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The Five Senses of Horror

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Hearing, sight, touch, smell, and taste: Our impressions of the world are formed by our five senses, and so too are our fears, our imaginations, and our captivation in reading fiction stories that embrace these senses. Whether hearing the song of infernal caverns, tasting the erotic kiss of treachery, or smelling the lush fragrance of a fiend, enclosed within this antholog Hearing, sight, touch, smell, and taste: Our impressions of the world are formed by our five senses, and so too are our fears, our imaginations, and our captivation in reading fiction stories that embrace these senses. Whether hearing the song of infernal caverns, tasting the erotic kiss of treachery, or smelling the lush fragrance of a fiend, enclosed within this anthology are fifteen horror and dark fantasy tales that will quicken the beat of fear, sweeten the flavor of wonder, sharpen the spike of thrills, and otherwise brighten the marvel of storytelling that is found resonant! Editor Eric J. Guignard and psychologist Jessica Bayliss, PhD also include companion discourse throughout, offering academic and literary insight as well as psychological commentary examining the physiology of our senses, why each of our senses are engaged by dark fiction stories, and how it all inspires writers to continually churn out ideas in uncommon and invigorating ways. Featuring stunning interior illustrations by Nils Bross, and including fiction short stories by such world-renowned authors as John Farris, Ramsey Campbell, Poppy Z. Brite, Darrell Schweitzer, and Richard Christian Matheson, amongst others. Intended for readers, writers, and students alike, explore THE FIVE SENSES OF HORROR! Table of Contents includes: “Preface: The Five Senses of Horror” by Eric J. Guignard “Introduction: Why Do Horror Stories Work? The Psychobiology of Horror” by Jessica Bayliss, PhD “Thoughts About the Sense of Touch” by Jessica Bayliss, PhD “Heading Home” by Ramsey Campbell “Soft” by Darrell Schweitzer “Feel the Noise” by Lisa Morton “Thoughts About the Sense of Hearing” by Jessica Bayliss, PhD “In the Cave of the Delicate Singers” by Lucy Taylor “Sounds” by Kathryn Ptacek “Malleus, Incus, Stapes” by Sarah Totton “Thoughts About the Sense of Taste” by Jessica Bayliss, PhD “His Mouth Will Taste of Wormwood” by Poppy Z. Brite “Cassilago’s Wife” by Sarah Singleton “Sweet Subtleties” by Lisa L. Hannett “Thoughts About the Sense of Sight” by Jessica Bayliss, PhD “The Beholder” by Richard Christian Matheson “In the Porches of My Ears” by Norman Prentiss “The Impression of Craig Shee” by David McGroarty “Thoughts About the Sense of Smell” by Jessica Bayliss, PhD “Shem-el-Nessim: An Inspiration in Perfume” by Chris Bell “The Scent” by John F.D. Taff “The Odor of Violets” by John Farris “Understanding and Incorporating the Five Human Senses into Modern Horror Short Fiction Writing” by Eric J. Guignard “Afterword: Sensation and Perception” by K. H. Vaughan, PhD “Suggested Academic Reading for Further Study” “A Brief Reading List of Modern Fiction Short Stories with Relation to the Senses (1940–2015)”


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Hearing, sight, touch, smell, and taste: Our impressions of the world are formed by our five senses, and so too are our fears, our imaginations, and our captivation in reading fiction stories that embrace these senses. Whether hearing the song of infernal caverns, tasting the erotic kiss of treachery, or smelling the lush fragrance of a fiend, enclosed within this antholog Hearing, sight, touch, smell, and taste: Our impressions of the world are formed by our five senses, and so too are our fears, our imaginations, and our captivation in reading fiction stories that embrace these senses. Whether hearing the song of infernal caverns, tasting the erotic kiss of treachery, or smelling the lush fragrance of a fiend, enclosed within this anthology are fifteen horror and dark fantasy tales that will quicken the beat of fear, sweeten the flavor of wonder, sharpen the spike of thrills, and otherwise brighten the marvel of storytelling that is found resonant! Editor Eric J. Guignard and psychologist Jessica Bayliss, PhD also include companion discourse throughout, offering academic and literary insight as well as psychological commentary examining the physiology of our senses, why each of our senses are engaged by dark fiction stories, and how it all inspires writers to continually churn out ideas in uncommon and invigorating ways. Featuring stunning interior illustrations by Nils Bross, and including fiction short stories by such world-renowned authors as John Farris, Ramsey Campbell, Poppy Z. Brite, Darrell Schweitzer, and Richard Christian Matheson, amongst others. Intended for readers, writers, and students alike, explore THE FIVE SENSES OF HORROR! Table of Contents includes: “Preface: The Five Senses of Horror” by Eric J. Guignard “Introduction: Why Do Horror Stories Work? The Psychobiology of Horror” by Jessica Bayliss, PhD “Thoughts About the Sense of Touch” by Jessica Bayliss, PhD “Heading Home” by Ramsey Campbell “Soft” by Darrell Schweitzer “Feel the Noise” by Lisa Morton “Thoughts About the Sense of Hearing” by Jessica Bayliss, PhD “In the Cave of the Delicate Singers” by Lucy Taylor “Sounds” by Kathryn Ptacek “Malleus, Incus, Stapes” by Sarah Totton “Thoughts About the Sense of Taste” by Jessica Bayliss, PhD “His Mouth Will Taste of Wormwood” by Poppy Z. Brite “Cassilago’s Wife” by Sarah Singleton “Sweet Subtleties” by Lisa L. Hannett “Thoughts About the Sense of Sight” by Jessica Bayliss, PhD “The Beholder” by Richard Christian Matheson “In the Porches of My Ears” by Norman Prentiss “The Impression of Craig Shee” by David McGroarty “Thoughts About the Sense of Smell” by Jessica Bayliss, PhD “Shem-el-Nessim: An Inspiration in Perfume” by Chris Bell “The Scent” by John F.D. Taff “The Odor of Violets” by John Farris “Understanding and Incorporating the Five Human Senses into Modern Horror Short Fiction Writing” by Eric J. Guignard “Afterword: Sensation and Perception” by K. H. Vaughan, PhD “Suggested Academic Reading for Further Study” “A Brief Reading List of Modern Fiction Short Stories with Relation to the Senses (1940–2015)”

38 review for The Five Senses of Horror

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Bayliss

    I may be a bit biased b/c I am a contributor to this book, but these are some great horror stories! And this anthology, dreamed up by editor Eric J. Guignard, also contains gorgeous illustrations by artist Nils Bross and six non-fiction essays on the psychobiology of horror as it pertains to the senses. So, if you like a little science with your scary, this book is for you!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Ian Welke

    When I read the list of authors in this anthology my expectations for it were astronomic. Happily I can say it lived up to those expectations. Additionally I think the use of a nonfiction short essay by a Psychologist introducing the stories in each Sense was inspired. And along similar lines I thought it was great to include a list of additional reading, both fiction and nonfiction at the end. Well done.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Michael Flores

    This is the craziest anthology I've ever read, and I mean that as the highest of praise. The stories are amazing, and they're meaningful, because they tie in to the human brain and our senses. The PhD psychologist gives excellent commentary throughout, and there's academic critique and artwork, and all kinds of other things. I feel smarter after reading this, a more learned person. And more entertained. This is the craziest anthology I've ever read, and I mean that as the highest of praise. The stories are amazing, and they're meaningful, because they tie in to the human brain and our senses. The PhD psychologist gives excellent commentary throughout, and there's academic critique and artwork, and all kinds of other things. I feel smarter after reading this, a more learned person. And more entertained.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Vivian Metzger

    ***Full review to come*** but let me just say immediately, this book is extraordinary

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jimmy Tam

    Ambitious as it is interesting. Never read an anthology book like this before. Learned a crazy amount of interesting information about the brain and fiction stories, along with inclusion of some of the best fiction!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Judi

    Wonderful and unique anthology bridging horror short fiction and literary and psychological analysis. Hearing, sight, touch, smell, and taste, all written and discussed in terms of fiction and in real-world brain studies. What a breath of fresh air this book is! Illuminating and meaningful. Looks great too. Wonderful artwork and a nice addition to my anthology library. Plus some of my favorite authors are in here! Ramsey Campbell and Poppy Z Brite I’ve read for decades. Some new names too, Im no Wonderful and unique anthology bridging horror short fiction and literary and psychological analysis. Hearing, sight, touch, smell, and taste, all written and discussed in terms of fiction and in real-world brain studies. What a breath of fresh air this book is! Illuminating and meaningful. Looks great too. Wonderful artwork and a nice addition to my anthology library. Plus some of my favorite authors are in here! Ramsey Campbell and Poppy Z Brite I’ve read for decades. Some new names too, Im now a fan of. (This ebook was provided to me for a review)

  7. 5 out of 5

    Paul Anderson

    As a writer of psychological horror, I had to buy this book the moment it came out. Not only does it contain cutting-edge cognitive science, it features excellent examples of how 16 talented horror writers focused on various senses to create superb stories. My favorites are David McGroarty's "The Impression of Craig Shee", Lisa Morton's "Feel the Noise", and John Farris' "The Odor of Violets". But all of the stories are outstanding. Well worth the read. As a writer of psychological horror, I had to buy this book the moment it came out. Not only does it contain cutting-edge cognitive science, it features excellent examples of how 16 talented horror writers focused on various senses to create superb stories. My favorites are David McGroarty's "The Impression of Craig Shee", Lisa Morton's "Feel the Noise", and John Farris' "The Odor of Violets". But all of the stories are outstanding. Well worth the read.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Lesley Ann Campbell

    The Five Senses of Horror 4* By: Eric J. Guignard (Editor), Ramsey Campbell (Contributor), Darrell Schweitzer (Contributor), Lisa Morton (Contributor), Lucy Taylor (Contributor), Kathryn Ptacek (Contributor), Sarah Totton (Contributor), Poppy Z. Brite (Contributor), Sarah Singleton (Contributor), Lisa L. Hannett (Contributor), Richard Christian Matheson (Contributor), Norman Prentiss (Contributor), David McGroarty (Contributor), Chris Bell (Contributor), John F.D. Taff (Contributor), John Farris (C The Five Senses of Horror 4* By: Eric J. Guignard (Editor), Ramsey Campbell (Contributor), Darrell Schweitzer (Contributor), Lisa Morton (Contributor), Lucy Taylor (Contributor), Kathryn Ptacek (Contributor), Sarah Totton (Contributor), Poppy Z. Brite (Contributor), Sarah Singleton (Contributor), Lisa L. Hannett (Contributor), Richard Christian Matheson (Contributor), Norman Prentiss (Contributor), David McGroarty (Contributor), Chris Bell (Contributor), John F.D. Taff (Contributor), John Farris (Contributor), Jessica Bayliss (Commentary), K.H. Vaughan (Afterword), Nils Bross (Illustrator) Dark Moon Books Synopsis courtesy of Goodreads: “Hearing, sight, touch, smell, and taste: Our impressions of the world are formed by our five senses, and so too are our fears, our imaginations, and our captivation in reading fiction stories that embrace these senses. Whether hearing the song of infernal caverns, tasting the erotic kiss of treachery, or smelling the lush fragrance of a fiend, enclosed within this anthology are fifteen horror and dark fantasy tales that will quicken the beat of fear, sweeten the flavor of wonder, sharpen the spike of thrills, and otherwise brighten the marvel of storytelling that is found resonant! Editor Eric J. Guignard and psychologist Jessica Bayliss, PhD also include companion discourse throughout, offering academic and literary insight as well as psychological commentary examining the physiology of our senses, why each of our senses are engaged by dark fiction stories, and how it all inspires writers to continually churn out ideas in uncommon and invigorating ways. Featuring stunning interior illustrations by Nils Bross, and including fiction short stories by such world-renowned authors as John Farris, Ramsey Campbell, Poppy Z. Brite, Darrell Schweitzer, and Richard Christian Matheson, amongst others. Intended for readers, writers, and students alike, explore THE FIVE SENSES OF HORROR!” Table of Contents includes: “Preface: The Five Senses of Horror” by Eric J. Guignard “Introduction: Why Do Horror Stories Work? The Psychobiology of Horror” by Jessica Bayliss, PhD “Thoughts About the Sense of Touch” by Jessica Bayliss, PhD “Heading Home” by Ramsey Campbell “Soft” by Darrell Schweitzer “Feel the Noise” by Lisa Morton “Thoughts About the Sense of Hearing” by Jessica Bayliss, PhD “In the Cave of the Delicate Singers” by Lucy Taylor “Sounds” by Kathryn Ptacek “Malleus, Incus, Stapes” by Sarah Totton “Thoughts About the Sense of Taste” by Jessica Bayliss, PhD “His Mouth Will Taste of Wormwood” by Poppy Z. Brite “Cassilago’s Wife” by Sarah Singleton “Sweet Subtleties” by Lisa L. Hannett “Thoughts About the Sense of Sight” by Jessica Bayliss, PhD “The Beholder” by Richard Christian Matheson “In the Porches of My Ears” by Norman Prentiss “The Impression of Craig Shee” by David McGroarty “Thoughts About the Sense of Smell” by Jessica Bayliss, PhD “Shem-el-Nessim: An Inspiration in Perfume” by Chris Bell “The Scent” by John F.D. Taff “The Odor of Violets” by John Farris “Understanding and Incorporating the Five Human Senses into Modern Horror Short Fiction Writing” by Eric J. Guignard “Afterword: Sensation and Perception” by K. H. Vaughan, PhD “Suggested Academic Reading for Further Study” “A Brief Reading List of Modern Fiction Short Stories with Relation to the Senses (1940–2015)” Our five senses: Touch, Hearing, Sight, Taste and Smell. All of which are explained and explored from both a psychological perspective, and from that of the horror writer. Thank you to Eric J. Guignard and Dark Moon Books for allowing to read this book in exchange for an honest review. A wonderful collection of short horror stories, split into five sections (the five senses obviously), all with fascinating introductions explaining the psychology behind the sense. I found those introductions, courtesy of Jessica Bayliss, PhD, very insightful and thought provoking. The short stories themselves were all very well chosen, fitting in even so well with their specific sense. The introductions for me seemed to also add to the feelings I had while reading each story. It felt like the explanations to our responses to fear stimuli actually invoked a fear response from me before I read the story itself. That may have been helped along though by a long discussion about the fear of spiders – I hate spiders. It’s quite difficult to choose a favourite. They are all so good. If pressed though, I would have to pick ‘In the Cave of Delicate Singers’ by Lucy Taylor. This short story I found to be especially haunting. ***beware of spoilers*** The Brotterling cave complex is a deep network of caves, chambers and tunnels, with a dark history behind it. This doesn’t sway Matthew and Lionel Hargave, brothers, and experienced cavers. They both went in, but only one, Lionel, returned. In a cruel twist of fate, Lionel was the lucky one; he had lost his hearing in Iraq years courtesy of a roadside IED. This terrible accident was what saved his life here; he could not be called by the maddening siren song within the depths of the cave. A search and rescue team are dispatched, confident and disbelieving of the rumours and stories of death. They are soon to find out the caves history is all too real. Karyn, a junior member of the team goes solo against orders to try and rescue her friends. What she finds are mutilated corpses, her friend and one time lover, Pree, being absorbed into the cave itself. This is a song that must be heard. “Madness made tangible. Contagion by sound. It spews from my lips – a song of such deadly beauty and unholy allure that I experience only the briefest frisson of horror – an emotion something inside me instantly quells – when their mouths fall open, songstruck, enthralled, and they begin to rend their own flesh and tear each other apart” A story that definitely resonates with today’s busy modern world of chaos is ‘Sounds’, by Kathryn Ptacek. This tells a tale of a woman plagued by sound – the constant din of the town where they live, the never ceasing intrusive soundtrack of life – to the point of madness. This is a particularly relevant story I felt, especially as I live in quite a built up area. We never get complete peace and quiet. There is always something going on. Whether it be the neighbours banging, cars revving, the garbage truck or the mail. There is always noise of some description. It is never ending. It’s easy to see how very real this story’s conclusion could become in today’s society. What is most frightening though, is that we have done this to ourselves. This is a wonderful anthology of stories from some great authors, which will appeal to all walks of horror fan. It contains a wonderful mix of the paranormal, the supernatural, as well as the most terrifying side of the human condition. Highly recommended and worth a read as soon as you get the chance. Available via Amazon (UK) here: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Five-Senses-... Dark Moon Books: http://darkmoonbooks.com/five_senses.... 4/5 Lesley-Ann (Housewife of Horror)

  9. 5 out of 5

    Miguel Bizarre

    Way wicked fun book packed with awesome and well written short stories. All of the authors have incredible talent and flair using the senses as an immediate part of their tales.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Mommacat

    4.5 stars

  11. 5 out of 5

    Pamela Scott

    https://thebookloversboudoir.wordpres... (copy via @ericjguignard and voluntarily reviewed) This is another cracking collection of stories from Dark Moon Books. I’m very impressed by the quality of the stories in their collections I’ve read so far. The Five Senses of Horror is quite an original concept for a collection of horror stories and this works really well. Most anthologies have at least a few duds but I enjoyed every story in this collection. I especially loved In the Cave of the Delicate https://thebookloversboudoir.wordpres... (copy via @ericjguignard and voluntarily reviewed) This is another cracking collection of stories from Dark Moon Books. I’m very impressed by the quality of the stories in their collections I’ve read so far. The Five Senses of Horror is quite an original concept for a collection of horror stories and this works really well. Most anthologies have at least a few duds but I enjoyed every story in this collection. I especially loved In the Cave of the Delicate Singers by Lucy Taylor, His Mouth Will Taste of Wormwood by Poppy Z. Brite, Sweet Subtleties by Lisa L. Hannett and Shem-el-Nessim: An Inspiration in Perfume by Chris Bell.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Lee

    The Five Senses of Horror is an intellectual orgasm for the horror connoisseur. It takes you on a journey of the five senses with engrossing short stories prefaced by analytical scientific commentary. The foreplay starts with the elegant and visually titillating cover. This visual stimulation is perpetuated by the captivating artwork sprinkled throughout the book. The next part of the experience begins with an enlightening preface by Eric J Guignard, and is followed by an introduction on the psyc The Five Senses of Horror is an intellectual orgasm for the horror connoisseur. It takes you on a journey of the five senses with engrossing short stories prefaced by analytical scientific commentary. The foreplay starts with the elegant and visually titillating cover. This visual stimulation is perpetuated by the captivating artwork sprinkled throughout the book. The next part of the experience begins with an enlightening preface by Eric J Guignard, and is followed by an introduction on the psychobiology of horror from Jessica Bayliss, PhD. Turn the page to immerse your senses in the stimulating journey of this conceptually brilliant collection. The book is divided into sections, with a separate section for each of the five senses. Each of these has creative, thought-provoking art representing the respective sense, a brief analysis of that sense as it pertains to the horror experience, and three short stories focused on that sense. The flow is simply amazing, the journey enthralling. And if you are left wanting just a little more, there is a section of additional material at the end to lead you on your own literary sensory journey. Whether or not you agree with all of the conclusions of the scientific commentaries, there is no denying the stimulating experience of the analytical process provided. And if you are not in the mood for the intellectual foreplay, well that’s fine. Read the stories! The collection of stories is incredible in and of itself. I found “Sounds” by Kathryn Ptacek to be particularly impactful. Then there is the horrifying read “His Mouth Will Taste of Wormwood” by Poppy Z Brite. Another story of note is the classically constructed tale “Shem-El-Nessim: An Inspiration in Perfume” by Chris Bell. You will have your own favorites. I would like to note here that a few of the stories deal with the neurological condition known as Synesthesia, which I found wonderfully fascinating! Read it for the in-depth analysis of the psychobiology of experiencing horror literature with the five senses. Read it for the excellent collection of stories. Read it.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Weevil Dead

    Wowwwww! From Dark Moon Books comes The Five Senses of Horror, edited by Eric J. Guignard. I read it slowly to savor every story. This anthology organizes its stories into sections, each dedicated to one of the senses. There are several powerhouse authors in here, as well as psychological commentary on how our human senses play a vital role in the fiction we read. Filled with excellent illustrations by Nils Bross, this is a work that had much thought put into it. With Dark Moon Books you know yo Wowwwww! From Dark Moon Books comes The Five Senses of Horror, edited by Eric J. Guignard. I read it slowly to savor every story. This anthology organizes its stories into sections, each dedicated to one of the senses. There are several powerhouse authors in here, as well as psychological commentary on how our human senses play a vital role in the fiction we read. Filled with excellent illustrations by Nils Bross, this is a work that had much thought put into it. With Dark Moon Books you know you will not only be reading unique work, you will also gain some expert knowledge in the science behind meaningful literature. I will highlight my favorite stories from each sense below. Touch – Soft by Darrell Schweitzer A man unhappy with his current marriage begins to reflect back on the early days of his love with his wife. “Soft” is the word that comes to mind, and thus begins his night of shaping his wife into what he wants her to be. As Eric discussed in his foreword to the story, everyone wishes they could shape some aspect of a loved one into the person they want them to be, the narrator of the story, Richard, takes this too far, and must deal with the creation he’s made. Hearing- In the Cave of the Delicate Singers by Lucy Taylor I think I’m a sucker for any story that takes place in a cave. A woman named Karyn is on a rescue mission in the Brotterling Cave in Kentucky. This is a cave that is known to have caused some tragedy in the past. People that enter this cave have become homicidal or suicidal. The main character has a form of synesthesia, in which she can feel sound waves. This is a vibrantly written story, as well as claustrophobic, where madness is sure to take place, only how long will Karyn continue before she succumbs to the music completely. Taste – His Mouth Will Taste of Wormwood by Poppy Z. Brite My favorite story in the entire collection is from Poppy Z. Brite. Eric describes this story as playing on all the senses, and he is totally correct. This is a story about two friends and lovers, Louis and Howard, who are bored of the life they are living. Practically dead inside, they go to endless lengths to live out their macabre fantasies. This story takes place in New Orleans, as do most of Brite’s works. Romantically written, but also graphically horrific, this story, once read, will live in your memory for a long time. I’ve never drank Wormwood, but after reading this story, I’m pretty sure I can taste it. Sight – The Beholder by Richard Christian Matheson Like something from the Twilight Zone, Matheson writes about a woman who receives unique, and beautiful paints from a the owner of an art gallery. She brings them home to create her work, and her inspiration comes to her in the middle of the night. As she paints, the world around her seems to come alive. As the worlds merge, the reader realizes the intention of the art dealer, to truly capture the art. Aside from the actual painting sounding lovely, I could definitely visualize this room in the night, with the moon shining, the leaves blowing, it was truly dreamlike. Smell – The Odor of Violets by John Farris John Farris is another excellent writer. In this tale, a has-been writer, Jack Mayo, accepts the draft of a novel from one of his fans, David Hallowell who seems to be very ill. That night, the smell of violets fills Mayo’s room. He reads the story, which is excellent; a masterpiece. Hallowell finishes the novel and soon dies. Mayo assured Hallowell he would see to the novel getting published. What he didn’t tell him was that he would publish it under his own name, giving him the sought after comeback he’s been wishing for… This is a very unique anthology that I would recommend for the reader who wants more out of their horror. The afterwards included are also a nice touch, as well as 75 more titles that appeal greatly to the reader’s senses.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Heather Miller

    I love horror. I especially love what I suppose you could call old-fashioned horror. I don't need blood and guts and sex and profanity to make a story good for me. I grew up reading the old Gothic classics. I was curled up in bed with a dim lamp and a copy of Poe when I was in middle school. And because of all that, I loved THIS book. There's so much to enjoy here. I love to read nonfiction, especially when it relates to fear or the supernatural or the horror genre, so the psychological essays o I love horror. I especially love what I suppose you could call old-fashioned horror. I don't need blood and guts and sex and profanity to make a story good for me. I grew up reading the old Gothic classics. I was curled up in bed with a dim lamp and a copy of Poe when I was in middle school. And because of all that, I loved THIS book. There's so much to enjoy here. I love to read nonfiction, especially when it relates to fear or the supernatural or the horror genre, so the psychological essays on why and how certain things relating to the different senses were of great interest to me. I love good writing, good storytelling, and each of the tales in this book offer both. This is intellectual horror, a more refined and less bloody but satisfyingly terrible form of storytelling, and I am here for that all day, every day. This collection contains fifteen stories, three for each of the five senses. The stories range from fantastical to unnerving to downright gruesome. There are no bad stories here. Editor and compiler Eric J. Guignard knows his stuff when it comes to works of horror and has selected an astoundingly excellent lineup for this book.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan Stewart

    Fascinating anthology of short stories (horror and dark fantasy) with tie-in commentary onto the relation of the 5 human senses. Beautifully illustrated, and thoughtful academic asides. Just unexpectedly deep and well done all throughout. Looking forward to seeing editor Eric J. Guignard’s next work!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Chris

  17. 5 out of 5

    Anita Patel

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jo Kaplan

  19. 5 out of 5

    Eric Guignard

  20. 4 out of 5

    David Anderson

  21. 4 out of 5

    Anne

  22. 5 out of 5

    Christa

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kirsten McKenzie

  24. 4 out of 5

    Tawnya Fugate

  25. 5 out of 5

    Nicole Flowers Frye

  26. 5 out of 5

    Michael Joseph Schumann

  27. 5 out of 5

    Tricia Guest

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kelly Woznik

  29. 5 out of 5

    Intellectual Magpie

  30. 4 out of 5

    Dani Rodriguez

  31. 4 out of 5

    Gabby

  32. 4 out of 5

    Jen (LOHF/Book Den)

  33. 5 out of 5

    Nannika

  34. 5 out of 5

    Jeanna Massman

  35. 5 out of 5

    John

  36. 5 out of 5

    Samia Salah

  37. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Read

  38. 5 out of 5

    Alexander Rose

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