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The Sentence Is Death

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"You shouldn’t be here. It’s too late…" These, heard over the phone, were the last recorded words of successful celebrity-divorce lawyer. Richard Pryce, found bludgeoned to death in his bachelor pad with a bottle of wine – a 1982 Chateau Lafite worth £3,000, to be precise.Odd, considering he didn’t drink. Why this bottle? And why those words? And why was a three-digit numbe "You shouldn’t be here. It’s too late…" These, heard over the phone, were the last recorded words of successful celebrity-divorce lawyer. Richard Pryce, found bludgeoned to death in his bachelor pad with a bottle of wine – a 1982 Chateau Lafite worth £3,000, to be precise.Odd, considering he didn’t drink. Why this bottle? And why those words? And why was a three-digit number painted on the wall by the killer? And, most importantly, which of the man’s many, many enemies did the deed?Baffled, the police are forced to bring in Private Investigator Daniel Hawthorne >and his sidekick, the author Anthony, who’s really getting rather good at this murder investigation business.But as Hawthorne takes on the case with characteristic relish, it becomes clear that he, too, has secrets to hide. As our reluctant narrator becomes ever more embroiled in the case, he realises that these secrets must be exposed – even at the risk of death…


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"You shouldn’t be here. It’s too late…" These, heard over the phone, were the last recorded words of successful celebrity-divorce lawyer. Richard Pryce, found bludgeoned to death in his bachelor pad with a bottle of wine – a 1982 Chateau Lafite worth £3,000, to be precise.Odd, considering he didn’t drink. Why this bottle? And why those words? And why was a three-digit numbe "You shouldn’t be here. It’s too late…" These, heard over the phone, were the last recorded words of successful celebrity-divorce lawyer. Richard Pryce, found bludgeoned to death in his bachelor pad with a bottle of wine – a 1982 Chateau Lafite worth £3,000, to be precise.Odd, considering he didn’t drink. Why this bottle? And why those words? And why was a three-digit number painted on the wall by the killer? And, most importantly, which of the man’s many, many enemies did the deed?Baffled, the police are forced to bring in Private Investigator Daniel Hawthorne >and his sidekick, the author Anthony, who’s really getting rather good at this murder investigation business.But as Hawthorne takes on the case with characteristic relish, it becomes clear that he, too, has secrets to hide. As our reluctant narrator becomes ever more embroiled in the case, he realises that these secrets must be exposed – even at the risk of death…

30 review for The Sentence Is Death

  1. 4 out of 5

    Yun

    Our favorite author who writes himself into murder mysteries is back! In this installment, famous celebrity-divorce lawyer Richard Pryce is found murdered in his home, beaten and stabbed with a bottle of expensive wine. The killer leaves a clue: a three-digit number painted on the wall next to his dead body. The police is baffled, so they bring in private investigator Daniel Hawthorne, who then brings in his scribe, writer Anthony Horowitz. This whodunit is so much fun. There is a small number of Our favorite author who writes himself into murder mysteries is back! In this installment, famous celebrity-divorce lawyer Richard Pryce is found murdered in his home, beaten and stabbed with a bottle of expensive wine. The killer leaves a clue: a three-digit number painted on the wall next to his dead body. The police is baffled, so they bring in private investigator Daniel Hawthorne, who then brings in his scribe, writer Anthony Horowitz. This whodunit is so much fun. There is a small number of interesting suspects, plenty of clues everywhere (but which ones are the important ones?), and lots of red herrings. It was delightful to go on the journey with the detective and the writer as they uncover secrets and sort through clues, trying to fit each piece into the puzzle. I've read a few mysteries by Horowitz now, and he hasn't disappointed yet. His style hearkens back to the Golden Age of mystery, where the murders can be solved by paying attention to the clues instead of cheap thrills or crazy characters. As is standard for this series, Horowitz writes himself into the book by being the scribe for the detective. I found it to be a little odd in the first book, and I'm still getting used to it in this one. Horowitz definitely isn't afraid to poke fun at himself, so his character verges on the annoying. He keeps jumping in with comments that give away crucial information. He becomes obsessed with solving the case before the detective does. He bungles around a lot. Honestly, I wouldn't mind if the character was toned down just a bit. Aside from that little nitpick, I'm really enjoying the series. This whodunit turned out to be super entertaining and engrossing, and I can't wait to read more. ~~~~~~~~~~~~ See also, my thoughts on: #1. The Word Is Murder #3. A Line To Kill Magpie Murders Moonflower Murders ~~~~~~~~~~~~

  2. 4 out of 5

    Annet

    Yeah, great read! This author, I like him. Not per definition a crime reader I am, but from Magpie Murders I'm kinda hooked on Horowitz. Utterly entertaining. Witty, clever, easy read & 'whodunnit', though I did not see it all coming... 4.3 maybe more. Loved it. Let #3 on private investigator Hawthorne aka Holmes and his assistant 'Watson' come soon. This series is recommended! Smooth-tongued divorce lawyer Richard Price is bludgeoned to death in his London home. What happened, who did it, and wh Yeah, great read! This author, I like him. Not per definition a crime reader I am, but from Magpie Murders I'm kinda hooked on Horowitz. Utterly entertaining. Witty, clever, easy read & 'whodunnit', though I did not see it all coming... 4.3 maybe more. Loved it. Let #3 on private investigator Hawthorne aka Holmes and his assistant 'Watson' come soon. This series is recommended! Smooth-tongued divorce lawyer Richard Price is bludgeoned to death in his London home. What happened, who did it, and who was at his front door just minutes before he died while talking on the phone? The police are forced to turn to disgraced private investigator Daniel Hawthorne. As the death toll rises, Hawthorne confronts a tangle of secrets while at the same time doing everything he can to conceal his own past....

  3. 5 out of 5

    BernLuvsBooks

    Horowitz and Hawthorne are perfection together! I can't get enough of this series. I love how the author has put himself into the story as the narrator - the Watson to Hawthorne's Holmes or as I like to think of them, the Felix Unger to his Oscar Madison. Horowitz comes off as honest, sympathetic, earnest and willing to poke fun at himself. Hawthorne is decidedly uncharming, brash, politically incorrect and I kinda have a soft spot for him. There is definitely a back story there and I am here fo Horowitz and Hawthorne are perfection together! I can't get enough of this series. I love how the author has put himself into the story as the narrator - the Watson to Hawthorne's Holmes or as I like to think of them, the Felix Unger to his Oscar Madison. Horowitz comes off as honest, sympathetic, earnest and willing to poke fun at himself. Hawthorne is decidedly uncharming, brash, politically incorrect and I kinda have a soft spot for him. There is definitely a back story there and I am here for it! I'm looking forward to peeling back all those grumpy, secretive layers. I see you Hawthorne and there is definitely more than meets the eye! In The Sentence is Death Hawthorne has once again been called in by the police to help investigate the murder of a high profile divorce attorney. He quickly recognizes this will be a perfect opportunity for Tony/Horowitz to write book #2. Although I did figure out the whodunnit early on I enjoyed the story immensely and how it tied so many people, places and things together. It definitely made me doubt myself a few times but in the end, I proved better at solving the crime than poor Tony - he never does seem to get it right. Thank goodness the police have Hawthorne! He may not be an active police officer but he sure keeps them from completely bumbling up all their high profile cases. Bring on case #3 Tony! Thank you to Anthony Horowitz, Harper Collins Publishing and NetGalley for the opportunity to read and review an arc of this book. I can't wait for book #3!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Beata

    My second close encounter with Mr Horowitz was as good as the first one, and I'm already looking forward to another one. An enjoyable novel with a grand mystery and a bottle of a terribly expensive wine in the background. My second close encounter with Mr Horowitz was as good as the first one, and I'm already looking forward to another one. An enjoyable novel with a grand mystery and a bottle of a terribly expensive wine in the background.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jaline

    This is the second in what is (at this point) a trilogy where Anthony Horowitz writes about a private detective named Daniel Hawthorne solving cases. The difference is that Anthony Horowitz is also in the books, and I still haven’t figured out if the stories are real with himself written in, or if they are invented with him imagining himself as a hard-nosed detective’s sidekick. At one point in the book, Hawthorne lectures Anthony about the importance of visualizing the ‘shape’ of a crime – simil This is the second in what is (at this point) a trilogy where Anthony Horowitz writes about a private detective named Daniel Hawthorne solving cases. The difference is that Anthony Horowitz is also in the books, and I still haven’t figured out if the stories are real with himself written in, or if they are invented with him imagining himself as a hard-nosed detective’s sidekick. At one point in the book, Hawthorne lectures Anthony about the importance of visualizing the ‘shape’ of a crime – similar to imagining the ‘shape’ of a novel. All that is then required is to fit the pieces into their rightful spots in the shape, and that’s how you find your killer. Or write your book. The visual I got very strongly in this novel is pyramids: there are several triad groupings of people in this story, and all the pyramids connect together with the victim – a high-profile divorce lawyer who is known for being absolutely ruthless when it comes to discerning the truth and using it to win his cases. Behind the many floating pyramids, waiting for Hawthorne and Anthony to explore them for their little factoid treasures, there looms a larger, ghostly pyramid. Three young college friends who love caving so much that they pursue the hobby into their adult lives, too – until about 8 or 10 years ago. Read it – you will love it!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sumit RK

    The Sentence is Death is the second book in the Private Detective Hawthorne series. If you have not read the first book of the series and have no idea what to expect (like me), this book will totally blow you away. The Sentence is Death is not a police procedural nor is it a thriller. It’s a good old murder mystery, much in the mold of Sherlock & Hercule Poirot, and that’s what makes it so special. The Sentence is Death deals with the murder of celebrity-divorce lawyer Richard Pryce who is b The Sentence is Death is the second book in the Private Detective Hawthorne series. If you have not read the first book of the series and have no idea what to expect (like me), this book will totally blow you away. The Sentence is Death is not a police procedural nor is it a thriller. It’s a good old murder mystery, much in the mold of Sherlock & Hercule Poirot, and that’s what makes it so special. The Sentence is Death deals with the murder of celebrity-divorce lawyer Richard Pryce who is bludgeoned to death with an expensive bottle of wine. Even more bizarre is the three-digit number painted on the wall beside the corpse. Now it’s up to Pvt Investigator Daniel Hawthorne and his compatriot (and the tale’s narrator) Anthony Horowitz to solve the mystery. The author has taken the unusual step of placing himself in the book- playing both the narrator and the Hawthorne’s companion – much like Watson or Hastings. The mystery is much like a Poirot mystery, set in modern times. With a lineup of suspects and each having the means and motivation to commit the crime, guessing the murderer is not easy. Like a kaleidoscope, the picture in front of you keeps changing, the moment you change your point of view. Like a skilled narrator, Horowitz (both the writer and the narrator in the book) keep guiding the readers through the maze of clues while Hawthorne keeps his theories mostly to himself. There are countless twists and turns, which keep the needle of suspicion moving from suspect to another. Just when you think you have figured out the killer, the entire story changes right before your eyes. So even as you want to to find out what happens next, a part of you never wants the story to end. There is plenty of amusing dialogue and humor to keep things light. The final reveal is logical but not too convincing to say the least. Coming to the characters, Horowitz comes off as a genuine and endearing character. He acts as a guide to the readers, reminding the readers of long-forgotten clues and even coming up with his own solution (read the book to know more about it). Hawthorne is, on the other hand, is reserved, rude, politically incorrect and not much of nice guy at all. But much like Sherlock, you start to admire his intelligence as the story goes on. As an investigation duo, Hawthorne and Horowitz really complement each other. Overall, The Sentence is Death is an engaging and entertaining murder mystery. With an excellent plot, some brilliant characters and many surprises, this book is a perfectly crafted mystery. 4.5/5 Many thanks to the publishers HarperCollins, the author Anthony Horowitz and Edelweiss for the ARC. v

  7. 4 out of 5

    Holly B

    Audio Edition/ Library loan Narrated by: Rory Kinnear Series:  A Hawthorne and Horowitz Mystery, Book 2 Length: 8 hrs and 36 mins This is #2 in the series. This one uses the same meta-fiction technique as his novel The Magpie Murders and the first in this series The Word is Murder. It is a unique narrative technique and it works with these novels. We have Hawthorne and Horowitz teaming again to solve the murder of Richard Pryce, an esteemed divorce attorney. Someone has whack Audio Edition/ Library loan Narrated by: Rory Kinnear Series:  A Hawthorne and Horowitz Mystery, Book 2 Length: 8 hrs and 36 mins This is #2 in the series. This one uses the same meta-fiction technique as his novel The Magpie Murders and the first in this series The Word is Murder. It is a unique narrative technique and it works with these novels. We have Hawthorne and Horowitz teaming again to solve the murder of Richard Pryce, an esteemed divorce attorney. Someone has whacked him in the head with a $2,000.00 bottle of wine. I'm not sure if he had a chance to sample it, but he lays dead. Hawthorne is sharp, but oh so annoying, he isn't a humble one! These two like to rib each other a bit. A good mystery-- much to unravel, a crying widow, red-herrings, scattered bread crumbs and lingering clues. The narrator was fantastic with his British accent, although he gets rather squeaky and high toned with DI Cara Granshaw's voice (She was a hoot). Recommend if you enjoy British mysteries, detectives, whodunnits with many suspects, Sherlock Holmes style and a tiny bit wacky! Looking forward to the third installment.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Margaret M

    With a murder scene reminiscent of a game of Cluedo, Anthony Horowitz once again writes himself into a story involving a detective / crime duo, with himself as a crime author teaming up with Inspector Daniel Hawthorne as the detective. Your move!!! - Divorce lawyer Richard Pryce has been bludgeoned to death in his study, with the murder weapon, an expensive bottle of wine. Who did it? Lockwood? Anno? Taylor? My move !!! Clue 1 for me, the killer didn’t obviously drink wine or poor Dicky would hav With a murder scene reminiscent of a game of Cluedo, Anthony Horowitz once again writes himself into a story involving a detective / crime duo, with himself as a crime author teaming up with Inspector Daniel Hawthorne as the detective. Your move!!! - Divorce lawyer Richard Pryce has been bludgeoned to death in his study, with the murder weapon, an expensive bottle of wine. Who did it? Lockwood? Anno? Taylor? My move !!! Clue 1 for me, the killer didn’t obviously drink wine or poor Dicky would have been killed with an empty wine bottle!!!. So, the killer had to be young, a non-drinker, or not clued into the price of wine!!! In true Cluedo style, there are several suspects and multiple side stories which may in some part be connected. Here are a few possible theories to help with your move - If Charlie Richardson was murdered at the Long Way Hole, declared a caving accident at the time, then the death of Richard Pryce could be connected. - If the death of Gregory Taylor was ruled murder or suicide, then the death of Richard Pyrce might also be connected. - However, if the deaths of Charles and Gregory were accidents then there’s a whole different shape that could relate to Adrian Lockwood and Akira Anno and their divorce. Interested, I was because the plot was so intricately woven that for a while, I couldn’t work out how it would all tie up in the end. Review and Comments ‘The Sentence is Death’ is how great detective and crime novels should be written, multi-layered, several suspects, motive, and opportunity. Although, the characterisation didn’t work for me unfortunately. I would have preferred if Horowitz had left himself out of the story and the references to his other works, and people complimenting him on how good he is!!!!. However, we have two men who are egotistical, thorough but brilliant with some irritating characteristics which brought an interesting dynamic to the story. I was intrigued to know how it would finish but wasn’t frantically turning the pages to find out. It was a very good everyday crime novel that was difficult to criticise but hard to get overly excited about, and not as compelling as some of Horowitz’s other books. I think the letter Charles sent to his wife in the last chapter of the book actually let the book down a little. It was trying too hard to build surprises / confessions / revelations into the story and it came across overworked and overplayed. What Horowitz did very well though, was tie up all the loose ends and multiple side stories. The three rating means it is a very good book by an accomplished author, but one I didn’t love.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    A successful divorce lawyer gets his head bashed in with a bottle of expensive wine, and Hawthorne & Horowitz are on the job to catch the killer. This was another good layered mystery with this duo. I kind of guessed the killer earlier than the reveal, but it was still very well done. The genius of the story is more in the details he weaves into the plot than in the mystery anyway. Like the disruption of the production of Horowitz's real-life creation Foyle's War, and the inclusion of Hawthorne's A successful divorce lawyer gets his head bashed in with a bottle of expensive wine, and Hawthorne & Horowitz are on the job to catch the killer. This was another good layered mystery with this duo. I kind of guessed the killer earlier than the reveal, but it was still very well done. The genius of the story is more in the details he weaves into the plot than in the mystery anyway. Like the disruption of the production of Horowitz's real-life creation Foyle's War, and the inclusion of Hawthorne's book club reading A Study in Scarlet and having Horwitz as the special guest speaker because he'd written The House of Silk. And we all know how weird book lovers can be when we get together... I absolutely loved the story arc for the snotty author who snubbed Anthony at every turn. I don't want to spoil it for those who haven't read the book, but those sort of people exist in real life no matter who you are, and I giggled at his version of poetic justice in this story. This is just such an overall filling series that I would highly recommend it to anyone who loves mysteries.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Liz

    Oh, how I love this series! For those of you that like audiobooks, it’s great intelligent entertainment. Horowitz blends in tales of filming Foyle’s War and writing the new Sherlock Holmes books in with the fictional murder at hand. Hawthorne and Horowitz are the perfect duo. Horowitz has an amazing way with words. Given that I listened to this, I can’t give exact quotes. But his description of DI Cara Granshaw was amazing in its detail. We still don’t learn much about Hawthorne’s personal life, Oh, how I love this series! For those of you that like audiobooks, it’s great intelligent entertainment. Horowitz blends in tales of filming Foyle’s War and writing the new Sherlock Holmes books in with the fictional murder at hand. Hawthorne and Horowitz are the perfect duo. Horowitz has an amazing way with words. Given that I listened to this, I can’t give exact quotes. But his description of DI Cara Granshaw was amazing in its detail. We still don’t learn much about Hawthorne’s personal life, but that just makes him all the more interesting. He’s one of those folks that would probably irritate the hell out of me in real life, but as a character, I can’t get enough of him! And bravo to Horowitz for being willing to play the foil to Hawthorne’s Holmes. A word of warning...if you listen, like I do, while walking in public areas, be prepared for strange looks as you laugh out loud. The narrator does a great job with getting the moods of the various voices even if his ability to get anywhere close to the timbre of a woman’s voice is nonexistent. I can only hope that Mr. Horowitz intends to keep writing this series for a long, long time.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Lindsay - Traveling Sisters Book Reviews

    3.5 stars. Another clever and unforgettable murder mystery solved by this brilliant duo! Hawthorne, a former detective and Horowitz, an author working on a three book series about Hawthorne are together on another case. I absolutely loved the first book in this series and this was a great addition to the trilogy! I love the snark, sarcasm and comradery between the two main characters working to solve the mystery before the police do. The author brilliantly executes the concept of having himself st 3.5 stars. Another clever and unforgettable murder mystery solved by this brilliant duo! Hawthorne, a former detective and Horowitz, an author working on a three book series about Hawthorne are together on another case. I absolutely loved the first book in this series and this was a great addition to the trilogy! I love the snark, sarcasm and comradery between the two main characters working to solve the mystery before the police do. The author brilliantly executes the concept of having himself star as a main character. I did find this book wasn’t consistently strong, like the first one in the series was. My attention wavered slightly between 50-75% where I wasn’t feeling as invested as usual with this authors writing. I did find myself confused between secondary characters and suspects a few times. Regardless of this, it was a solid, unique and entertaining read that I recommend! Thank you to the publisher for my review copy!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Diane S ☔

    Second in series as good as the first. Though I'll admit I liked the case better in the first, this one was a little different and did keep me guessing. A five thousand dollar of wine as the murder weapon is rather unique, though a waste, in my opinion, of good wine. We find out a little more about Hawthorne and also more about our author, playing the part of a Watson type character. He is still reluctant at the start to involve himself into another Hawthorne type investigation, but he does have Second in series as good as the first. Though I'll admit I liked the case better in the first, this one was a little different and did keep me guessing. A five thousand dollar of wine as the murder weapon is rather unique, though a waste, in my opinion, of good wine. We find out a little more about Hawthorne and also more about our author, playing the part of a Watson type character. He is still reluctant at the start to involve himself into another Hawthorne type investigation, but he does have a deal for two more books so.........He's not faring to well in the safety department though as his life has taken a sharp turn to the dangerous. He is getting a bit better at putting the cases together as in this one he comes pretty close. A wonderful series, I'm really enjoying these and once again the narration by the amazing Kinnear. On to the third.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Phrynne

    Hawthorne is back with his rather abrasive personality and his undoubted skill at finding clues and solving cases. Horowitz features again as himself acting as Hawthorne's sidekick attempting to solve not one but possibly two murders. Having the author actively involved in his own book makes for some interesting reading. Occasionally I sat back and wondered which bits were fact and which fiction, but in the end it really does not matter. The book is totally enjoyable and very easy to read. There Hawthorne is back with his rather abrasive personality and his undoubted skill at finding clues and solving cases. Horowitz features again as himself acting as Hawthorne's sidekick attempting to solve not one but possibly two murders. Having the author actively involved in his own book makes for some interesting reading. Occasionally I sat back and wondered which bits were fact and which fiction, but in the end it really does not matter. The book is totally enjoyable and very easy to read. There is a good story, well paced and interesting. The clues are all provided and although there is a surprise ending I managed to guess the culprit before Horowitz did. Altogether an interesting and entertaining read and I am looking forward to the return of Hawthorne in #3.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Linda

    Keep in mind: One lie can ruin a thousand truths. Anthony Horowitz opens the heavy wrought iron gates on another stellar mystery that feels circa 1930. Anthony becomes a key figure in his own novel as he takes on the role of himself. Horowitz, you see, is the famed writer of Foyle's War, an on-going successful television saga in the UK. He's in the middle of filming a crucial scene on the streets of London when a cab pulls up and spoils the shot. Anthony recognizes the man who has just exited the Keep in mind: One lie can ruin a thousand truths. Anthony Horowitz opens the heavy wrought iron gates on another stellar mystery that feels circa 1930. Anthony becomes a key figure in his own novel as he takes on the role of himself. Horowitz, you see, is the famed writer of Foyle's War, an on-going successful television saga in the UK. He's in the middle of filming a crucial scene on the streets of London when a cab pulls up and spoils the shot. Anthony recognizes the man who has just exited the cab and is running towards him. Let's introduce you to former Detective Inspector Daniel Hawthorne. Hawthorne is now a "for hire" crime expert who works on random cases. He has convinced Anthony to write his biography. That entails riding shotgun with Hawthorne as he attempts to solve a case. Anthony signed on the dotted line with the buzz of crime/murder intrigue dancing staccato in his heart. Later, his common sense caught up with this pending madness. The body of an affluent divorce lawyer has been found in the posh section of Hampstead Heath. A teetotaler by choice, Richard Pryce is found to have been blungeoned with an expensive bottle of wine at the back of his once stately head. The number "182" has been dripping green paint on a wall alongside the staircase. There's no sign of forced entry. Hawthorne and Anthony peruse the crime scene. Hawthorne, typically, is short on words and long on rudeness. DI Cara Grunshaw of the Metro Police is none too happy to see this duo at the scene. Grunshaw will be dogging them throughout the novel.....because she can. The flavor of this one (including The Word Is Murder) has an Agatha Christie vibe to it. Horowitz has an amazing mind for detail. It's all brain power happenin' here. Hawthorne never divulges his thoughts, but Anthony lays out his process of deduction as he stacks the foundation of his case for who's guilty and who's not. We're awed by his reflections as the voice running right alongside of us. As readers, we're involved fully now. Is Anthony right? Maybe not so fast..... The Sentence Is Death is a delightful read filled with the good, the bad, and the indifferent. Horowitz has a way with dialogue that is laugh-out-loud in some skillful scenarios. We'll also be finding out that Hawthorne is shedding a bit of his intricate layers of self-preservation. Something is brewing with this talented crime expert who is tight lipped and laced up like a kettle drum. We'll just have to see what Anthony Horowitz has in mind with the next one, shall we now? I received a copy of this book through NetGalley for an honest review. My thanks to Harper Collins and to Anthony Horowitz for the opportunity.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Carolyn

    In the first book in this series, The Word Is Murder, Horowitz took the unusual step of placing himself in the book as the narrator, melding his real life with this fictional life as a writer engaged to write about PI Daniel Hawthorne's cases. This made for delightful and amusing reading as Horowitz stumbles through the case in the wake of Hawthorne's somewhat more astute detective work. I wasn't sure how well this would work in a second episode but am happy to report that if anything it worked In the first book in this series, The Word Is Murder, Horowitz took the unusual step of placing himself in the book as the narrator, melding his real life with this fictional life as a writer engaged to write about PI Daniel Hawthorne's cases. This made for delightful and amusing reading as Horowitz stumbles through the case in the wake of Hawthorne's somewhat more astute detective work. I wasn't sure how well this would work in a second episode but am happy to report that if anything it worked even better the second time around. The case this time involves a high profile divorce lawyer, Richard Pryce, a teetotaler bashed with an expensive bottle of wine and then stabbed to death with broken glass from the bottle. On the wall above the body the killer painted the number 182 in green paint. At the time Pryce had been involved in a major case involving a celebrity writer, Akira Anno, who immediately becomes their main suspect, as she was recently witnessed pouring a glass of wine over Pryce's head in a popular restaurant and then threatening to hit him with the bottle. Or could that just be what the police are meant to think? Baffled they call in ex-detective, PI Hawthorne and his biographical sidekick Horowitz to investigate. Hawthorne is filling out more as a character in this second outing. Horowitz is still trying to fathom him out and find out more about his secretive past and current life but Hawthorne remains antisocial and unforthcoming. His investigative style reminds me a little of the 1970s TV detective Columbo - a bumbling, grumpy sort of character, giving little away but thinking deeply and two steps ahead of everyone else, particularly Horowitz who frequently upsets Hawthorne by putting his foot in at the wrong time in Hawthorne's interviews. As before Horowitz weaves into the story his real life activities, writing episodes for 'Foyle's War' with Hawthorne blustering onto the set with little regard for the film crew. Horowitz also loves to poke fun at himself, depicting himself as hopeless at detective work. What results is a clever, gentle murder mystery reminiscent of the golden age of crime writing. As Horowitz has been contracted (fictionally) to write three books covering Hawthorne's cases, I look forward with eager anticipation to the next episode. 4.5★ With thanks to Netgalley and Random House for a digital ARC to read.

  16. 5 out of 5

    PorshaJo

    I think this statement pretty much sums it up.... I love Anthony Horowitz. Ever since I read Magpie Murders I was hooked. I enjoyed Hawthorne #1 and couldn't wait to get this one. Gist of the book, Daniel Hawthorne and his sidekick, the author Anthony, are at it again. Anthony is writing and involved in his 'movie/tv' life of writing. There is a murder and Hawthorne is picked to solve this crime as only he can. Many characters fleet in and out of this one. DI Cara Grunshaw, the nemesis to both w I think this statement pretty much sums it up.... I love Anthony Horowitz. Ever since I read Magpie Murders I was hooked. I enjoyed Hawthorne #1 and couldn't wait to get this one. Gist of the book, Daniel Hawthorne and his sidekick, the author Anthony, are at it again. Anthony is writing and involved in his 'movie/tv' life of writing. There is a murder and Hawthorne is picked to solve this crime as only he can. Many characters fleet in and out of this one. DI Cara Grunshaw, the nemesis to both was hysterical. Anthony and Hawthorne "work" together to solve the crime with Anthony eventually writing a book about it, and shall we say bumbling his way through the investigation. And the fun begins. I love these two and how they are like oil and water. As soon as it started, you are immediately dumped in the world of these two. I listened to this one via audio as I adore the narration of these books. I had to knock it a bit (hence 4 stars) as I liked the first book better. I wanted to hear more about Hawthorne. Why is his neighbor helping him? I felt you started to get a glimpse more into him but just not enough. It also had a similar "outline" like the first book. But hey, this was a fun, engaging read and I can't WAIT for Hawthorne #3. I'll be patiently waiting for the audio. A must for any Anthony Horowitz fan, fan of Magpie Murders, or who just want to be entertained for a few hours.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

    3.5 stars In this 2nd book in the 'DI Daniel Hawthorne' mystery series, the consulting detective investigates the murder of a lawyer. The book can be read as a standalone. ***** Daniel Hawthorne was a Scotland Yard Detective Inspector until he was fired for pushing a child molester down the stairs. Still, the Yard sometimes asks Hawthorne - who's essentially a modern day Sherlock Holmes - to consult on tough cases. Hawthorne's Watson-like sidekick and chronicler is Anthony Horowitz, a real-life aut 3.5 stars In this 2nd book in the 'DI Daniel Hawthorne' mystery series, the consulting detective investigates the murder of a lawyer. The book can be read as a standalone. ***** Daniel Hawthorne was a Scotland Yard Detective Inspector until he was fired for pushing a child molester down the stairs. Still, the Yard sometimes asks Hawthorne - who's essentially a modern day Sherlock Holmes - to consult on tough cases. Hawthorne's Watson-like sidekick and chronicler is Anthony Horowitz, a real-life author who writes the television series Foyle's War among other things. Anthony Horowitz Hawthorne is asked to help solve the murder of divorce lawyer Anthony Pryce, who was bashed on the head with a wine bottle, then stabbed in the neck with the broken top. At the time of his death, Pryce was about to finalize the divorce of his wealthy client Adrian Lockwood - for whom Pryce had secured a very advantageous divorce settlement. Lockwood's wife Akira Anno - an artsy literary writer and poet - felt cheated, and confronted Pryce in a restaurant. Anno shouted at Pryce, upended a bottle of wine over his head, and threatened his life. This makes Anno the prime suspect in the attorney's murder. Hawthorne rounds up his wingman Horowitz, and the duo accompany Detective Inspector Cara Grunshaw to interview Anno, who seems to have an alibi. Hawthorne then considers other people in Pryce's orbit, including the lawyer's husband and a woman named Davina Richardson, whom Pryce has been helping financially for years. It turns out that Pryce and two college buddies, Gregory Taylor and Charlie Richardson, were wont to go caving every year. When the three men were exploring Long Way Hole ten years ago, a sudden storm flooded the caves, and Charlie - who had fallen behind - drowned. Pryce and Richardson felt guilty about the incident, and Pryce stepped up with money for Charlie's wife and son. Hawthorne and Horowitz also discover that dead attorney Pryce, who did things 'by the book', had hired forensic accountants to make sure the Lockwood-Anno financial settlement was completely kosher. This widens the suspect pool and brings surprising things to light. An additional death muddies the investigative waters, and Hawthorne and Horowitz travel around England to question people and make inquiries. As always, Horowitz is expected to pony up for travel expenses, food, witness payoffs, and other incidentals. The criminal investigations in this series are always accompanied by snippets about the Hawthorne-Horowitz relationship. Hawthorne is extremely secretive about himself, and Horowitz wants to know more - for his book about the case. This leads to a kind of 'cat and mouse game' that's very amusing. Horowitz even agrees to attend a meeting of Hawthorne's book club, where he might hear scuttlebutt about the detective. Horowitz has an additional problem. DI Grunsaw - who's determined to solve the case herself - threatens the writer, and demands that he keep her informed about Hawthorne's investigation. Hawthorne is so tight-lipped, however, that Horowitz can't tell her much. This leads to trouble for Horowitz, who's framed for a minor crime AND loses permits to film Foyle's War in London. While he's recounting the case, the author takes the opportunity to throw a little shade at literary writers who disdain 'commercial fiction' (like his) and give us a peek at the complexities of producing/filming a TV show, which is quite interesting. Behind the scenes at Foyle's War I'm a fan of Sherlock Holmes and I enjoyed this this homage to the iconic sleuth. I'd recommend the book to mystery fans. You can follow my reviews at https://reviewsbybarbsaffer.blogspot....

  18. 5 out of 5

    JanB

    What a terrific whodunit! This series is a homage to the Golden Age of mystery writers, although with a modern bent, and I loved every minute of it. It’s very clever how the author inserts himself into the story as the narrator, adds in tidbits from his real life, and pokes a little fun at himself, which makes this a fun, unique read. Tony is an author hired to write a series of books about Daniel Hawthorne, a disgraced former police detective turned PI, and accompanies him as he works his cases What a terrific whodunit! This series is a homage to the Golden Age of mystery writers, although with a modern bent, and I loved every minute of it. It’s very clever how the author inserts himself into the story as the narrator, adds in tidbits from his real life, and pokes a little fun at himself, which makes this a fun, unique read. Tony is an author hired to write a series of books about Daniel Hawthorne, a disgraced former police detective turned PI, and accompanies him as he works his cases. Hawthorne is short on charm, but is a brilliant observer of things most people miss, a Columbo-type character. He’s an enigma with an air of mystery surrounding him and is as determined to keep his private life a secret as much as Tony is determined to unearth those secrets. The mystery in this story follows the formula of a victim with a full cast of suspects, all of whom have secrets and powerful motives for murder. Tony plays Watson to Hawthorne’s Sherlock and bumbles along determined to outwit Hawthorne and solve the case himself. There’s plenty of amusing dialogue and wry observations to keep things light. This is pure fun and I can’t wait for book #3! This one can stand on its own but I highly recommend the first book, The Word Is Murder • Many thanks to Edelweiss for a copy of the book in exchange for an honest review • This was a buddy read with Marialyce and a series we both wholeheartedly recommend. For our reviews on this book, and others, please visit https://yayareadslotsofbooks.wordpres...

  19. 5 out of 5

    Gary

    This is the 2nd novel in the Daniel Hawthorne, Private Investigator series by Anthony Horowitz. I have not read the 1st book 'The Word is Murder' nor in fact any other books by this author but quickly realised once I started this novel that times were going to change. I was so impressed and enjoyed reading this book that I had already purchased a couple of the authors other books before finishing it. For me the book had a feel of an older style of detective novel, maybe an Agatha Christie or more This is the 2nd novel in the Daniel Hawthorne, Private Investigator series by Anthony Horowitz. I have not read the 1st book 'The Word is Murder' nor in fact any other books by this author but quickly realised once I started this novel that times were going to change. I was so impressed and enjoyed reading this book that I had already purchased a couple of the authors other books before finishing it. For me the book had a feel of an older style of detective novel, maybe an Agatha Christie or more likely Arthur Conan Doyle. Witty, well plotted and some excellent characters. I found the book a light read but intriguing and very enjoyable. The setting of the novel is a little bit unusual with the author being one of the main characters. In the novel Anthony Horowitz is invited to write about the retired detective Daniel Hawthorne who still helps the Police solve difficult cases. Anthony tags along Hawthorne in much the same way that Hastings followed Poirot or Watson, Holmes, aiding and abetting along the way. The plot in this novel surrounds a divorce lawyer who has been murdered using an expensive bottle of wine and Hawthorne is invited in to assist. This is an intriguing read that is a refreshing change from some of the darker novels I also enjoy. I would like to thank Net Galley and Random House for supplying a copy of this novel in exchange for an honest review.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Fran

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. The rehearsal was stressful. While attempting to shoot a scene of London Street circa 1947 for an episode of Foyle's War, there were weather issues and the police would not allow filming before 10 AM. Adding to film writer Anthony Horowitz's woes, Detective Inspector Daniel Hawthorne drove on set, music blasting. Hawthorne told Anthony that high profile divorce lawyer Richard Pryce had been murdered. "I though you would want to write about it." Having made a three-book-deal to write about Hawtho The rehearsal was stressful. While attempting to shoot a scene of London Street circa 1947 for an episode of Foyle's War, there were weather issues and the police would not allow filming before 10 AM. Adding to film writer Anthony Horowitz's woes, Detective Inspector Daniel Hawthorne drove on set, music blasting. Hawthorne told Anthony that high profile divorce lawyer Richard Pryce had been murdered. "I though you would want to write about it." Having made a three-book-deal to write about Hawthorne's cases, Horowitz had no choice but to work with this ex-copper who "swore all the time...smoked and called me [him] Tony." Ex-detective Hawthorne was hired by the Metropolitan Police to assist with this difficult case much to the dismay of Detective Cara Grunshaw, a scowling, hostile, and unpleasant woman. She wanted all the accolades despite the input of others. Anthony Horowitz, the author, inserts himself into the investigation acting as a veritable Doc Watson to Hawthorne's Sherlock Holmes. The crime: Richard Pryce was found bludgeoned to death in his dwelling. He had been hit on the head with an expensive bottle of wine then stabbed repeatedly with the jagged edged neck of the bottle. Why did Pryce, a teetotaler, possess this wine? He had recently completed divorce proceedings favoring Adrian Lockwood, an expensively dressed, pony-tailed, property developer. Lockwood's ex-wife Akira Anno, a writer of literary fiction and poetry, was the prime suspect having verbally threatened Pryce in a restaurant and then poured a glass of wine over his head. Shortly thereafter, he was murdered. The murder weapon: a bottle of wine. The team of Hawthorne-Horowitz actively investigates the crime. Hawthorne is a strange duck. He expects Horowitz to be "seen and not heard" for why should a film writer "ask questions"? Hawthorne and Horowitz continually frustrate each other. "The Sentence is Death" by Anthony Horowitz is an excellent golden age type mystery. There are a multitude of suspects, numerous twists and turns and many surprise revelations. Secrets abound. What fun! This tome was unputdownable! Thank you HarperCollins Publishers and Net Galley for the opportunity to read and review "The Sentence is Death".

  21. 4 out of 5

    NZLisaM

    Anthony Horowitz never disappoints! Richard Pryce, a high profile divorce attorney, is murdered in his home, bludgeoned to death with a two thousand quid bottle of wine, which is strange in itself as the victim didn’t drink alcohol. Even stranger, written on the wall near the body are the numerals 182. What does the message mean? Hawthorne and Horowitz are called to investigate. As per usual I was hooked from the onset, and couldn’t put the book down. Interesting and engaging characters, a suspec Anthony Horowitz never disappoints! Richard Pryce, a high profile divorce attorney, is murdered in his home, bludgeoned to death with a two thousand quid bottle of wine, which is strange in itself as the victim didn’t drink alcohol. Even stranger, written on the wall near the body are the numerals 182. What does the message mean? Hawthorne and Horowitz are called to investigate. As per usual I was hooked from the onset, and couldn’t put the book down. Interesting and engaging characters, a suspect who threatened the victim with a wine bottle in the weeks before his death, two seemingly accidental deaths, past secrets, corrupt detectives, and a behind-the-scenes look at what goes into shooting Foyles’s War made this a compelling, addictive read, and a wonderful addition to an amazing series. There was a brief moment of uncertainty when I wondered if the mystery was going to be too predictable, but I should’ve known better, because not only did the plot go in a completely different, unexpected direction, but there was also a surprising revelation unveiled at the last second. I’m not sure how similar the real Anthony Horowitz is to the one portrayed in the books, but I just adore the way he pokes fun at himself. There are some hilarious moments as Horowitz not only attempts to outwit and solve the mystery ahead of Hawthorne, but also tries to discover more about the man as a person. Hawthorne is his usual un-charming and unhelpful self, annoying Horowitz to no end right from his first appearance. Just like The Word is Murder I love the chosen title The Sentence is Death, and how it was woven into the plot. Horowitz continues to be one of my favourite current writers. He could write about paint drying and I’d lap it up. The king of the modern Agatha Christie style murder mystery.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jen

    Richard Pryce, a well heeled and well known divorce lawyer, is discovered dead in his apartment, bludgeoned to death by a bottle of wine. A poetic choice of weapon, as the ex wife of his most recent client had not too long ago created a stir on social media when she was caught pouring a glass of wine all over Richard before threatening to do worse with the rest of the bottle. But can it possibly be that easy? In order to find out, the police have brought back ex-officer turned consultant Daniel Richard Pryce, a well heeled and well known divorce lawyer, is discovered dead in his apartment, bludgeoned to death by a bottle of wine. A poetic choice of weapon, as the ex wife of his most recent client had not too long ago created a stir on social media when she was caught pouring a glass of wine all over Richard before threatening to do worse with the rest of the bottle. But can it possibly be that easy? In order to find out, the police have brought back ex-officer turned consultant Daniel Hawthorne to help with the case, which in turn means Anthony “Tony” Horowitz is back on the case as well, there to observe and write, but yet again not having learned when to keep his mouth shut and not bungle up the investigation. The Hawthorne and Horowitz series feels like a love letter to modern day fans of golden age mysteries. I enjoy the psychological thrillers and domestic suspense that seem to be the rage right now, but I will always have a soft spot for old fashioned detective whodunits. These books use that classic “little grey cells” approach, but bring it into the modern age. I just adore when there are clues and breadcrumbs left for me to find, even if I don’t always catch all of them. I’m much better than poor Tony at picking up on things, but I didn’t get *all* of this one right. Then again, that’s half the fun. I always love a good reveal. I also love that Horowitz inserts himself as the bumbling, often completely wrong Watson/Hastings stand-in, and while at first I wasn’t much of a fan of the author including some of Hawthorne’s worst qualities (like homophobia), I realized in reading the second book and writing this review that perhaps that too is a nod to the classics the author is riffing on. Much as I enjoy Christie’s plots, reading them today can often be quite uncomfortable. They are, of course, a product of their time, but that doesn’t make it any less jarring to come across the racism and sexism present. My only major complaint is that I could have done without the Grunshaw side plot. Perhaps it was intended as comic relief, but it just didn’t really land for me. I also have to say that Jill’s remarks to Anthony (her husband) toward the end had me rolling. I can’t say more, but AGREE Jill. It’s great fun how Horowitz is so willing to make fun of himself. The third book in this series comes out this week (publication date October 19, 2021) and I absolutely can’t wait to get my hands on it!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Ova - Excuse My Reading

    Full review here Sentence is Death starts with the murder of a divorce lawyer and Horowitz sets to write a second book of this case alongside working with Hawthorne. The victim had been threatened by a well-known, award winning and fiercely literary writer and his husband seems to be hiding things… Of course, there are also issues from the past that bubbles up in surface of the case. Who visited the victim before he died, and why is there a number on the crime scene? This was such a fun read, and Full review here Sentence is Death starts with the murder of a divorce lawyer and Horowitz sets to write a second book of this case alongside working with Hawthorne. The victim had been threatened by a well-known, award winning and fiercely literary writer and his husband seems to be hiding things… Of course, there are also issues from the past that bubbles up in surface of the case. Who visited the victim before he died, and why is there a number on the crime scene? This was such a fun read, and I genuinely can’t wait for the 3rd book. I really feel desperate to know more about Hawthorne, as much as poor Horowitz in this book.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Carolyn Walsh

    This is the second in an innovative and clever mystery series by Anthony Horowitz, a follow up to the Word is Murder. The author inserts himself into the story, playing a bumbling companion to Private Detective, Daniel Hawthorne, a Watson to Hawthorne’s Sherlock. Hawthorne is a secretive, rude, and disgraced ex-policeman. He has been hired by the police as a consultant for his brilliant and superior deductive reasoning ability. Hawthorne is working on the case of a wealthy divorce lawyer who was This is the second in an innovative and clever mystery series by Anthony Horowitz, a follow up to the Word is Murder. The author inserts himself into the story, playing a bumbling companion to Private Detective, Daniel Hawthorne, a Watson to Hawthorne’s Sherlock. Hawthorne is a secretive, rude, and disgraced ex-policeman. He has been hired by the police as a consultant for his brilliant and superior deductive reasoning ability. Hawthorne is working on the case of a wealthy divorce lawyer who was murdered by being bludgeoned by a very expensive wine bottle and stabbed with the broken glass. Horowitz accompanies Hawthorne on his investigation and his interviews. He has been asked by the detective to write this second book about his successful crime-solving procedures. There are a number of suspects who have valid reasons to want the lawyer dead, and who are keeping secrets or lying. The two men have a strained collaboration and don’t seem to like each other. Horowitz often fails to notice clues, discover relationships and draw astute conclusions like Hawthorne. He bumbles along at interviews and has been warned to be quiet and only observe. In spite of this, the Horowitz character believes he can sort out the perpetrator from the untruthful suspects and solve the crime before either Hawthorne or the police. After drawing incorrect conclusions and being injured, Horowitz believes he has made a fool of himself and is pondering whether to work again with the detective on a promised third book. This mystery has a great old fashioned feeling although set in modern times. It relates to the times in the past when fictional detectives solved crimes by sorting out clues and brilliant thinking, rather than by the use of modern forensic science.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jill Hutchinson

    I love Horowitz's trick of inserting himself as a character in this series of his books. He teams up with a private detective (who is a disgraced police officer) since he is writing a book about this detective's life and cases and then becomes involved in some new crime that the detective is investigating. Written in the first person, he melds his two roles as writer and amateur Sherlock Holmes seamlessly and although the results are often complicated, it is a great concept. In this, the third bo I love Horowitz's trick of inserting himself as a character in this series of his books. He teams up with a private detective (who is a disgraced police officer) since he is writing a book about this detective's life and cases and then becomes involved in some new crime that the detective is investigating. Written in the first person, he melds his two roles as writer and amateur Sherlock Holmes seamlessly and although the results are often complicated, it is a great concept. In this, the third book of the series, a famous divorce lawyer is beaten to death in his home and the murderer paints a three digit number on the wall which seems meaningless. Suspects abound and almost everyone is lying. If you figure out who the murder is, you should start your own detective agency! The story is rather improbable but maybe that is why this series is so enjoyable. Recommended.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Marialyce (absltmom, yaya)

    Looking for a great book to get us out of a bit of a rut, Jan and I decided to give The Sentence is Death a go. Happily we were very surprised and elated that the second book in the Hawthorne series became a favorite and brought us back to the days of a true and wonderful mystery story. Keep them coming Mr Horowitz, for we are anxious to see where you take yourself and Hawthorne next, for we are sure to follow. Mr Horowitz with his usual flair for cleverness has once again teemed up with his ers Looking for a great book to get us out of a bit of a rut, Jan and I decided to give The Sentence is Death a go. Happily we were very surprised and elated that the second book in the Hawthorne series became a favorite and brought us back to the days of a true and wonderful mystery story. Keep them coming Mr Horowitz, for we are anxious to see where you take yourself and Hawthorne next, for we are sure to follow. Mr Horowitz with his usual flair for cleverness has once again teemed up with his erstwhile nemesis, Hawthorne, and is on the trail of finding a killer. These two seem to model themselves after the team of Holmes and Watson, as one seems to bumble his way through the investigation, while the other is miles ahead and seems to have puzzled out the perpetrator long before the last chapter is read. I was so ready for a down home, real good, wonderfully written mystery book that told a straight story with just the right amount of dropped clues, a bit of whimsy, and a touch of the camaraderie we came to love in the previous book, The Word is Murder, where both Anthony and Hawthorne made their grand entrance into the world of crime solving. Having read and loved The Word Is Murder, I was fully expecting another wonderful turn out for this book and happily I was not disappointed. Loving mysteries the way I do, this book was perfect in all the ways a mystery can be. There were the usual suspects each one shrouded in secrets and looking more guilty than the next. You can match wits with Hawthorne once again and see if you too, can beat Anthony to the final conclusion. Murder is again afoot and our team is hot on the trail of a killer. Thank you to Anthony Horowitz, Harper Books, and Edelweiss for a copy of this most enjoyable book. For our duo reviews and an interview with the author on writing sequels, you can look here: http://yayareadslotsofbooks.wordpress...

  27. 5 out of 5

    Dianne

    Another winner from Horowitz - I love this series! It’s like I have Christie, Poirot and Hastings back together again......or Conan Doyle, Holmes and Watson! So fun and very cleverly executed. I love how Horowitz makes himself a character in this series. Highly recommend if you like British who-dunnits with style, smarts and humor. Or should I say “humour?”

  28. 5 out of 5

    Umut

    Another witty crime book from Horowitz. If you liked The Word Is Murder, you will enjoy this one too. I thought it was better than the first, the case being more cohesive. There were convenient coincidences after all, but still an enjoyable read.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    I adored, “The Word is Murder,” the first in the Daniel Hawthorne series, and was delighted to receive the second, “The Silence is Death,” for review. As before, Anthony Horowitz, or ‘Tony,’ as Hawthorne calls him, is very much telling the story as himself. Horowitz is working on a television series when the book begins, and Hawthorne’s reappearance is cleverly introduced – his arrival causing unintentional mayhem and annoyance. As before, Hawthorne is wonderfully irritating and yet has a bizarr I adored, “The Word is Murder,” the first in the Daniel Hawthorne series, and was delighted to receive the second, “The Silence is Death,” for review. As before, Anthony Horowitz, or ‘Tony,’ as Hawthorne calls him, is very much telling the story as himself. Horowitz is working on a television series when the book begins, and Hawthorne’s reappearance is cleverly introduced – his arrival causing unintentional mayhem and annoyance. As before, Hawthorne is wonderfully irritating and yet has a bizarre fascination for Horowitz. A sort of Seventies throwback, with definitely non-politically correct views and language; Horowitz finds him exasperating and is yet admiring of his ability to solve the most bizarre of crimes. Indeed, when Hawthorne states they have another murder to investigate, you know it will be something special. A divorce lawyer, Richard Pryce, has been murdered with an extremely expensive bottle of wine. This bizarre murder sees the pair becoming immersed in the investigation, with Horowitz gleefully having a lot of fun with the world of publishing. Pryce had been involved in a celebrity divorce, involving the author, Akira Anno, a writer of literary fiction, who visibly sneers at Horowitz. However, the divorce is only one possible strand of the investigation. This is a brilliantly executed plot, full of twists and turns. One motive involves the case that the lawyer was working on, then there is an incident in the past which may be involved and, then again, there are the usual issues with personal relationships and money. Along the way, Horowitz also tries to find out more about Hawthorne’s past and longs to solve the mystery before anyone else, while falling foul of the aggressive D.I. Cara Grunshaw and trying to juggle all of his writing commitments. I really feel that this is growing into an excellent series. In the novel, Horowitz claims to have a three book deal, writing about Hawthorne. You can only hope that he will continue the series beyond that point. It is a joy and I love the way that the author manages to insert so much of his own experiences, albeit in a fictional way, to create such an enjoyable read. I loved every part of the novel set around the world of publishing in particular, but every page was wonderfully enjoyable. I do feel that Daniel Hawthorne has a lot more to offer. Highly recommended.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Lori

    “It’s a simple fact of life that a clever private detective needs a much less clever police officer in much the same way as a photograph needs both light and darkness. Otherwise, there’s no definition.” ― Anthony Horowitz, The Sentence is Death Great addition to the Hawthorne and Horowitz series! These characters are so fun and I’ve enjoyed seeing their unorthodox relationship develop. I thought the plot was better developed than in the previous book. This is a slower paced mystery series that d “It’s a simple fact of life that a clever private detective needs a much less clever police officer in much the same way as a photograph needs both light and darkness. Otherwise, there’s no definition.” ― Anthony Horowitz, The Sentence is Death Great addition to the Hawthorne and Horowitz series! These characters are so fun and I’ve enjoyed seeing their unorthodox relationship develop. I thought the plot was better developed than in the previous book. This is a slower paced mystery series that definitely has Sherlock Holmes vibes. The misdirections are so well done that found myself constantly questioning how all the pieces would end up fitting together. Again, Rory Kinnear did a wonderful job with the narration. I’m looking forward to seeing what murder case these two will solve next. 4 stars.

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