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The False Principle of Our Education

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Humanism and Realism, the Egoist way. A classic essay from Stirner.


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Humanism and Realism, the Egoist way. A classic essay from Stirner.

30 review for The False Principle of Our Education

  1. 4 out of 5

    Nick

    Stirner criticizes humanists and realists both for treating knowledge as something you possess rather than something which gets integrated into your ego and manifested through your (ego-conquered) will. He thinks that a proper education consists of perpetual self-creation and a process of learning how to be free, how to master one's own will, and how to seamlessly integrate knowledge into action. It seems to imply a teaching method more centered around individual self exploration and questioning Stirner criticizes humanists and realists both for treating knowledge as something you possess rather than something which gets integrated into your ego and manifested through your (ego-conquered) will. He thinks that a proper education consists of perpetual self-creation and a process of learning how to be free, how to master one's own will, and how to seamlessly integrate knowledge into action. It seems to imply a teaching method more centered around individual self exploration and questioning than memorization, "civilizing", practical/technical learning, or even painstaking analytic thought. A pretty good essay although I'm not sure I understood it all. For instance, I'm not entirely sure what a Stirnerite school would look like. This is really high up on the abstraction ladder. HEY GERMAN PHILOSOPHERS. I'm down here on planet Earth. Why not write something for practical men once in a while EH??

  2. 4 out of 5

    Valdemar Gomes

    Poorly explained and dully conceived notions of what should be done. "knowledge must die and rise again as will and create itself anew each day as a free person", wrote Stirner, finishing the book with this empty and contradicting sentence. He plays around with conceptions of abstraction and empirical knowledge (promoting the osmosis of the former with the latter) in such a contradicting way, one can only read them as literary devices planned to instigate and appeal. But it is presented in such Poorly explained and dully conceived notions of what should be done. "knowledge must die and rise again as will and create itself anew each day as a free person", wrote Stirner, finishing the book with this empty and contradicting sentence. He plays around with conceptions of abstraction and empirical knowledge (promoting the osmosis of the former with the latter) in such a contradicting way, one can only read them as literary devices planned to instigate and appeal. But it is presented in such a confusing, obscurantist way, that it fails to do the latter. This book is an empty new age'ish essay, dripped with racist/sexist/anti-semitic remarks. It was completely useless for my search of knowledge in the fields of education and/or anarchism (unless for cultural/historical reasons).

  3. 4 out of 5

    Nyard

    Stirner is laying out a truly worthwhile and fundamental critique of education that exists in service to ideology, to create a person instead of nurturing the creative spirit of a person to create themselves. Great basis for a self oriented philosophy.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Andrés Rafael Valle

    Only the spirit which understands itself is eternal. [...] Thus the radii of all education run together into one centre which is called personality.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Apio

    This pamphlet is interesting in light of Stirner's brief stint as a teacher at a girls' high school. Although the detail of the debate are specific to the Prussian educational system of the time, one of Stirner's central points remains valid: if one wants to educate people to be free individuals, one needs to encourage their recalcitrance and their tendencies to rebel... This pamphlet is interesting in light of Stirner's brief stint as a teacher at a girls' high school. Although the detail of the debate are specific to the Prussian educational system of the time, one of Stirner's central points remains valid: if one wants to educate people to be free individuals, one needs to encourage their recalcitrance and their tendencies to rebel...

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jack

    The Anarchist Library is such a great source for free lit and stuff

  7. 5 out of 5

    Tom

    I’m so glad that I didn’t waste my time on “The Ego And Its Own” as it’s over 400 pages, and I dread to think of all the incessant waffle which must permeate it. This essay basically denounces systemised education, and there’s really not much more to it. If you really want to enrich yourself with knowledge then you have to go above and beyond the dogmatic principles and hierarchies of the institutions and source enlightenment via your own alternative methods. Stirner is lucky enough to be canonise I’m so glad that I didn’t waste my time on “The Ego And Its Own” as it’s over 400 pages, and I dread to think of all the incessant waffle which must permeate it. This essay basically denounces systemised education, and there’s really not much more to it. If you really want to enrich yourself with knowledge then you have to go above and beyond the dogmatic principles and hierarchies of the institutions and source enlightenment via your own alternative methods. Stirner is lucky enough to be canonised as a meme, but I would seriously advise anyone who is even contemplating taking him seriously to reconsider. This stuff is just pompous and verbose. Don’t waste your time. 😂😂

  8. 4 out of 5

    Elsterfeder

    Vamos a ver, pongamos las cosas en su sitio. Este panfleto no ha de ser juzgado como una obra filosófica de pleno derecho, ni como un librillo incendiario, ni como un intento de tomarle el pelo al personal, que es como lo juzgan la mayor parte de las críticas en este sitio. Este libro es una reseña para un periódico (ni más ni menos que la Gaceta Renana, que acabó sus días siendo dirigida por Karl Marx) de un librito de un tal Heinsius, hoy olvidado, pero que fue parte de una legión de pedagogos Vamos a ver, pongamos las cosas en su sitio. Este panfleto no ha de ser juzgado como una obra filosófica de pleno derecho, ni como un librillo incendiario, ni como un intento de tomarle el pelo al personal, que es como lo juzgan la mayor parte de las críticas en este sitio. Este libro es una reseña para un periódico (ni más ni menos que la Gaceta Renana, que acabó sus días siendo dirigida por Karl Marx) de un librito de un tal Heinsius, hoy olvidado, pero que fue parte de una legión de pedagogos que, cada uno armado con su idea redentora, se plantearon ilustrar Alemania a principios del XIX. Y en ese contexto debe ser comprendido. Las aparentes contradicciones de Stirner (que además atravesaba una etapa excepcionalmente hegeliano-ilusionada con la vida, a juzgar por sus opiniones) son en muchas ocasiones chascarrillos difíciles de pillar fuera del contexto de la filosofía y la política alemanas de mediados del siglo industrial, pero antes que actuar en detrimento del estilo, son pequeñas perlas-bomba que Stirner les dejaba a sus combatidos. Sus ideas son, más o menos, las de los psicopedagogos de ayer y hoy, explicadas con menos verborrea y con más cultura. Y se trata, repito, de un artículo para un periódico. Lo que me parece a mi es que muchos venimos a Stirner con el chip puesto en que, ya que es un anarquista, escribirá sus panfletos de manera simplista e incendiaria, y claro... no se puede uno llevar a engaño, Stirner podría profesar la fe política que quisiese, pero antes que cuaquier cosa era un filósofo alemán, con toda la multiplicidad de virtudes y defectos que eso implica.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Al Capwned

    So many simplifications (a very short work anyway), it's difficult to take it very seriously. Two stars may be an overrating. So many simplifications (a very short work anyway), it's difficult to take it very seriously. Two stars may be an overrating.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Craig Bolton

    The False Principle Of Our Education by Max Stirner (2002)

  11. 5 out of 5

    Doyle

    se lit très bien. bilingue

  12. 4 out of 5

    Azula

  13. 5 out of 5

    Myrto

  14. 4 out of 5

    Gabe

  15. 4 out of 5

    Brandon Mccary

  16. 4 out of 5

    Simon Moon

  17. 4 out of 5

    Hali Palombo

  18. 4 out of 5

    joy

  19. 4 out of 5

    Mohammed Amine

  20. 4 out of 5

    Damian

  21. 5 out of 5

    Shelia Tarrant

  22. 4 out of 5

    Linartas

  23. 5 out of 5

    Mehmet Gundogdu

  24. 4 out of 5

    Charles

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Victor

  26. 5 out of 5

    Brendan

  27. 4 out of 5

    Ronald Hinner

  28. 4 out of 5

    Christian Amaral

  29. 5 out of 5

    Timothy Wood

  30. 5 out of 5

    Guilherme Amorim

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