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First, They Were Children: Origin Stories of 7 People Who Changed the World: Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, Walt Disney, Albert Einstein, Henry Ford, Nikola Tesla, Thomas Edison

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WHAT MADE THESE PEOPLE SO SMART? Could the lessons apply to you, or your children? Was their genius truly a gift, or was it created through hard work? A few rare people are responsible for the modern world we live in. These people had the vision and drive to discover, invent, and create a world significantly different than the one they were born into.First, They Were C WHAT MADE THESE PEOPLE SO SMART? Could the lessons apply to you, or your children? Was their genius truly a gift, or was it created through hard work? A few rare people are responsible for the modern world we live in. These people had the vision and drive to discover, invent, and create a world significantly different than the one they were born into.First, They Were Children examines the important but ignored part of so many biographies: childhood. The stories in this book take you through the youth and teenage years of seven extraordinary people, so you can share in their development, their struggles, and their successes.Perhaps more importantly, it tackles the larger question of how rebellious, inattentive, bored, or lazy children can grow into world-wide icons of history; children who were told by their teachers they were “slow” or too “addled” to learn, created a future that previous generations could not even dream of.These children were different, but different isn’t necessarily a disability. Learn about the desires and motivations that drove them, and see how they set their own goals and followed their own paths.You may even discover a new perspective and appreciation of your children’s, or your own, childhood.Extracted from more than 50 sources of information, and combined here in one place, are the little-known childhoods of seven fascinating people.Each childhood biography only takes about a half hour to read, but will surprise you with many insights and stories that most people are unaware of.Buy this book today! Enter the world of these children and their families. See how geniuses are made.


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WHAT MADE THESE PEOPLE SO SMART? Could the lessons apply to you, or your children? Was their genius truly a gift, or was it created through hard work? A few rare people are responsible for the modern world we live in. These people had the vision and drive to discover, invent, and create a world significantly different than the one they were born into.First, They Were C WHAT MADE THESE PEOPLE SO SMART? Could the lessons apply to you, or your children? Was their genius truly a gift, or was it created through hard work? A few rare people are responsible for the modern world we live in. These people had the vision and drive to discover, invent, and create a world significantly different than the one they were born into.First, They Were Children examines the important but ignored part of so many biographies: childhood. The stories in this book take you through the youth and teenage years of seven extraordinary people, so you can share in their development, their struggles, and their successes.Perhaps more importantly, it tackles the larger question of how rebellious, inattentive, bored, or lazy children can grow into world-wide icons of history; children who were told by their teachers they were “slow” or too “addled” to learn, created a future that previous generations could not even dream of.These children were different, but different isn’t necessarily a disability. Learn about the desires and motivations that drove them, and see how they set their own goals and followed their own paths.You may even discover a new perspective and appreciation of your children’s, or your own, childhood.Extracted from more than 50 sources of information, and combined here in one place, are the little-known childhoods of seven fascinating people.Each childhood biography only takes about a half hour to read, but will surprise you with many insights and stories that most people are unaware of.Buy this book today! Enter the world of these children and their families. See how geniuses are made.

30 review for First, They Were Children: Origin Stories of 7 People Who Changed the World: Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, Walt Disney, Albert Einstein, Henry Ford, Nikola Tesla, Thomas Edison

  1. 4 out of 5

    Carolyn Wilhelm

    People Who Have Changed the World Used to be Children 7 Unique Biographies and Author Observations Of course, we all know famous people used to be children, but until reading this new book, I had not read short childhood biographies of people who changed the world, much less understood their common characteristics. The author does a service by writing this book for adults as it is true that there are biographies for children about these people. The stories about the childhood of these geniuses hav People Who Have Changed the World Used to be Children 7 Unique Biographies and Author Observations Of course, we all know famous people used to be children, but until reading this new book, I had not read short childhood biographies of people who changed the world, much less understood their common characteristics. The author does a service by writing this book for adults as it is true that there are biographies for children about these people. The stories about the childhood of these geniuses have some striking and surprising commonalities, as well as interesting facts. All seven people did not have the exact same characteristics, but often four of them shared some trait or experience. Would we read this to try to develop such gifted people? No, as it is partly the time period of history, world events, and family life which combined to help them. Each person’s story is told until they are about age 21, then stops, as we all know the rest. The author’s observations chapter summarizes his thoughts. He provides a diagram of the traits for all of the people while showing which belong to each of the seven people. It does give one pause to think. As a teacher, in the fall we would get our new class lists, and when we had maybe 15 boys and 7 girls, we would say it was preparation for a coming war. Who knows, but it stopped our possible complaining about how active our classes would be. What I mean is people are born at certain times and that the future doesn’t just happen all at once someday in the far future. A life starts at the beginning. Yes, the times were important to allowing these people to excel in their chosen fields, as I read in Malcolm Gladwell’s book, Outliers. But there was something going on from birth for each person, and the way was paved with a combination of intelligence, environment, family, and access to the technologies of the time. It began with perhaps being born with a large head, educated parents, or the conditions to foster curiosity and interest in learning. None of these people were complainers, and they all showed continued persistence, and had to deal with less than understanding teachers and principals. They all faced obstacles of some kind and, before reading this book, I had no idea how many things they each had to endure. Yes, luck was on their side, but they did not have completely easy lives. Reading this book shows how true it is when people say luck is how hard you work. This book has implications for schools who may have gifted education courses to perhaps be more flexible about grade levels and have more willingness to try advanced curriculum with students who could possibly be mislabeled as having behavior issues. It was a near miss a few times for several of these people who obviously did make it through life, but not without having to change schools or be taught at home. One interesting fact in the book is that some of the people were slow to speak, doing so at ages 3 or 4. I did teach several years of gifted education classes, and it was not unusual for a student to leave a challenge class to walk across the hall to the speech teacher. Of course, that doesn’t happen to all bright people, but it was interesting to me that it was one of the characteristics mentioned. I recommend this book to bright secondary students struggling with the prescribed curriculum, parents dealing with gifted children and the related challenges, and schools looking to be more empathetic to very intellectual children. Often, it is a difficult road for children and families. This author understands.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Barbara Ann

    The author presents a personal story in the prologue about a child who is miscategorized by teachers as inattentive but was actually bored because he needed to be placed in a higher grade. Butler investigates how seven of the world's greatest geniuses contained insights and clues in their childhoods that helped to mold the geniuses they later became. Butler devotes a chapter to each of these seven giants: Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, Walt Disney, Albert Einstein, Henry Ford, Nikolas Tesla and Thomas E The author presents a personal story in the prologue about a child who is miscategorized by teachers as inattentive but was actually bored because he needed to be placed in a higher grade. Butler investigates how seven of the world's greatest geniuses contained insights and clues in their childhoods that helped to mold the geniuses they later became. Butler devotes a chapter to each of these seven giants: Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, Walt Disney, Albert Einstein, Henry Ford, Nikolas Tesla and Thomas Edison. Certain attributes stand out in all of them. Each developed a high level of self-confidence and the need to impress other people. They developed passionate feelings for their objectives, and dogged persistence to reach what sometimes seemed like impossible goals. Most loved to read and endured suffering and loss of some kind. These men tended toward being detached yet were influenced strongly by their mothers. None of these men seemed to suffer from boredom or to fear failure. Perhaps a combination of these factors led to success in later life. The author does not claim to have reached a definitive conclusion but rather presents an interesting hypothesis about the role childhood plays in success as an adult. This book is an interesting read for at least two reasons. First, it is a birds-eye view of the lives of seven unique geniuses presented from a different perspective, and second, it provides an introduction for children in elementary and middle school classrooms to learn about and research these intellectual giants.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Damilola

    I really enjoy this book. AS the title suggests, the book unpacks the childhood and early lives of 7 greatest in history - Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, Walt Disney, Albert Einstein, Henry Ford, Nikola Tesla and Thomas Edison. I thought the life summaries captured good detail. I especially liked that at the end of the book the author, David Butler, distills the common denominators to all their life stories in the epilogue. They are as follows: -DEvleoped their self confiendece - Had a childhood on a fa I really enjoy this book. AS the title suggests, the book unpacks the childhood and early lives of 7 greatest in history - Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, Walt Disney, Albert Einstein, Henry Ford, Nikola Tesla and Thomas Edison. I thought the life summaries captured good detail. I especially liked that at the end of the book the author, David Butler, distills the common denominators to all their life stories in the epilogue. They are as follows: -DEvleoped their self confiendece - Had a childhood on a farm - Had someone special who they wanted to impress - Had trouble staying focused - Liked to construct dams - Loved reading - Suffered a tragic loss - Their father didn't want them to go to war - Their mother taught them to read - Their mother was a teacher - They were a loner - They were bored at school - They were fascinated by steam engines - They were good at mathematics - They were inquisitive - They were shy - They were close to their mother I have come to realize that it is the small things in children growing up that make the biggest differences. This resonates with Malcolm Gladwell's Outlier's which coined the phrase (for me) of "accumulate advantages" and is a large part of my philosophy on raising kids. I think that rarely do the large things matter like sending your kid to the best private high school or making sure your baby gets breast milk for the first year of life and I think it has everything to do with the small things adding up. Anyways, a great read! Helps me to solid by philosophy on raising children, etc.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Mihai

    I'm sure you heard some stories about this personalities' childhood - this book is a chance to read about their real life before becoming the men we know about and learn some defining elements that can help us or our children to grow and develop our personalities and characters. I like also the lessons the author learned from and give us at the end of the book I'm sure you heard some stories about this personalities' childhood - this book is a chance to read about their real life before becoming the men we know about and learn some defining elements that can help us or our children to grow and develop our personalities and characters. I like also the lessons the author learned from and give us at the end of the book

  5. 5 out of 5

    William D Mitchell Jr

    Great review and inspirating story of 7 great contributors of the last couple centuries David Butler pick 7 of the greatest contributor to the development of our modern society, on which he explained their contribution and how they struggle to finish school and become master on their area of expertise. I enjoyed very much this book specially the clarity of the text.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Susan Budman

    Intriguing concept Enjoyed the novel approach and appreciate all the research. Final commentary is enlightening. I'd like to assign this book to my students. However, the book requires some editing for simple errors. Thank you for the interesting read. Intriguing concept Enjoyed the novel approach and appreciate all the research. Final commentary is enlightening. I'd like to assign this book to my students. However, the book requires some editing for simple errors. Thank you for the interesting read.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Shelby

    An insightful book Well organized and interesting. Gives a wonderful understanding of these important people. Every parent of an autistic or ADHD child should read this as well as other parents. It gives one hope and encourages specific useful behavior.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kim Yencer

    Why no women I enjoyed this book but I would have enjoyed it more had you focused on both men and women. I feel this book would be a great asset if the focus was on both.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jessi Wheeler

    Very enlightening This was a wonderful and interesting book to read! I loved seeing how these famous people grew up and started out!

  10. 4 out of 5

    SWAPNA GODAY

    Good I liked it very much. It went deep into the details of their childhoods and it was just awesome and amazing

  11. 5 out of 5

    Nadiya

    It's an easy and quick read, best to be shared with your kids. The language is very simple, the stories concise and interesting. I was especially mesmerized by the presentation of Nicola Tesla's childhood and his unique visualizing abilities - never heard about it before. I subtracted one star, as I think the book would have greatly benefited from a little bit more of research and deapth. Ca 20 pages per person was way to little. It's an easy and quick read, best to be shared with your kids. The language is very simple, the stories concise and interesting. I was especially mesmerized by the presentation of Nicola Tesla's childhood and his unique visualizing abilities - never heard about it before. I subtracted one star, as I think the book would have greatly benefited from a little bit more of research and deapth. Ca 20 pages per person was way to little.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Laurence M.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Caron Francy

  14. 4 out of 5

    Protik

  15. 5 out of 5

    Bree Perrin

  16. 4 out of 5

    Akib Uddin

  17. 4 out of 5

    CJV

  18. 4 out of 5

    Mary Eva Gregory

  19. 4 out of 5

    Katheryn L Neuberger

  20. 4 out of 5

    Dave McGarvey

  21. 4 out of 5

    sallyann price

  22. 5 out of 5

    emanuael jo bejoy

  23. 5 out of 5

    Dan E Davey

  24. 4 out of 5

    Yan Hao

  25. 5 out of 5

    Athaliah

  26. 5 out of 5

    Gabriel

  27. 4 out of 5

    Sjdub

  28. 5 out of 5

    Franddy Rodriguez

  29. 4 out of 5

    Gesu Aftab

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jan Horn

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