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Cults that Kill: Shocking True Stories of Horror from Psychopathic Leaders, Doomsday Prophets, and Brainwashed Followers to Human Sacrifices, Mass Suicides and Grisly Murders

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30 review for Cults that Kill: Shocking True Stories of Horror from Psychopathic Leaders, Doomsday Prophets, and Brainwashed Followers to Human Sacrifices, Mass Suicides and Grisly Murders

  1. 4 out of 5

    Misty Is

    An estimated 2 to 5 million Americans have been involved in a cult at some point. That is one scary number. Cults recruit more educated and high-powered career people than you would think. One way they successfully recruit is by having team building programs that employers use. I always knew my employers had ulterior motives behind those exercises. I am dropping someone the next time I am made to do the "trust fall". 😂 This book covers: Earth Silvia Meraz Moreno’s Santa Muerte Heaven’s Gate The Vam An estimated 2 to 5 million Americans have been involved in a cult at some point. That is one scary number. Cults recruit more educated and high-powered career people than you would think. One way they successfully recruit is by having team building programs that employers use. I always knew my employers had ulterior motives behind those exercises. I am dropping someone the next time I am made to do the "trust fall". 😂 This book covers: Earth Silvia Meraz Moreno’s Santa Muerte Heaven’s Gate The Vampire Clan The Peoples Temple The Manson Family

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jasmine Danielle

    It was at the library, readily available...and with such an enticing title. I couldn't resist. I was so intrigued by the Jonestown cult survivor book that I read awhile back, that I had to give this one a try. It wasn't as well-written and engaging as I thought it was going to be. It felt like a Google search disguised as a book. I could be using the countless true crime podcasts that I listen to regularly as an unfair standard, however, with a title like this one I was expecting a little bit mo It was at the library, readily available...and with such an enticing title. I couldn't resist. I was so intrigued by the Jonestown cult survivor book that I read awhile back, that I had to give this one a try. It wasn't as well-written and engaging as I thought it was going to be. It felt like a Google search disguised as a book. I could be using the countless true crime podcasts that I listen to regularly as an unfair standard, however, with a title like this one I was expecting a little bit more. More than just a book divided into chapters that have the cult's name as the title followed by a brief overview. I think the cults themselves kept this book interesting, not the actual writing. That's not to say it wasn't a comprehensive, researched presentation of information but there were no bells and whistles here folks.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Smith

    A friend let me borrow this book and I mean, who isn't interested in how cults work? This book takes you on a trip through a series of different cults throughout history and provides a pretty basic background on each. If you wanted more in depth study or information on any of the cults outlined in the book, or on cults in general, then this one probably isn't for you. It's a very quick read and basically gives a short story version of the cults included. It is, however, incredibly entertaining a A friend let me borrow this book and I mean, who isn't interested in how cults work? This book takes you on a trip through a series of different cults throughout history and provides a pretty basic background on each. If you wanted more in depth study or information on any of the cults outlined in the book, or on cults in general, then this one probably isn't for you. It's a very quick read and basically gives a short story version of the cults included. It is, however, incredibly entertaining and informative. It it rather gruesome and detailed at times, but I could see this leading me into looking up and reading more into some of these cults and how they operate.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Clay

    As someone enticed by a good crime story, I grabbed this book off the library display immediately. Unfortunately I was disappointed with the result. Though several of the cults themselves were intriguing, I found the structure and themes of the writing formulaic and repetitive. The book could have been strengthened by either a more diverse group of cults and outcomes to explore, or by differentiating how the cults were discussed.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Frank Kohl

    The author carefully researched and documented five cults from the 1960's through the 1900's. I felt the book fell short about cults in more modern times and did not offer suggestions or ideas to protect the reader from falling under a cult's influence. The author carefully researched and documented five cults from the 1960's through the 1900's. I felt the book fell short about cults in more modern times and did not offer suggestions or ideas to protect the reader from falling under a cult's influence.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Rob

    Interesting read Interesting read if you’re into cults and true crime. Nothing too in-depth, just an overview of a few cults from the past few decades.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Mariana Abeid-McDougall

    Cults that Kill is an intriguing (and often disturbing) look at extreme cults that have left suicides and murders in their wake. With expert and unbiased reporting, Wendy Joan Biddlecombe Agsar retells the stories of charismatic leaders whose followers did the unthinkable. From highly publicized cases such as Charles Manson to the more obscure devotees of "Santa Muerte," Agsar tells the stories of those who can no longer tell if for themselves. In so doing, she raises important points about free Cults that Kill is an intriguing (and often disturbing) look at extreme cults that have left suicides and murders in their wake. With expert and unbiased reporting, Wendy Joan Biddlecombe Agsar retells the stories of charismatic leaders whose followers did the unthinkable. From highly publicized cases such as Charles Manson to the more obscure devotees of "Santa Muerte," Agsar tells the stories of those who can no longer tell if for themselves. In so doing, she raises important points about freedom of religion, state involvement, and the exploitation of the vulnerable. Cults that Kill is an excellent book about awful situations—an interesting read that will make you remember or teach you the history of suicide cults, but most importantly, it's a book that will make you think.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jill

  9. 4 out of 5

    Natasha Harder

  10. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Winter

  11. 4 out of 5

    Mitch Troop

  12. 5 out of 5

    Liv

  13. 4 out of 5

    Rivka Weisz

  14. 4 out of 5

    Nonautomaton

  15. 4 out of 5

    Allyson

  16. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kelsey

  18. 5 out of 5

    Mia

  19. 5 out of 5

    Harveen

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kelly Clark

  21. 5 out of 5

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  22. 4 out of 5

    Chasity Easter

  23. 4 out of 5

    TJL

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kerry Louise Dixon

  25. 4 out of 5

    Makenna

  26. 5 out of 5

    Andy Mac

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kate

  28. 5 out of 5

    Gaby

  29. 4 out of 5

    Marily

  30. 4 out of 5

    Joke

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