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Other Boys

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In Other Boys, debut author Damian Alexander delivers a moving middle grade graphic memoir about his struggles with bullying, the death of his mother, and coming out. Damian is the new kid at school, and he has a foolproof plan to avoid the bullying that's plagued him his whole childhood: he's going to stop talking. Starting on the first day seventh grade, he won't utter a In Other Boys, debut author Damian Alexander delivers a moving middle grade graphic memoir about his struggles with bullying, the death of his mother, and coming out. Damian is the new kid at school, and he has a foolproof plan to avoid the bullying that's plagued him his whole childhood: he's going to stop talking. Starting on the first day seventh grade, he won't utter a word. If he keeps his mouth shut, the bullies will have nothing to tease him about—right? But Damian's vow of silence doesn't work—his classmates can tell there's something different about him. His family doesn't look like the kind on TV: his mother is dead, his father is gone, and he's being raised by his grandparents in a low-income household. And Damian does things that boys don't usually do, like play with Barbies instead of GI Joe. Kids have teased him about this his whole life, especially other boys. But if boys can be so cruel, why does Damian have a crush on one?


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In Other Boys, debut author Damian Alexander delivers a moving middle grade graphic memoir about his struggles with bullying, the death of his mother, and coming out. Damian is the new kid at school, and he has a foolproof plan to avoid the bullying that's plagued him his whole childhood: he's going to stop talking. Starting on the first day seventh grade, he won't utter a In Other Boys, debut author Damian Alexander delivers a moving middle grade graphic memoir about his struggles with bullying, the death of his mother, and coming out. Damian is the new kid at school, and he has a foolproof plan to avoid the bullying that's plagued him his whole childhood: he's going to stop talking. Starting on the first day seventh grade, he won't utter a word. If he keeps his mouth shut, the bullies will have nothing to tease him about—right? But Damian's vow of silence doesn't work—his classmates can tell there's something different about him. His family doesn't look like the kind on TV: his mother is dead, his father is gone, and he's being raised by his grandparents in a low-income household. And Damian does things that boys don't usually do, like play with Barbies instead of GI Joe. Kids have teased him about this his whole life, especially other boys. But if boys can be so cruel, why does Damian have a crush on one?

30 review for Other Boys

  1. 5 out of 5

    Caleb Roehrig

    This was a really moving read, and while the subject matter is heavy, it’s handled with sensitivity and care for the reader. Kids who have experienced bullying or tragedy, kids who feel isolated or out of place, will feel recognized in this memoir. It celebrates finding your own path, learning to love what sets you apart, and building the courage to be who you are.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ms. Yingling

    E ARC provided by Edelweiss Plus In this autobiographical graphic novel, we see how difficult young Damian's life is. His mother is killed when he is a baby, so he is being raised by his grandparents, who are not well off. School is difficult, and changing schools often leads Damian to decide to not talk at all in school in the 8th grade. He is a sensitive boy, who is often told that the choices he makes are "girl" choices, and he thinks it best to fly under everyone's radar. This doesn't always E ARC provided by Edelweiss Plus In this autobiographical graphic novel, we see how difficult young Damian's life is. His mother is killed when he is a baby, so he is being raised by his grandparents, who are not well off. School is difficult, and changing schools often leads Damian to decide to not talk at all in school in the 8th grade. He is a sensitive boy, who is often told that the choices he makes are "girl" choices, and he thinks it best to fly under everyone's radar. This doesn't always work, but it does get him recommended for therapy with a school counselor, although he doesn't think he will benefit from talking to her, either. There are some students who are nice to him, like Mark, and his grandmother and brother David are supportive, although his grandfather dies of cancer. His best friend is a girl named Sylvia, and he is comfortable hanging out with her friends until they get further into middle school and decide that they can't be friends with boys. There are some better moments, like hanging out with gamers who accept him, and even meeting a nonbinary person named Taylor. At one point, he draws the line between all of the slurs of "gay" that are hurled at him, and his feelings about finding boys attractive, but he doesn't get much support in processing this. Having a pet cat helps with his anxiety somewhat. In general, though, Damian's life is filled with trauma that he finds hard to deal with, although he eventually gets some support from the school counselor. Strengths: I can't think of another book dealing with selective mutism from the point of view of the person experiencing it, and this certainly has lots of details about how being uncomfortable with aspects of one's identity can have a devastating impact on one's life. There is a lot of discussion about gender stereotypes that have changed a bit, but exposing toxic masculinity and its effects goes a long way to preventing its survival. Readers who are having difficulty in their own lives might take comfort from this, and readers who aren't might learn some empathy. Weaknesses: I wish that specific dates had been mentioned. From the geometric graphics on the cover and some internal clues like Cabbage Patch dolls and an ALF stuffed animal, I'm guessing that this is set in the mid 1980s. This is important, because the experience of a student coming out in middle school might be somewhat different in the 2020s. What I really think: This is a somewhat less traumatic version of the family dynamics examined in Krosoczka's Hey, Kiddo with the addition of the problems embracing sexual identity, and is in line with other graphic novel style memoirs like Hale's Best Friends and Telgemeier's Smile.

  3. 5 out of 5

    TJ

    I related to this a lot, and it’s so nice to see a middle grade book explore deeper themes while keeping it age friendly. This would be a great addition to any school library, and it’ll make young queer kids feel seen. The art style didn’t exactly appeal to me, but I thought it fit this story. 4.5/5 stars.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Adam Sass

    With OTHER BOYS, Damian Alexander bares his soul for young readers in a way I can only describe as heroic. The illustrations are heartwarming and pitch perfect, and the real life story of tragedy and self-discovery will enrapture readers of all ages. You'll fall out of your chair in love with this book! With OTHER BOYS, Damian Alexander bares his soul for young readers in a way I can only describe as heroic. The illustrations are heartwarming and pitch perfect, and the real life story of tragedy and self-discovery will enrapture readers of all ages. You'll fall out of your chair in love with this book!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Amy Pickett

    Damian has always felt different from other boys, preferring activities like playing with dolls, reading fairy tales, and sewing to GI Joes and superhero movies. He was teased and bullied relentlessly for being “gay” and a “homo” long before he knew what those words meant. Although it’s not discussed in detail, the reader learns that Damian’s mother was murdered by his father when Damian was a small child. Now, he lives with his brother and grandmother in a small apartment. Tired of being the “d Damian has always felt different from other boys, preferring activities like playing with dolls, reading fairy tales, and sewing to GI Joes and superhero movies. He was teased and bullied relentlessly for being “gay” and a “homo” long before he knew what those words meant. Although it’s not discussed in detail, the reader learns that Damian’s mother was murdered by his father when Damian was a small child. Now, he lives with his brother and grandmother in a small apartment. Tired of being the “dead mom” kid and a target for bullies, Damian stops talking on the first day of 7th grade. After months of silence and loneliness, Damian finally shares his feelings with a kind therapist, who also helps normalize his crushes on boys. Friendly peers, including a couple of cute boys, begin to draw him out of his protective shell, lending a hopeful note to an often heartbreaking graphic memoir. Inspired by colorful cartoons, funky arcade decor, and VHS tape boxes, Damian Alexander’s artwork is both firmly rooted in his childhood era and as timeless as a child’s secret pain. Other Boys is a heartfelt graphic memoir about the loss of a parent, coming out, bullying, and self-acceptance. It’s an excellent addition to shelves that already include options for slightly older readers, such as Hey, Kiddo by Jarrett J. Krosoczka and Brave Face by Shaun David Hutchinson.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Beverly

    This graphic autobiographical novel is so moving. Damian Alexander doesn't shy away from the reality of trauma, bullying, and feeling alone. It's a great addition to any middle grade class library--and adults will find it poignant and moving, too. Note: Damian was my student as an undergrad. This graphic autobiographical novel is so moving. Damian Alexander doesn't shy away from the reality of trauma, bullying, and feeling alone. It's a great addition to any middle grade class library--and adults will find it poignant and moving, too. Note: Damian was my student as an undergrad.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Amy Pickett

    Damian has always felt different from other boys, preferring activities like playing with dolls, reading fairy tales, and sewing to GI Joes and superhero movies. He was teased and bullied relentlessly for being “gay” and a “homo” long before he knew what those words meant. Although it’s not discussed in detail, the reader learns that Damian’s mother was murdered by his father when Damian was a small child. Now, he lives with his brother and grandmother in a small apartment. Tired of being the “d Damian has always felt different from other boys, preferring activities like playing with dolls, reading fairy tales, and sewing to GI Joes and superhero movies. He was teased and bullied relentlessly for being “gay” and a “homo” long before he knew what those words meant. Although it’s not discussed in detail, the reader learns that Damian’s mother was murdered by his father when Damian was a small child. Now, he lives with his brother and grandmother in a small apartment. Tired of being the “dead mom” kid and a target for bullies, Damian stops talking on the first day of 7th grade. After months of silence and loneliness, Damian finally shares his feelings with a kind therapist, who helps normalize his crushes on boys. Friendly peers, including a couple of cute boys, begin to draw him out of his protective shell, lending a hopeful note to an often heartbreaking graphic memoir. Inspired by colorful cartoons, funky arcade decor, and VHS tape boxes, Damian Alexander’s artwork is both firmly rooted in his childhood era and as timeless as a child’s secret. Other Boys is a heartfelt graphic memoir about the loss of a parent, coming out, bullying, and self-acceptance.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Ryan

    Other Boys is a new middle grade graphic memoir by Damian Alexander. After being bullied the previous year, the author transfers to a new school at the start of 7th grade and decides to quit speaking. If he doesn’t talk, he can’t be bullied. The author’s life is told in flashbacks where he lost his mother as a baby and his father isn’t involved in his life. He’s living with a grandmother and a brother. At the same time, he’s realizing his attraction to other boys and trying to figure out what th Other Boys is a new middle grade graphic memoir by Damian Alexander. After being bullied the previous year, the author transfers to a new school at the start of 7th grade and decides to quit speaking. If he doesn’t talk, he can’t be bullied. The author’s life is told in flashbacks where he lost his mother as a baby and his father isn’t involved in his life. He’s living with a grandmother and a brother. At the same time, he’s realizing his attraction to other boys and trying to figure out what that means. When I first heard about this book, I thought it was going to be a fun read. I didn’t expect it to be so emotional. The whimsy of the illustrations balances the heart wrenching story of trauma and coming out. The story smartly builds, revealing events from the past which cumulate in a very powerful story. I didn’t have the level of trauma that the author experiences while growing up. But I was bullied a lot in school and I shut down and stopped speaking unless I had to. It was nice to see someone similar to me and that I wasn’t alone. This is a great story of resilience and becoming who you are.▪️

  9. 4 out of 5

    Ben Truong

    Other Boys is a graphic novel written and illustrated by Damian Alexander. It explores Alexander's childhood as a sensitive boy starting middle school in this melancholy queer coming-of-age memoir. Damian Alexander is a cartoonist and storyteller who grew up in and around Boston. His first graphic novel, Other Boys, is based off his viral and award winning autobiographical web-comics. Following the death of Damian's mother, he lives with his brother and maternal grandmother in a small apartment, a Other Boys is a graphic novel written and illustrated by Damian Alexander. It explores Alexander's childhood as a sensitive boy starting middle school in this melancholy queer coming-of-age memoir. Damian Alexander is a cartoonist and storyteller who grew up in and around Boston. His first graphic novel, Other Boys, is based off his viral and award winning autobiographical web-comics. Following the death of Damian's mother, he lives with his brother and maternal grandmother in a small apartment, and is the new kid at a school where it seemed everyone was from a perfect family. To fend off the bullying he's come to expect, the aspiring artist stops speaking on the first day of seventh grade. However, his no-talking plan backfires as he is placed in remedial classes and forced to see a therapist at school. Opening up is not easy, especially when Damian begins to think that he might actually like some boys. Other Boys is written and constructed rather well. The narrative is interspersed with contextualizing moments from Alexander's past, which damages gender stereotypes and uncomplimentary commentary on his preference for dolls and dollhouses over action figures. Stylized art, with blocky designs and sometimes-wonky proportions, has a handmade feel. All in all, Other Boys is an excellent and important debut, despite the rush at the end, it was wonderfully written and constructed.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Katy Jean Vance

    This is an ideal middle school graphic novel: true story, brightly colored, narrator struggling to find themselves/fit in, bullies, friendship. It will be ideal for students who have read all the Raina Telgemeier’s and are looking for “older” content but aren’t quite ready for the harshness of something like Hey Kiddo. It’s also a beautiful coming of age story for a young gay person, and it offers a critical look at traditional gender roles and the boxes we put children in. I also liked how the This is an ideal middle school graphic novel: true story, brightly colored, narrator struggling to find themselves/fit in, bullies, friendship. It will be ideal for students who have read all the Raina Telgemeier’s and are looking for “older” content but aren’t quite ready for the harshness of something like Hey Kiddo. It’s also a beautiful coming of age story for a young gay person, and it offers a critical look at traditional gender roles and the boxes we put children in. I also liked how the author, Damian Alexander, reflects on how people who loved him very much made some very poor choices in the name of helping him. I also appreciated how he addressed his struggles with mental health and the important role a therapist played in his life. This book is filled with tragedy but ends with hope and happiness. It’s a book that will easily find its readers in any middle school library. Thank you to NetGalley for this ARC in return for my honest review.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Cy

    a really brave memoir that doesn't shy away from the author's trauma. i can't imagine baring my soul like this for people to read, lmao. this book will bring comfort to a lot of kids who deal with similar feelings of loneliness and/or the effects of ptsd. also, love a book that normalizes seeing a therapist and shows how beneficial that can be. a really brave memoir that doesn't shy away from the author's trauma. i can't imagine baring my soul like this for people to read, lmao. this book will bring comfort to a lot of kids who deal with similar feelings of loneliness and/or the effects of ptsd. also, love a book that normalizes seeing a therapist and shows how beneficial that can be.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

    I've started this review at least four times so far because I have a lot to say and don't quite know where to start. If this were a work of fiction, I would praise it talk about how important it is because it shows the damage that heteronormativity and rigid gender expectations do. I'd say that it shows kids that it's okay to be themselves and that eventually they'll find people who will accept them. I'd also be grateful for the portrayal of a non-nuclear family and how that could hopefully make I've started this review at least four times so far because I have a lot to say and don't quite know where to start. If this were a work of fiction, I would praise it talk about how important it is because it shows the damage that heteronormativity and rigid gender expectations do. I'd say that it shows kids that it's okay to be themselves and that eventually they'll find people who will accept them. I'd also be grateful for the portrayal of a non-nuclear family and how that could hopefully make kids reading this book feel like their families were valid, too, no matter what they looked like. I'd be grateful for a book that explores loss and trauma so well. And I can say all of that. Actually, I suppose I just did. But I also need to acknowledge that this is a *memoir* and talk about how courageous the author was for laying this all out on the page. I hope the fact that this is a true story provides an extra layer of connection to the kids who need this book, the ones who feel hopeless and alone. I am grateful that I had the chance to read this book. Note: I received a free copy of this book from Goodreads's Giveaways program.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Mariela

    An important and timely middle grade memoir of a boy who doesn't fit in because of others preconceived notions of what a boy should be like. At times, this was hard to read. His trauma and loneliness of his family situation with his mom and grandfather was exacerbated by the bullying and cruelty of his peers and adults around him. I'm pleased that it ended on a hopeful note, because I think that is important to balance with the difficult times of his life. I received this arc from the publisher f An important and timely middle grade memoir of a boy who doesn't fit in because of others preconceived notions of what a boy should be like. At times, this was hard to read. His trauma and loneliness of his family situation with his mom and grandfather was exacerbated by the bullying and cruelty of his peers and adults around him. I'm pleased that it ended on a hopeful note, because I think that is important to balance with the difficult times of his life. I received this arc from the publisher for my honest review.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    Damian has not had an easy childhood- with his mother dead, his father gone, and his school days filled with bullies, Damian just wants to avoid all of it. Avoiding speaking is the best plan Damian has- after all, if he doesn't talk, what could anyone make fun of him for? Unfortunately, his plan doesn't work at school or at home. At school, the kids think it is weird that he doesn't talk and at home, his extended family thinks it strange that he prefers Barbies to GI Joe. Damian's internal strug Damian has not had an easy childhood- with his mother dead, his father gone, and his school days filled with bullies, Damian just wants to avoid all of it. Avoiding speaking is the best plan Damian has- after all, if he doesn't talk, what could anyone make fun of him for? Unfortunately, his plan doesn't work at school or at home. At school, the kids think it is weird that he doesn't talk and at home, his extended family thinks it strange that he prefers Barbies to GI Joe. Damian's internal struggles continue to grow as he deals with all of this along with his growing realization that he has a crush on one of the boys at school. Other Boys is a great look at how trauma can affect young people. We all process and handle things differently and Damian's silence is just one of the ways that trauma can manifest. The story gives a little insight into what middle school may be like for someone like Damian who is struggling to find where he fits in the world. (As a middle school librarian, I think it is important to note that even the most confident of kids is still searching for that fit). The illustrations are lovely and draw the reader into the story with Damian as he learns how to deal with middle school.

  15. 4 out of 5

    The Nerd Daily

    Originally published on The Nerd Daily | Review by Mimi Koehler Anyone ever miss middle school? Yeah, me neither. In Other Boys, we follow Damian, the new kid at school. Despite his vow not to talk at school so people will stop bullying him, he still finds himself a target of daily ridicule. With the death of his mother still fresh in his mind and the absence of a parent weighing heavy on him, Damian doesn’t have an easy life. But when Damian finds himself crushing on a boy, things begin to change Originally published on The Nerd Daily | Review by Mimi Koehler Anyone ever miss middle school? Yeah, me neither. In Other Boys, we follow Damian, the new kid at school. Despite his vow not to talk at school so people will stop bullying him, he still finds himself a target of daily ridicule. With the death of his mother still fresh in his mind and the absence of a parent weighing heavy on him, Damian doesn’t have an easy life. But when Damian finds himself crushing on a boy, things begin to change. But what does it mean to like a boy when all they’ve ever done is make fun of you? Other Boys was so incredibly immersive because, if your journey through tweendom was anything like Damian’s, chances are you’re going to experience flashbacks while reading this memoir. Read the FULL REVIEW on The Nerd Daily

  16. 4 out of 5

    Carin

    A short review as I waited too long to review it! But this was a touching graphic memoir about growing up gay, and with a bad family to boot. Damian is teased at school, and when he starts at a new school, he decided he’s just not going to speak, because often that’s what kids have teased him about–things he’s said. But of course it doesn’t make it all stop. It is a bit of a distraction because the kids aren’t trying quite as hard to tell if he’s gay, as now they have the distraction of why won’ A short review as I waited too long to review it! But this was a touching graphic memoir about growing up gay, and with a bad family to boot. Damian is teased at school, and when he starts at a new school, he decided he’s just not going to speak, because often that’s what kids have teased him about–things he’s said. But of course it doesn’t make it all stop. It is a bit of a distraction because the kids aren’t trying quite as hard to tell if he’s gay, as now they have the distraction of why won’t he talk. But it won’t fix anything. It’s just avoidance. This is a cool, albeit sad, story about growing up and discovering yourself, and admitting the bad things that have happened to you. I think the graphic format is great both for a book where the main character doesn’t say anything(!!) but also as a way to increase the accessibility of this book for kids who might not love reading. As it is an important book and a lot of kids will find something to identify with here.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    I've been reading a lot of LGBTQ middle grade books recently, and this was the toughest read just because of the heaviness. It was a real heartbreaker, especially knowing that it's based on the writer/illustrators life. The level of bullying is more severe compared to other books I've read for this age group, but I have no doubt that it's honest and that a lot of kids in similar situations to Alexander - whether it's because of sexual orientation, different family circumstances, poverty - will r I've been reading a lot of LGBTQ middle grade books recently, and this was the toughest read just because of the heaviness. It was a real heartbreaker, especially knowing that it's based on the writer/illustrators life. The level of bullying is more severe compared to other books I've read for this age group, but I have no doubt that it's honest and that a lot of kids in similar situations to Alexander - whether it's because of sexual orientation, different family circumstances, poverty - will recognize themselves here. I loved how it started in 7th grade and slowly went back and highlighted the experiences that brought him to that point. I think the ending felt a tiny bit rushed, but I'm glad it ended on a more optimistic note, and I'm sure that'll make an impact on some young readers.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Raven Black

    We know this story: Boy learning who he is. And we know the story of Boy learning that he is Gay and that's okay. However, Alexander's approach makes this a fresh take on that story. Comic book illustrations, bold colors, and the right details to illustrations show much of what the text does not. There are some stereotypes that are not always shown in a book as other books tend to start during the teen years, and Alexander gives you the highlights from the "beginning" to "now." These are, of cou We know this story: Boy learning who he is. And we know the story of Boy learning that he is Gay and that's okay. However, Alexander's approach makes this a fresh take on that story. Comic book illustrations, bold colors, and the right details to illustrations show much of what the text does not. There are some stereotypes that are not always shown in a book as other books tend to start during the teen years, and Alexander gives you the highlights from the "beginning" to "now." These are, of course, just who Alexander was and not a comment on the action itself. This memoir is condensed (certain events happened much later than is shown) but the emotions are not skimped on. Due to the bullying and the how behind the death of his mother some people might be triggered. However, the way Alexander handles them is tastefully done.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    Damian isn't like other boys. He lives with his grandparents, he wants to play with dolls, and he hates the other boys. Upon entering 7th grade, Damian is starting at a new school and decides that he just won't talk at all, that way the other kids will have no reason to pick on him. Unfortunately, this plan backfires and he becomes the target of his peers' taunting. This middle-grade graphic memoir is raw and emotional. It tackles many difficult topics from diverse families to coming out. I also Damian isn't like other boys. He lives with his grandparents, he wants to play with dolls, and he hates the other boys. Upon entering 7th grade, Damian is starting at a new school and decides that he just won't talk at all, that way the other kids will have no reason to pick on him. Unfortunately, this plan backfires and he becomes the target of his peers' taunting. This middle-grade graphic memoir is raw and emotional. It tackles many difficult topics from diverse families to coming out. I also love that this book normalizes therapy. Mark your calendars for September 6th so that you don't miss this fantastic grahic novel release!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jenn Marshall

    A middle grade memoir about bullying, death of his mother, and coming out. This book is cute, sad, funny, and so very frustrating to see how this child was treated. The art was adorable and the I really enjoyed how the letters looked. I was almost instantly super invested in the story. I know that it is going to turn out ok, because it is a memoir. But every part of me wanted to scoop up this child and bring him home to live with me. It was well written, my middle schoolers will completely relat A middle grade memoir about bullying, death of his mother, and coming out. This book is cute, sad, funny, and so very frustrating to see how this child was treated. The art was adorable and the I really enjoyed how the letters looked. I was almost instantly super invested in the story. I know that it is going to turn out ok, because it is a memoir. But every part of me wanted to scoop up this child and bring him home to live with me. It was well written, my middle schoolers will completely relate and love this story. I can't wait until I can get my hands on a physical copy.

  21. 5 out of 5

    R E

    “Other Boys” explores a complex, autobiographical story told honestly yet sensitively. Author and artist Damien Alexander is forthright about the tragedy and confusion he experienced growing up, sharing with us a childhood of loss and alienation. But he also shows us how loving, if imperfect, adults can help children confront and process trauma, even when the road to a happier life is evasive and uncertain. This is a good book for schools and libraries to have on hand, as it is likely to help at “Other Boys” explores a complex, autobiographical story told honestly yet sensitively. Author and artist Damien Alexander is forthright about the tragedy and confusion he experienced growing up, sharing with us a childhood of loss and alienation. But he also shows us how loving, if imperfect, adults can help children confront and process trauma, even when the road to a happier life is evasive and uncertain. This is a good book for schools and libraries to have on hand, as it is likely to help at least some young people to find solace, guidance, and strength.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    This book, memoir, was very well written. I am heartbroken at all the trauma the author had to endure to write the story, but I am grateful he did so it can help other kids who may find themselves in relatable situations. I also enjoyed the graphic novel format; it made the story easier to digest and process, and many people love GNs.

  23. 5 out of 5

    TheNextGenLibrarian

    This is a fantastic MG graphic novel about what it means to think of yourself as different and then to go to love who you are. It deals with the issues of poverty, being LGBTQIA+, starting a new school/trying to make friends, and being bullied. So many students will connect with this book. CW: homophobia, bullying

  24. 4 out of 5

    Christy

    A fantastic memoir that is insight not only into Damian’s life but the life of a middle schooler. Bright colors pop off the page and the expressions tell the story as much as the words do. This GN is not to be missed - pick one up for your personal library and all classrooms you know!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Aryssa

    2.5 stars. An important story, but ultimately, common and therefore I wanted something more out of this graphic memoir that I didn't get. A good addition to a shelf of LGBTQ graphic memoirs, especially focusing on the younger years, but not distinctive. 2.5 stars. An important story, but ultimately, common and therefore I wanted something more out of this graphic memoir that I didn't get. A good addition to a shelf of LGBTQ graphic memoirs, especially focusing on the younger years, but not distinctive.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Andréa

    Note: I received a digital review copy of this book from the publisher through NetGalley.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Caleb Bollenbacher

    Damian's just the best and I can't wait to have this and so many other stories from him out in the world!! Damian's just the best and I can't wait to have this and so many other stories from him out in the world!!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Janeisis

    it is a really good book this reminds me to be kind to new kids in class

  29. 4 out of 5

    Megan Mann

    (I received an advanced copy of this on NetGalley) We all know I love me a graphic memoir and this one was also amazing. I loved the author’s note at the end where he talks about how he could have made it JUST about his mom or JUST about his coming out or JUST about his bullying, but he needed all of those elements for it to really drive home how isolating all of that made him feel. And that he could have included his brother more BUT he wanted to most importantly show his perspective as this was (I received an advanced copy of this on NetGalley) We all know I love me a graphic memoir and this one was also amazing. I loved the author’s note at the end where he talks about how he could have made it JUST about his mom or JUST about his coming out or JUST about his bullying, but he needed all of those elements for it to really drive home how isolating all of that made him feel. And that he could have included his brother more BUT he wanted to most importantly show his perspective as this was a memoir. I mean, kids can be super awful! I’m hoping, as I work with kids every day, that this next generation coming up is going to be brought up differently and taught differently because the perpetuation of this nonsense cannot continue. We need more stories like this to show that we cannot allow this sort of thing to continue. I thought this was fantastic.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Dan

    Other Boys is a strong memoir in the graphic novel format. Damian had faced many hardships in his life and there are lots of moments that will resonate with kids about growing up. Although heartbreaking at times, this story is ultimately a hopeful one. I look forward to sharing it with kids this school year.

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