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Manga Mania: How to Draw Japanese Comics

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The only step-by-step guide ever published on drawing this wildly popular style of comic book art--perfect for every age! Take a look at the wild popularity of such shows as Pok�mon, Digimon, and Dragonball Z, and you'll see the Manga style of comic-book art in action. There's no doubt about it: Manga is hot. And Manga Mania is the only guide that details, step by step, how The only step-by-step guide ever published on drawing this wildly popular style of comic book art--perfect for every age! Take a look at the wild popularity of such shows as Pok�mon, Digimon, and Dragonball Z, and you'll see the Manga style of comic-book art in action. There's no doubt about it: Manga is hot. And Manga Mania is the only guide that details, step by step, how young and veteran artists alike can draw fantasy robots, diabolical monsters, mythical animals, and the other exciting characters that are part of this exciting genre. Manga art has many styles: the young Manga style, � la Pok�mon; and the more mature style popular with teens and adults. Manga Mania covers them both. Big, splashy chapters demonstrate how to draw martial arts, special effects, and much, much more. Since the Manga style stresses character rather than anatomy, Manga comics are easier to draw. So a beginning comic-book artist can easily learn the tricks of the trade. Chris Hart, known for his very clear step-by-step illustrations and accompanying text, details how anyone can become a real Manga artist without having to reinvent the art of drawing.


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The only step-by-step guide ever published on drawing this wildly popular style of comic book art--perfect for every age! Take a look at the wild popularity of such shows as Pok�mon, Digimon, and Dragonball Z, and you'll see the Manga style of comic-book art in action. There's no doubt about it: Manga is hot. And Manga Mania is the only guide that details, step by step, how The only step-by-step guide ever published on drawing this wildly popular style of comic book art--perfect for every age! Take a look at the wild popularity of such shows as Pok�mon, Digimon, and Dragonball Z, and you'll see the Manga style of comic-book art in action. There's no doubt about it: Manga is hot. And Manga Mania is the only guide that details, step by step, how young and veteran artists alike can draw fantasy robots, diabolical monsters, mythical animals, and the other exciting characters that are part of this exciting genre. Manga art has many styles: the young Manga style, � la Pok�mon; and the more mature style popular with teens and adults. Manga Mania covers them both. Big, splashy chapters demonstrate how to draw martial arts, special effects, and much, much more. Since the Manga style stresses character rather than anatomy, Manga comics are easier to draw. So a beginning comic-book artist can easily learn the tricks of the trade. Chris Hart, known for his very clear step-by-step illustrations and accompanying text, details how anyone can become a real Manga artist without having to reinvent the art of drawing.

30 review for Manga Mania: How to Draw Japanese Comics

  1. 4 out of 5

    Olivia

    This helped me a lot with my drawing!

  2. 5 out of 5

    NickTSD

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Good drawing strategies like the robot and kids

  3. 4 out of 5

    Logan

    During the anime boom that began about 15 years ago, these "how to draw manga" books exploded onto the market. Naturally, as a fan of shows such as Evangelion and FLCL, I wanted to draw something similar in style, so I found myself looking for these books, and to accumulate a small collection of them. When one looks for these books, ideally you want to find works written and illustrated by actual manga-ka, or illustrators of manga. Unfortunately, while I was lucky enough to snag a couple volumes During the anime boom that began about 15 years ago, these "how to draw manga" books exploded onto the market. Naturally, as a fan of shows such as Evangelion and FLCL, I wanted to draw something similar in style, so I found myself looking for these books, and to accumulate a small collection of them. When one looks for these books, ideally you want to find works written and illustrated by actual manga-ka, or illustrators of manga. Unfortunately, while I was lucky enough to snag a couple volumes of Sketching Manga, the best "how to draw manga" books have all but disappeared from the shelves. Now their place is held by one of the biggest charlatans of the art world, Christopher Hart. I find this unfortunate, because amateur artists are now looking into Hart's work, even though his instructions aren't actually a useful foundation for illustration. Rather than showing how to begin a character illustration, set up a pose, and so on, Hart will just start with a pose and expect the reader to do the same. How is this helpful for a beginner that wants to learn how to create original works? It isn't. Instead, they learn how to draw the poses and illustrations that Hart has created. They've learned nothing on anatomy, abstraction, or just about anything that a fresh, naive, newbie artist needs to illustrate their own characters. His level of instruction is like that of an elementary school art teacher who has you do specific projects similar to what she's done, while not cultivating the style of the individual. So let's assume that you actually do learn something from Christopher Hart's book. Congratulations! You've learned crappy art. If you've developed even the slightest eye for talent, it's really obvious that Hart's work is really low-tier. Just compare his art with the work of actual Japanese character artists, such as Yoshiyuki Sadamoto of Evangelion and FLCL, Toshihiro Wakamoto of Cowboy Bebop, and Takeshi Obata of Death Note and Bakuman. Compared to actual big names of Japanese animation and comic books, Chritopher Hart's work just can't measure up. If I were to learn art from a big name, I'd want advice from industry veterans, not a rank amateur. And while his recent works show a jump in quality, he's still not to the level where I'd want to learn from him. Normally, I write reviews for myself. However, for Christopher Hart's books, I leave a warning. Before you decide to pick up his work, consider the question of whether or not there's something better, to which I'd say, "There is." If anyone reads this, I'll leave a list of artists and books on the subject of art instruction that are more useful. Graphic-Sha's "How to Draw Manga" and "Sketching Manga" series Will Eisner Tom Bancroft Andrew Loomis Burne Hogarth James Gurney Betty Edwards Artists to avoid: Christopher Hart Ben Dunn Fred Perry Arisa Suyama - I came across a book by her on Amazon. Strong voices tell me that most of the work is ripped off and her own work is crap. Mark Crilley Katy Coope While I generally avoid telling people to torrent on the internet, I'll make an exception for the "Sketching Manga" series by Grpahic-Sha. They're my favorite books by that publisher, though it's unfortunate to say that the series was cancelled and no longer printed. The only place you'll easily find them is online, ranging anywhere into the hundreds of dollars. That's not exactly helpful to artists who are interested in the books. To that I say, "Torrent away!" After all, since you can't actually buy these books new anymore, you can't actually contribute to Graphic-Sha and its artists by buying them from resellers at extremely marked-up prices.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Angela Blount

    A great little instructional introduction to drawing manga. With the exception of a couple of boobie-fantastic sketch examples, I'd generally call this a good place to start for kids as young as 10+ who've taken an interest in replication this style of art (with parental discretion advised). I'll admit, I still reference it form time to time when I'm working on a comic strip and need to work out a trickier figure angle. Granted, my skill level is still pretty rudimentary--which is why I'd describ A great little instructional introduction to drawing manga. With the exception of a couple of boobie-fantastic sketch examples, I'd generally call this a good place to start for kids as young as 10+ who've taken an interest in replication this style of art (with parental discretion advised). I'll admit, I still reference it form time to time when I'm working on a comic strip and need to work out a trickier figure angle. Granted, my skill level is still pretty rudimentary--which is why I'd describe it as a -basic- introduction.

  5. 4 out of 5

    An Ru

    It's just meh. Some of the anatomy in there (especially facial anatomy) looks really, really distorted, and the teaching method isn't very helpful. If you're looking for these kinds of books, I'd recommend Mark Crilley's "Mastering Manga" (seriously, this book taught me sooooo much and I actually wonder how my drawing skills would be if I never found it). This book I could live without. It's just meh. Some of the anatomy in there (especially facial anatomy) looks really, really distorted, and the teaching method isn't very helpful. If you're looking for these kinds of books, I'd recommend Mark Crilley's "Mastering Manga" (seriously, this book taught me sooooo much and I actually wonder how my drawing skills would be if I never found it). This book I could live without.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    I recommend Christopher Hart's books all the time to aspiring artists, especially those of the manga persuasion. I booktalk this by drawing an eye on the chalkboard. It seems to be an impressive feat. I recommend Christopher Hart's books all the time to aspiring artists, especially those of the manga persuasion. I booktalk this by drawing an eye on the chalkboard. It seems to be an impressive feat.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Antoine Land

    This book will teach you vass styles of Manga drawing and teach you techniques that will be very useful to you when it comes to drawing. This book is so AWESOME, no its more then awesome its BeAwesome!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Nanda

    Nice book, a lot of examples, well explained, but sadly enough does not explain much about the real basics.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kylia

    It provided good instructions and pretty cool illustrations as well. I'll be reading it again. It provided good instructions and pretty cool illustrations as well. I'll be reading it again.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Hailey

    I learned ho to draw

  11. 4 out of 5

    Christøpher Es

    Homer Simpson says, "Irony" Homer Simpson says, "Irony"

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jake Thomas

  13. 5 out of 5

    Rouge Z

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ian

  15. 4 out of 5

    Susanne

  16. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth Richardson

  17. 4 out of 5

    Madeline

  18. 4 out of 5

    Roland

  19. 4 out of 5

    Maia

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jake

  21. 5 out of 5

    Nguyen Thuy Dung

  22. 5 out of 5

    Cris Pakieser

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kirman Kirman

  24. 4 out of 5

    Booey

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kayla Socarras

  26. 4 out of 5

    Oscar

    Great Book, teaches much about Drawing Manga, and I must say I enjoyed it. You will really want to read this book, and any book by this author if you want to improve your Manga Artwork.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Michaelblackshear

  28. 4 out of 5

    Owen McCormack

  29. 5 out of 5

    Collin

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ken Mennell

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