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Animal Farm: The Graphic Novel

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A beautiful graphic adaptation of George Orwell's timeless and timely allegorical novel. "All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others." In 1945, George Orwell, called "the conscience of his generation," created an enduring, devastating story of new tyranny replacing old, and power corrupting even the noblest of causes. Today it is all too clear that A beautiful graphic adaptation of George Orwell's timeless and timely allegorical novel. "All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others." In 1945, George Orwell, called "the conscience of his generation," created an enduring, devastating story of new tyranny replacing old, and power corrupting even the noblest of causes. Today it is all too clear that Orwell's masterpiece is still fiercely relevant wherever cults of personality thrive, truths are twisted by those in power, and freedom is under attack. Now, in this fully authorized edition, the artist Odyr translates the world and message of Animal Farm into a gorgeously imagined graphic novel. Old Major, Napoleon, Squealer, Snowball, Boxer, and all the animals of Animal Farm come to life in this newly envisaged classic. From his individual brushstrokes to the freedom of his page design, Odyr's adaptation seamlessly moves between satire and fable and will appeal to all ages, just as Orwell intended.


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A beautiful graphic adaptation of George Orwell's timeless and timely allegorical novel. "All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others." In 1945, George Orwell, called "the conscience of his generation," created an enduring, devastating story of new tyranny replacing old, and power corrupting even the noblest of causes. Today it is all too clear that A beautiful graphic adaptation of George Orwell's timeless and timely allegorical novel. "All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others." In 1945, George Orwell, called "the conscience of his generation," created an enduring, devastating story of new tyranny replacing old, and power corrupting even the noblest of causes. Today it is all too clear that Orwell's masterpiece is still fiercely relevant wherever cults of personality thrive, truths are twisted by those in power, and freedom is under attack. Now, in this fully authorized edition, the artist Odyr translates the world and message of Animal Farm into a gorgeously imagined graphic novel. Old Major, Napoleon, Squealer, Snowball, Boxer, and all the animals of Animal Farm come to life in this newly envisaged classic. From his individual brushstrokes to the freedom of his page design, Odyr's adaptation seamlessly moves between satire and fable and will appeal to all ages, just as Orwell intended.

30 review for Animal Farm: The Graphic Novel

  1. 4 out of 5

    Ariel

    ADORED. Adored it. It's an adaption so sacrifices had to be made (including a couple scenes and some characters) but the heart was there, and some moments felt even more scary when I actually had to face the visuals of what was going on. The illustrations are GORGEOUS, the story is POWERFUL, and although I'm no official authority on the matter, I really think Orwell would have loved this adaptation. ADORED. Adored it. It's an adaption so sacrifices had to be made (including a couple scenes and some characters) but the heart was there, and some moments felt even more scary when I actually had to face the visuals of what was going on. The illustrations are GORGEOUS, the story is POWERFUL, and although I'm no official authority on the matter, I really think Orwell would have loved this adaptation.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    I am ambivalent about graphic novels. They are nothing like the original book, and that is why I rarely pick them for myself. But they do magic for kids in school who struggle to understand the complex storylines in their class novels. After all, we have a quite substantial percentage of students who have severe difficulties with literacy even in Middle School, and who find it incredibly hard to engage in literature. They get their fill of excitement and drama via other media, and they hardly ev I am ambivalent about graphic novels. They are nothing like the original book, and that is why I rarely pick them for myself. But they do magic for kids in school who struggle to understand the complex storylines in their class novels. After all, we have a quite substantial percentage of students who have severe difficulties with literacy even in Middle School, and who find it incredibly hard to engage in literature. They get their fill of excitement and drama via other media, and they hardly ever see any benefit in overcoming the struggle to read in the traditional way. Needless to say, this partial illiteracy causes problems far beyond not being able to read Animal Farm in original, but in a way, this minor issue is symbolical for the bigger picture. Those kids who don't grasp the concept of subtle manipulation through text (as shown in the progressive power grab by the pigs on the farm) have a hard time understanding changes in society and the impact society has on them as individuals. They struggle to decipher the meaning of the political change when the slogan "All animals are equal" receives the additional note "But some animals are more equal than others". And more importantly, the kids who struggle with literacy also lack the words and phrases to stand up against unfair treatment and bullying. Literacy is not just about reading and understanding text, it is also about applying text to life and expressing thoughts and feelings verbally. How to change this? If I look at this from a macro-perspective, I feel that the only thing I can actually do is to lie down in front of all the busy windmills and take a nap. Too many problems, too little me. On a micro-level, visual support in storytelling is like transforming a tedious and lifeless windmill into a living dragon that invites the student to a challenging but exciting and worthwhile match. If chosen with care, a graphic novel holds the key to the magic king-and-queendom of story. This edition of Animal Farm has the extra advantage of being a piece of art well made! All books are equal.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Dave Schaafsma

    Happy New Year! A graphic novel adaptation by the Brazilian Odyr of the classic 1945 George Orwell text. If you had to read one Of Orwell’s several great works that are still relevant to the present state of society I would choose 1984, but this is a great one, too, also focused on his concern about totalitarianism. This is lovely, watercolored, and gets at the heart of the story though loses much of Orwell’s wonderful use of the English language, too. I still recommend it, especially as a way in Happy New Year! A graphic novel adaptation by the Brazilian Odyr of the classic 1945 George Orwell text. If you had to read one Of Orwell’s several great works that are still relevant to the present state of society I would choose 1984, but this is a great one, too, also focused on his concern about totalitarianism. This is lovely, watercolored, and gets at the heart of the story though loses much of Orwell’s wonderful use of the English language, too. I still recommend it, especially as a way into the original text or to accompany it. The story is a parable about a group of farm animals who rise up against their evil farmer/landowner who is getting unfairly rich on their back-breaking labor (you’ve probably never heard of such a thing, as your country wouldn’t allow such injustice—just kidding). It also in part is an allegory or dark satire about some actual historical events: Farmer Jone, may be seen as similar to Tsar Nicholas II; the leader of the uprising, Old Major, may be like Marx/Lenin. After the revolution is complete the animals for a time run the farm themselves, but it’s never really communism as one might hope for (in that goal of equality). The issue of power is never really absent in government, it seems; it corrupts, and absolute power corrupts absolutely, as in the novel’s best-known phrase: “All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others.” Political/governmental hierarchies seem inevitable--maybe it’s human nature?—but two pigs in particular, Snowball (Trotsky) and Napoleon (Stalin), eventually completely corrupt the originally stated democratic design. Folks on the Right have always used this text as evidence that Orwell is really politically conservative, anti-communist, but I think Orwell’s larger target is not commies or even Stalinist “communism” but totalitarianism in all its forms. Clover expresses her disappointment for what comes about: "If she herself had had any picture of the future, it had been of a society of animals set free from hunger and the whip, all equal, each working according to his capacity, the strong protecting the weak, as she had protected the lost brood of ducklings with her foreleg on the night of Major's speech. Instead- she did not know why- they had come to a time when no one dared to speak his mind, when fierce, growling dogs roamed everywhere, and when you had to watch your comrades torn to pieces after confessing to shocking crimes”—Clover So many good reviews of the original novel are her on Goodreads—Petra, Manny, many others--so good, but this is a very good adaptation!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Claudia

    Orwell’s Animal Farm is one of those books which, even if you did not read it feels like you did, because of its popularity. It’s my case and because of that, I never felt the desire to read it. But when I found this graphic novel, I thought I’d give it a try and I think it was the best choice for me. Although I knew everything about it, I highly enjoyed this adaptation of the story, the illustrations and even the translation. The story is told in simplistic main ideas, and they capture perfect t Orwell’s Animal Farm is one of those books which, even if you did not read it feels like you did, because of its popularity. It’s my case and because of that, I never felt the desire to read it. But when I found this graphic novel, I thought I’d give it a try and I think it was the best choice for me. Although I knew everything about it, I highly enjoyed this adaptation of the story, the illustrations and even the translation. The story is told in simplistic main ideas, and they capture perfect the message of the book; same with the illustrations, which seem to be made originally in watercolor, not just drawings. It’s one of those political satires which will never get old. Highly recommended in this edition too, with one reservation though: I don't think it's for children, even if it's placed in Junior category.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Ashley Daviau

    I first was introduced to Animal Farm in high school when we had to read it for English class and I had a difficult time enjoying it. Many years later, I decided to give it another go. I'm really glad I did because now I was able to fully appreciate this novel. I blew through it in one sitting because once I started reading, I became totally absorbed in the story and couldn't stop turning the pages. That's a true testament to how this book has stood the test of time and is still relevant today. I first was introduced to Animal Farm in high school when we had to read it for English class and I had a difficult time enjoying it. Many years later, I decided to give it another go. I'm really glad I did because now I was able to fully appreciate this novel. I blew through it in one sitting because once I started reading, I became totally absorbed in the story and couldn't stop turning the pages. That's a true testament to how this book has stood the test of time and is still relevant today. Getting to read it again plus the amazing artwork was an absolute treat!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Ed Erwin

    I read and enjoyed the original in 9th grade. One of the few assigned books that I liked. I didn't understand exactly who and what was being satirized, but the gradual subversion of a utopian idea interested and frightened me. It works well in this adaptation. Some things come off more funny visually, like animals constructing a windmill, or pigs walking on two feet and dining at a table. Other things come off scarier, like the wars and the political executions performed by a pack of dogs. I only I read and enjoyed the original in 9th grade. One of the few assigned books that I liked. I didn't understand exactly who and what was being satirized, but the gradual subversion of a utopian idea interested and frightened me. It works well in this adaptation. Some things come off more funny visually, like animals constructing a windmill, or pigs walking on two feet and dining at a table. Other things come off scarier, like the wars and the political executions performed by a pack of dogs. I only regret that Benjamin the donkey (whose name isn't even mentioned here) wasn't given a chance to show his cynical self. His Eeyore-like quote "life would go on as it had always gone on– that is, badly" doesn't appear.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Rod Brown

    Originally published in Brazil, this is a superb adaptation of Orwell's dark fable. The satire remains just as timely today for our society where the "some animals are more equal than others" mentality thrives. Originally published in Brazil, this is a superb adaptation of Orwell's dark fable. The satire remains just as timely today for our society where the "some animals are more equal than others" mentality thrives.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Chasity

    I read the actual book too many years ago to compare the accuracy here, but I thought this was beautiful. I wish I’d had this when I was reading the book in high school. The illustrations were just gorgeous.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Whitney

    Animal Farm is one of my favorite books, so I was excited to see this on the shelves at my local library. Overall, I enjoyed it. The art style was very inviting and reminded me a little of an artsy Children's book. The illustrations alone make it interesting. The story's bare bones plot is told and told well, but the reason it's missing a star for me is that I didn't get the same sense of foreboding that I got reading the actual text. I understand story needs to be condensed in this format and n Animal Farm is one of my favorite books, so I was excited to see this on the shelves at my local library. Overall, I enjoyed it. The art style was very inviting and reminded me a little of an artsy Children's book. The illustrations alone make it interesting. The story's bare bones plot is told and told well, but the reason it's missing a star for me is that I didn't get the same sense of foreboding that I got reading the actual text. I understand story needs to be condensed in this format and not every little thing needs to be shown, but major plot points like slowly changing the rules on the barn and the roles of some characters (for example, Mollie, Moses, Benjamin, etc. ) have been drastically reduced or written out almost entirely. This changes the story for the reader and causes the graphic novel version to lack some of the symbolism and nuance of the original tale. The slow horror that builds up for the reader as the pigs start making small changes become one panel of conversation or not mentioned at all. The ending comes and doesn't seem earned in this adaptation. I still think it would be a useful tool for students who are reluctant readers or who maybe need a condensed version of the story to get the gist (or readers who liked the original and want to see how it was changed for this format), but I would recommend reading the book if at all possible. It's still pretty short and the pay off, in my opinion, is better. Popsugar reading prompt: A fiction or nonfiction book about a world leader

  10. 5 out of 5

    Cherlynn (cherreading)

    Wonderful adaptation of one of the best classics ever! The illustrations are quite graphic and brutal, oof. But they make the story come alive and even more powerful. Still not over Boxer 😭 Is it weird that every time I read this book, I still somehow hope for a different ending??

  11. 5 out of 5

    Filipa

    Timeless tale from George Orwell, here with illustrations from Odyr, once again showcasing greed and one's pursuit of power perfectly. The story translates super well into a graphic novel format and it's one of those I'll have to get hold of a copy to keep on my personal book collection. Timeless tale from George Orwell, here with illustrations from Odyr, once again showcasing greed and one's pursuit of power perfectly. The story translates super well into a graphic novel format and it's one of those I'll have to get hold of a copy to keep on my personal book collection.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Brent

    44 years or so have gone by since I read Orwell's novel, and now, look at us. "The creatures outside looked from pig to man, and from man to pig, and from pig to man again; but already it was impossible to say which was which." This adaptation was first published in Brazil in 2018, and I am grateful to Brazilian artist Odyr Fernando Bernardi for the painted adaptation. Thanks to Atlanta-Fulton Public Library for the loan. Highly recommended. 44 years or so have gone by since I read Orwell's novel, and now, look at us. "The creatures outside looked from pig to man, and from man to pig, and from pig to man again; but already it was impossible to say which was which." This adaptation was first published in Brazil in 2018, and I am grateful to Brazilian artist Odyr Fernando Bernardi for the painted adaptation. Thanks to Atlanta-Fulton Public Library for the loan. Highly recommended.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sreedevi Nair

    Amazing Graphical representation of one of my favorite books..❤️❤️the pictures/colors used were like beautiful .

  14. 4 out of 5

    Dakota Morgan

    Animal Farm is always a worthwhile read and this adaptation by Odyr has only strengthened the book's appeal. Beautiful watercolor images accompany a truncated version of the familiar tale, pared down to just the hits. As revolutionary socialism turns to tyrannical oligarchy on the animal-run farm, the satire has never felt so biting, the Aesop's fable-style charms so strong. Always a relevant read, Animal Farm is even more enjoyable and digestible in this format. Highly recommended. Animal Farm is always a worthwhile read and this adaptation by Odyr has only strengthened the book's appeal. Beautiful watercolor images accompany a truncated version of the familiar tale, pared down to just the hits. As revolutionary socialism turns to tyrannical oligarchy on the animal-run farm, the satire has never felt so biting, the Aesop's fable-style charms so strong. Always a relevant read, Animal Farm is even more enjoyable and digestible in this format. Highly recommended.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Manya Bansal

    This was deep...I want to read the original book right now!!!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Eleni

    4✨ This graphic novel is an excellent depiction of George Orwell's Animal Farm, and captures the messages and essence of the original in a really accessible way. Some scenes, characters, and general details had to be sacrificed as this was an adaptation and the book would have been insanely dense if the team had decided to recreate it word for word. However, the main plot points and scenes that added to the overall message were kept, and the overall story felt very true to the original. I really l 4✨ This graphic novel is an excellent depiction of George Orwell's Animal Farm, and captures the messages and essence of the original in a really accessible way. Some scenes, characters, and general details had to be sacrificed as this was an adaptation and the book would have been insanely dense if the team had decided to recreate it word for word. However, the main plot points and scenes that added to the overall message were kept, and the overall story felt very true to the original. I really liked the art style! I thought the brush stroke watercolour aesthetic was so stunning, and the colouring of the book was insanely gorgeous. I read Animal Farm really recently and so the story was fresh in my mind, but the illustrations gave the story so much more life and made the experience so vivid. I do wish a few more details from the original were included, and then there also would have been an opportunity for more stunning artwork, however, I think this adaptation is very accessible for younger readers, or anyone who finds the classic novel slightly intimidating.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Emma

    Odyr’s stunning illustrations bring a new dimension to this classic dystopian novel by George Orwell. For those who haven’t read the book before, Animal Farm is a cleverly crafted commentary on the 1917 Russian revolution disguised as a story about a humble farm. The animals revolt against their tiresome human leader and, under the leadership of some clever pigs, they overthrow the farm and begin their own era of rule. As with most graphic novel adaptations, the original story has been carefully Odyr’s stunning illustrations bring a new dimension to this classic dystopian novel by George Orwell. For those who haven’t read the book before, Animal Farm is a cleverly crafted commentary on the 1917 Russian revolution disguised as a story about a humble farm. The animals revolt against their tiresome human leader and, under the leadership of some clever pigs, they overthrow the farm and begin their own era of rule. As with most graphic novel adaptations, the original story has been carefully distilled to create a succinct, but no less powerful, version of the tale. The political undertones of this graphic novel are still razor sharp, and the satire isn’t lost in translation either. This graphic novel can be read as a refresher if you’re familiar with the original, or it would be a great introduction into Orwell’s twisted world if you haven’t read any of his work before. Either way, it’s definitely recommended reading.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    "All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others." Some kids get parents who let them stay up all night playing video games. My kids got me, and I'm the sort of parent who lulls my offspring to sleep with dystopian allegories of totalitarian rule. Possibly a questionable move on my part, but since today's kids don't have Wishbone to introduce them to classic literature on their level, it's the best I can do. I recently chose this abridged and illustrated version of Animal Farm t "All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others." Some kids get parents who let them stay up all night playing video games. My kids got me, and I'm the sort of parent who lulls my offspring to sleep with dystopian allegories of totalitarian rule. Possibly a questionable move on my part, but since today's kids don't have Wishbone to introduce them to classic literature on their level, it's the best I can do. I recently chose this abridged and illustrated version of Animal Farm to be our newest "bedtime book," reading a few chapters a night with my 7- and 8-year-old boys, and we all enjoyed the clever take on the classic! It prompted lots of good conversations about justice, fairness, equality, power, and leadership. From my perspective, the abridged text certainly took a few shortcuts in the actual telling of the story, but the illustrations were impactful and well-done, and added valuable context throughout. I was impressed by how much extra detail my kids picked up on through the visual representations.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kris

    An excellent adaptation. I think this would work best as a supplement to the original text, which is not very long itself. It could enhance a reading of it because this adaption both adds the rich element of art that works well with the story, as well as detracting a bit by necessity by eliminating some elements of the text. Parts are even more vivid, thanks to the art (Boxer *sob*), but Orwell's language and his ability to slowly build a world that at first seems ideal and grows ever more omino An excellent adaptation. I think this would work best as a supplement to the original text, which is not very long itself. It could enhance a reading of it because this adaption both adds the rich element of art that works well with the story, as well as detracting a bit by necessity by eliminating some elements of the text. Parts are even more vivid, thanks to the art (Boxer *sob*), but Orwell's language and his ability to slowly build a world that at first seems ideal and grows ever more ominous are hings I missed.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jin Rhee

    Great adaptation! I very much enjoyed the irony that the drawings reminded of children's books, but the story still not much so. Seeing in pictures what's happening on Animal Farm, made it even worse and scarier than when only reading about it. Especially the scene with Boxer.. I would recommend to read the book first, before reading this adaptation, since it does not mention everything from the actual book. Great adaptation! I very much enjoyed the irony that the drawings reminded of children's books, but the story still not much so. Seeing in pictures what's happening on Animal Farm, made it even worse and scarier than when only reading about it. Especially the scene with Boxer.. I would recommend to read the book first, before reading this adaptation, since it does not mention everything from the actual book.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Linda

    I love reading graphic versions of books that I have previously read. This rendition is beautifully illustrated telling the classic Orwell tale. My only hesitation is that a couple of times the continuity seemed disrupted to me. Worth a look.

  22. 5 out of 5

    nad.

    "The creatures outside looked from pig to man, and from man to pig, and from pig to man again, but already it was impossible to say which was which" The satire went so high lmao. Haven't read not the graphic book but I think this one already explain lots about Animal Farm. "The creatures outside looked from pig to man, and from man to pig, and from pig to man again, but already it was impossible to say which was which" The satire went so high lmao. Haven't read not the graphic book but I think this one already explain lots about Animal Farm.

  23. 5 out of 5

    oli

    I read Animal Farm near the end of 2020, so I thought I would reread the story when I saw that there was a graphic novel for it. I adored the art of this graphic novel; I think it painted a clear image that added to the storyline :)

  24. 5 out of 5

    Becca Harris

    I don't ever choose to read graphic novels, but was prompted to do so because of an adult library reading challenge. This edition was gorgeously put together. The illustrations are beautifully done and I even loved the text font. I had never read Animal Farm. Allegory and anthropomorphic fiction aren't favorite genres, but this was great! I think I'm probably ready to read The Book of the Dun Cow after this. I'm going to definitely keep my eyes open for more classics adapted to graphic novel for I don't ever choose to read graphic novels, but was prompted to do so because of an adult library reading challenge. This edition was gorgeously put together. The illustrations are beautifully done and I even loved the text font. I had never read Animal Farm. Allegory and anthropomorphic fiction aren't favorite genres, but this was great! I think I'm probably ready to read The Book of the Dun Cow after this. I'm going to definitely keep my eyes open for more classics adapted to graphic novel format.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Hannah

    Good adaptation of Orwell's novel. It presents the essential aspects of the novel and communicates the viciousness of tyranny in a visual form. I may use this in the classroom. Good adaptation of Orwell's novel. It presents the essential aspects of the novel and communicates the viciousness of tyranny in a visual form. I may use this in the classroom.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Shakirul Khan

    Loved the art, loved the story. I was going from hard laughter to "OH NO!" within minutes. I read the whole book in one sitting and I don't know which one I should admire more? The art or the story? Loved the art, loved the story. I was going from hard laughter to "OH NO!" within minutes. I read the whole book in one sitting and I don't know which one I should admire more? The art or the story?

  27. 5 out of 5

    Cam Waller

    The art was beautiful and harrowing and brought new dimensions to the story of ANIMAL FARM. I wasn’t thrilled by the layout and font choice, but what can you do *shrug emoji*

  28. 4 out of 5

    Nayab

    Loved itttt.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Hesam

    What Victory?

  30. 5 out of 5

    Daisy May Johnson

    There's a part of me that can never quite cope with Animal Farm, having read it as a pony-loving child and immediately bonding with Boxer. For those of you who know the story, you'll know now why I can't quite cope with this book that promises one thing on the surface and gives you something quite different instead. It's a lot to handle at an impressionable age. It's a lot to handle at any age, I think, this book. It is rather, endlessly, brilliant. (I also remember being marked down in a test a There's a part of me that can never quite cope with Animal Farm, having read it as a pony-loving child and immediately bonding with Boxer. For those of you who know the story, you'll know now why I can't quite cope with this book that promises one thing on the surface and gives you something quite different instead. It's a lot to handle at an impressionable age. It's a lot to handle at any age, I think, this book. It is rather, endlessly, brilliant. (I also remember being marked down in a test about Animal Farm. We were asked how we knew Snowball was a pig - a reading comprehension passage - and I put "because I've read it". And I got told off! The injustice! I suspect Orwell would have found it rather amusing though...) But this isn't the book, it's a graphic novel adaptation of it and as such, there's an almost separate story being told. It might be easier to refer to it as a translation, because that's what you have to do. You have to find the heart of the story, those beats that echo, and you have to relocate them. Find space for them. Make them talk to art and make art that talks back and, in that conversation, deliver that indefinable thing that makes a graphic novel work. It is a dance, a spell, magic. And I am so in favour of people doing that with classic texts, because it does not matter how you find a story or what version of it you read. It matters that you find it. That's it, that's all. And this is such a finding; Odyr's work here is boundless, rich and there's no frames throughout which is such clever work. Frames stop something. They capture it within a moment. They hold it. And this is a story that doesn't need that - in fact, works actively against it. Moments bleed into moments, the message falls off the page, and - when it gets to those darker moments - there's nothing to save you from them. Lines are powerful things, but the omission of them is equally so: a purge occurs and the pages are split with red, the moments fall off the page and into the world. Odyr's loose, rich, emotional art seeks for the edge of that world and finds it. I found evocations here of JMW Turner, and that intrigued me. That pastoral edge turned dark. The ever-England turned black. The darkness in the light. Fascinating, powerful work. I still couldn't quite deal with what happens to Boxer.

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