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Flesh and bone and hearts unknown, lead to the rath and your fate will be shown… Deadmarsh. The name struck terror into the hearts of all who heard it. But to Roger Knightley, neither Deadmarsh the house, nor Deadmarsh the family, had ever been anything to fear. Nearly each summer of his young life had been spent in that manor on the moors, having wild adventures with his Flesh and bone and hearts unknown, lead to the rath and your fate will be shown… Deadmarsh. The name struck terror into the hearts of all who heard it. But to Roger Knightley, neither Deadmarsh the house, nor Deadmarsh the family, had ever been anything to fear. Nearly each summer of his young life had been spent in that manor on the moors, having wild adventures with his cousin, Lockie, the Deadmarsh heir. This year should have been no different, but when Roger arrives, he finds everything, and everyone, changed. The grounds are unkempt, the servants long gone. Kip, the family cat, has inexplicably grown and glares at Roger as if he is trying to read the boy’s mind. Roger’s eldest cousin, Travers, always treated as a servant, now dresses like a duchess and wears round her neck a strange moonstone given to her by someone known as Master Coffyn, who has taken over the teaching of Lockie at a school in Wales called Nethermarrow. And soon after he crosses the threshold of Deadmarsh, Roger discovers that Coffyn has overtaken Lockie. The boy is deceitful, riddled with fear, and has returned bearing tales of creatures called Jagged Ones that claim to be of the Fey and can somehow conceal themselves while standing in the full light of the moon. What they want with Lockie, Roger cannot fathom, until the horror within his cousin lashes out, and it becomes savagely clear that these Jagged Ones and the Dark Wreaker they serve are not only after Lockie and Travers, but Roger, too. Joining forces with an ally whose true nature remains hidden, Roger seeks to unravel the tapestry of lies woven round his family’s connection to the death-haunted world of Everl’aria—and the Dark Wreaker who calls it home. The deeper Roger delves into the past, the more he begins to suspect that the tales of dark deeds done in the forest behind Deadmarsh, deeds in which village children made sacrifice to an otherworldly beast and were never seen or heard from again, are true. And if there is truth in these outlandish stories, what of the rumor that it was not an earthquake which rocked the moors surrounding Deadmarsh sixteen years ago, but a winged nightmare attempting to break free of its underground prison? Enlisting the aid of a monster equipped with enough inborn firepower to blast his enemies into oblivion might be as suicidal as Roger’s friends insist, yet the boy knows he needs all the help he can get if there is to be any hope of defeating not only the Dark Wreaker and his servants, but an unholy trinity known as the Bear, the Wolf, and the Curse That Walks The Earth. And then there is the foe named Blood Wood, who might be the deadliest of them all. Racing against time, Roger must find a way to end the battle being waged across worlds before the night of Lockie’s eleventh birthday—two days hence. If he fails, blood will drown the earth. And Roger and his entire family will fulfill the prophecy of fey’s older, more lethal meaning… Fated to die.


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Flesh and bone and hearts unknown, lead to the rath and your fate will be shown… Deadmarsh. The name struck terror into the hearts of all who heard it. But to Roger Knightley, neither Deadmarsh the house, nor Deadmarsh the family, had ever been anything to fear. Nearly each summer of his young life had been spent in that manor on the moors, having wild adventures with his Flesh and bone and hearts unknown, lead to the rath and your fate will be shown… Deadmarsh. The name struck terror into the hearts of all who heard it. But to Roger Knightley, neither Deadmarsh the house, nor Deadmarsh the family, had ever been anything to fear. Nearly each summer of his young life had been spent in that manor on the moors, having wild adventures with his cousin, Lockie, the Deadmarsh heir. This year should have been no different, but when Roger arrives, he finds everything, and everyone, changed. The grounds are unkempt, the servants long gone. Kip, the family cat, has inexplicably grown and glares at Roger as if he is trying to read the boy’s mind. Roger’s eldest cousin, Travers, always treated as a servant, now dresses like a duchess and wears round her neck a strange moonstone given to her by someone known as Master Coffyn, who has taken over the teaching of Lockie at a school in Wales called Nethermarrow. And soon after he crosses the threshold of Deadmarsh, Roger discovers that Coffyn has overtaken Lockie. The boy is deceitful, riddled with fear, and has returned bearing tales of creatures called Jagged Ones that claim to be of the Fey and can somehow conceal themselves while standing in the full light of the moon. What they want with Lockie, Roger cannot fathom, until the horror within his cousin lashes out, and it becomes savagely clear that these Jagged Ones and the Dark Wreaker they serve are not only after Lockie and Travers, but Roger, too. Joining forces with an ally whose true nature remains hidden, Roger seeks to unravel the tapestry of lies woven round his family’s connection to the death-haunted world of Everl’aria—and the Dark Wreaker who calls it home. The deeper Roger delves into the past, the more he begins to suspect that the tales of dark deeds done in the forest behind Deadmarsh, deeds in which village children made sacrifice to an otherworldly beast and were never seen or heard from again, are true. And if there is truth in these outlandish stories, what of the rumor that it was not an earthquake which rocked the moors surrounding Deadmarsh sixteen years ago, but a winged nightmare attempting to break free of its underground prison? Enlisting the aid of a monster equipped with enough inborn firepower to blast his enemies into oblivion might be as suicidal as Roger’s friends insist, yet the boy knows he needs all the help he can get if there is to be any hope of defeating not only the Dark Wreaker and his servants, but an unholy trinity known as the Bear, the Wolf, and the Curse That Walks The Earth. And then there is the foe named Blood Wood, who might be the deadliest of them all. Racing against time, Roger must find a way to end the battle being waged across worlds before the night of Lockie’s eleventh birthday—two days hence. If he fails, blood will drown the earth. And Roger and his entire family will fulfill the prophecy of fey’s older, more lethal meaning… Fated to die.

30 review for Deadmarsh Fey

  1. 5 out of 5

    Virginia Ronan ♥ Herondale ♥

    ** I received this book from the author in exchange for an honest review. Thank you so much for sending me your amazing book, Melika! I’m sorry it took me so long to get to it and I’m even more sorry for taking so long to write a proper review! >_<** ”When you close off your heart, Son of Iron, you slam the door on goodness. It cannot get in, but evil can. It is a crafty burglar armed with many types of keys. Once you give in to despair, it is like sounding the dinner gong. And I fear this spy an ** I received this book from the author in exchange for an honest review. Thank you so much for sending me your amazing book, Melika! I’m sorry it took me so long to get to it and I’m even more sorry for taking so long to write a proper review! >_<** ”When you close off your heart, Son of Iron, you slam the door on goodness. It cannot get in, but evil can. It is a crafty burglar armed with many types of keys. Once you give in to despair, it is like sounding the dinner gong. And I fear this spy and his master are hungry.” Where to start with this review?! I’m going to be completely honest now so please bear with me! Ready? Okay! I have absolutely no clue how I’m supposed to write about this awesome book but I’ve been procrastinating for three weeks already and regardless of how hard it will be to write a proper review, I still think that “Deadmarsh Fey” deserves every single word I’m going to write about it! This book wasn’t just amazing but also so intricate that I have no idea how I should write about it without giving away some of the major plot points. *lol* I don’t want to spoil you because, damn this story is something you just NEED to experience for yourself so I’m having kind of a hard time to keep from revealing all too much. Well, I guess we probably should start with the things I can tell you and take it from there. Maybe that will make it a little bit easier to encompass the full glory of this book. ;-) ”They’d been a good pair over the years, he and Lockie – mischievous, rather stroke-inducing to the older members of society, and decidedly informal with one another.” Roger and Lockie were not only the two main characters of “Deadmarsh Fey” but also best friends who went through thick and thin and always had each other’s back. Well, at least until Roger returned to Deadmarsh and realized that Lockie hadn’t only changed somehow but also had been forced to bring along his new master … ”One Deadmarsh enslaved to the Master of Nethermarrow is quite enough.” Gosh how I hated Coffyn! I mean his name says it all! He’s not only an egoistic sadist but also as lively as the coffin he was named after. XD I really disliked that man from the very first moment he made an appearance in the book and if I’d know him in real life there would be no love lost between us. *lol* Thankfully there was always Bellows who would intervene at the behalf of Roger and Lockie firmly putting that monster of a man in his place. XD Haha! Oh boy did I love Bellows for speaking up for his boys! <33 The world certainly needs more guys like him and his presence definitely made the book even more enjoyable! =)) ”We’ll see. Just don’t get any ideas about slippin’ Saint Pete a fiver to oil the hinges so you can eel yerself in. It don’t work that way, ‘specially if ya’ve been a wheezer yer whole life long.” “I have never heard such incendiary talk!” “Course, there ain’t no guarantee ya won’t be takin’ the express train ta you know where,” said Bellows, casting his eyes downward for good measure, just in case Coffyn hadn’t taken his meaning. Haha! I still have to laugh whenever I think about that scene! =)) But damn there were so many other things that made this book such a delightful experience! For instance I loved the interactions between our hero and his guardian Kip as well as the conversations between Carver and Roger! Boy, those two were so damn hilarious! I know Carver was the baddie (or should I rather say one of the baddies?! ;-P) of the story, but damn did I love this little bluish fiend to bits and pieces!!! He was exactly the way I always imagined faeries to be: self-confident, sinister, cunning, unapologetic, sassy and devilishly eloquent! <3 Oh wait, except of sinister that could actually describe me as well. *lol* Guess that explains why I loved him so much! Haha! ”You’re not allowed in church!” The Jagged One squinted at him. “Sez who?” “Says God!” Carver tsked. “I thought you Christians welcomed everyone.” “We make exceptions for demons like you.” ”You’re all smarts, ain’t you, Rislohir?” “So sharp I’ll cut myself,” Roger retorted. “Let’s leave the cutting to me, shall we?” Carver said, flourishing his talons. Anyway, after reading this you can be sure I picked up the “Sez who?” phrase to use it in my everyday speech. XD I mean this is just epic and needs to be carried out into the world, don’t you agree? *lol* “Deadmarsh Fey” however wasn’t just funny and entertaining but also very well-thought out and extremely convincing for people like me who are a sucker for legends about faeries. I was genuinely surprised to realize that Melika knew all about the myths and interlaced them in her story so effortlessly! I swear after reading so many stories about faeries and knowing the myths it was such a delight to get to know an author who knew them all and was able to convey them with ease!!! ”It was a tactic they used to turn uncooperative children red with bloodlust – feed them viscera baked into a sweet treat. A bit of sugaring helps the murder go down much more palatably.” ”Why should I not know what he’s really called?” “Tell a man your name and he will have power over you forever,” Carver muttered. Also the foreboding that was hidden in every little corner of the story and not to mention the creepiness that ran like a red thread through the entire narration! Brilliant! Just brilliant! Melika made me so happy with this book that I must have declared my eternal love to her at least once (maybe even twice ;-P) throughout the course of the entire book! *lol* Admittedly I have to confess that I was rather confused at one point of the story because there was a chapter with so many names and different places that my head started to spin. Then again this confusion is part of what made the entire book so intriguing. It’s like you only see certain parts of the spider’s web and then, at the end, when it’s already way too late to use that knowledge to your advantage, everything suddenly makes sense and you finally notice the entire cleverly woven spider web in its full glory. XD Unfortunately at that point you’re already halfway rolled up into a delicious spider snack. And the spider is hungry… very hungry indeed. *lol* ”Regardless of what they have tried to poison your mind with at that school of yours, there can be no room for mercy when battling the forces of darkness. It cannot be reasoned with. It cannot be explained away. It is what it is … evil. We do not need to understand it or empathize with it. We need to annihilate it and make certain it never rises again.” I think I could go on and on praising Melika’s book but I’ll refrain from doing so because I don’t want to spoil you! Of course there would be even more to tell, like for instance how much I adored some of the other characters I didn’t even get a chance to mention yet! (view spoiler)[Precious Fetcher!!! Oh, how much I loved him and his relationship with Incendiu and Llyrian!!! Those three were nothing but amazing! <333 ”Undamaged goods. That was Da’s reasoning. I hadn’t ever drawn First Blood. I’d never wanted to kill anyone. There was no murder in my heart.” And for that very reason, Roger decided, this kid, though he lacked one, had more heart than both his parents combined. (hide spoiler)] I won’t tell you anything about them though! You’ll have to find out for yourself! ;-) For now all I’m saying is that this book was an intricate masterpiece and that I enjoyed every single word of it! Even though there was a lot of name dropping and confusion involved I still savoured “Deadmarsh Fey” like a bottle of Bushmills 16 Three Wood Single Malt Irish Whiskey! *lol* Which is probably the highest compliment I’m able to give to a book! XD But no, I still won’t spoil your fun! ;-P To end it with a quote: Carver tut-tutted. “That would be telling, Rislohir.” “But this is your moment of triumph,” Roger argued. “Aren’t you supposed to blab your whole master plan to me now? Isn’t that what all villains do?” “Where did you get a damfool idea like that? This isn’t a story, Ironspawn. Nobody’s that stupid in real life.” ______________________________ PREREVIEW: I’ve been dying to read this ever since Melika offered me to read her new book! XD I mean a book with faeries that seems to be a mix of horror and fantasy?! How could I possibly say no?! I LOVE FAERIES!!! Anything with faeries? I’m game! ;-P So yeah to say “yes” was probably the easiest decision of my entire life and I’m sure I won’t regret it. (She said before she actually read the book and started to hide under her blanket because she’s a scaredy cat. *lol*) I’m sure the cruel, cunning and sinister faeries will be worth my heart attacks though. Especially the one on the cover. Boy, does he look sinister! >_< Melika, I’m ready and I really hope I won’t be scared shitless. *lol* *crosses fingers and takes a deep breath* Give me all those creepy faeries, I’m pretty certain that I’ll love them. <3

  2. 5 out of 5

    Dianne

    Clear your calendar and settle in, you are about to become part of an epic journey where nightmares become reality and reality isn’t quite as it seems in Melika Dannese Lux’s DEADMARSH FEY, an incredibly solid beginning to what appears to be a fabulous series! There is more story between the covers of this dark horror/fantasy than can be given justice in a review. Roger Knightley never understood the dark stories told of Deadmarsh. For the eleven-year-old, the mansion was a summertime delight, a Clear your calendar and settle in, you are about to become part of an epic journey where nightmares become reality and reality isn’t quite as it seems in Melika Dannese Lux’s DEADMARSH FEY, an incredibly solid beginning to what appears to be a fabulous series! There is more story between the covers of this dark horror/fantasy than can be given justice in a review. Roger Knightley never understood the dark stories told of Deadmarsh. For the eleven-year-old, the mansion was a summertime delight, a place of adventure with his cousin, Lockie, so why should this year be any different? But it was, and it was the things nightmares are made of and the monsters sometimes hid in plain sight or worse, deep in the bowels of the earth under Deadmarsh. For Roger, it starts as another adventure, a mystery to solve, but what he discovers and the strange allies he makes will forever change his reality and the reality of those around him. Family secrets will be revealed, deceit will abound and an evil so terrible will overtake the very souls of those Roger cares about as the clock counts down to the very hour when the veils between worlds is at its thinnest and a deadly prophecy will be fulfilled. Melika Dannese Lux hasn’t given us a tale to read and let go of, she has created an atmosphere to breathe, a world to get lost in and characters that come alive, morphing and changing throughout! Brilliant writing holds those final truths just out of reach, because no one is who they seem at first glance and as the fantasy grows, it darkens and branches off down twisted tunnels into a labyrinth that will culminate in an incredible series of unveilings, battles and magical beings that defy our reality! Roger is “that” character who brings light to this tale with his youthful determination, his newfound allies and his belief in both himself and those around him. He is a youthful adventurer with a spine of steel in my book! Start to finish, there is not a wasted word or page, and yes, this is longer than many tales, so plan to be swept away from reality for a while. You may find yourself reluctant to return when all is said and done! This is a book to enjoy, not race through, the ideas are fabulous, and the execution by this author is near flawless with page after page of constant movement and detail as we sit front and center to one family's many secrets! I received a complimentary copy from Melika Dannese Lux! Series: Dwellers of Darkness, Children of Light - Book 1 Publisher: Books in my Belfry (May 2, 2018) Publication Date: May 2, 2018 Genre: Dark Fantasy Print Length: 674 pages Available from: Amazon For Reviews, Giveaways, Fabulous Book News, follow: http://tometender.blogspot.com

  3. 4 out of 5

    ☕️Kimberly

    Lux brings us a deliciously dark story shared from the voice of eleven-year-old, Roger Knightley. Before our story ends, he will have to face his fears and use his wit if he and his family want to survive. The story has a rather large cast of characters and references many a book and lore. With its atmospheric tone and villainous characters you are quickly pulled into the story. The living cast of characters are easy enough to keep track of. We’ve got family members, staff and unwanted guests,  b Lux brings us a deliciously dark story shared from the voice of eleven-year-old, Roger Knightley. Before our story ends, he will have to face his fears and use his wit if he and his family want to survive. The story has a rather large cast of characters and references many a book and lore. With its atmospheric tone and villainous characters you are quickly pulled into the story. The living cast of characters are easy enough to keep track of. We’ve got family members, staff and unwanted guests,  but the family tree and those of the supernatural realm made my head spin. I wish the book had a reference guide. I recommend writing them down as you hear a name or their nicknames. Don’t let this deter you though because Lux takes us on quite the journey as Roger tries to keep his cousin Havelock (Lockie) from harm. His cousin Travers and his valet Bellows assist Rogers throughout the story. Travers lives at Deadmarsh full-time and Bellows is a former boxer. Kip, the family cat is an important part of the story, but alas spoilers dear reader. What I can tell you is that there is a curse of sorts on the Havelock family and it has something to do with the heir turning eleven. The mist appears to be alive and the servants have left. When, Roger arrives expecting good times with his cousins thing have changed.  For a start he finds Travers, dressed like a Duchess and behaving oddly. Worse, his cousin Lockie bring with him his schoolmaster and he acts as if they are strangers. Worse yet, they have moved him into a damp, dreadfully dark bedchamber. It took me the better part of a week to devour Deadmarsh Fey, as I tried to unravel the secrets of Deadmarsh and determine who was friend or foe. While engaging and filled with colorful characters living, dead and other, it is a story that demands one’s full attention. The setting itself added to the tale with the unrelenting mist, rundown condition of the gardens and decay,  The woods and moor that surrounded the property are dark, damp and full of secrets. Lux has a vivid imagination and I could feel the cold manor floor and dampness seeping into Roger’s bedchamber. Without spoilers I will tell you we slip between the veil and see a glimpse of what was. I loved the tension created by Lockie’s approaching birthday and the encounters with strange creatures and the dreaded Blood Wood. I’ve always feared the fae and Lux reminded me why. We encounter many twisted creatures and demons. I loved how the author brought them to life. It honestly gave me goosebumps. Roger was a clever boy, well versed in books as I imagine a lonely young boy of this era would be. He was quick to piece things together and trusted his gut even when he wanted to give up. I enjoyed his transformation in the book as his confidence grew. Dark bogs, fairy circles and dragons await you in this engaging quest. The tale wrapped up nicely with some reveals and twists. I am curious to see what the next book will bring. This review was originally posted at Caffeinated Reviewer

  4. 5 out of 5

    REMEMBER UKRAINE NOW ReadingReindeer

    Review: DEADMARSH-FEY (Dwellers of Darkness, Children of Light A dark fantasy set in England and Wales, starring the scion of a family of long lineage, identifiable back to at least the 13th century, DEADMARSH: FEY reminds me in some ways of Henry James' TURN OF THE SCREW. in a very effective and deeply-delineated feat of world-building, young Roger Knightley, expecting n easy-going summer of pretend adventuring with Cousin Lockie at Deadmarsh Hall, instead enters into a world turned upside down Review: DEADMARSH-FEY (Dwellers of Darkness, Children of Light A dark fantasy set in England and Wales, starring the scion of a family of long lineage, identifiable back to at least the 13th century, DEADMARSH: FEY reminds me in some ways of Henry James' TURN OF THE SCREW. in a very effective and deeply-delineated feat of world-building, young Roger Knightley, expecting n easy-going summer of pretend adventuring with Cousin Lockie at Deadmarsh Hall, instead enters into a world turned upside down and a family in grave otherworldly danger--including Roger himself.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    *thank you to Netgalley, CreateSpace Independent Publishing and Melika Dannese Lux for a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review* 4.5 stars. Wow. Ok. This was.....WOW. I took my time with this because I will admit that as an ebook copy, with it being over 600 pages, that kinda overwhelmed me. Don't get me wrong, I LOVE LOVE thick chunky books. But NOT thick chunky ebooks. (There is a difference.) Only physical ones. But the story and the cover, OMG THAT COVER, made me push through that *thank you to Netgalley, CreateSpace Independent Publishing and Melika Dannese Lux for a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review* 4.5 stars. Wow. Ok. This was.....WOW. I took my time with this because I will admit that as an ebook copy, with it being over 600 pages, that kinda overwhelmed me. Don't get me wrong, I LOVE LOVE thick chunky books. But NOT thick chunky ebooks. (There is a difference.) Only physical ones. But the story and the cover, OMG THAT COVER, made me push through that negative feeling because I really wanted to read this still. And I am SO glad that I did. It's brought back my love for gothic horror and Melika Dannese Lux definitely knows how to tell a story. This had everything I love and I wanted to take my time and not rush it and just absorb it all. So I did. I hope I can track down an actual physical copy to buy so I can re read this. Highly recommend!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jack

    Owain Deadmarsh grabbed a knife, stalked into the woods, and murdered his wife! Ok, so I’m a little weird. Sometimes when I read a book, I like to surround myself with sounds, smells, and tastes of the time period. I rationalize this behavior to myself by thinking that this will help immerse and engross me in the tale even more, allowing it to expand beyond reading to encompass several more senses beyond sight. So, in several sessions during my reading of Deadmarsh Fey, I listened to a lot of cla Owain Deadmarsh grabbed a knife, stalked into the woods, and murdered his wife! Ok, so I’m a little weird. Sometimes when I read a book, I like to surround myself with sounds, smells, and tastes of the time period. I rationalize this behavior to myself by thinking that this will help immerse and engross me in the tale even more, allowing it to expand beyond reading to encompass several more senses beyond sight. So, in several sessions during my reading of Deadmarsh Fey, I listened to a lot of classical music (not that that’s a stretch), smoked a couple of cigars by the firepit, had bangers & mash, drank bourbon and brandy from tumblers & snifters, and had a whiskey/tobacco scented candle burning sporadically. Ok, truth be told, NONE of those are a stretch or are too far left of the norm for me, BUT…I did them MORE while reading the book. I can’t say if they immersed me in the tale more than I would have already been…but damn! It sure made the whole experience even more enjoyable! So, now that that’s out the way, I can get on to the review proper. Oh! But before that, I have a preliminary little heads up; Disclaimer – I was offered a copy of this book in exchange for a fair & honest review. Receiving a copy of the novel has not biased my review in any way. Ok, now that THAT’S done, I can truly get on to the review. For reals this time! As with all of my reviews, I will attempt to avoid spoilers whenever possible. Given that this book is incredibly plot heavy, this will be a difficult endeavor. But given all the care and attention to detail that Melika Lux has put into this tale, it would be a huge disservice to her to let any cats out of any proverbial bags. So, if it’s not mentioned in the official book synopsis on Goodreads, I will do my level best to avoid mentioning it here. Also, in line with my other reviews, you will not get oblique statements or a half-constructed “I liked it”. The author put care into crafting the story, and I will reciprocate in kind. Deadmarsh Fey, aside from the other qualities it has, possesses a certain sense of…age. Even though it’s not a Victorian horror, it shares some of the general characteristics. Even though it’s not written in the prose of those bygone years, it still firmly resides in that timeframe, and conveys the sense of it just fine. It may not have the prose, but it evokes the spirit of the age with some of the word choices, cultural references, and the atmosphere. You just don’t come across stories like this too often anymore, and I feel that had Melika Lux been alive during those times, she would have caused quite a stir with her sensational and dreadful tales. "I've known more than my fair share of sadists in short trousers, Kip, I can tell you. Just because a fellow's a child, doesn't mean his soul's lily white." While reading Deadmarsh Fey I had quite a few other reading obligations, from personal endeavors to local book club selections, so there were moments where I was under the gun and felt like skimming through sections of the book. But, at the end of the day, I wanted to give Melika Lux’s creation a 100% fair shake, so anytime I was reading it, I made sure it had my full attention. So while it took me a while to finish the book, this is by no means a poor reflection on Deadmarsh Fey itself. Yes, it is an incredibly detailed novel, one that will require complete attention from the reader, but the long period of actually finishing the novel was entirely because of my own convoluted schedule. "I don't know how else to explain this, but I could feel her age, almost as if the weight of her years were pressing against me like a great mountain of corpses that would collapse onto me if I so much as looked at her the wrong way." Though it is a single POV, third person affair, Deadmarsh Fey is very deceptive, as it is chock full of characters, both heroes and ne’er-do-wells. So much so that it feels like it expands beyond the scope of a single character's viewpoint. Some of this is because there is quite a bit of exposition, and some of it is simply because of the large cast. And I mean LARGE cast. Casual readers will have one hell of a time with this book, in part because of the high count of characters. And, on top of the sheer number of personalities, many of them are known by several names, depending on who is addressing them. Friends may call them one thing (which may or may not be their given name), while enemies may call them something else entirely. It reminds me a bit of A Song of Ice and Fire in that regard, where many of the characters had multiple names, nicknames, and official titles. Each of the nicknames or titles in this book are explained, but sometimes it happens on the sly, so readers really need to be paying attention! I generally pride myself on being able to keep up on “who’s who in the zoo”, but I will totally admit to being a little lost sometimes with who was related to who, and whose nickname belonged to whom. I imagine that Melika has this huge and convoluted family tree taped to one of her walls, like a crime scene in some serial killer thriller, with all sorts of colored string crisscrossing the whole thing, each color signifying some obscure tie, event, or other relation beyond blood. I imagine that it causes her houseguests no small amount of discomfort and distrust. And I am aware that, in assuming THAT level of detail, I am essentially elevating Ms. Lux to Bond villain status. So be it. Hey, she even has a Bond villain name! Whoever had given that thing to Travers must have been pretty cracked himself. Thinking you could cage the rock in a bit of gold work to make it beautiful was just about as stupid as believing you could dress up a tarantula in a tiara. So…yeah, back to the single POV character discussion. Roger Knightley is not what I would call a traditional hero in a tale such as this. As a boy who has not yet turned 11, he is small in both stature AND experience. But, that said, this is 19th century England we are talking about here, where children (especially children beyond the standard means) were vigorously educated and expected to comport themselves like little adults. So it’s not inaccurate to say that he’s more mature than an 11 year old from the 21st century. Since he is so young, he meets each new circumstance or event with a varying range of emotions and outlooks. Sometimes he’s brave and stands tall, sometimes he’s enfeebled with fear, and many times he’s simply confused or overwhelmed. Which makes sense, as Deadmarsh Fey is chock full of extraordinary circumstances, stuff that would make even hardened adults crumble. Poor little Roger can barely catch his breath before the next horrific revelation. All I can say is that this kid’s gonna need some serious therapy after this series is done. But he’s a scrappy lad, our Roger, and I rather enjoyed my time spent with him. I liked the fact that there were things he could figure out on his own, and things that he couldn’t, as befitting his age. He had just the right amount of earnestness, sarcasm, and wit to make him endearing, but not so much that it rang false or became annoying or overwrought. He also grows a bit during this novel, even though the narrative really only takes place over the course of a few days. I’m always more invested in characters who show actual growth, or have an actual arc, during a story. As mentioned above, there are numerous supporting characters in Deadmarsh Fey. From Roger’s cousin Havelock aka Lockie (very central to the narrative), his cousin Travers (also pivotal), and his valet (and former bare-knuckle boxer) Bellows, to various other allies and acquaintances, this book is not lacking for a cast of characters. Sadly, many of these characters can’t really be mentioned in any sort of detail without heading into potential spoiler territory. That said, I’m very excited to meet Iso in the next book, as she seems like a fun impish counterpoint to Roger’s occasional stick-in-the-mud shtick. "You're too young to have rheumatism." "You're never too young to suffer." On the villain front, Melika Lux has provided Roger a worthy rogue’s gallery of antagonists, though some are more effective than others. Regardless of how effective a villain they are or are not, they are all incredibly threatening to our young hero and his cohorts. Alas, it’s also difficult to talk about the villains without potentially giving away more info than I would like to. Suffice it to say that Deadmarsh Fey has plenty of interesting and dangerous big bads, each seemingly more dastardly and diabolical than the last. "Need I remind you that some of the worst atrocities in the histories of your world and mine have been committed by mere men?" I’m self-aware enough to know that I sometimes will judge a book, and the way it’s written, by how I think the author and I would get along hanging out in a not-so-seedy bar late at night. Given the level of sarcasm and wit present in Deadmarsh Fey, I get the impression that Ms. Lux and I would have absolutely zero issues with bantering back and forth. She obviously has a knack for conversation, as the book is filled to the brim with characters engaged in all sorts of banter. Chummy banter amongst pals? Check. Tit-for-tat put-downs between foes? Also check. Devious villain monologues? Also also check. Some of the conversations are delightfully on-point witty thrusts and parries, while some of them are somber and mournful discussions of fate and the price of familial misdeeds. Ms. Lux is also highly descriptive, providing plenty of evocative detail in her settings and events. I think she manages to convey what she sees in her mind pretty effectively to page, which some authors do struggle with. It’s not enough to have a great idea…it’s how well that idea is portrayed and explained that really matters. And in that regard, she nails it. I bet she’d be a lot of fun drunk, trying to elaborate on some obscure point while also trying not to fall over. Oh, and she also has more than a few instances in this book with alliteration. I LOVE alliteration! But there was no question of his surviving a battle against this panther of prehistoric proportions now. I can honestly say that this is one of the more detailed books I have yet read. Every narrative thread, no matter how small or seemingly inconsequential, is accounted for and resolved. I wouldn’t say it’s as dense or requires as much undivided attention as, say, Cryptonomicon by Neal Stephenson, but this really isn’t a book you can half-ass your way through. There are so many events taking place in the “now” of the book that are intrinsically tied to historic events, and so many characters that maybe had a hand to play in both those now AND past events, that you’ll get lost quickly if you aren’t paying attention. If you like your books to have some rich history, then you’ve come to the right place. The revelations fly fast and furious here (maybe Bellows is a stand-in for Vin Diesel!?), and sometimes questions get answered that you didn’t even know were questions in the first place. I can’t even begin to imagine just how much work went into making sure every plot-point and contrivance was examined and resolved. It likely involved more than a few late nights, blood sacrifices, and soul-selling. And, in a nice change of pace, because of the tactics used by the enemy, the people/beings that are supposed to be protecting the likes of Roger and his family are generally just as in the dark as Roger himself. It goes a little like this: “What do we do now Kip? We are good and screwed due to this latest development. How do we make it right?” To which Kip replies, “Dude, how the eff should I know? I’ve been in Wales this whole time!” (Note - Not actual quotes from the book!) It’s kind of refreshing not having some wizened old chap named Sir Deus-Ex-Machina just dropping in and making things too easy. "There are more things in Heaven and earth..." Uncle Gryffyn muttered. "Now ain't the time to be quotin' old Bill Shakes, guv," Bellows shot in. There is also a point that I need to make for potential readers. Though this book may start out with a feeling of whimsy and light fantasy, it quickly turns DARK. Like, grimmer than GrimDark dark. And, while I personally like that, some folks don’t. There are quite a few atrocities that are committed in this tale, and many of them are done against children. If you have a hard time with that, then this is likely not the book for you. I lost track of how many times something awful happened, either in the actual continuing plot of the book, or as some past event that directly affects our heroes. And just when you think things can’t get any more dire, or any more grim, Ms. Lux throws another bloody and evil event into the mix. And Roger, poor Roger, is splattered, drenched, or sprayed with blood so often that it’s amazing the he isn’t permanently dyed red. "Do not make the mistake of thinking present society is so highly advanced that they have forgotten their baser instincts, Roger Knightley. Evil is evil no matter the century, or the world." By this point, it’s pretty safe to say that I enjoyed Deadmarsh Fey (surprise, I did!). But that’s not to say that I don’t have a few gripes (surprise, I do!). My biggest gripe is that, for all the great conversation, characters tend to talk a little TOO much. Sometimes it’s just a conversation that went on too long, with too many points re-iterated. But, sometimes it was to the detriment of the action itself. At one point in the tale, Roger stops mid-run (on his way from one crazy happenstance to another) to quip to a carved dragon on a staircase's newel post. Look, I’m all about witty banter, and characters absolutely do need to communicate (I hate it in books, movies, TV shows, etc. where characters have some vital piece of information and simply don’t share it until it’s too late). But during life-or-death struggles is generally not the time for deep meaningful conversations, sustained pun-filled asides, or aha! proclamations to oneself. Nor should deep insightful conversations be happening in the middle of two characters battling each other to the death. This is how Victor Frankenstein must have felt when his monster woke up, Roger thought crazily. "So it is alive," he said in wonder, but that wonder turned into suspicion when the impossibility of his words sunk in a second later. Also, there are more than a couple of moments where someone will just appear (protagonist or antagonist), without much explanation as to where they came from. They were somewhere else entirely, or they weren’t even close to the person in question, and then all of sudden they pull a Nightcrawler and just appear. Or some new character will suddenly show up (from who knows where), and then they are actively engaged in the action or are talking to established characters mid-conversation, even though they were just literally introduced a sentence ago and we have no idea who they are. There were a few of these jarring transitions, and it caused me on several occasions to go back and re-read the passages to make sure I didn’t miss something. Compounding those transitions, there were a few moments where the sense of urgency, established by the characters in the book itself, grinds to a halt due to some conversation or new discovery. At one point, Roger needs to get outside of Deadmarsh mansion in a hurry. He’s on a strict time limit, and another character has made sure he’s aware that time is most assuredly of the essence. But before he goes outside on this time-sensitive endeavor, he pauses to investigate the room of one of the book’s antagonists. And I don’t mean he does a quick glance. I mean he looks through EVERYTHING, but just kind of at leisure, like the world’s more lackadaisical cat-burglar. He goes through drawers and cabinets. He goes through luggage. He looks for false bottoms in said luggage. He reads a multiple page letter found in said luggage. He ponders said multiple page letter. And then, after burgling that room, he stops to investigate some strange happenings in the room next door. Keep in mind that this is all pertinent to the plot, so it’s not fluff. But he’s given such a strict deadline for his outdoor excursion, but then time seems irrelevant when there’s important plot-related stuff to uncover (except when Roger receives a letter directly addressed to him, in which case he just pockets it and say he'll check who it's from later. Ummmm...is this the same kid?). There are a few other instances in the book where time seems rather elastic, and doesn’t flow nearly as fast as it should. There was only one other point of contention, and it came from the smallest of passages. At one point, one of our supporting characters manages, while chained up, to use his feet to flip a dagger into his mouth and use it to threaten a villain. Keep in mind that this character is certainly no Victorian ninja in disguise...until the story requires him to be. So I was like...NOPE! But, those nitpicks aside, I really did enjoy my time with Deadmarsh Fey. It’s a wholly unique creation in a time when we are getting WAY too many books with similar characters/plots/settings. And any time an author can create something new, different, and engaging, I have to give major kudos. I have no doubt I will revisit Roger & friends when the next book in the series is released, and I look forward to seeing how Melika Lux hones her craft for future offerings. "Cursed are those who have seen and still refuse to believe."

  7. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    +Received a copy in exchange for an honest review. Thank you Melika! Since I wasn't familiar with the author I didn't set any expectations. THE WORLD: It's a fantasy world set in England and Wales. I am guessing some time around the 19th Century but I am not sure about this... one of the characters was a crusader and that event happened between the 11th and 13th Century, and we know the character is 700 hundred years old so yeah around the 19th Century. CHARACTERS: Get ready because there are a +Received a copy in exchange for an honest review. Thank you Melika! Since I wasn't familiar with the author I didn't set any expectations. THE WORLD: It's a fantasy world set in England and Wales. I am guessing some time around the 19th Century but I am not sure about this... one of the characters was a crusader and that event happened between the 11th and 13th Century, and we know the character is 700 hundred years old so yeah around the 19th Century. CHARACTERS: Get ready because there are a ton of characters in this book! The main character is Roger Knightley, a 10 year old boy who goes to spend a summer in the family house in the country. The house and land is called Deadmarsh due to their ancestor Owain Deadmarsh who doesn't have a good reputation among the country men... but anyway, Roger is a Deadmarsh from his mom's side only. Then we have Roger's cousin and best friend, Havelock "Lockie" Deadmarsh, who is about to be 11 years old. Travers, who is 28 years old and also Roger's cousin. The family's friend/butler/guardian, Bellows, and last but not least we have the family cat, Kip. Is the cat important? Very much so. Of course then we have all the magical creatures like Dragons, Faes, Demons, Witches, etc but there are SO MANY and I don't want to spoil anything. Oh wait, I have to mention Master Coffyn. I hate that man. Really hate that man. That's all I can say. I think it would be a good idea to put a list of character names with a small description at the end of the book because I swear you need a master degree to crack up who is who. Or at least a family tree picture. ROMANCE: There's barely any romance in the book. GOOD: I have to say I loved the plot. Everything about the story and the magical creatures and even legends from Wales wow yes, I loved it all. The story was very unique which you don't see easily any more. I loved how neither the characters nor the plot were straight forward, the plot had a lot of deceives which makes it exciting but also more difficult to understand phew. A good number of characters were very morally gray too, they did good things and bad things and things in between they had to latter apologize for. Therefore, giving them a better sense of humanity and personality. The other point was the writing. It is very well written and you can tell the author knows all the intricacies of the language which I appreciate a lot. There's nothing worse than a book published or about to be published with grammar and spelling mistakes everywhere. However, there are a lot of descriptions or thoughts in the book and they tend to be too long... sometimes a full page or even two pages for a character simply thinking can be too much. BAD: Having mentioned all the good things now I have to talk about the bad ones. First, the book has A LOT of characters -it is a fantasy book after all- but a little help would have been appreciated. As I mentioned before I think a character glossary or family tree at the end of the book would be really helpful. Oh, and the main character is 10 years old only but definitely thinks and talks like an adult... I know in the 19th Century they were taught to be "mini adults" but I don't know if it's still not realistic enough. I mean, Roger solves things logically in a way not even the adults of the book do. Secondly, also related to the first point is that the book has a lot of pages. It's a long story but it happens in a very tiny amount of time (I think about 3 days) from the beginning to end which makes it very difficult for people to remember who is who and also what is their place in the story. Finally, the last point is that while the writing is beautiful and high level, some descriptions tend to drag too much, they're a bit too long for my liking. It reminds me a bit of other fantasy books such as The Name of the Wind and LoTR... amazing books but can get a tad boring. OVERALL: 3.5 stars (bumped up to 4 on Goodreads). I was actually impressed with the book because it was very original and I definitely appreciate good writing. Nonetheless, be aware that it is very long and has a lot of characters so it gets confusing. It's a book you will have to read twice in order to appreciate all of it. —P.S. I Love That Book!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Shalini

    This was an atmospheric read, the entire book had a dark Gothic feel to it. I loved the cover which caused a slight shudder to course through me. The protagonist, a 11-year-old Roger Knightley is the one leading the story and using his knowledge and intelligence to save his family especially his cousin Lockie. A war between magical creatures, he was ably helped by cousin Travers and valet Bellows. A curse which comes alive when heir to Deadmarsh turns 11 was the basic plot putting into play the This was an atmospheric read, the entire book had a dark Gothic feel to it. I loved the cover which caused a slight shudder to course through me. The protagonist, a 11-year-old Roger Knightley is the one leading the story and using his knowledge and intelligence to save his family especially his cousin Lockie. A war between magical creatures, he was ably helped by cousin Travers and valet Bellows. A curse which comes alive when heir to Deadmarsh turns 11 was the basic plot putting into play the theme of good vs evil, a mist which seems alive and blankets the moors leading right up to a dank and shadowy Deadmarsh, and a cat named Kip who has a major role to play. Melika's writing made me feel as if she was leading me down some shadowy lanes, where I knew danger resided, but I still couldn't help but follow helplessly. Her immense talent in writing the different characters and connecting each one to the plot was nothing short of amazing. The plot had its own twists, and yet it niggled me. At 674 pages, it was a long read for me and took me months to complete; the prose was descriptive and made for a slow read, but I have to agree it did create an aura of horror. And the characters were aplenty, and that felt too confusing. I don't like books which make me concentrate too much. Overall, the book was meant to be enjoyed in its totality for descriptions, atmosphere, and a timeless feel of an old long-forgotten dark tale. Recommended for readers who enjoy immersing themselves into the entire feel of the book.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Heena Rathore Pardeshi

    When I first came across Deadmarsh Fey by Melika Dannese Lux, I was quickly convinced to read this title because it seemed very interesting but unfortunately, it turned out to be insanely lengthy and full of exhaustive exposition. There are a lot of details and an insane amount of wandering. It took me 3 days to complete the first 1% of the book and somehow I managed to plough on till 5%, not wanting to give up on the book, but it was for nought because same old exposition continued (even more s When I first came across Deadmarsh Fey by Melika Dannese Lux, I was quickly convinced to read this title because it seemed very interesting but unfortunately, it turned out to be insanely lengthy and full of exhaustive exposition. There are a lot of details and an insane amount of wandering. It took me 3 days to complete the first 1% of the book and somehow I managed to plough on till 5%, not wanting to give up on the book, but it was for nought because same old exposition continued (even more so than before.) The story idea seemed good, but it was thwarted by the descriptions and the wanderings, then same two elements that put down the characterization as well. Overall, it wasn't for me.  You can also read this review on ww.thereadingbud.com

  10. 4 out of 5

    Carrie

    Really exciting read I didn't know if I was going to like this, but I found it through r/fantasy, and gave it a chance. I stayed up till one in the morning to finish it, it was that good. Despite the main character being 10, it is an emotional ride, and I found myself attached to the characters. I can't wait for the next one! Really exciting read I didn't know if I was going to like this, but I found it through r/fantasy, and gave it a chance. I stayed up till one in the morning to finish it, it was that good. Despite the main character being 10, it is an emotional ride, and I found myself attached to the characters. I can't wait for the next one!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Katie Tucker

    An ambitious and exciting beginning to a series. Full of twists and turns; I genuinely never knew what was going to happen next. If you love fantasy, the supernatural, faeries, demons, dragons, and big creepy houses, this book is for you. It's hard to come by fantasy books these days that truly feel inventive, but this book certainly is. An ambitious and exciting beginning to a series. Full of twists and turns; I genuinely never knew what was going to happen next. If you love fantasy, the supernatural, faeries, demons, dragons, and big creepy houses, this book is for you. It's hard to come by fantasy books these days that truly feel inventive, but this book certainly is.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Ash Fitzsimmons

    Deadmarsh Fey is a relatively long novel, but don't let that put you off--it's a strong entry into a new series. The story opens almost as a gothic horror tale, which quickly veers into dark fantasy. Melika Lux's cosmology is unique, her characters are memorable, and her ability to maintain a slow build is commendable. Looking forward to the next installment! Deadmarsh Fey is a relatively long novel, but don't let that put you off--it's a strong entry into a new series. The story opens almost as a gothic horror tale, which quickly veers into dark fantasy. Melika Lux's cosmology is unique, her characters are memorable, and her ability to maintain a slow build is commendable. Looking forward to the next installment!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Finley

    Deadmarsh Fey was an exciting adventure from the first page to the last. It tells the story of the cursed Deadmarsh family, as the youngest generation fights to save themselves and the world from the evil creatures who strive to join this world with their own. Upon returning to his family’s ancestral home for the summer, Roger Knightly finds his world turned upside down. The whole staff of Deadmarsh has been dismissed, save for his cousin, Travers, who is being courted by the mysterious Master C Deadmarsh Fey was an exciting adventure from the first page to the last. It tells the story of the cursed Deadmarsh family, as the youngest generation fights to save themselves and the world from the evil creatures who strive to join this world with their own. Upon returning to his family’s ancestral home for the summer, Roger Knightly finds his world turned upside down. The whole staff of Deadmarsh has been dismissed, save for his cousin, Travers, who is being courted by the mysterious Master Coffyn. Meanwhile, his cousin and best friend, Lockie, has become a shell of himself, fearful of his new schoolmaster, though he refuses to tell Roger why, or even to talk with him more than is necessary. Forced to investigate the shadowy presence that has fallen over his former favorite place, Roger becomes entrenched in a supernatural war that threatens the lives of him, his cousins, and the world as a whole. He must carefully choose who is friend and who is foe, as each wrong step may unleash a demonic presence beyond his cruelest nightmares. I loved this book so much. It had a unique and exciting storyline, mixing classic English mythology with original stories, and setting it all as a backdrop for an exciting story of fantasy and horror. It is a very long book with long chapters, so there were times that individual parts dragged a bit, especially when giving historical backgrounds to the Deadmarsh family and the being from Everla’ria. However, the story really drew me in, and kept me coming back each day, excited to see what would happen next. The characters were all very interesting and have realistic motivation, and it was difficult to tell who was good or who was evil until the moment Roger discovered their motivations himself. And even after the sides had been set, and the battle was coming to its climax, the story had plenty of twists and turns to keep you at the edge of your seat until the final page. I enjoyed reading this book so much, and I will be looking for physical copies of this book and the rest of the series the next time I am at the book store.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Crystal Mayfield

    Deadmarsh Fey...it's a book that by the end I was cheering on the good guys. The second half of the book is what drew me in finally. It had me wanting to hurry and turn the pages and read faster and faster. This book brings a whole new meaning to family ties that bind. The first third of the book almost had me shutting it and not ever opening again. However, I kept on and glad I did. The story finally got more interesting in the last two-thirds of the book. Of course, every book starts off a lit Deadmarsh Fey...it's a book that by the end I was cheering on the good guys. The second half of the book is what drew me in finally. It had me wanting to hurry and turn the pages and read faster and faster. This book brings a whole new meaning to family ties that bind. The first third of the book almost had me shutting it and not ever opening again. However, I kept on and glad I did. The story finally got more interesting in the last two-thirds of the book. Of course, every book starts off a little weak having to explain characters and setting the scene. The story finally got up the pace and excelled greatly. Deadmarsh Fey is about a family that is cursed but finding if they work together anything is possible. The Deadmarsh Fey crawl all around the stories edges. You think you know what the Fey is, but in Deadmarsh they may be a completely different thing!!! I am so looking forward to reading the second book of this series. This ebook was given to me for review but Netgalley.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Aly

    I think this book has some good idea in it.  But for me this book was very long and it didn't grab me like I wanted.  I love the cover and that grabbed me and I wanted so much for this book to be as good or better than the cover.  I can say, for me it wasn't better.  It was a slow book, which made me not want to keep reading it.  I enjoyed the writing and how different the book was from others I've read but I am still not sure I will read book 2.  I guess time will tell. *This book was given to I think this book has some good idea in it.  But for me this book was very long and it didn't grab me like I wanted.  I love the cover and that grabbed me and I wanted so much for this book to be as good or better than the cover.  I can say, for me it wasn't better.  It was a slow book, which made me not want to keep reading it.  I enjoyed the writing and how different the book was from others I've read but I am still not sure I will read book 2.  I guess time will tell. *This book was given to me for free at my request from NetGalley and I provided this voluntary review.*

  16. 4 out of 5

    John

    Another fantastic book by Melika Dannese Lux. I am definitely a huge fan of hers and she doesn't disappoint with Deadmarsh Fey. The best part of this? There will be other books to follow so we get to get deeper into the characters as the series progresses. A must read for horror/fantasy fans everywhere! Another fantastic book by Melika Dannese Lux. I am definitely a huge fan of hers and she doesn't disappoint with Deadmarsh Fey. The best part of this? There will be other books to follow so we get to get deeper into the characters as the series progresses. A must read for horror/fantasy fans everywhere!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Doris Wiggins

    Roger can't wait to get to Deadmarsh. There he will see his cousins. They always have so much fun together. When he gets there, he see things have changed. Travers is wearing an overly fancy dress and a strange moonstone necklace. She seems frightened and not the fun loving girl she usually is. When his other cousin finally arrives from school, he is cold and distant. He also has a strange companion with him, Master Coffyn. He seems to think he is the master of Deadmarsh. Roger finally discovers Roger can't wait to get to Deadmarsh. There he will see his cousins. They always have so much fun together. When he gets there, he see things have changed. Travers is wearing an overly fancy dress and a strange moonstone necklace. She seems frightened and not the fun loving girl she usually is. When his other cousin finally arrives from school, he is cold and distant. He also has a strange companion with him, Master Coffyn. He seems to think he is the master of Deadmarsh. Roger finally discovers that if he doesn't save his cousin before his birthday, the family will be destroyed. This was an interesting and imaginative story. It keeps your attention and entertains you. I enjoyed reading it and would recommend it to any fantasy readers out there.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Debbie

    Thank you Goodreads for the giveaway.I really loved this book of dark fantasy and the story of Desmond and the dragon and the adventures he had to go through. Creatures that don't exist outside of fairy stories. Thank you Goodreads for the giveaway.I really loved this book of dark fantasy and the story of Desmond and the dragon and the adventures he had to go through. Creatures that don't exist outside of fairy stories.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Desiree reilly

    THANK YOU FOR LETTING READ THE BOOK. I DO THIS BECAUSE I RECEIVED THE BOOK TO DO A REVIEW, A FAMILY WHO IS FE AND ONE PERSON WHO DOES THE TRAVEL IS ROGER AND THEN THE LAST TIME I TRAVEL IT ALL MOST KILLED ME,NOW HE COMING UP TO THE DEAD MATCH AND ROGER THINK IT CATCHY NAME THERE IS MURDERED S AND THEN WHEN ROGER IS IN TURMOIL AND HE THINKS HE CAME FROM CONQUER AND BEFORE RED ROSE OF LANCASTER.AND BEFORE THE WHITE ROSE OF YORK. YOU SEE ROGER IS BETWEEN THE DEVIL AND LIVING AND DEAD NOW HIS COUSIN I THANK YOU FOR LETTING READ THE BOOK. I DO THIS BECAUSE I RECEIVED THE BOOK TO DO A REVIEW, A FAMILY WHO IS FE AND ONE PERSON WHO DOES THE TRAVEL IS ROGER AND THEN THE LAST TIME I TRAVEL IT ALL MOST KILLED ME,NOW HE COMING UP TO THE DEAD MATCH AND ROGER THINK IT CATCHY NAME THERE IS MURDERED S AND THEN WHEN ROGER IS IN TURMOIL AND HE THINKS HE CAME FROM CONQUER AND BEFORE RED ROSE OF LANCASTER.AND BEFORE THE WHITE ROSE OF YORK. YOU SEE ROGER IS BETWEEN THE DEVIL AND LIVING AND DEAD NOW HIS COUSIN IS IN THE LEAGUE OF THE DEVIL NOW A ANOTHER GROUP CALLED THE ROTTERS WAS CALLED LORD ROTSBY AND NOW THE PROPRIETY THEY SAY THEY OWN IS BIGGER THAN AND MORE WEALTH OF MONACO THEN THERE WERE INCEST IN FAMILY DURING THE TIMES AND THEY KEEP UP THE TRACT AND THEN THEY HAVE GIVEN THE SURNAME OF THE WOMEN BUT WHAT ROGER WANT TO DO IS MARRY SOME ONE WHO IS RESPECTABLE AND WILL DO FOR HIM. THE BOOK TAKE YOU IN TO THE FE LIVING AND DEAD AND THEN WILL SURPRISE YOU IT LITTLE SCARY BOOK BUT I COULD NOT PUT IT DOWN AND GOT IT DONE QUICK THANK YOU AGAIN I HAVE TO DO THIS IN CAP MY EYES ARE HAVING PROBLEM

  20. 4 out of 5

    Ramona Plant

    Deadmarsh Fey is an interesting book written by Melika Dannese Lux. First of, I admit this book overall was very well written. You can tell the author knows how to write, however she does tend to get a little lengthy. This book is extremely complicated and I had a very difficult time understanding the who is who for most of the book. This is especially difficult since the author weaves a tight web of secrets throughout the entire story and only very slowly reveals them. The book is very long I f Deadmarsh Fey is an interesting book written by Melika Dannese Lux. First of, I admit this book overall was very well written. You can tell the author knows how to write, however she does tend to get a little lengthy. This book is extremely complicated and I had a very difficult time understanding the who is who for most of the book. This is especially difficult since the author weaves a tight web of secrets throughout the entire story and only very slowly reveals them. The book is very long I found and unfortunately the pace if it is rather slow which made it difficult for me to get into it and through it, which is sad since I really enjoyed the concept of the book and really think the author has a great book here, if she can make it more captivating. Probably around three quarters into it the pace picks up and a lot is revealed, which is when I finally had the "aha" moment and really appreciated the book for what it is, but since this book is so long, I am not sure how many will make it there, which is a shame. Roger is a real likable character and you really get to know him well. Thanks to the length of the book the author has the opportunity to do a lot of character development and Roger in my eyes is my favorite. He is the kind of friend everyone should have, who will stop at nothing to save his friends. I am also very partial to Traverse and think she is an excellent character in this book! Kip is also one of my favorite although he can be a bit difficult, but I think that is part of his charm. So this book for me is difficult to evaluate. The downsides of it were that it was VERY long and slow which made it difficult to read and keep reading. On the upside however what kept me reading was the uniqueness of the subject matter as well as how well it was overall written. This book is definitely interesting but you better be in for the long haul. I have received this book from the author for an honest review. (LoP, Lovers of Paranormal)

  21. 4 out of 5

    Translator Monkey

    This was a book full of brilliant ideas and slices of perfection when it comes to old-dark-house creepiness abounding. All of the ingredients for an outstanding book are there, but much like the ingredients to a magnificent meal, in the wrong hands they can turn out bland. I've seen a lot of really excellent reviews of this book, and wish I could have had the same experience. What did I like? The feeling of urgency that the book demanded, as well as the unexpected behind every corner of every page This was a book full of brilliant ideas and slices of perfection when it comes to old-dark-house creepiness abounding. All of the ingredients for an outstanding book are there, but much like the ingredients to a magnificent meal, in the wrong hands they can turn out bland. I've seen a lot of really excellent reviews of this book, and wish I could have had the same experience. What did I like? The feeling of urgency that the book demanded, as well as the unexpected behind every corner of every page. The creeping sense of unease was palpable. The author's ability to paint a haunting picture of the characters and their surroundings was superb. What didn't I like? The dialogue was all wrong for the ages of the characters. Picture young children trying hard to sound very mid-19th century adult. It was jarring at best, repulsive at worst. The book is worth picking up and flipping through. Many people have had a far different reaction than I have; sometimes the plot makes up for something so seemingly inconsequential. But for me, that wasn't the case. Three stars.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Myreadbooks

    I would like to thank CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform and Netgalley for this partnership. I was immediately attracted by the blanket and we see a boy with a ghost behind him and in the distance a woman in a glass prison. We learn from the beginning that the name Deadmarsh is scary except to Roger who fears nothing and no one. When he returned to DeadMarsh he found that everything had to be changed: the grounds were no longer maintained, the servants were no longer there, the cat had g I would like to thank CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform and Netgalley for this partnership. I was immediately attracted by the blanket and we see a boy with a ghost behind him and in the distance a woman in a glass prison. We learn from the beginning that the name Deadmarsh is scary except to Roger who fears nothing and no one. When he returned to DeadMarsh he found that everything had to be changed: the grounds were no longer maintained, the servants were no longer there, the cat had grown up but as no cat had ever been. He's going to learn a lot about supernatural creatures. A book read several times because I found it a little long but I immediately hooked on the story so captivating and full of suspense and twists and turns as well as the characters. Looking forward to reading on.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jo

    This is a long book.  And sadly, that was apparent when reading it - not in a good way. I appreciate what the author was trying to achieve with this gothic feeling novel.  However, I found the pacing to be a little ponderous and the plot to be overly complicated.  That latter issue might not have been such a problem, had the narrative voice been more focused, but it wasn't.  I found it unduly wordy and meandering. Unfortunately, all these combined meant that, although I finished the book (and I di This is a long book.  And sadly, that was apparent when reading it - not in a good way. I appreciate what the author was trying to achieve with this gothic feeling novel.  However, I found the pacing to be a little ponderous and the plot to be overly complicated.  That latter issue might not have been such a problem, had the narrative voice been more focused, but it wasn't.  I found it unduly wordy and meandering. Unfortunately, all these combined meant that, although I finished the book (and I did have to make myself pick it back up on more than one occasion), this was, unfortunately, more due to stubbornness, than enjoyment of the book. I voluntarily reviewed an advanced reader copy of this book.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Raven

    This is a very long and drawn out book. Much too wordy and definitely no need for it. You don't need to throw in a bunch of adjectives to create an atmosphere. The story should have been enough to back that up but unfortunately, it wasn't. Very disappointing. This is a very long and drawn out book. Much too wordy and definitely no need for it. You don't need to throw in a bunch of adjectives to create an atmosphere. The story should have been enough to back that up but unfortunately, it wasn't. Very disappointing.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kris

    TBC

  26. 4 out of 5

    Tena

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jackie Lantern

  28. 5 out of 5

    Allyson G

  29. 5 out of 5

    Eric

  30. 5 out of 5

    Krissie

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