ready to put the remaining old-fashioned humans into suspended animation while they clean up the Earth. Or possibly it's about genocide of the Jews. I think there were hints in the text, but possibly ones you need to be familiar with Judeo-Christian mythology to understand. Looking for Kelly Dahl was interesting, about a suicidal former school teacher who has to track down one of his former pupils. And finally, The End of Gravity was possibly the least interesting to me. You know that cliché about Lit Fic being all about 50-something straight white writers who have affairs with young, pretty women? This felt sort of like that. The protagonist is an older straight white male writer, and there's an attraction to a younger woman, and possibly some sort of metaphor involving the International Space Station that I didn't really get. I think I found the protagonist too irritating to really pay that much attention to his internal monologue. So a decent hit rate with stories that have a bit more room to breathe than your normal shorts. But I would mostly skip the introductions (although YMMV, as always).

  10. 4 out of 5

    Cat

    I bought this in a post-Hyperion Cantos depression, hoping for a scrap of Hyperion lore to feed my withdrawal symptoms. Simmons continues to weave dark, complex tales. I enjoyed his intros more than I expected. With that said, his complicated world-building style of writing wasn’t my favorite for short stories: some parts feel rushed or flimsy. Still a good read, and the stories all made me think. I’ll be chewing on their lessons for a while.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Althea Ann

    A collection of 5 "long short-stories" by Simmons, with introductions by the author. * "Looking for Kelly Dahl" I'd read this one before, I think in a "Year's Best SF" collection for 1996. It's a surreal but memorable story of a burned-out, alcoholic teacher, who's emotionally suffering from the death of his son and his subsequent divorce. In an all-too-real dreamworld(?), he's being hunted down by Kelly Dahl, a former student whom, he believes, he failed to help - he didn't see the clues that she A collection of 5 "long short-stories" by Simmons, with introductions by the author. * "Looking for Kelly Dahl" I'd read this one before, I think in a "Year's Best SF" collection for 1996. It's a surreal but memorable story of a burned-out, alcoholic teacher, who's emotionally suffering from the death of his son and his subsequent divorce. In an all-too-real dreamworld(?), he's being hunted down by Kelly Dahl, a former student whom, he believes, he failed to help - he didn't see the clues that she came from an abusive home situation. Through violence and anger, is there a hope of redemption? * "Orphans of the Helix" Inspired by Simmons' being asked to write an episode of Star Trek: Voyager, but set in his world of Hyperion/Endymion. It does have a very Star-Trek-like plot. A far-voyaging colony ship intercepts a distress call, far from human space. The locals have settled on a giant tree-helix around their sun - which was already there when they arrived. Their problem? Every 57 years a giant harvester-ship arrives, and munches up part of their settlements. They ask the well-armed colony ship to destroy this destructive threat. But ethical issues come into play - does the harvester belong to anyone? Does another civilisation depend on it for their survival? Only days remain before the next disaster strikes... Although it sounds simple, the background of the story is complex and rich, informed by Simmons' previous world-building. * "The Ninth of Av" This is a weird story. In the intro, Simmons complains that most people don't like it and/or don't "get it." Sadly, I might have to go down as on of those people. In 3001, humans are nearly extinct, wiped out by a disease. A seemingly benevolent race of aliens has helped the remnants of humanity (who are all descended from ethnic Jews) survive, giving them extended life spans - but they are infertile. The aliens have also given humanity teleportation ("faxing"). But the day of the Final Fax is approaching. The aliens have told humans that they are going put them "on hold" for 10,000 years, while they renovate the earth. But are they really planning to bring humans back? Or is it a mysterious plot to wipe out the Jews once and for all? * "On K2 with Kanakaredes" Mantis-like aliens have sent a delegation to Earth. But they live quietly in the Antarctic, and communication is virtually nil. When a young alien pulls some strings to be allowed to join a trio of human climbers who are planning an expedition to the famously treacherous mountain peak known as K2, the State Department looks on it as an unprecedented chance to find out more about the race. But facing adversity and Nature together, a more significant event that the Secretary of State might have hoped for happens - from being ultimate strangers, the climbers, human and alien, truly become a team. * "The End of Gravity" Probably the weakest of these stories, but still an interesting piece. An aging writer, in ill-health, is sent to Russia to interview cosmonauts regarding the Russian space program. He meets a woman who's hit the "glass ceiling" in the program due to her gender, and some philosophical thoughts ensue.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Brian

    Five short stories from dan simmons, picked this up primarily due to interest in the follow on novelette related to his brilliant hyperion books. Looking for Kelly Dahl – mostly forgettable, unexplained sci-fi leanings with disappearing worlds/towns/people and man hunting? a former student Enjoyed the hyperion universe entry with the spectrum helix people’s encounter with post human ousters in deep space Ninth of av- would be pretty meaningless for anyone who hadn’t read ilium and olympos prior to Five short stories from dan simmons, picked this up primarily due to interest in the follow on novelette related to his brilliant hyperion books. Looking for Kelly Dahl – mostly forgettable, unexplained sci-fi leanings with disappearing worlds/towns/people and man hunting? a former student Enjoyed the hyperion universe entry with the spectrum helix people’s encounter with post human ousters in deep space Ninth of av- would be pretty meaningless for anyone who hadn’t read ilium and olympos prior to this On K2 with kanakaredes – three climbers and an alien scaling K2 The end of gravity – a journalist assigned the cover the dilapidated and waning days of the once great Russian space program generally enjoyable stories that I guess i'd only recommend to fans of dan simmons

  13. 5 out of 5

    Koji Mukai

    Sure, these stories are well-crafted. However, Simmons appears far more interested in presenting an array of facts, and not in the connections among the facts. My impression can be summarized as "self-importance." Sure, these stories are well-crafted. However, Simmons appears far more interested in presenting an array of facts, and not in the connections among the facts. My impression can be summarized as "self-importance."

  14. 5 out of 5

    James Tucker

    Oh I wish Dan Simmons would write some more of the Hyperion and Endymion four book series. I was so struck by his imaginative and astounding creation, science and religion wrapped up in an exciting and chilling universe that hooked me completely. He is such a marvelous story teller. I found this book of short stories with a promise to revisit his ethos set not in the same time or worlds but far off in the future, connected to Hyperion by the thinnest of threads in the short story 'Orphans of the Oh I wish Dan Simmons would write some more of the Hyperion and Endymion four book series. I was so struck by his imaginative and astounding creation, science and religion wrapped up in an exciting and chilling universe that hooked me completely. He is such a marvelous story teller. I found this book of short stories with a promise to revisit his ethos set not in the same time or worlds but far off in the future, connected to Hyperion by the thinnest of threads in the short story 'Orphans of the Helix' . I know that Dan Simmons has said that he doesn't want to revisit the stories so as not to 'dilute the vitality' of the epic and so though I was very keen to get my hands on this book, I didn't know what to expect. I need not have worried because although I haven't read the Hyperion quartet for many years I found myself transport back into that universe within the first page. Little snippets, words and phrases prompted long lost memories of those stories and I was gripped. Shame it was just a short story and one that could have benefited from a longer exploration as I felt the ending was some what rushed. Of Dan Simmons other works that I have read more recently are Ilium and Olympus, another double book series that he revisits inthe short 'The Ninth of Av'. This I hadn't realised was in the collection and although for me Ilium wasn't as great as Hyperion, I was still able to marvel at his retelling of Greek mythology encompassed in a far flung future. This was a very nice addition to that story even if it didn't actually add much to it. The other stories in this slim volume were okay but didn't rouse me enough to mention them individually and it was these that drag my review of the whole book down to 3 stars. If you though have read the Hyperion / Endymion series and want more 'Orphans...' will at least wet your appetite and if it leaves you wanting more, then like me perhaps you'll think about re-reading the originals.

  15. 5 out of 5

    L

    As with any collection, some stories held more appeal for me than others. I enjoyed most of the stories, while others were ok. For instance, I absolutely adored "On K2 with Kanakaredes"! I've read a few of the mountain-climbing" true-adventure stories, so while I would never, ever do such a thing, the content was not totally foreign, and the speculation re technology was fun. But the most fun was the relationships between Kanakaredes and the others. I laughed out loud when he eloquently used a h As with any collection, some stories held more appeal for me than others. I enjoyed most of the stories, while others were ok. For instance, I absolutely adored "On K2 with Kanakaredes"! I've read a few of the mountain-climbing" true-adventure stories, so while I would never, ever do such a thing, the content was not totally foreign, and the speculation re technology was fun. But the most fun was the relationships between Kanakaredes and the others. I laughed out loud when he eloquently used a human colloquialism. I can't spoil it by telling you what it was. The end both broke my heart and brought me happiness. Again, you have to read it. By contrast, the introduction to "The Ninth of Av" was so off putting for me that I did not read the story. Simmons' list of--what words to use?--evil-tyrants perhaps, includes at least one person I strongly admire, so why read a story likely to be filled with right-wing ranting that will only piss me off? And, I began the intro interested in Simmons' definition of a problem we'll see well into the future, paraphrased as "everyone wants to kill the Jews," as certainly worth exploring, anti-Semitism being strong and continuing, even if not exactly universally murderous. However, the more I read, his explanation, and given what Israel is, and has been, doing to the Palestinian people, I just didn't want to deal with the potential implied "if you don't support the policy of the Israeli government, you must be anti-Semitic" line of thought. I always hope people who suffer at the hands of the US government, and/or are appalled by the same, can distinguish between the government and the US people. Similarly, I would expect my ability to distinguish similarly would be respected. Fearing it would not, I gave this one a skip. So, a mixed bag. Enjoy what you enjoy!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Rita

    Looking for Kelly Dahl: 2 🌟 I think you have to be from the area (Colorado front range) to be able to visualize these scenes. Personally, I struggled. I didn't appreciate the part where Kelly Dahl's former teacher was kissing her. Only 30+ years difference, too. Orphans of the Helix: 4 🌟 Just a little tease for those of us who fell in love with the Hyperion cantos. We can't have the full treatment, says Simmons, because it would turn into the crapitalists' nightmare of marketing etc. It was lovely. T Looking for Kelly Dahl: 2 🌟 I think you have to be from the area (Colorado front range) to be able to visualize these scenes. Personally, I struggled. I didn't appreciate the part where Kelly Dahl's former teacher was kissing her. Only 30+ years difference, too. Orphans of the Helix: 4 🌟 Just a little tease for those of us who fell in love with the Hyperion cantos. We can't have the full treatment, says Simmons, because it would turn into the crapitalists' nightmare of marketing etc. It was lovely. Thank you. The ninth of Av: 5 🌟 Post humans (?) are going to final-fax the old-style humans for 10,000 years, supposedly while the posts fix up planet Earth to before-dementia condition. Old-style humans all have Jewish blood, but none of them seem suspicious until the last few minutes before final fax. Simmons uses Voynix in this story: those scary things that are servile and benevolent until they're...not . On K2 with Kanakaredes: 4 🌟 (Above image) Three experienced climbers agree to let the son of Speaker Mantispid of the South Pole to accompany them to the summit of K2 in exchange for giving them the technology to climb Olympus Mons on Mars. The End of Gravity: 3 🌟 A writer gets the chance to tour the Russian space center and meet cosmonauts during the Xmas holiday. He has a recurring dream of being on the Mir spacestation but, as in the way of dreams, he is in a submarine and exploring the underwater wreck. The ending reminded me of that 1980s movie Brainstorm, where they record a man's brain while he's dying.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kris

    Sadly only a couple of stories were really interesting for me. I haven't read a Dan Simmons book in a really long time. I enjoyed 'Auf der Suche nach Kelly Dahl', 'Der neunte Av', especially due to its open end and the potential this story had for me (I really would love to read a full book, where the whole story is set up and brought to a further point) and 'Mit Kanakaredes auf dem K2'. The last story was the one I thought best compiled in its setting from the beginning to the end. It is a good Sadly only a couple of stories were really interesting for me. I haven't read a Dan Simmons book in a really long time. I enjoyed 'Auf der Suche nach Kelly Dahl', 'Der neunte Av', especially due to its open end and the potential this story had for me (I really would love to read a full book, where the whole story is set up and brought to a further point) and 'Mit Kanakaredes auf dem K2'. The last story was the one I thought best compiled in its setting from the beginning to the end. It is a good afternoon read (I actually finished the book in less than 24 hours).

  18. 4 out of 5

    Julian White

    Five shortish stories, one tied into the Hyperion books, the other four stand-alones. Shorter than most of his novels (duh!) and has been sitting unread on the shelf for 15 years (bought February 2004) so about time... An interesting range of topics - climbing K2 with an alien, mankind's survivors coming to the end of their life before being put into stasis while the post-humans sort out the planet, an alcoholic teacher being haunted/hunted by a former pupil, a treatment for a film... Five shortish stories, one tied into the Hyperion books, the other four stand-alones. Shorter than most of his novels (duh!) and has been sitting unread on the shelf for 15 years (bought February 2004) so about time... An interesting range of topics - climbing K2 with an alien, mankind's survivors coming to the end of their life before being put into stasis while the post-humans sort out the planet, an alcoholic teacher being haunted/hunted by a former pupil, a treatment for a film...

  19. 4 out of 5

    William Mosley

    My favorite author I first read this book over 15 years ago. I have rad every book Dan Simmons has written. He is in fact an exceptional writer of fiction and science fiction. It is hard to choose a favorite but if pressed, I would say the four book Hyperion series is the best I have ever read. Dan Simons towers over most of greatest writers including Tolkien, JRR Martin, C S Lewis and all of the greatest sci-fi writers I have read.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Mitch

    4.0 Stars A solid collection, Orphans of the Helix being the highlighted that brought back all those warm and fuzzy feelings reading the Hyperion Cantos for the first time. Dan Simmons still comes off as a condescending asshole in his introductions though. Sorry Dan, you're an amazing writer but an insufferable human. 4.0 Stars A solid collection, Orphans of the Helix being the highlighted that brought back all those warm and fuzzy feelings reading the Hyperion Cantos for the first time. Dan Simmons still comes off as a condescending asshole in his introductions though. Sorry Dan, you're an amazing writer but an insufferable human.

  21. 5 out of 5

    John Pedersen

    Dan Simmons wrote one of my favorite sci-fi series ever - the Hyperion Cantos. These stories were enjoyable, but not on the same level. Which maybe isn't a fair comparison, but that's how I feel. I enjoyed these stories, but this is probably ultimately skippable if you're trying to hit Simmons' high points. Dan Simmons wrote one of my favorite sci-fi series ever - the Hyperion Cantos. These stories were enjoyable, but not on the same level. Which maybe isn't a fair comparison, but that's how I feel. I enjoyed these stories, but this is probably ultimately skippable if you're trying to hit Simmons' high points.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Moonshadow

    I loved Dan Simmons Hyperion universe and bought this book because it had a story in which he returned to that universe. The other stories were incomprehensible to me. I think there was not enough time for him. It failed for because he didn’t have enough time to set up the universe these stories were in.

  23. 5 out of 5

    John

    Its a nice return to the universe of Hyperion several hundred years later after the end of Rise of Endymion and learn what came of the various societies and heroes Short and sweet with a tiny twist at the end left me wanting more-- and to return to this world again.

  24. 5 out of 5

    GJF

    Is it just me or has Dan Simmons become the grumpy old man yelling at “foreigners” or was he always like this? If he wanted to give a history lesson “Itbah al-Yahud” really should have been replaced with 2nd century Latin or a quote from the New Testament.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Yong

    My advice: read it after you've read the Hyperion Cantos, i.e. the Endymion stories. My advice: read it after you've read the Hyperion Cantos, i.e. the Endymion stories.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Rick English

    Enjoyable as usual. If you read "Abominable " by Simmons then you can probably skip the third story about K2 Enjoyable as usual. If you read "Abominable " by Simmons then you can probably skip the third story about K2

  27. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

    A decent collection of short stories. If you're interested in Simmons sci-fi work, but don't want to commit to a full novel, this serves as a good introduction. A decent collection of short stories. If you're interested in Simmons sci-fi work, but don't want to commit to a full novel, this serves as a good introduction.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Ceri Sambrook

    5 Short stories from the author of my favourite sci-fi Novel. S'alright but nothing amazing here. 5 Short stories from the author of my favourite sci-fi Novel. S'alright but nothing amazing here.

  29. 5 out of 5

    jjonas

    A disappointing collection of short stories. Ironically the author's introductions to each story were the most interesting part, the stories themselves went nowhere. A disappointing collection of short stories. Ironically the author's introductions to each story were the most interesting part, the stories themselves went nowhere.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Christian Borup

    I got this book just to read "Orphans of the Helix" and it was excellent. So nice to return to the Hyperion universe. I also really like "Looking for Kelly Dahl" and "On K2 with Kanakaredes". I got this book just to read "Orphans of the Helix" and it was excellent. So nice to return to the Hyperion universe. I also really like "Looking for Kelly Dahl" and "On K2 with Kanakaredes".

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