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American Omens: The Coming Fight for Faith

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In this taut thriller that depicts a future where belief is dangerous, faith is deemed hatred, and a group of powerful elite keeps watch, the Reckoner has come to wake up America. The year is 2038 and Cheyenne Burne is a brilliant young programmer working for Acatour, the world's top technology firm. Her father converts to Christianity, and he suddenly disappears without a In this taut thriller that depicts a future where belief is dangerous, faith is deemed hatred, and a group of powerful elite keeps watch, the Reckoner has come to wake up America. The year is 2038 and Cheyenne Burne is a brilliant young programmer working for Acatour, the world's top technology firm. Her father converts to Christianity, and he suddenly disappears without a trace. When a stranger hands Cheyenne a coded message that sends her on a collision course with a clandestine group of believers, she must put her life in the hands of those following a man known only as the Reckoner. He claims he wants to bring back true faith in Christ to America and also reveal the forces behind the disappearances of the many renowned people who publicly declared their Christian faith. Operating in the shadows and living off the grid, this mysterious prophet assembles a ragtag team--including a former bookseller whose store was shut down for selling prohibited books--to help him take the battle for transparency to the top. With a ruthless FBI agent closing in, can Cheyenne and the others expose the truth and lead a return to God in America before it's too late?


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In this taut thriller that depicts a future where belief is dangerous, faith is deemed hatred, and a group of powerful elite keeps watch, the Reckoner has come to wake up America. The year is 2038 and Cheyenne Burne is a brilliant young programmer working for Acatour, the world's top technology firm. Her father converts to Christianity, and he suddenly disappears without a In this taut thriller that depicts a future where belief is dangerous, faith is deemed hatred, and a group of powerful elite keeps watch, the Reckoner has come to wake up America. The year is 2038 and Cheyenne Burne is a brilliant young programmer working for Acatour, the world's top technology firm. Her father converts to Christianity, and he suddenly disappears without a trace. When a stranger hands Cheyenne a coded message that sends her on a collision course with a clandestine group of believers, she must put her life in the hands of those following a man known only as the Reckoner. He claims he wants to bring back true faith in Christ to America and also reveal the forces behind the disappearances of the many renowned people who publicly declared their Christian faith. Operating in the shadows and living off the grid, this mysterious prophet assembles a ragtag team--including a former bookseller whose store was shut down for selling prohibited books--to help him take the battle for transparency to the top. With a ruthless FBI agent closing in, can Cheyenne and the others expose the truth and lead a return to God in America before it's too late?

30 review for American Omens: The Coming Fight for Faith

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jes Drew

    This was a very realistic-feeling view of what may very well be the future (if I don't have anything to say about it, that is). We see this strangely familiar world through the eyes of three characters. One is a woman who works for the tech company that has led to everyone getting special computer type things in their heads (creepy, I know) and whose father has disappeared- and that pulls her unwillingly into this world. I liked Cheyenne, except for one stupid decision she made that really threw This was a very realistic-feeling view of what may very well be the future (if I don't have anything to say about it, that is). We see this strangely familiar world through the eyes of three characters. One is a woman who works for the tech company that has led to everyone getting special computer type things in their heads (creepy, I know) and whose father has disappeared- and that pulls her unwillingly into this world. I liked Cheyenne, except for one stupid decision she made that really threw me off- because trusting random men to drive you to meet strangers in the dead of night is never a good idea. The second character is sweet old Will, the book seller who has his shop closed down by the powers-that-be as he stumbles through life. Until he comes into contact with the Reckoner. And the Reckoner is the man that FBI agent Dowland is ruthlessly on the hunt for. Dowland is obviously one of the bad guys, but I couldn't help but feel bad and kind of like him. Plus, his middle name and a certain kind of weapon that was alluded to makes me wonder if he's going to have a certain Biblical story arc in the sequel (there had better be a sequel!)... This tale was more than just a bunch of characters in a realistic almost-dystopian world, though. It's a warning. And, we can only pray, not as prophetic as it feels... I received a copy from the publisher and was not required to write a positive review. (see the review on my blog https://agencyofbooksandspies.blogspo...)

  2. 5 out of 5

    Kevin

    AMERICAN OMENS: THE COMING FIGHT FOR FAITH may turn out to be the most important fiction book published in recent years that a Christian needs to read and deserves to be the must-read book of 2019. Set twenty years in the future but based in part on present-day happenings, the novel comes across as prophetic --especially if the devaluation of Christianity in America continues. AMERICAN OMENS is intensely compelling and will grab readers with its strong characters, plot, and uncompromising view th AMERICAN OMENS: THE COMING FIGHT FOR FAITH may turn out to be the most important fiction book published in recent years that a Christian needs to read and deserves to be the must-read book of 2019. Set twenty years in the future but based in part on present-day happenings, the novel comes across as prophetic --especially if the devaluation of Christianity in America continues. AMERICAN OMENS is intensely compelling and will grab readers with its strong characters, plot, and uncompromising view that God is still God and He is still ultimately in control in a world where technology seemingly rules and privacy is violated by an "elite" few. Love those pop-up ads you see while surfing the Internet? On his blog, author Travis Thrasher had this to say about algorithms: "I’ve spent many hours researching technology and the advancements being made in all sorts of areas. Algorithms are something I’ve studied quite intensely, and honestly, the more I know the more terrified I become." (http://www.thejourneyiseverything.com...) After reading AMERICAN OMENS, I'm more terrified as well. I rarely quote from the advance reader copy of a book as things may change between release if the ARC and publication. However, this quote hit me hard when I read it: There’s a war going on out there. You know it now from experience— how they forced you to close after selling some Christian materials . It’s gone that far in this country. First you couldn’t speak out about issues like homosexuality or abortion or refugees or a better understanding of racial equality, with everybody on social media slamming those they deemed on the wrong side. The condemnation became so extreme, and now our culture is attacking everything— churches, gatherings, literature, and the arts. Everything. Christianity has been eradicated, and most of the country has sat back and done nothing to stop it.” I'm not saying that events are going to unfold the way that Thrasher's fertile imagination has them laid out in AMERICAN OMENS, but I'm saying it is scary just how plausible the scenario is. I have already started a list of friends, family, and church family who I think should read this book. That's how excited I am for AMERICAN OMENS. 5 Stars. Highly recommended!!! I received a copy from Multnomah through NetGalley in exchange for my honest review.

  3. 5 out of 5

    AnnaScott

    This was an interesting book. I liked the premise of a dystopian/futuristic America, and all of the action that must take place in order to "fix" the corrupt government. I loved Cheyenne and Malek, and the rest of the characters were well formed as well. I also really liked how the three perspectives worked together to show the complexity of the situation and the different sides of the story, and then ultimately blended together. Here's my biggest complaint: I felt like this book largely used the This was an interesting book. I liked the premise of a dystopian/futuristic America, and all of the action that must take place in order to "fix" the corrupt government. I loved Cheyenne and Malek, and the rest of the characters were well formed as well. I also really liked how the three perspectives worked together to show the complexity of the situation and the different sides of the story, and then ultimately blended together. Here's my biggest complaint: I felt like this book largely used the "fear factor" side of Christianity (there was wrath, judgment, and even a Day of Reckoning). I completely understand that within the Christian-dystopian genre, this is going to be present, but I felt like with this, Thrasher missed the perfect opportunity to share the true gospel rather than just indicate it as the only positive alternative to the death and destruction. The Christians are all operating on the basis of "the world is corrupt, and this is the only bit of goodness left," which I felt minimized the true impact of the message of Christianity. The fear tactic can produce results, but often they aren't lasting and/or genuine, and that's my concern with this book. SPOILER ALERT: My other big complaint with this book is that there was this prophecy that roughly a month from the beginning of the book, the Chicago area would be wiped out (think the story of Jonah, but with the ending of Sodom and Gomorrah). But it was only mentioned a few times, incorporated into the fear factor, and that was it. I was left with questions as to what happens, how it happens, how the characters are affected, etc. and since this book doesn't seem to be a part of a series I was left disappointed. Overall, I'm glad I read it. It made me think critically about technology and its presence in our life, and stretched me out of my normal reading genres. Dystopian is definitely not my favorite genre, but it is good to branch into every once and a while.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Claudia

    American Omens is the story of three people who are caught up in a web of intrigue centered on a conspiracy to eradicate Christianity. Will Stewart, Jon Dowland, and Cheyenne Burne all play different roles in the story. Jon Dowland is the assassin tasked with taking out influential Christians, thus silencing them and diminishing the faith’s influence on society. Will Stewart, a failed bookseller, is knee deep in financial and family despair when he is approached, and challenged, by a mysterious American Omens is the story of three people who are caught up in a web of intrigue centered on a conspiracy to eradicate Christianity. Will Stewart, Jon Dowland, and Cheyenne Burne all play different roles in the story. Jon Dowland is the assassin tasked with taking out influential Christians, thus silencing them and diminishing the faith’s influence on society. Will Stewart, a failed bookseller, is knee deep in financial and family despair when he is approached, and challenged, by a mysterious stranger. Cheyenne Burne is a top tech guru who receives a message from her missing father and subsequently is thrust into a series of events that put her very life in danger. I was excited to read American Omens: The Coming Fight for Faith by Travis Thrasher. I love a good thriller! The beginning was really captivating, and the pace of the book kept up…until the middle where it just seemed to go into slow-mo for a while. I enjoyed the ‘thriller’ aspects of this book, and there are some really pertinent points made about the way our lives are being monitored by algorithms. In the future portrayed in American Omens, everyone is monitored by a personal device called a SYNAPSYS. "There are many, many things a SYNAPSYS is capable of doing, things that people have no idea about….It used to be that people were scared about Facebook keeping their data on the recipes and cat pictures they liked. They have no idea. In wanting life to be easier and faster and better all around, people have allowed themselves to be monitored. And even worse, manipulated." American Omens (Advance Reading Copy), p. 271 Where Thrasher went too far, in my estimation, is putting the monitoring into the hands of one, fictional mega-corporation, Acatour, run by one man, Jack Heyford, and inferring that he’s just the latest in a giant conspiracy. "Heyfor’s a part of something that’s been around for decades. The world government. The New World Order. The Freemasons. The Illuminati. The deep state. The cabal. Names for secret societies that have become cartoons and comic books. Words that are punch lines. The figures change, and so do their names and networks. Yet the evil remains the same." American Omens (ARC), p. 191 One other thing that was just ‘off’ to me was a passage late in the book where two of the characters are sneaking into the headquarters of Acatour in disguise. ” …Malek wore glasses, and Cheyenne had her hair in a new style with it tied to one side, making them look different enough for the cameras monitoring everything not to instantly pick up on them if people were, in fact, looking for them” (American OmensARC p.274). So, I’m supposed to believe that technology is so advanced that we have self-driving cars (Autovehs) everywhere, and programs with such advanced algorithms that they nearly read our minds, but we don’t have facial recognition?? I believe that we ARE being surveilled by algorithms and that Christianity IS under attack, but I think it’s a much less focused effort on the part of any one human, earthy entity. Businesses are surveilling us because it makes them money. If it makes them more money, they’ll do it…throwing privacy concerns to the wind. I don’t have an Alexa for that very reason. “She’s” always listening. Freedom of religion is under attack. Holding beliefs that are not “politically correct” on homosexuality or abortion are mocked at best and considered hate speech at worst. There IS a conspiracy to control us. There IS a conspiracy to stop the message of Christianity from spreading. There IS one man at the root of this conspiracy. His name is Satan. He’s not using just one man, one company, or one organization to accomplish his evil work. He’s using millions of them. When we look for boogie men in the world, we forget that there is a very real force behind them. The way to combat that is to read our scriptures, study, and pray. Not watch conspiracy videos on YouTube. Overall, the book is interesting but I just felt it was pandering to the conspiracy theory, flat earth types. *I received a complimentary copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for my honest review*

  5. 5 out of 5

    Andrea Cox

    FTC Disclosure: I received a complimentary copy of this book from Multnomah. A positive review was not required. These are my honest thoughts. The prologue hooked me in with its tension, suspense, and Jason Bourne-style assassin. I knew I was in for an intriguing read, and I wasn't disappointed on that front. I liked that the computer-speak was worded in ways that non-computer-savvy folks can understand the majority of it. I never felt completely lost or confused on the high-tech end of things in FTC Disclosure: I received a complimentary copy of this book from Multnomah. A positive review was not required. These are my honest thoughts. The prologue hooked me in with its tension, suspense, and Jason Bourne-style assassin. I knew I was in for an intriguing read, and I wasn't disappointed on that front. I liked that the computer-speak was worded in ways that non-computer-savvy folks can understand the majority of it. I never felt completely lost or confused on the high-tech end of things in this story, though I did have to reread a few sentences here and there to make sure I was catching on to the technology specific to this book's plot. There were a few instances of violence but nothing outside the norm for a thriller. One particular scene was a bit too bloody for my taste, but it was a short scene and over fairly quickly. The things that bothered me the most, and why my rating is only three stars instead of four, were the handful of expletives (some by "Christian" characters), drug usage, and the heavy drinking Dowland became known for. His personality could have used a lot more defining, but instead he came off as a generic James Bond sort who loved drowning his sorrows in booze and women. The other characters were well developed and interesting, with current-day problems and battles to face and hopefully overcome as the journey of the plot moved forward. The tension throughout was great, and I really liked how the action/tech stuff ebbed and flowed in a nice rhythm that felt much like the coming and going of an ocean tide: sometimes rough and bumpy with turbulence and other times so subtle that the transition was completely disguised and the next turn of events surprised me. One thing I especially enjoyed was the reason why Jazz got his nickname. Watch for that when you're reading! It's a beautiful moment. This story isn't how I envision the end of time happening, but I appreciate the imagination that went into creating this unique look at future social events and catastrophes. This author definitely has some great points that he brought out about today's social media and huge corporations and government that I found interesting. (Sometimes fiction is a lot closer to the truth than we think!) I'm glad I read this book, and I'll be passing it on for another reader to enjoy as well.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Nicole

    3.5 stars Starting this book was like finding oneself on a high-speed chase for answers with no place to hide. The speed of the game stays consistent with every page-turn, until finally you drive over the edge and hold your breath, suspended on air and waiting to see...what's next? Thought-provoking in a new and gripping way, let this novel be the startling wake-up call to what's already happening in the technological society around us. My official rating is a bit lower because I started to get un 3.5 stars Starting this book was like finding oneself on a high-speed chase for answers with no place to hide. The speed of the game stays consistent with every page-turn, until finally you drive over the edge and hold your breath, suspended on air and waiting to see...what's next? Thought-provoking in a new and gripping way, let this novel be the startling wake-up call to what's already happening in the technological society around us. My official rating is a bit lower because I started to get uncomfortable with the frequent promotion of rock music, alcohol, and even one language instance, among the Christian characters. While the message of the story is for everyone, some material may not be for sensitive or younger readers. I could understand and even appreciate the author's ability to present the future in a realistic way, but it often feels dark and gritty. I was glad to be able to "breathe again" when it was over. I'm interested in finding out whether this will become the first in a series. A wild, rough ride; but again, very thought-provoking. I received a complimentary copy of this book from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review. All opinions expressed are mine alone.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Reeda Booke

    While the premise of the book was believable to me, what with things like Facebook, Google, Amazon, and the like knowing so much information about you, this story was slow with a couple of unbelievable scenarios and an ending, that to me, felt very anticlimactic. Giving it 3 stars.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Vera Godley

    I found the book surreal in the technological advances purported to be in place twenty years in the future. But then.... where were we with technology 20 years in the past. So much is possible and we shouldn't be surprised at what advances actually might happen. Reading thoughts? Hearing other voices speak in our heads? Far fetched? Perhaps. I dread the possibility that these things could happen. Yes, chips can be implanted and activities traced. But some other technological advances are science I found the book surreal in the technological advances purported to be in place twenty years in the future. But then.... where were we with technology 20 years in the past. So much is possible and we shouldn't be surprised at what advances actually might happen. Reading thoughts? Hearing other voices speak in our heads? Far fetched? Perhaps. I dread the possibility that these things could happen. Yes, chips can be implanted and activities traced. But some other technological advances are science fiction. What is not science fiction is the very real possibility that Christianity will not be looked favorably upon. And in American Omens that is definitely the situation. People are manipulated. Cars are automated. One can speak into thin air and receive a spoken answer, or an answer in one's head, or pictures appear to hang in the air in front of you. The future of technology? Perhaps. But the future is also one of control either using technology or sheer force. In American Omens, the main, yet shadow, character is The Reckoner. I fully expected this to be some sort of avenging angel or representative of God in an end-times scenario. That doesn't seem to be the case. But that might be different if this story line plays out in more books along this line if Mr. Thrasher pursues it as a series. This story is, after all, about the downfall or decline of Christianity in America and we have the whole World in which we can look for prophetic or end-times stories. A good book. A good story. A good premise. DISCLOSURE: I received a complimentary copy from the publisher to facilitate this review. Opinions are my own and are freely given.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Valerie in Nebraska

    The year is 2038 and all expressions of Christianity are forbidden by the government. All forms of communication are conveyed through a personal SYNAPSYS system, Los Angeles is in ruins and another city is the center of pop culture (movies, music, etc.) in the United States. The most popular means of transportation is autovehs - self-driving cars. This was an interesting glimpse into an imagined future that wasn't dystopian; all major systems of communication, transportation, medicine, food prod The year is 2038 and all expressions of Christianity are forbidden by the government. All forms of communication are conveyed through a personal SYNAPSYS system, Los Angeles is in ruins and another city is the center of pop culture (movies, music, etc.) in the United States. The most popular means of transportation is autovehs - self-driving cars. This was an interesting glimpse into an imagined future that wasn't dystopian; all major systems of communication, transportation, medicine, food production, etc. are operating. The novel follows three main characters: a young single rising-star computer programmer who works for the leading tech conglomerate, a middle-aged man with a wife and children who had to close his passion-project bookstore due to the types of items he sold, and a rogue FBI agent who is tasked with eliminating the leader of the underground Christian movement. Throughout this fast-paced thriller, I was continually worried the storyline would swing to the far right evangelical viewpoint, but the author did a good job of maintaining a moderate position on the systemized persecution Christians face in this version of the future. All in all, this novel gave me a great deal of food for thought.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Terry Conrad

    This book is about 20 years into the future. I can see us heading this way. Christianity is outlawed and people have implants to do everything for them. Everyone can be tracked. The storyline is great as is the writing. I was expecting a lot more action and less dialogue. That is my only disappointment.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Nay Denise

    Received an ARC for review. This was an interesting read. Though I didn't find myself attached to any of the characters in the story, I thoroughly enjoyed the plot and pacing of the story. I also enjoyed the multiple POVs in the story as well. Each of the characters were their own and didn't confuse me. This is a sci-fi dystopian set in 2038 mainly in Chicago during a time that Christianity is banned, the Bible is illegal and faith is naught among the people. There is a modern day prophet who's pl Received an ARC for review. This was an interesting read. Though I didn't find myself attached to any of the characters in the story, I thoroughly enjoyed the plot and pacing of the story. I also enjoyed the multiple POVs in the story as well. Each of the characters were their own and didn't confuse me. This is a sci-fi dystopian set in 2038 mainly in Chicago during a time that Christianity is banned, the Bible is illegal and faith is naught among the people. There is a modern day prophet who's plan to wake up the people, bring back faith and reveal the evil on the earth. The plot thickened with each turn of the page and each character. This story also felt so real, I know this is real for those in third world countries, but for those in America I feel like this could definitely happen in the future with how the world is going. Cheyenne Burne was typical woman working and doing what she loved. She was contacted by her father the day she was fired from her job. That day was the wake-up call she needed to truly live and be free. Cheyenne was quiet sassy and comical. She took things in pieces and didn't rush. She was level-headed. Will Stewart is a bookstore owner -- that was until his store was shut down for selling "illegal" books about faith. Will was an interesting character in that he was married with three daughters. He pretty much despised his father and tried to do things on his own. In moving on his own he found himself miserable. It wasn't until he came across a man that he began to live his faith and beliefs out. Will was a timid man among all the bold characters in the story. He was also just as crucial to the plot as well. Dowland was a killer...a hit-man...he was also FBI. I did not care for him which made me enjoy him oddly. He was against God, Jesus and anything dealing with Christianity. He was all about a clean kill and completing a job. He was a confused man living in dark world. Dowland was a fool through and through, but he was also comical. I adored Jazz and Keith a ton. Malek was awesome as well. Seeing them all work for the Reckoner was amazing. As different as each of these characters were, they were all needed to make the plan succeed. They all melded well for the betterment of the people. The Reckoner was an interesting character. I had many ideas on who it was, but when it was finally revealed I was honestly shocked! He was such a common man with a common job, but his faith was powerful and he was set on fulfilling the work of God. He was a cool guy, but sometimes came off a bit harsh. That ending was interesting. I would have thought it'd been more dramatic, but I still enjoyed the end and how it closed off. Definitely would recommend it sci-fi & dystopian lovers.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Suzie Waltner

    Travis Thrasher’s American Omens fits in many genre categories. It’s part suspense, part sci-fi, part speculative, but wholly entertaining (and maybe even disturbingly plausible). In 2038, powerhouse names like Amazon, Google, Apple, and Facebook are no more. But technology has advanced in ways that are hard to imagine today from automatically driven vehicles (autovehs) to AI assistants that do everything from connecting you with others, selecting music, and offering advise based on the informati Travis Thrasher’s American Omens fits in many genre categories. It’s part suspense, part sci-fi, part speculative, but wholly entertaining (and maybe even disturbingly plausible). In 2038, powerhouse names like Amazon, Google, Apple, and Facebook are no more. But technology has advanced in ways that are hard to imagine today from automatically driven vehicles (autovehs) to AI assistants that do everything from connecting you with others, selecting music, and offering advise based on the information the computer has for the individual, the potential for manipulation is great. And Christians are now the criminals as their conversations of faith are viewed as hate crimes. Thrasher dangles three story threads in front of readers, inviting them to follow along until they all collide in a massive undertaking. From a programmer (it’s much more complicated than that, but I’m going to simplify it for time’s sake), a bookstore owner, and a man hired to get the job done no matter the method, the build up to the climax is gradual but steep, keeping you focused on what’s to come. I have to say I appreciated the ending of this story. While it is satisfying, there are still questions because not everything is wrapped up in a neat little bow. Not everyone responds as the group expects, and even some in the group are still searching for their own answers. Disclosure statement: I receive complimentary books from publishers, publicists, and/or authors, including NetGalley. I am not required to write positive reviews. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Johnson

    Title: American Omens Author: Travis Thrasher Pages: 352 Year: 2019 Publisher: Multnomah My rating: 5 out of 5 stars. The past weekend I spent time enjoying the story of American Omens. The subtitle is “The Coming Fight for Faith,” which seems to already be a part of American society today. As I progressed through the tale, I became enamored with Cheyenne’s character. In the futuristic setting, we see “Chey” (Cheyenne) working for a company that has developed highly technical software. She is one smar Title: American Omens Author: Travis Thrasher Pages: 352 Year: 2019 Publisher: Multnomah My rating: 5 out of 5 stars. The past weekend I spent time enjoying the story of American Omens. The subtitle is “The Coming Fight for Faith,” which seems to already be a part of American society today. As I progressed through the tale, I became enamored with Cheyenne’s character. In the futuristic setting, we see “Chey” (Cheyenne) working for a company that has developed highly technical software. She is one smart cookie! However, Chey enters her workplace one day and she is handed a note. She reads it later for fear someone else might see it. The book was hard to put down because the plot thickens, the danger heightens, and it wasn’t hard to imagine fiction being reality. I was turning pages for hours until my eyes got tired, but I wanted to read on. Why are churches closed? Why are people seeming to disappear without any concern from others? Is the man who is revealing God’s plan to a select few at first a plausible character? I will answer only the one question about the prophet as that character is very mysterious and intriguing to say the least. Christians in the novel are forced to live life off the grid but challenged to share their beliefs with others, knowing that comes with a cost. There were twists and turns in the plot that kept me engrossed and thinking, plus there are Scripture references and a quote from Oswald Chambers that I really was impacted by. On page 161, it reads as follows: “Seeing is never believing we interpret what we see in the light of what we believe. Faith is confidence in God before you see God emerging; therefore, the nature of faith is that it must be tried.” So, when you read the novel, don’t be surprised if something stands out to you that stirs your mind, heart and soul. The timing of the release of the novel is providential in that it seems like a wake-up call to pay attention, decide for or against being a disciple of Christ, and living that faith out before the world. Here is a great story to read and share with others, perhaps even discuss it with someone! Note: I received a complimentary copy for an honest review of this book. The opinions shared in this review are solely my responsibility.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kimberly

    American Omens: The Coming Fight for Faith: A NovelI received this book from Waterbrook Multnoman in exchange for my honest review. This book caught my attention from the first page. Set in the future, 2038, we find the main character, Cheyenne Burne working for Acatour as a programmer. Her father has disappeared after becoming a Christian. Then Cheyenne is given a coded message, by a stranger, which leads her to a group of believers. She comes across a man known as the Reckoner. This man has a American Omens: The Coming Fight for Faith: A NovelI received this book from Waterbrook Multnoman in exchange for my honest review. This book caught my attention from the first page. Set in the future, 2038, we find the main character, Cheyenne Burne working for Acatour as a programmer. Her father has disappeared after becoming a Christian. Then Cheyenne is given a coded message, by a stranger, which leads her to a group of believers. She comes across a man known as the Reckoner. This man has a group of people following him and his beliefs in bringing back Christ to this land. He also has shown what is behind the disappearances of , not just Cheyenne's father but many others who openly practice Christianity. This vision of the future leaves the reader thinking about our world where we could not openly serve Christ. Behind the story, Thrasher has done research on legislation concerning items that could lead to Christian speech being against the law. The book was mainly focused on a visionary view of America while not including other countries and how they are looking upon Christianity. However, I feel this book was able to reinforce by faith and pushes me to make sure I am demonstrative about my Christianity. Highly recommended to all.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Emily Yager

    This is not my typical read, as those of you who have been following my review posts know. The topic sounded intriguing and I just had to check it out. To be honest though it was a bit of a tough read, and it had my thinking that some of this is quite plausible. One just needs to listen/watch the news to see just how much Christianity and our faith is being attacked and threatened. American Omens is an eye opening read I feel all Christians should read. It has a overwhelming amount of truth wrap This is not my typical read, as those of you who have been following my review posts know. The topic sounded intriguing and I just had to check it out. To be honest though it was a bit of a tough read, and it had my thinking that some of this is quite plausible. One just needs to listen/watch the news to see just how much Christianity and our faith is being attacked and threatened. American Omens is an eye opening read I feel all Christians should read. It has a overwhelming amount of truth wrapped up in a story. It is thought provoking and definitely makes you think differently about what is going on around us today. Despite the harsh reality and struggles in this book, there is also a line of hope that flows through the plot.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jess Hanna

    A terrifying look into a near future where faith is under fire, and the fight to overturn the tide feels hopeless. A great read for those looking for a thriller with a bit of sci-fi and contemplation. The writing is natural and this is a fantastic read!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    American Omens: The Coming Fight for Faith is a fabulous book. This fictional story is what I fear will become reality in the years to come. That is the reason why I think why this book could be one of the scariest thrillers I have read in a long time. American Omens: The Coming Fight for Faith is getting a very well deserved five plus stars from me. I highly recommend this book for all readers. I received this book from the publisher, but was not required to write a review. This review is 100% American Omens: The Coming Fight for Faith is a fabulous book. This fictional story is what I fear will become reality in the years to come. That is the reason why I think why this book could be one of the scariest thrillers I have read in a long time. American Omens: The Coming Fight for Faith is getting a very well deserved five plus stars from me. I highly recommend this book for all readers. I received this book from the publisher, but was not required to write a review. This review is 100% my own honest opinion.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Nora St Laurent

    I couldn’t put this thrilling, haunting, suspenseful, fast-paced, thought-provoking novel down. Its kind of like the of movie I Robot with Will Smith. It also had the feel of the movies Enemy of the State and Mission Impossible all rolled into one wild ride I’m still thinking about. The I Robot aspect of the story was the robot technology; how the cars drive themselves and the robots can help you and are with you all the time. They are called “partners” in this story. The Mission Impossible feel w I couldn’t put this thrilling, haunting, suspenseful, fast-paced, thought-provoking novel down. Its kind of like the of movie I Robot with Will Smith. It also had the feel of the movies Enemy of the State and Mission Impossible all rolled into one wild ride I’m still thinking about. The I Robot aspect of the story was the robot technology; how the cars drive themselves and the robots can help you and are with you all the time. They are called “partners” in this story. The Mission Impossible feel was the fact that the Reckoner has asked this group to do something unheard of; which to them is an impossible mission to accomplish. Just like the Mission impossible movies the author reveals some of the plan to the audience but not the whole thing until the plan is put into action and is played out on the screen. Then finally the Enemy of the State aspect of the novel. the whole country is up in arms about Christians – they are wiping out any mention of God. Many Christians have mysteriously disappeared and suspected dead soon after their declaration of faith. They’ve become an Enemy of not just the state but the world. The first character the reader meets is Dowland whose great at his job. He wipes out assigned targets. He’s on his last mission. He’s to kill the Reckoner. The Reckoner who tells people God is real. Everyone knows that isn’t true. But part of him wonders as he reads a piece of paper found at his latest victim’s house, “Abraham approached God and said, “Will you sweep away both the righteous and the wicked?” Gen 18:23. Memories of his grandmother and her faith come to mind. He pushes them away and presses onto his next mission, which is interrogating Christians; wiping out them out systematically to find their leader, the Reckoner. The next character introduced is Cheyenne Burne. She’s a program specialist for Acatour. She helped put technology in people’s heads. The year is 2038, many Christians have gone missing presumed dead. Her father was one of them. He became a Christian and then disappeared without a trace, not even a note good-bye. Then she hears a message in her head, …” This is your wake-up call, Cheyenne. You’ve been sleeping your whole life, dreaming those dreams. The alarm clock is about to go off, and there won’t be anyway to press the snooze button…. Do not over think and analyze the situation you’re about to encounter---Just act and don’t react. Deal with the road in front of you and the door that’s about to open.” She no sooner finishes listening to this message when things start to explode. She finds herself heading thru a door she didn’t know existed. Now she’s on the run for her life. The last character readers are introduced to is Will Stewart, former book store owner. After 10 years in business his dream store has closed. He knew he wouldn’t get rich, but his goal was to connect with a community of fellow believers. Will struggles…” Believing wasn’t the issue, nor was knowing the truth. It was following and obeying and getting with the program and not having this awful uncertainty running through his system day and night.” …” Why can’t I be like the rest of them? Not worrying about God and not feeling guilty for not being strong enough? Not carrying this load of fear and brokenness around while also hurting for all those how are so deluded, so far gone?” He ponders as a customer shares with him, “Our souls are assaulted daily, and yet we are all so passive, acting as if the bombs didn’t just destroy the home around us and refusing to arm ourselves and go into battle. We are pacifists, not because of some strong belief to be so, but because we don’t have strong beliefs in the first place.” You’ll be burning the mid-night oil with this story that will rock your world and as you can’t stop thinking about these characters and their struggle in a whole new light. It’s chilling! I highly recommend this novel as an amazing read and one that would work well for book club as there is so much to talk about. This book is a keeper and a must read! Disclosure of Material Connection: I received a complimentary copy of this book from the Publisher. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising” Nora St. Laurent TBCN Where Book Fun Begins! www.bookfun.org The Book Club Network blog www.psalm516.blogspot.com Book Fun Magazine https://www.bookfun.org/page/past-iss...

  19. 5 out of 5

    Cheri Swalwell

    American Omen by Travis Thrasher is a book that makes one think about the way the world is becoming. It’s a thinking book, one that will stay with you long after you turn the last page. It’s a book that makes you question your beliefs, why you believe what you believe and how important it is to continue to share with others the importance of one’s faith. This book is one I’m glad I read and will be talking about with many people for weeks, months to come. It’s also a book that fills me with hope American Omen by Travis Thrasher is a book that makes one think about the way the world is becoming. It’s a thinking book, one that will stay with you long after you turn the last page. It’s a book that makes you question your beliefs, why you believe what you believe and how important it is to continue to share with others the importance of one’s faith. This book is one I’m glad I read and will be talking about with many people for weeks, months to come. It’s also a book that fills me with hope knowing the ending of our story lies in the hands of God and we don’t have to worry about all the ‘what ifs’ as a result. I received a copy of this book from the author in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are mine.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Mary Jackson _TheMaryReader

    Review coming later.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Nathan Albright

    In reading a book like this [1], my thoughts pretty straightforwardly go to thinking of this book as part of a franchise.  The author is apparently known for his series of Christian thriller novels, which I have not read before and don't have a context, but this particular work is aiming at the same kind of feel as a novel like Left Behind, only this particular work feels as if it approaches end time prophecy from a viewpoint that can be considered postmillennial and optimistic as opposed to pre In reading a book like this [1], my thoughts pretty straightforwardly go to thinking of this book as part of a franchise.  The author is apparently known for his series of Christian thriller novels, which I have not read before and don't have a context, but this particular work is aiming at the same kind of feel as a novel like Left Behind, only this particular work feels as if it approaches end time prophecy from a viewpoint that can be considered postmillennial and optimistic as opposed to premillennial and focused on the aftermath of the rapture.  Without knowing the author's eschatological views it is hard to fully understand where this novel series is going (assuming that it will be part of a series that demonstrates a sort of revival of faith within the United States), but even without that context it is clear that the author's idea that Christianity could be viewed within the next generation as being a hateful religion that brings social and economic ruin to those who are committed to it is not completely inconceivable.  While the context of this novel is dystopian, it is hardly an unreasonable extrapolation from current societal trends. Coming in at a bit more than 300 pages, there is a lot to enjoy about this novel.  It manages to tell a compelling story with a variety of intersecting plotlines that look at two different conspiracies, one of them a conspiracy of resistance to tyrannical and anti-Christian government that involves the exposure of evil of the powerful in the quest for legitimacy for biblical faith, and the other a look at the lengths to which those in positions of power are willing to go to try to destroy the viability of a Christian counterculture within a progressive, secular, technocratic future.  This is the sort of volume it is easy to see becoming part of a longer series, if the author wishes to tell the story of a societal revival following this novel's events, or as a standalone project that prompts thought and reflection among believers with whom this book's thoughts about isolation and societal pressure and the consequences of rejecting the Gospel message will greatly resonate.  There is even a compelling villain here, who ends up being a particularly complicated person given numerous chances to repent only to end up in a very appropriate sort of place to meet his just fate, even as most of the other characters have a new beginning to look forward to, and some people end up serving as martyrs for the faith triumphant. There is a lot to like about this novel, and reading the book certainly gave me the interest of reading more of what the author has to offer.  There is a pretty explicit focus on divine providence within the book, and no question that the author wants to heavily hit various aspects of faith and the legitimacy of Christianity and the illegitimacy of any regime that would ban it.  The author is also pretty explicit about his preference for a focus on the freedom of thought that comes from the text as opposed the manipulation of thoughts and emotions that comes from the sort of technology that several of the characters are working on developing.  The author shows himself to be hostile to monopolistic and corrupt big business, a populist stand that many people will find appealing.  And as someone who doesn't read all that many novels within this genre, this book definitely gives me some encouragement in reading more and looking out for more of them. [1] See, for example: https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2018...

  22. 5 out of 5

    Sara Wise

    ** “That was the great mystery she had been working hard to uncover — the magical components of people that computers couldn’t detect. Perhaps there were more ways of figuring out someone’s true wants and needs, the wants and needs of a soul? To find not only logical and smart choices for them but also to fill in the holes they had inside.” “Believing wasn’t the issue, nor was knowing the truth. It was following and obeying and getting with the program and not having this awful uncertainty ...” * ** “That was the great mystery she had been working hard to uncover — the magical components of people that computers couldn’t detect. Perhaps there were more ways of figuring out someone’s true wants and needs, the wants and needs of a soul? To find not only logical and smart choices for them but also to fill in the holes they had inside.” “Believing wasn’t the issue, nor was knowing the truth. It was following and obeying and getting with the program and not having this awful uncertainty ...” ** Travis Thrasher brings a shockingly realistic future look into the United States in “American Omens,” a foreshadowing novel that reveals what could happen to our society if we allow it. Set in 2038, political and corporate America has made Christianity a crime. As more and more vocal Christians mysteriously disappear, never to be heard from again, a man calling himself the Reckoner steps forward to warn the world that judgement is coming. The perspective in “American Omens” switches between three main characters and the people the come in contact with — Cheyenne Burne, a top algorithm specialist at the company founded by trillionaire Jackson Heyford that oversees the digital identity system everyone is tied into, and whose father has mysteriously disappeared; Will Stewart, a former bookstore owner and believer struggling to survive, and who may have a surprising connection to Heyford; and Jon Dowland, an FBI agent sourced to find and eliminate the Reckoner. As Cheyenne and Will’s paths cross with intriguing characters like a saved-by-grace rapper and a man who warns of God’s impending plan, they each must decide if they have the faith to follow God or man. “American Omens” is an eerily telling tale of the road America could easily take if we aren’t careful. Thrasher also does an incredible job of building his characters — he gives them a depth and reality that most can relate to. His characters always face very real decisions, battling very real flaws and crises. And I wonder if he may have inserted a bit of himself into the character of Will. While reminding us that the “day of the Lord” is near (see Zephaniah 1:14), it reminds us of the dangers of having a world where everything is so inclusive and intrusive. A society where everything is tucked away in the clouds isn’t necessarily a safe society. Thrasher takes on several themes throughout his latest novel, including worry, manipulation, doubt, and thinking for oneself. But the two major themes, which go hand-in-hand, are faith and belief. This story makes us question how far are we willing to go for our faith, especially when the world is battling against us? And just what ... or who ... do we believe? As Cheyenne and her rapper friend Jazz discuss:  “ ‘You make it sound so easy,’ she said. ‘What?’ ‘Believing in something you can’t see.’ ‘Nah,’ he said to her. ‘That’s not the hard part. It’s having to live in this world with faith while you see everybody else around you living without it.’ ” This novel will definitely convict you ... to decide where you stand in your faith, and what you’re willing to do to defend it. I believe Thrasher wrote this story with the hope that it will continue in a series, but that it could also be a standalone if needed. I seriously HOPE we will see a second novel! (Hint, hint Multnomah). Five stars out of five. Multnomah provided this complimentary copy for my honest, unbiased review.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Patti Whitson Stephenson She Lives to Read

    This is a challenging book on many levels. It’s taken me a little while to decide how I wanted to review this book as there’s several different ways to write a review on it. I’m going to focus on the story itself and not debate in this review anything about the author’s theological view of end time events. I’m also going to share how it challenged me personally. We see this story unfold through the eyes of three main characters: Cheyenne, Dowland, and Will. Cheyenne is an unbeliever who is not an This is a challenging book on many levels. It’s taken me a little while to decide how I wanted to review this book as there’s several different ways to write a review on it. I’m going to focus on the story itself and not debate in this review anything about the author’s theological view of end time events. I’m also going to share how it challenged me personally. We see this story unfold through the eyes of three main characters: Cheyenne, Dowland, and Will. Cheyenne is an unbeliever who is not antagonist towards Christianity—she just doesn’t understand it. When her dad becomes a believer and then disappears, her main purpose becomes finding her dad. Dowland is an unbeliever who hates everything about Christianity and will do anything that he can to stop it. He’s an agent of the government who has no hesitation about murdering believers as soon as he finds them. Will is a believer whose bookstore was closed down because he sold books with a Christian viewpoint. He’s lost his courage and focus, and is struggling to take care of his family and his marriage. The author does a great job of shifting viewpoints among the three as he takes us through the story. The most mysterious character in the book, and the one who is driving the story, is The Reckoner. He is a modern day prophet that God is guiding to spread the message of salvation throughout the world. We learn some about his past life, but not enough to fill in all the blanks. To the last chapter of the book, we still don’t learn all we’d like about him. The setting is the year 2038. It’s hard to imagine the world in this shape. Technology is at it’s height. The author imagines some very interesting technology that I believe could very well come about in some form. That technology is at the core of this storyline and is somewhat disturbing to think about. SInce the Church has been forced to go underground, society is in a sad state. At the highest point of technological development, people are the most wretched. The heart of the book for me was a discussion between The Reckoner and Will in Chapter 4. In discussing spiritual warfare, The Reckoner asks Will this question: “Do you believe he’s (satan) real? Not a notion or an idea but real and true, a leader of an army of demons?” Then later in that conversation, The Reckoner makes this statement about spiritual warfare: “We are pacifists, not because of some strong belief to be so, but because we don’t have strong beliefs in the first place.” So, if you are reading this review, are you a pacifist in spiritual warfare? That’s the challenge of this suspenseful and intriguing book. It’s a question that all of us are facing, whether or not we want to acknowledge it. I’m hoping there’s a sequel to this book. I’d like to see how these characters face their next spiritual battle now that they are awake spiritually. I received a copy of this book from the publisher. All opinions are my own.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Ian

    It’s 2038 and America is being dominated by one organisation, Acatour, which is owed by a trillionaire, Jackson Heyford, who has far too much control over all things by the looks of thing. Thrasher presents a version of the antichrist from some interpretations of Biblical revelation. It’s a technology future, however, interestingly, all the major tech companies like apple, Amazon, FB, etc have imploded and now Acatour is king. Interestingly, Christianity is gradually being eradicated and Christia It’s 2038 and America is being dominated by one organisation, Acatour, which is owed by a trillionaire, Jackson Heyford, who has far too much control over all things by the looks of thing. Thrasher presents a version of the antichrist from some interpretations of Biblical revelation. It’s a technology future, however, interestingly, all the major tech companies like apple, Amazon, FB, etc have imploded and now Acatour is king. Interestingly, Christianity is gradually being eradicated and Christians are having to go underground not unlike what is happening at the moment in the Middle East and China. The story is told through the eyes of three people: Cheyenne, a 20-something tech guru who works and lives in the mother ship of Acatour; Will Stewart, a husband with three delightful young girls whose bookstore has just had to closedown due to external pressures; and Jon Dowland, a hitman of sorts who is out to find the leader of the Christian rebellion who is responsible for publishing fire and brimstone-style propaganda. This individual has been affectionately dubbed The Reckoner. The story moves well for the first two hundred or so pages and is fun to read as we move between the three POVs plus meet a bunch of other characters, most of whom are Christians involved in a plot to overthrow Heyford and Acatour. In order to succeed, they must engage Cheyenne and Will as they have vital connections, which can open up doors to enable the plot to succeed. It’s clever writing. I appreciated the faith arc that both Cheyenne and Will walked through the story. Cheyenne is initially unconvinced and struggles through most of the story to be convinced, however, makes a move forward by the end of it. I think this was a realistic progression and well portrayed. Will, on the other hand, is clearly a struggling believer and once again we see a realistic portrayal of his journey. I found the fire and brimstone messages a little tough but once again this is a common interpretation of the future that God will bring a reckoning upon the earth that will involve death and destruction like what was experienced in the Old Testament. I found the last hundred pages a little odd. The pace seemed to fall out of it and the prophecy that had been prominent in the beginning of the story didn’t seem to eventuate or if it did it wasn’t nearly as dramatic as it could have been. Accordingly, the story sort of just ran out of steam. It lacked a really good climactic moment when good and bad confront each other and duke it out (whatever form that might take). By all accounts this is a standalone novel but one was left with a feeling that we might see these characters once again in another story. I would still recommend the story simply because it has a good perspective of a future America that’s less than 20 years away and the character arcs are well done as you’d expect from such an experienced author as Travis Thrasher. I'd rate it a 3.5/5.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Nay Denise

    Received an ARC for review. This was an interesting read. Though I didn't find myself attached to any of the characters in the story, I thoroughly enjoyed the plot and pacing of the story. I also enjoyed the multiple POVs in the story as well. Each of the characters were their own and didn't confuse me. This is a sci-fi dystopian set in 2038 mainly in Chicago during a time that Christianity is banned, the Bible is illegal and faith is naught among the people. There is a modern day prophet who's pl Received an ARC for review. This was an interesting read. Though I didn't find myself attached to any of the characters in the story, I thoroughly enjoyed the plot and pacing of the story. I also enjoyed the multiple POVs in the story as well. Each of the characters were their own and didn't confuse me. This is a sci-fi dystopian set in 2038 mainly in Chicago during a time that Christianity is banned, the Bible is illegal and faith is naught among the people. There is a modern day prophet who's plan to wake up the people, bring back faith and reveal the evil on the earth. The plot thickened with each turn of the page and each character. This story also felt so real, I know this is real for those in third world countries, but for those in America I feel like this could definitely happen in the future with how the world is going. Cheyenne Burne was typical woman working and doing what she loved. She was contacted by her father the day she was fired from her job. That day was the wake-up call she needed to truly live and be free. Cheyenne was quiet sassy and comical. She took things in pieces and didn't rush. She was level-headed. Will Stewart is a bookstore owner -- that was until his store was shut down for selling "illegal" books about faith. Will was an interesting character in that he was married with three daughters. He pretty much despised his father and tried to do things on his own. In moving on his own he found himself miserable. It wasn't until he came across a man that he began to live his faith and beliefs out. Will was a timid man among all the bold characters in the story. He was also just as crucial to the plot as well. Dowland was a killer...a hit-man...he was also FBI. I did not care for him which made me enjoy him oddly. He was against God, Jesus and anything dealing with Christianity. He was all about a clean kill and completing a job. He was a confused man living in dark world. Dowland was a fool through and through, but he was also comical. I adored Jazz and Keith a ton. Malek was awesome as well. Seeing them all work for the Reckoner was amazing. As different as each of these characters were, they were all needed to make the plan succeed. They all melded well for the betterment of the people. The Reckoner was an interesting character. I had many ideas on who it was, but when it was finally revealed I was honestly shocked! He was such a common man with a common job, but his faith was powerful and he was set on fulfilling the work of God. He was a cool guy, but sometimes came off a bit harsh. That ending was interesting. I would have thought it'd been more dramatic, but I still enjoyed the end and how it closed off. Definitely would recommend it sci-fi & dystopian lovers.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Joan

    Thrasher imagines the U.S. twenty years in the future. Successive legislative acts have basically outlawed Christianity. Technology has advanced so that people have brain implants capable of receiving messages, showing photos, etc. Unknown to most, they can also be used for monitoring and manipulation. One corporate man is in control of nearly everything in the nation. FBI agents are manipulated to find and kill outspoken Christians. Yet there are a few faithful Christians who are determined to Thrasher imagines the U.S. twenty years in the future. Successive legislative acts have basically outlawed Christianity. Technology has advanced so that people have brain implants capable of receiving messages, showing photos, etc. Unknown to most, they can also be used for monitoring and manipulation. One corporate man is in control of nearly everything in the nation. FBI agents are manipulated to find and kill outspoken Christians. Yet there are a few faithful Christians who are determined to make public the nefarious technological control being perpetrated on the nation's citizens. The narrative follows three people, a programmer working for the evil technology company, an FBI agent enlisted to find and remove the man leading underground Christians, and a bookseller whose is forced to end his business because he made Christian material available. The main characters in these narratives do not intersect. While all three stories take place at the same time, I felt a little disconnect. I wish the paths of the main characters would have crossed. The character development was a little hap hazard, I thought. We do not learn the background of the FBI killer and the reason he does what he does until the second half of the book, for example. Readers will have much to think about as Thrasher imagines the future. People have generally drifted away from Christianity. There is little biblical literacy. Thrasher has included good information on recent legislation regarding hate crimes, for example, and how that might be used to outlaw Christian speech. There is a little conversation about spiritual warfare but it is not an active element of the plot. Technology futurists will like the ideas of digital drugs, floating serving trays, robot baristas, self driving cars, and more. There is a strong sense of the dangers of technology being used for evil intent, however. The brain implants can be programmed to influence an individual, a projection of the use of algorithms in social media today. This novel concentrates on imagining a possible future for the U.S. but contains little suspense. It has nothing to say about Christianity worldwide. I found that odd since there are some areas south of the equator where Christianity is flourishing. The novel does remind readers to be faithful in living Christlike and be aware of the impact we have on others. I received a complimentary advanced reading copy of this book from the publisher. My comments are an independent and honest review.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Connie Saunders

    I usually don't read futuristic fiction but this book is published by Multonomah and the subject matter and my respect for this publisher prompted me to give it a try. American Omens is set in 2038 and Christian believers are being targeted for their faith. As I read this I couldn't help but compare our current situation with the events being portrayed thirty years from now. Yes, it is fiction and yes, it may cause some people to cry "Paranoia" but I consider it possible and even prophetic. We A I usually don't read futuristic fiction but this book is published by Multonomah and the subject matter and my respect for this publisher prompted me to give it a try. American Omens is set in 2038 and Christian believers are being targeted for their faith. As I read this I couldn't help but compare our current situation with the events being portrayed thirty years from now. Yes, it is fiction and yes, it may cause some people to cry "Paranoia" but I consider it possible and even prophetic. We Americans are becoming complacent and more accepting of values that once would have been considered very unacceptable. I enjoy technology but this book suggests that it is being used to control all of us who use it so freely. Every social media post that we make and every statement that is available for public viewing may also be used as a way to challenge our freedoms and our beliefs in God. This book won't be for everyone and every reader won't agree with the premises being offered but it is certainly a book that deserves to be discussed among fellow believers. There are some very believable situations where the Christian believers are accused, tortured and even killed for their beliefs. Near the end of American Omens the author offers a statement that I plan to keep in my personal journal. A newly converted Christian, whose unexplained absence a year ago is the basis of this story, leaves a letter for his brilliant computer programmer daughter. He tells her that "I want you to see the power of faith. It's not fantasy. It's not scientific, and it's not computer generated. There won't be algorithms in Heaven. God doesn't need them." This quote is from an uncorrected proof so it may be changed in the published copy but I love the deep meaning. I also like that author Travis Thrasher uses Bible scripture throughout the story and that he allows his characters to learn to trust one another and to experience growth in their faith. I also appreciate that among all of the warnings there is also hope and encouragement! This book is Christian futuristic but it also has mystery and suspense for readers who enjoy those genres. I received this complimentary book from WaterBook and Multnomah Book Launch Team but I was under no obligation to review it. #americanomens #travisthrasher

  28. 5 out of 5

    Pam Graber

    A United States where Christianity is banned as hate speech? Where everyone has a chip implanted in their brain that communicates with whoever they want to, or searches what passes as the internet for information? Cell phones are virtually obsolete, as are computers. Set in the year 2038, American Omens presents a world where no Christian is safe. An elite hit team operates under the auspices of the FBI, taking out any vocal, influential Christian, resorting to murder when they can't simply disc A United States where Christianity is banned as hate speech? Where everyone has a chip implanted in their brain that communicates with whoever they want to, or searches what passes as the internet for information? Cell phones are virtually obsolete, as are computers. Set in the year 2038, American Omens presents a world where no Christian is safe. An elite hit team operates under the auspices of the FBI, taking out any vocal, influential Christian, resorting to murder when they can't simply discredit them. Think about that for just a minute, then consider some of the things that are happening already today. This book's setting is only 19 years into the future. Could this really be where today's America is headed?? Cheyenne Burke is a tech architect for Acatour, the most powerful tech giant in the world. One day she's at the top of the world, the next, her father disappears and she's escorted from her office in the Incen Tower and confined to her apartment in the same building. When a voice breaks into her Synapsys, a virtual impossibility, telling her to pack a small bag and leave, she obeys. Full of questions and hoping to find her father, Chy obeys, finding herself in an underground network led by someone called, The Reckoner. A modern-day prophet, The Reckoner is predicting the fall of Chicago - which has become the unofficial capitol of the US - and even more specifically, the fall of Acatour, in a cleansing reminiscent of Sodom and Gomorrah. While this book is billed as a "taut thriller", it's setting also puts it in a dystopian future. What I found most chilling was the complete plausibility of Thrasher's whole concept. More and more today, we are seeing instances where Christians are silenced, and beliefs are slammed as hateful. It's not a far stretch to believe that the day may come where professing belief in Jesus becomes not only ridiculed, but demonized. 2038? That's within my lifetime, and certainly within my children and grandchildren's lifetimes. Readers who enjoy dystopian, futuristic novels, will enjoy American Omens. This story is told from a Christian perspective, so ultimately, there is the knowledge that God wins, even though He "loses" a few skirmishes. This was eye-opening to me, as I read today's headlines, and see the attacks on Christianity, in both subtle and overt ways.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Lesa Caputo

    American Omens by Travis Thrasher seems to give a glimpse of what our future might look like! It’s a bit terrifying to think that might be true. In our lives we have always enjoyed freedom, freedom to speak and freedom to believe what we know to be true. What if the world is turned upside down, what are old truths have suddenly become against the law. What if your faith is suddenly against the law. It doesn’t seem as far fetched now as it might have a couple decades ago. . In this world we meet th American Omens by Travis Thrasher seems to give a glimpse of what our future might look like! It’s a bit terrifying to think that might be true. In our lives we have always enjoyed freedom, freedom to speak and freedom to believe what we know to be true. What if the world is turned upside down, what are old truths have suddenly become against the law. What if your faith is suddenly against the law. It doesn’t seem as far fetched now as it might have a couple decades ago. . In this world we meet three main characters. First is Cheyenne, she is an algorithm creator. We are in the future where everyone has an internal technology, this is frightening in itself, she works for the top technology firm and is unaware of what her programs are actually doing. On her way to work one day she is handed a note from her father, missing for some time since he converted to Christianity. Now she doesn’t know what to do and what is really going on in the world, but she is suddenly thrust into the world of the Reckoner, she is about to find out what is really happening. . Next we meet Will, he is closing his business, a bookstore. A Christian, he has been hassled and is now out of business for selling prohibited books. His family is in debt, his bookstore is closing, his marriage is frazzled. What does the stranger he meets when closing up shop for good want? He is about to be thrust into the world of the Reckoner too. . We meet Agent Dowland, an FBI Agent bent on destroying the Reckoner. The Reckoner is trying to wake up the world so they see what is going on with the internal technology, being told what they like, what they want, and get them to turn back to God. . This book is full of suspense, danger, and a lot of fear for the future. With the course we are on right now it doesn’t seem as impossible as one would hope. What we can do is pray. Pray that our freedom to worship the One True God is never challenged, never outlawed. The way the technology companies are going, it seems they have already judged Christians, and this is very scary. . I would recommend this book for every Christian to read. It may seem far-fetched, sci-fi even but is holds some truth, we need to hold on to our right to religious freedom at any cost. . I received an uncorrected proof copy from the publisher but was under no obligation to write a review.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Nyla

    Have you ever read a book that made you think this really could happen? It challenges your way of thinking? American Omens, The Coming Fight for Faith, is exactly like that. This 352 page thriller made me think what might be in the future if things do not change. This is the first book I have read by author Travis Thrasher. His style of writing kept me on the edge of my seat and turning the pages. The story played out like a movie before my eyes. It was easy to imagine the chaos, drama, conflict Have you ever read a book that made you think this really could happen? It challenges your way of thinking? American Omens, The Coming Fight for Faith, is exactly like that. This 352 page thriller made me think what might be in the future if things do not change. This is the first book I have read by author Travis Thrasher. His style of writing kept me on the edge of my seat and turning the pages. The story played out like a movie before my eyes. It was easy to imagine the chaos, drama, conflict and characters. Set in the future this imaginative, exciting novel had me on the edge of my seat as I turned the pages. Technology was much more advanced (anyone want a self making bed?!) but Christianity was something that could get one killed. Are we far from that now? The characters, both primary and secondary, were well defined. I felt like I knew each one. Cheyenne and I became friends. Her emotions transferred to me. I was anxious, afraid, determined, and felt part of her adventure. There was plenty of dialogue and it was penned smoothly. The conversations seemed real and not just thrown in. They were not ackward but realistic. The author has intricately woven characters, plots, and twists into his well planned thought provoking tale. It took me a while to read this because it is very suspenseful and packs a punch. Sometimes I needed to take a break or soak in what I had read, but then I needed to get back reading to know what was happening. This is no piece of fluff. It is heavy reading and I kept saying “what if this really happens in America?” The way things seem to be going, this isn’t so far fetched. I was tense while reading this, even scared at some point. Thrasher is a gifted author to do that. I definitely recommend this thrilling, hard hitting book. Fans of Christian contemporary, prophecy, action, intrigue, and end times will love this. I cannot express how good this is because it is so plausible. Hopefully it will be a call to action for our Nation to turn back to God before things do become this bad. My rating is 5 out of 5 stars. A copy was provided by the publisher but I was under no obligation to write a review.

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