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Je voudrais que quelqu'un m'attende quelque part Audiobook PACK [Book + 3 CD's - recording of 9 out of 12 stories]

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Les personnages décrits par Anna Gavalda sont de ceux que l'on peut croiser tous les jours. Elle les met en lumière avec un humour délicieux et obtient ainsi un savoureux mélange de simplicité, de merveilleuses et tragiques vérités quotidiennes. Les personnages de ses 12 nouvelles sont pleins d'espoirs futiles, ou de désespoir grave. Ils ne cherchent pas à changer le monde Les personnages décrits par Anna Gavalda sont de ceux que l'on peut croiser tous les jours. Elle les met en lumière avec un humour délicieux et obtient ainsi un savoureux mélange de simplicité, de merveilleuses et tragiques vérités quotidiennes. Les personnages de ses 12 nouvelles sont pleins d'espoirs futiles, ou de désespoir grave. Ils ne cherchent pas à changer le monde. Quoi qu'il leur arrive, ils n'ont rien à prouver. Ils ne sont pas héroïques. Simplement humains.


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Les personnages décrits par Anna Gavalda sont de ceux que l'on peut croiser tous les jours. Elle les met en lumière avec un humour délicieux et obtient ainsi un savoureux mélange de simplicité, de merveilleuses et tragiques vérités quotidiennes. Les personnages de ses 12 nouvelles sont pleins d'espoirs futiles, ou de désespoir grave. Ils ne cherchent pas à changer le monde Les personnages décrits par Anna Gavalda sont de ceux que l'on peut croiser tous les jours. Elle les met en lumière avec un humour délicieux et obtient ainsi un savoureux mélange de simplicité, de merveilleuses et tragiques vérités quotidiennes. Les personnages de ses 12 nouvelles sont pleins d'espoirs futiles, ou de désespoir grave. Ils ne cherchent pas à changer le monde. Quoi qu'il leur arrive, ils n'ont rien à prouver. Ils ne sont pas héroïques. Simplement humains.

30 review for Je voudrais que quelqu'un m'attende quelque part Audiobook PACK [Book + 3 CD's - recording of 9 out of 12 stories]

  1. 4 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    Je Voudrais Que Quelqu'un M'attende Quelque Part = I Wish Someone Were Waiting for Me Somewhere, Anna Gavalda I Wish Someone Were Waiting for Me Somewhere was first published in 1999 under the title Je Voudrais Que Quelqu'un M'attende Quelque Part that met with both critical acclaim and commercial success, selling more than three-quarters of a million copies in her native France and winning the 2000 Grand Prix RTL-Lire. عنوانهای چاپ شده در ایران: «دوست داشتم کسی جایی منتظرم باشد»؛ «کاش کسی جایی م Je Voudrais Que Quelqu'un M'attende Quelque Part = I Wish Someone Were Waiting for Me Somewhere, Anna Gavalda I Wish Someone Were Waiting for Me Somewhere was first published in 1999 under the title Je Voudrais Que Quelqu'un M'attende Quelque Part that met with both critical acclaim and commercial success, selling more than three-quarters of a million copies in her native France and winning the 2000 Grand Prix RTL-Lire. عنوانهای چاپ شده در ایران: «دوست داشتم کسی جایی منتظرم باشد»؛ «کاش کسی جایی منتظرم باشد»؛ نویسنده: آنا گاوالدا؛ تاریخ نخستین خوانش روز بیستم ماه ژانویه سال2007میلادی عنوان: دوست داشتم کسی جایی منتظرم باشد؛ نویسنده: آنا گاوالدا؛ مترجم: الهام دارچینیان؛ تهران، قطره، سال1386؛ در198ص؛ شابک9643416119؛ موضوع: داستانهای نویسندگان فرانسه - سده 20م عنوان: دوست داشتم کسی جایی منتظرم باشد؛ نویسنده: آنا گاوالدا؛ مترجم: سولماز واحدی کیا؛ تهران، کوله پشتی، سال1393؛ در144ص؛ شابک9786006687926؛ عنوان: کاش کسی جایی منتظرم باشد؛ نویسنده: آنا گاوالدا؛ مترجم: ناهید فروغان؛ تهران، ماهی، سال1394؛ در207ص؛ شابک9789647948463؛ داستانهای: «در حال و هوای سن ژرمن»؛ «سقط جنین»؛ «این مرد و زن»؛ «اپل تاچ»؛ «آمبر»؛ «مرخصی»؛ «حقیقت روز»؛ «نخ بخیه»؛ «پسر کوچولو»؛ «سال ها»؛ «تیک تاک»؛ و «سرانجام»؛ نقل از متن داستان کوتاه «در حال و هوای سن ژرمن»: (دیدم از دور می­آید؛ نمی­دانم، شاید حالت بی ­قید قدم ­زدنش توجهم را جلب کرد، یا لبه ­ی پالتویش، که گویی جلوتر از او حرکت می­کرد ...؛ خلاصه در بیست متری او بودم، و خوب می­دانستم، که از دستش نخواهم داد؛ چندان هم ناکام نماندم، به یک قدمی­ ام رسید، دیدم نگاهم می­کند؛ لبخندی شوخ طبعانه زدم؛ از نوع لبخندهای الهه ی عشق «رومی»­ها، که همچو تیری از کمان رها می­شود؛ البته اندکی محافظه ­کارانه ­تر؛ او نیز به من لبخند زد، همانطور که به راهم ادامه می­دادم، همچنان لبخند بر لب داشتم، به یاد «رهگذر بودلر» افتادم - کمی پیش­تر که از «ساگان» گفتم: حتما متوجه شدید حافظه ی ادبی خوبی دارم!- آرام­تر قدم برداشتم، سعی داشتم به یاد بیاورم...؛ زنی بلند بالا، باریک اندام، در پیراهن بلند سوگواری...؛ دنباله­ اش یادم نبود...؛ بعد از آن...؛ زنی عبور کرد، بله دست زیبایش را بلند کرد، ریسه ­ی گلی در دستش پیچ و تاب می­خورد...؛ و در آخر، آه این تویی که دوستت میداشتم، ای کاش می­دانستی؛ هر بار همین طور تمام می­شود)؛ پایان نقل تاریخ بهنگام رسانی 17/07/1399هجری خورشیدی؛ 25/07/1400هجری خورشیدی؛ ا. شربیانی

  2. 4 out of 5

    Petra going to Mexico to hospital again, so hiatus

    The title says it all. I'm lonely. So, I'm off to Cancun tomorrow to hospital and then Miami on the 27th and ... back on the dating apps. Maybe someday I will go to Miami and somebody will be waiting for me there. Or somewhere. Richie wrote that he had read my letter over and over and over, and wanted to chat 'soon'. Soon is like tomorrow, never comes. (view spoiler)[Maybe I will get this book for the plane tomorrow. This is how it goes, boat, long taxi ride, plane, plane, long taxi ride. 12 hours The title says it all. I'm lonely. So, I'm off to Cancun tomorrow to hospital and then Miami on the 27th and ... back on the dating apps. Maybe someday I will go to Miami and somebody will be waiting for me there. Or somewhere. Richie wrote that he had read my letter over and over and over, and wanted to chat 'soon'. Soon is like tomorrow, never comes. (view spoiler)[Maybe I will get this book for the plane tomorrow. This is how it goes, boat, long taxi ride, plane, plane, long taxi ride. 12 hours... so it's like a long haul and I need something to read. (hide spoiler)]

  3. 4 out of 5

    Suzanne

    This is what it means to write with economy. All of these short stories – and most of them are very short— are told in the first person. No flowery metaphors here. The voices do the heavy lifting, creating these little gems that are revealing and poignant. What Gavalda does with so few words is amazing. While many are emotionally affecting and thought-provoking, there is humor too. The end of “Junior” is the funniest thing I’ve read in a while. There is much said on Goodreads about the unreliabi This is what it means to write with economy. All of these short stories – and most of them are very short— are told in the first person. No flowery metaphors here. The voices do the heavy lifting, creating these little gems that are revealing and poignant. What Gavalda does with so few words is amazing. While many are emotionally affecting and thought-provoking, there is humor too. The end of “Junior” is the funniest thing I’ve read in a while. There is much said on Goodreads about the unreliability of first person narrators, as though it were a formulaic rule that a first-person narrative is always unreliable. I don’t think that’s necessarily true, at least no more so than it is for people telling stories in real life, who are sometimes less than forthcoming for various good or bad reasons, or self-deluded, or simply don’t have all the information. I also think it’s not as important as whether or not a narrator is self-aware. The very fact of the narrator’s self-awareness is what makes several of this stories work so well. They know what their problem is. Not that it changes anything. But they know. Other times their character traits, and not necessarily undesirable ones, lead them in directions that will wreck their lives, but circumstances have tripped them up. But character is fate. Deal with it. My favorites among the dozen stories in this volume include “Courting Rituals of the Saint-Germain-des- Pres,” “Amber,” “Leave,” “Lead Story,” “Catgut,” and “Junior.” The simplicity and the economy with which Gavalda tells a complete, plot-driven, arc-fully constructed story in very few pages, and the vivid voices used to do this, completely blew me away. I will be reading more of her. A shout-out, too, to translator Karen L. Marker.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Berengaria di Rossi

    3 stars Maybe it's because my ultra-casual, hipster French is lacking, but I found a number of these highly praised stories not only difficult to follow at times, but also kind of boring. Towards the end, I was thinking oh get a move on way too often and skimming forward through the bla bla just to reach the end. There were a few stories that I enjoyed quite a lot, though: Cet homme et cette femme, Ambre, Pendent des annees, IIG and my personal favourite, Le fait du jour. These are on point, 3 stars Maybe it's because my ultra-casual, hipster French is lacking, but I found a number of these highly praised stories not only difficult to follow at times, but also kind of boring. Towards the end, I was thinking oh get a move on way too often and skimming forward through the bla bla just to reach the end. There were a few stories that I enjoyed quite a lot, though: Cet homme et cette femme, Ambre, Pendent des annees, IIG and my personal favourite, Le fait du jour. These are on point, stylistically highly competent, and clearly have a deeper meaning to them. Others in the collection, I'm not so sure about. Or maybe it's a French thing and I wouldn't understand. Not recommended for anyone below C1 in French.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Pris robichaud

    Is That So Much To Ask?, 5 Mar 2006 "I shifted somewhat abruptly. She stood back up behind me and put both hands flat on my shoulders. She said, "I'm going to go. I want you not to move and not to turn around. Please I am begging of you. I didn't move I didn't want to anyway, because I didn't want her to see me with my eyes swollen and my face all contorted. I waited a while, and then headed to my car." Anna Gavalda has seen a lot in her life. This novel with twelve short stories of people tryin Is That So Much To Ask?, 5 Mar 2006 "I shifted somewhat abruptly. She stood back up behind me and put both hands flat on my shoulders. She said, "I'm going to go. I want you not to move and not to turn around. Please I am begging of you. I didn't move I didn't want to anyway, because I didn't want her to see me with my eyes swollen and my face all contorted. I waited a while, and then headed to my car." Anna Gavalda has seen a lot in her life. This novel with twelve short stories of people trying to connect shows her capturing their inner dialogues with perfect pitch. Reaching out, knowing they are missing something and moving to the center to find exactly what it is. These stories, all small snippets of life. Coming-apart love, met-again love, aborted love, unknown love and of love lost all woven from separate stories into a theme. The saddest is the "Pregnancy". The story of a new love and the nine months it takes to grow this new love, only to have an unknown enemy defeat it. In "For Years' a man searches for his lost love. Not reality searching but in his mind. He knows where she lives but not why she left. Both of them have moved on but he knows not why. And, then one day twelve years later he hears from her. In "Courting Rituals of the Saint-Germaine-des-Pres", an attractive woman smiles at a passing man, and he pursues her. He asks her out to dinner. They meet hours later, both with a purpose of their own. They are attracted to each other and she is thinking of what might happen after dinner, when all of a sudden his cell phone goes off. At that moment he shuts it off, but she sees him scrumptiously look a number of the caller. She knows that the evening is over, forever. each of these satires is better then the other, each one tells a separate but seemingly similar tale. These are the stories of a friend who is telling you bits and pieces of life. These are lively stories told with flourish and style. There is variety that surprises you, Parisian chic or hilarious, sophisticated farce. Anna Gavalda sees through ordinary appearances to our hidden longings. Highly Recommended. prisrob 3-4-06

  6. 5 out of 5

    Lysiane

    I was first attracted to the book by its title that I really liked and still do, I just loved the simplicity of it that means so much. But then I was really disappointed when I started reading it, it was BORING. Hear me out, i'm fond of boring stories/life stories where almost nothing happen cause like they say in Mr Nobody "life is like a french movie, most of the time nothing happens" so I like the truth that it implies. But this was just too much...I don't know how many times I gave up on thi I was first attracted to the book by its title that I really liked and still do, I just loved the simplicity of it that means so much. But then I was really disappointed when I started reading it, it was BORING. Hear me out, i'm fond of boring stories/life stories where almost nothing happen cause like they say in Mr Nobody "life is like a french movie, most of the time nothing happens" so I like the truth that it implies. But this was just too much...I don't know how many times I gave up on this book before succeeding to finish it! Too much description for nothing concrete, characters for me undefined and too distant. I really wanted to like this book cause its title sounded so good to me, meant so much but I just can't... Maybe after some time I'll take it back again and see if I see it with another sight but for now I'll stay to the title.

  7. 5 out of 5

    David

    This collection of short stories by Anna Gavalda, a former high-school teacher and mother of two, won the Academie Francaise Short Story Award in 2000. The citation mentions the 'dry wit and almost involuntary elegance' apparent in the twelve stories. The translation (by Karen Marker, published in 2003) manages to preserve both the wit and elegance - these stories were fun to read. Courting rituals of the Saint-Germain-de-Pres, a country vet's terrible revenge, or an indelible encounter between This collection of short stories by Anna Gavalda, a former high-school teacher and mother of two, won the Academie Francaise Short Story Award in 2000. The citation mentions the 'dry wit and almost involuntary elegance' apparent in the twelve stories. The translation (by Karen Marker, published in 2003) manages to preserve both the wit and elegance - these stories were fun to read. Courting rituals of the Saint-Germain-de-Pres, a country vet's terrible revenge, or an indelible encounter between a wild boar and a Jaguar which cannot end well; there are stories about longing and loss, a few almost unbearably poignant; others hilariously funny. Remarkably, in many cases, it's only in the last few lines that Gavalda reveals her hand. Many of the stories reach the level of Dorothy Parker at her best, which is to say they are very good indeed. Gavalda shifts easily between male and female perspectives; in almost every case the result is moving, without being sentimental, and is told with a dry, often devastating, wit.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Marzieh Torabi

    3.5 Stars

  9. 5 out of 5

    Tiffany

    I've always been fascinated by the French because they have this sneering way of communicating they are completely above mediocrity. It might be apocryphal, but I've bought into it. Remember that fabulous film "Diva"? The bald guy who dedicated his life to assembling a 10,000 piece puzzle? In white? He was so cooooooooooooool ... Loads of internal coolness. That white canvas was just a token of his Zen-like internal refrigeration. It's possible I've been living under a misapprehension for most o I've always been fascinated by the French because they have this sneering way of communicating they are completely above mediocrity. It might be apocryphal, but I've bought into it. Remember that fabulous film "Diva"? The bald guy who dedicated his life to assembling a 10,000 piece puzzle? In white? He was so cooooooooooooool ... Loads of internal coolness. That white canvas was just a token of his Zen-like internal refrigeration. It's possible I've been living under a misapprehension for most of my life that the French are better than the rest of us because of their exquisite sensibilities. Did it take Nicholas Sarkozy to show us that underneath it all they're really just as arriviste as the rest of us? Certainly you'd think so reading Ms. Gavalda and her foray into the class-based social shake-out of France of the 90's and the aughts. This book is peopled with awful human beings who are completely caught up in their mundane and banal existences. The first of these stories--"I.I.G."--is about a woman newly incubating life. Her interior landscape is lunar at best. Her thoughts go like this: Bébébébébébébébébébébébébébébébébébébébébébébébébébébébébébébébébébébébébébébébébébébébébébébébébébébébébébébébébébébébébébébébébébébébébébébébébébébébébébébébébébébébé...." ad nauseum. (view spoiler)[When her baby dies and she is forced to give birth to a lifeless fetus, I was almost relieved that the train of her tedious, blank, baby-making blandness had been derailed. (hide spoiler)] Perhaps I owe something to Ms. Gavalda for finally stripping the scales from my eyes. The more I read the more I realize that this is precisely what she has set out to do: reveal the difference between what people playing their public roles think they are doing and how their actions really affect people around them. Most of these people are not striving for excellence, although they frequently dwell on their innate superiority. In "Permission" a young man is on leave from his military service. If ever there was a being living in a deluded world of judgment and otiosity this is he. He describes the presence of others around him as definitive proof there is no God. Could it be possible others are saying the same thing about him? "Je voudrais que quelqu'un m'attende quelque part" is uttered by the afore mentioned youthful blot. He's a sort of non-entity who doesn't fit in with his peers, his family, his society. While he's wrestling with his contempt for others he's also longing for recognition, belonging, community. Except it's just not cool to admit these things. It's much cooler to be an expressionless star-fucker-slash-photographer who is sleeping with such a messed up musician that the only thing on him she can find in working order is his hands. Yeah, not cool to want things. It's not cool to admit to longing for community--and yet, isn't it universal? What is Ms. Gavalda showing us? Is there evolution of understanding going on? Or has there always been this décalage between desire to be thought worthwhile and desire for being accepted warts and all? Has no popular novelist ever bothered to write about it? If this is the case then Ms. Gavalda is doing a much better job of unwinding my expectations because I started off scoffing at the lack of ornament in her writing. Je voudrais que quelqu'un m'attende quelque part This title leans heavily on the subjunctive. The subjunctive tense is one of the best things about the French language (of which there are many; imagine having a special word for contradicting a negative question: "si!" It is just so clarifying and smart. Why can't we have one in English?!?!) The subjunctive is a verb tense that is largely obsolete in English although remnants of it still exist; when it is used it is invariably used incorrectly. I misuse it myself. The gift of the subjunctive is to hint (subtly) at truthfulness. This is not to say the French are the ultimately truthful race; they do, however, unarguably understand precision and nuance, which is why they are such good theoretical physicists and philosophers. Because the French grok that an idea, thought, belief, conviction, etc. is formless it can not be accepted as a fact. Thus one uses the subjunctive when something is not yet out of the realm of possibility. One also uses the subjunctive for prognostications, forecasts, and doubts. In English we indicate the precarious nature of these types of statements by using aspects, which is just the teeniest, tiniest bit less elegant than using a verb tense. An especially velvety use of the subjunctive is for necessity. Il faut que + subjunctive means "it's essential that ..." or "one must ..." Ha-ha-ha, those time traveling whip wielding language engineers of yore knew that just because one must doesn't mean one will. Because Ms. Gavalda has decided to title her book with the inconclusive subjunctive, we must take everything we encounter there as tinged with possibility rather than probability. The young kid who distains others as much as he distains himself--does he really long to belong?; the heroin-shooting rapidly-aging musician--does he love the girl? or is it role-playing?; the god-awful B.C.B.G's driving their 60,000€ car with the wonky wiper--are they really so willing to swap having a real life for a nice weekend house with all the trimmings? ... I believe we are meant to wonder if they are all as rotten and blank and repulsive as they appear. --- Ms. Gavalda has a certain amused contempt for people. She holds special distaste for her characters with class insecurity. I love how often her characters make sure you know they are not ploucs. ("Plouc" is onomatopoetic word for low life; only the French could give an actual sound to snobbery.) The story "Le Fait du Jour" was a soft-ball I saw coming--pleasurable nonetheless--and its companion "Pendant des Années" both play on middle-aged male solipsism. (Or is that a tautology?) "Cat-Gut" set me back on my feet. (view spoiler)[Every woman in the world has at least once in her life plotted evil ways to get back at her aggressors--here for once we have a woman who has the means, motive and opportunity to do so and she does it creepily and well. (hide spoiler)] Her characters are always unlikeable but her stories have infinite pay-off. A special mention of"Junior", which, wow, I'm still chuckling over. Do read it then call up your aging parents and read it to them. From the way her books are splashed all over airports, I dove into this expecting that Ms. Gavalda was another Sophie Kinsella (note the use of subjunctive!) But no, she may actually be closer to Guy de Maupassant.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Raed

    This collection of short stories (12 different daily life) was good, yes, but not brilliant. The best thing about this book was its name 😁 ⭐⭐⭐ but not recommended !

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jae

    "The important thing isn't where you are, it's the state of mind you're in." "The important thing isn't where you are, it's the state of mind you're in."

  12. 4 out of 5

    Her Royal Orangeness

    “Life can be changed in just one fateful moment.” These are the words printed on the cover of “I Wish Someone Were Waiting for Me Somewhere” and they perfectly encapsulate the overarching theme that connects these stories. The stories in this collection are, for the most part, startling in a very understated way. For example, “Lead Story,” my favorite in this collection, is about a man who makes a decision to do something that doesn’t seem particularly out-of-the-ordinary, but leads to a devastat “Life can be changed in just one fateful moment.” These are the words printed on the cover of “I Wish Someone Were Waiting for Me Somewhere” and they perfectly encapsulate the overarching theme that connects these stories. The stories in this collection are, for the most part, startling in a very understated way. For example, “Lead Story,” my favorite in this collection, is about a man who makes a decision to do something that doesn’t seem particularly out-of-the-ordinary, but leads to a devastating consequence. Anna Gavalda is gifted at creating characters. In just a few pages, she presented characters so well developed and complex that they seemed like real people. But what I admired most about the stories is how they lingered in my brain. The imagery was fresh in my mind for days after reading them, and I continued to puzzle over the subtle life questions that Gavalda poised. There were a few stories that I didn’t like much at all, but I think that was more a matter of a culture barrier than the quality of the writing. (Gavalda is a French author.) Overall, “I Wish Someone Were Waiting for Me Somewhere” is quite good and I enjoyed it. (3.5 Stars)

  13. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    This collection of short stories offers a good, satisfying mix of different voices, tones, and emotions. One of the things Anna Gavalda excels at is accurately reproducing the look and feel of our inner monologues to ourselves -- the self-doubt, guilt, awkwardness, fear, and muddle, but also the hopes, crushes, day dreams, inside jokes, and imagined futures that percolate through our brains on any given day. These stories also go by in a breeze that makes her writing seem effortless, but the the This collection of short stories offers a good, satisfying mix of different voices, tones, and emotions. One of the things Anna Gavalda excels at is accurately reproducing the look and feel of our inner monologues to ourselves -- the self-doubt, guilt, awkwardness, fear, and muddle, but also the hopes, crushes, day dreams, inside jokes, and imagined futures that percolate through our brains on any given day. These stories also go by in a breeze that makes her writing seem effortless, but the themes are heavy enough that she can never be accused of vapidness or silliness.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Lena

    A strange collection of short stories in that they're not quite quotable, but often incredibly lovely and poignant. Some of the stories fall a little flat but the ones that work work so well that it makes up for it ("Courting Rituals of the Saint-Germain-des-Pres," "Leave," "For Years," and "Clic-Clac"). A strange collection of short stories in that they're not quite quotable, but often incredibly lovely and poignant. Some of the stories fall a little flat but the ones that work work so well that it makes up for it ("Courting Rituals of the Saint-Germain-des-Pres," "Leave," "For Years," and "Clic-Clac").

  15. 4 out of 5

    Sara Raquel

    dnf, boring:') dnf, boring:')

  16. 5 out of 5

    Justine

    Short stories, from her. Touching :)

  17. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    The last book we read in French class as an example of contemporary, modern and popular literature. It is a collection of short stories, where the common themes usually are such as love and every day situations. Sometimes humour, sometimes tragedy. The titles is chosen, I believe, because "waiting" really is what the lives of all these people is marked by. Waiting for a lover, for a child to be born, to find a sense of belonging in life, to a letter from an editor to arrive... I prefer the story The last book we read in French class as an example of contemporary, modern and popular literature. It is a collection of short stories, where the common themes usually are such as love and every day situations. Sometimes humour, sometimes tragedy. The titles is chosen, I believe, because "waiting" really is what the lives of all these people is marked by. Waiting for a lover, for a child to be born, to find a sense of belonging in life, to a letter from an editor to arrive... I prefer the story the title is taken from ("Permission") because it's kind of sweet and I can sort of relate to the main character in a way, even if it's really not that surprising. And I like the one called "Ambre", because it has a hopeful tone to it, despite the fact that the main character is a famous pop star who has lost big parts of his live to drugs. A bit chliché as it may be, I kind of like the idea of redemption through love and a second chance. The problem I see with it is that it's a bit banal. The writer wants to amuse and surprise but there are no real surprises and it's like everything is "ready-made", already served for the reader, too transparent. And most of the stories just don't interests me. The way the first one starts kind of proves my point, in a way: Saint-Germain-des-Prés!?... Je sais ce que vous allez me dire: "Mon Dieu, mais c'est d'un commun, ma chérie, Sagan l'a fait bien avant toi et tellllement mieux!" Je sais. Here, Gavalda tries to disarm the reader with what can look like self-irony... I doesn't really work for me. I really think that there are more interesting stories to be found out there. The language was a bit hard for me to follow at times because it's very modern, colloquial even, but I think that's one reason why Gavalda is popular. Many people probably find it refreshing. Myself, I don't really like the style and the tone of voice of the writer... (I can say this because I read the book translated to Swedish a couple of years ago!) The reason I liked Ensemble, c'est tout a lot was probably mostly because I found the plot and the characters much more interesting. Still, I gave the book two stars because it wasn't crap... it's nice enough for a moment's diversion for example on an airplane, which was where I first read it. It's hard, if not impossible, to tell which of the authors of today that will be in tomorrow's books of the history of literature... Still, I think there must be more interesting collections of short stories to use as example of something "contemporary" in a French literature class.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Abeer Hoque

    I wish the oceans didn't separate the lit worlds so. British books sometimes make it over this way, and sometimes translations of foreign language books, but not enough. So it took a hearty recommendation from a friend who lives in Paris for me to pick up this fabulous French book by Anna Gavalda: I Wish Someone Were Waiting for Me Somewhere, which took the French world by storm, and then went international. I myself devoured it in two days. IWSWWfMS is a collection of stories, some so short as I wish the oceans didn't separate the lit worlds so. British books sometimes make it over this way, and sometimes translations of foreign language books, but not enough. So it took a hearty recommendation from a friend who lives in Paris for me to pick up this fabulous French book by Anna Gavalda: I Wish Someone Were Waiting for Me Somewhere, which took the French world by storm, and then went international. I myself devoured it in two days. IWSWWfMS is a collection of stories, some so short as to be vignettes, but don't imagine that narrative or character are sacrificed, not even for a split second. The personalities leap off the page, and the stories just get better and better (and they start off great). The range of characters is awesome, and their stories precisely and deeply described. The language is fresh and modern (perhaps a little too much so, but that's maybe my only complaint - it comes off almost slangy and careless sometimes - but maybe this is the translation). I can remember almost every one of the stories now, but the ones that jumped out at me included the one about the returning military soldier who falls for his brother's girlfriend, the one about a pregnancy, the one about a chance encounter between two would be lovers, the one about the two rich boys who take daddy's car out to a party, the one about a female vet working in a rural village, and the one about the sales rep whose mindless error changes his life. Oh I remember another complaint - unimaginative titles, so I won't bother looking them up for this review. But don't worry, you don't need them. You can read IWSWWfMS in one delicious shot, and you won't regret it.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Andy

    I liked this a lot. It seems like recently I've been reading collections of short stories just to shit on them, but I felt like these stories really justified the format. They had a zing or an oomph to them that I enjoyed very much. I think that, in some ways, these stories appealed to the part of me that makes me tear up during romantic comedies (which is something I promised I wasn't going to volunteer anymore; oops). That's not to imply that I think they are just junk food or anything like tha I liked this a lot. It seems like recently I've been reading collections of short stories just to shit on them, but I felt like these stories really justified the format. They had a zing or an oomph to them that I enjoyed very much. I think that, in some ways, these stories appealed to the part of me that makes me tear up during romantic comedies (which is something I promised I wasn't going to volunteer anymore; oops). That's not to imply that I think they are just junk food or anything like that. On the contrary, they were full of intelligence and wit and all sorts of disturbing things. Just that I think "'What are they about, your stories?' 'Everything.' 'Oh.' '...' '...' 'But mostly about love.' 'Oh?'" was a nice bit of metadescription.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Catie

    This collection of short stories is as easy to read as pure fluff, but has substance and passion behind it. There are twelve stories in this book, all about ten pages long, which I gleefully devoured in an afteroon. The first-person narrators speak directly to their reader in conversational tones. One of the things I love best about Gavalda's style is that she's sparse. Her pen-strokes are never wasted; no line of melodramatic adjectives strung on to fifty-cent words. She is at once precise and v This collection of short stories is as easy to read as pure fluff, but has substance and passion behind it. There are twelve stories in this book, all about ten pages long, which I gleefully devoured in an afteroon. The first-person narrators speak directly to their reader in conversational tones. One of the things I love best about Gavalda's style is that she's sparse. Her pen-strokes are never wasted; no line of melodramatic adjectives strung on to fifty-cent words. She is at once precise and vivid. I still favor her novel "Hunting and Gathering" (have yet to read "Someone I Loved") but am VERY satisfied by my most recent does of Gavalda.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Charlie

    A collection of short stories set in Paris. We are allowed a glimpse into the -very- mundane life of the characters. Each perfectly encapsulates the bleakness of routine, the isolation and loneliness we all feel at times. Yet I really disliked the writing, it felt almost clinical, like the author couldn't bare to get to close to the characters, which for the most part were pretty unlikeable in the first place. A collection of short stories set in Paris. We are allowed a glimpse into the -very- mundane life of the characters. Each perfectly encapsulates the bleakness of routine, the isolation and loneliness we all feel at times. Yet I really disliked the writing, it felt almost clinical, like the author couldn't bare to get to close to the characters, which for the most part were pretty unlikeable in the first place.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Maria Ella

    The prose is so intimate, yet intrusive. When I was reading some of the stories, I feel like I was watching #Aldub, looking at their eyes full of unspeakable truth, but concealed with the surrounding "phenomenon". Between you and them, there is a promise that is meant to keep. The prose is so intimate, yet intrusive. When I was reading some of the stories, I feel like I was watching #Aldub, looking at their eyes full of unspeakable truth, but concealed with the surrounding "phenomenon". Between you and them, there is a promise that is meant to keep.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Donnell

    So far I really like this book. I will definitely be reading more from this author.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Marja

    Oh, how I love this book. Ever since I read this for the first time in early 2000's, it has been one of my all time favorite short story collections. After this second reading, I still love it. Each short story paints such a vivid picture with only few words. The stories are shocking, hilarious and heartfelt. Anna Gavalda, when you are good, you are really good. Oh, how I love this book. Ever since I read this for the first time in early 2000's, it has been one of my all time favorite short story collections. After this second reading, I still love it. Each short story paints such a vivid picture with only few words. The stories are shocking, hilarious and heartfelt. Anna Gavalda, when you are good, you are really good.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Masu

    I liked it

  26. 5 out of 5

    Alex Kogay

    some stories are better than others but all of them are atmospheric and carry some sort of ... je ne sais quoi

  27. 4 out of 5

    Mandy

    Courting Rituals <3 Pregnant <3 For Years !! <333 Clic-Clac <3 The art of love, longing and loss and everything in between.

  28. 4 out of 5

    F

    it's about the life and very realistic . it has fantastic writing.I think everyone should read this book. it's about the life and very realistic . it has fantastic writing.I think everyone should read this book.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Heather Fineisen

    Short chapters are short stories with the French charm. Love, loss and living. This was my go to book to carry around in my purse. Author is solid.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Caroline

    I raise my hand unceasingly in French class to ask exactly about words, but Gavalda is as good as any dictionary: "A un moment, elle m'a demandé la difference entre désarroi (aimlessness) et désoeuvrement (confusion)." And the moments of kindred spirit make sense: "When New York Review of Books Classics republished Stoner, it was reviewed quite well, but sold modestly at first — until it caught the attention of Anna Gavalda, one of France's best-selling novelists. She had to read Stoner in English I raise my hand unceasingly in French class to ask exactly about words, but Gavalda is as good as any dictionary: "A un moment, elle m'a demandé la difference entre désarroi (aimlessness) et désoeuvrement (confusion)." And the moments of kindred spirit make sense: "When New York Review of Books Classics republished Stoner, it was reviewed quite well, but sold modestly at first — until it caught the attention of Anna Gavalda, one of France's best-selling novelists. She had to read Stoner in English — there wasn't a French translation — but she says she still felt a deep connection with the book. "I think it's a book I could have written myself because I feel really close to the author and the narrator, who, in my opinion are probably a bit of the same person," she said. Gavalda liked it so much that she asked her editor to buy the rights, so she could translate it herself. And the book took off. "My books sell really well in France," she explained, "so when all the other European editors saw that it was me who translated this book, they were all curious about why Anna Gavalda translated it, and so they all bought the rights." Back in New York, Frank can only speculate as to why Stoner has so moved European readers like Gavalda. "[Stoner] resonates I think, partly, because of the art with which the story has been told," he said. "So even as he sets the scene in Columbia, Missouri, at the same time, it could be anywhere." (from NPR: http://www.npr.org/2013/05/19/1847706...)

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