Hot Best Seller

White Jesus: The Architecture of Racism in Religion and Education

Availability: Ready to download

In White Jesus: The Architecture of Racism in Religion and Education, White Jesus is conceived as a socially constructed apparatus—a mythology that animates the architecture of salvation—that operates stealthily as a veneer for patriarchal White supremacist, capitalist, and imperialist sociopolitical, cultural, and economic agendas. White Jesus was constructed by combining In White Jesus: The Architecture of Racism in Religion and Education, White Jesus is conceived as a socially constructed apparatus—a mythology that animates the architecture of salvation—that operates stealthily as a veneer for patriarchal White supremacist, capitalist, and imperialist sociopolitical, cultural, and economic agendas. White Jesus was constructed by combining empire, colorism, racism, education, and religion; the by-product is a distortion that reproduces violence in epistemic and physical ways. The authors distinguish White Jesus from Jesus of the Gospels, the one whose life, death, and resurrection demands sacrificial love as a response—a love ethic. White Jesus is a fraudulent scheme that many devotees of Jesus of Bethlehem naively fell for. This book is about naming the lies, reclaiming the person of Jesus, and reasserting a vision of power that locates Jesus of the Gospels in solidarity with the easily disposed. The catalytic, animating, and life-altering power of the cross of Jesus is enough to subdue White Jesus and his patronage. White Jesus can be used in a variety of academic disciplines, including education, religion, sociology, and cultural studies. Furthermore, the book will be useful for Christian institutions working to evaluate the images and ideologies of Jesus that shape their biblical ethics, as well as churches in the U.S. that are invested in breaking the mold of homogeneity, civil religion, and uncoupling commitments to patriotism from loyalty to one Kingdom. Educational institutions and religious organizations that are committed to combining justice and diversity efforts with a Jesus ethic will find White Jesus to be a compelling primer.


Compare

In White Jesus: The Architecture of Racism in Religion and Education, White Jesus is conceived as a socially constructed apparatus—a mythology that animates the architecture of salvation—that operates stealthily as a veneer for patriarchal White supremacist, capitalist, and imperialist sociopolitical, cultural, and economic agendas. White Jesus was constructed by combining In White Jesus: The Architecture of Racism in Religion and Education, White Jesus is conceived as a socially constructed apparatus—a mythology that animates the architecture of salvation—that operates stealthily as a veneer for patriarchal White supremacist, capitalist, and imperialist sociopolitical, cultural, and economic agendas. White Jesus was constructed by combining empire, colorism, racism, education, and religion; the by-product is a distortion that reproduces violence in epistemic and physical ways. The authors distinguish White Jesus from Jesus of the Gospels, the one whose life, death, and resurrection demands sacrificial love as a response—a love ethic. White Jesus is a fraudulent scheme that many devotees of Jesus of Bethlehem naively fell for. This book is about naming the lies, reclaiming the person of Jesus, and reasserting a vision of power that locates Jesus of the Gospels in solidarity with the easily disposed. The catalytic, animating, and life-altering power of the cross of Jesus is enough to subdue White Jesus and his patronage. White Jesus can be used in a variety of academic disciplines, including education, religion, sociology, and cultural studies. Furthermore, the book will be useful for Christian institutions working to evaluate the images and ideologies of Jesus that shape their biblical ethics, as well as churches in the U.S. that are invested in breaking the mold of homogeneity, civil religion, and uncoupling commitments to patriotism from loyalty to one Kingdom. Educational institutions and religious organizations that are committed to combining justice and diversity efforts with a Jesus ethic will find White Jesus to be a compelling primer.

37 review for White Jesus: The Architecture of Racism in Religion and Education

  1. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    “Dear White people” (Netflix) I refer to the Netflix series Dear White people because this book had a similar influence on me as did that show. The show is about a college student who hosts a college radio program of the same name, and she uses the show as an opportunity to talk about racial issues such as stereotyping, inequity, bias, and harassment, occurring on campus. For me, a 60+ year old White male, that show and this book helped open my eyes to implicit biases in my perspective of White s “Dear White people” (Netflix) I refer to the Netflix series Dear White people because this book had a similar influence on me as did that show. The show is about a college student who hosts a college radio program of the same name, and she uses the show as an opportunity to talk about racial issues such as stereotyping, inequity, bias, and harassment, occurring on campus. For me, a 60+ year old White male, that show and this book helped open my eyes to implicit biases in my perspective of White supremacy in American culture and Jesus and the church.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    White Jesus is certainly a book that is worth reading. As another review stated, the title is a bit misleading as the book does not really address how Jesus becomes White, or even really describes how that concept works. It simply assumes the idea, which I believe is correct, that Jesus is imagined to be White by most American Evangelical Christians, and then the authors discuss how racism has been present within Christian institutions and history. I give the book 3 stars, because as a multi-auth White Jesus is certainly a book that is worth reading. As another review stated, the title is a bit misleading as the book does not really address how Jesus becomes White, or even really describes how that concept works. It simply assumes the idea, which I believe is correct, that Jesus is imagined to be White by most American Evangelical Christians, and then the authors discuss how racism has been present within Christian institutions and history. I give the book 3 stars, because as a multi-authored book, the writing is sometimes a bit strained, as it seems that multiple authors' wordings and ideas must be accommodated. There were also a few, not many, historical inaccuracies. Other books have addressed similar issues, and have done it better, to be honest. That said, if this is the book that one reads, it is a good first step towards learning more about the intersection of religion and racism.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Joel Devore

    This was great although calling it “White Jesus” was deceptive. I was expecting more of a history of how people created white Jesus a bit more. Instead of you focus more on the subtitle of this book, that is the real essence of the piece. It helps us see how religion, education, and politics have failed to end systemic racism due to the intertwining of ideologies from all 3 of those areas. Great read overall. Kind of scary how it predicted lots of the division we are seeing since the election of This was great although calling it “White Jesus” was deceptive. I was expecting more of a history of how people created white Jesus a bit more. Instead of you focus more on the subtitle of this book, that is the real essence of the piece. It helps us see how religion, education, and politics have failed to end systemic racism due to the intertwining of ideologies from all 3 of those areas. Great read overall. Kind of scary how it predicted lots of the division we are seeing since the election of Joe Biden and Trump perpetuating the big lie.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Tori Minger

  5. 4 out of 5

    Christina Iluzada

  6. 5 out of 5

    Lacy

  7. 5 out of 5

    Tony

  8. 4 out of 5

    Patricia

  9. 4 out of 5

    Harvey Nriapia

  10. 4 out of 5

    William Connell

  11. 5 out of 5

    Laura Alyssa

  12. 4 out of 5

    Carmen

  13. 4 out of 5

    Maggie

  14. 5 out of 5

    Lexi

  15. 5 out of 5

    Caeli Kean

  16. 5 out of 5

    Caroline

  17. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Lehr

  18. 4 out of 5

    Dana

  19. 5 out of 5

    John Willis

  20. 5 out of 5

    Suzanne Crowell

  21. 5 out of 5

    Sandy

  22. 5 out of 5

    Susan Lee

  23. 4 out of 5

    Winnie Fraiser-Boykins

  24. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

  25. 4 out of 5

    Eliseu

  26. 4 out of 5

    Katie Melone

  27. 5 out of 5

    Lauren Mendez

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Hale

  29. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Stainfield

  30. 5 out of 5

    Laurel

  31. 5 out of 5

    Marielle Mansfield

  32. 4 out of 5

    anneka

  33. 5 out of 5

    Curtis

  34. 5 out of 5

    Sofia

  35. 4 out of 5

    tiara hodges

  36. 5 out of 5

    Kiesha Holt

  37. 4 out of 5

    Grace

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...