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The Official Downton Abbey Cookbook

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2020 IBPA Awards Winner! The Official Downton Abbey Cookbook presents over 100 recipes that showcase the cookery and customs of the Crawley household—from upstairs dinner party centerpieces to downstairs puddings and pies—and bring an authentic slice of Downton Abbey to modern kitchens and Downton fans.  Whether adapted from original recipes of the period, replicated as see 2020 IBPA Awards Winner! The Official Downton Abbey Cookbook presents over 100 recipes that showcase the cookery and customs of the Crawley household—from upstairs dinner party centerpieces to downstairs puddings and pies—and bring an authentic slice of Downton Abbey to modern kitchens and Downton fans.  Whether adapted from original recipes of the period, replicated as seen or alluded to on screen, or typical of the time, all the recipes reflect the influences found on the Downton Abbey tables. Food historian Annie Gray gives a rich and fascinating insight into the background of the dishes that were popular between 1912 and 1926, when Downton Abbey is set —a period of tremendous change and conflict, as well as culinary development. With a foreword by Gareth Neame, executive producer and co-creator of Downton Abbey, and featuring over 100 stunning color photographs, The Downton Abbey Cookbook also includes a special section on hosting Downton-themed dinner parties and presents stills from across the TV series as well as the latest film. Notes on the etiquette and customs of the times, quotes from the characters, and descriptions of the scenes in which the foods appear provide vivid context for the dishes. The recipes are grouped by occasion, which include breakfast; luncheons and suppers; afternoon tea and garden parties; picnics, shoots and race meets; festivities; upstairs dinner; downstairs dinner; downstairs supper and tea; and the still room.   From the upstairs menu: Cornish Pasties Sausage Rolls Oysters au Gratin Chicken Vol-au-Vents Cucumber Soup Soul a la Florentine Salmon Mousse Quail and Watercress Charlotte Russe From the downstairs menu: Toad-in-the-Hole Beef Stew with Dumplings Steak and Kidney Pie Cauliflower Cheese Rice Pudding Jam and Custard Tarts Gingerbread Cake Summer Pudding With these and more historic recipes—compelling to a contemporary palate and easy to replicate in today’s kitchens—savor the rich traditions and flavors of Downton Abbey without end.


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2020 IBPA Awards Winner! The Official Downton Abbey Cookbook presents over 100 recipes that showcase the cookery and customs of the Crawley household—from upstairs dinner party centerpieces to downstairs puddings and pies—and bring an authentic slice of Downton Abbey to modern kitchens and Downton fans.  Whether adapted from original recipes of the period, replicated as see 2020 IBPA Awards Winner! The Official Downton Abbey Cookbook presents over 100 recipes that showcase the cookery and customs of the Crawley household—from upstairs dinner party centerpieces to downstairs puddings and pies—and bring an authentic slice of Downton Abbey to modern kitchens and Downton fans.  Whether adapted from original recipes of the period, replicated as seen or alluded to on screen, or typical of the time, all the recipes reflect the influences found on the Downton Abbey tables. Food historian Annie Gray gives a rich and fascinating insight into the background of the dishes that were popular between 1912 and 1926, when Downton Abbey is set —a period of tremendous change and conflict, as well as culinary development. With a foreword by Gareth Neame, executive producer and co-creator of Downton Abbey, and featuring over 100 stunning color photographs, The Downton Abbey Cookbook also includes a special section on hosting Downton-themed dinner parties and presents stills from across the TV series as well as the latest film. Notes on the etiquette and customs of the times, quotes from the characters, and descriptions of the scenes in which the foods appear provide vivid context for the dishes. The recipes are grouped by occasion, which include breakfast; luncheons and suppers; afternoon tea and garden parties; picnics, shoots and race meets; festivities; upstairs dinner; downstairs dinner; downstairs supper and tea; and the still room.   From the upstairs menu: Cornish Pasties Sausage Rolls Oysters au Gratin Chicken Vol-au-Vents Cucumber Soup Soul a la Florentine Salmon Mousse Quail and Watercress Charlotte Russe From the downstairs menu: Toad-in-the-Hole Beef Stew with Dumplings Steak and Kidney Pie Cauliflower Cheese Rice Pudding Jam and Custard Tarts Gingerbread Cake Summer Pudding With these and more historic recipes—compelling to a contemporary palate and easy to replicate in today’s kitchens—savor the rich traditions and flavors of Downton Abbey without end.

30 review for The Official Downton Abbey Cookbook

  1. 5 out of 5

    Joy

    As a huge Downton Abbey fan, I enjoyed this cookbook with its references to the series. I liked the way the author included tidbits from the shows. Unfortunately I am not much of a cook, and I didn’t really find any recipes that I felt I could actually make successfully. But I may try to find a simple one before I have to return this book to the library. I highly recommend it for Downton Abbey fans and adventurous cooks! The pictures are beautiful!

  2. 5 out of 5

    QNPoohBear

    This is an incredible cookbook for those who enjoy learning about historic cookery and the behind-the-scenes aspects of the popular show Downton Abbey. Annie Gray, a food historian, former interpreter, biographer and consultant to the BBC and English Heritage has compiled not just a cookbook but a HISTORICAL cookbook! She painstakingly researchers period cookbooks from the late Georgian eras to the 1930s to find recipes that actually matched the food shown on the show and other foods eaten by gr This is an incredible cookbook for those who enjoy learning about historic cookery and the behind-the-scenes aspects of the popular show Downton Abbey. Annie Gray, a food historian, former interpreter, biographer and consultant to the BBC and English Heritage has compiled not just a cookbook but a HISTORICAL cookbook! She painstakingly researchers period cookbooks from the late Georgian eras to the 1930s to find recipes that actually matched the food shown on the show and other foods eaten by grand families at the time the show takes place. Annie Gray also includes a brief history of the dish which I liked better than the recipes. If you miss the history segments of the Great British Bake Off or haven't seen the authentic BBC episodes of the show (the American version has only a short history segment at the end), you will be delighted with this cookbook. I recognized a lot of the recipes from the Great British Baking Show. This cookbook contains the classics like treacle tart and puddings but also obscure things like that tennis cake they made in Season 4 of the GBBS! It's actually a games cake, made by pastry chefs for a sporting tea. It can be made for golf, cricket or rugby as well. I've never seen that cake outside of the GBBS. The book is divided into Upstairs and Downstairs. Upstairs people ate a LOT and often. The Upstairs section is divided into meals: breakfast; lunch & supper; afternoon tea and garden parties; picnics & shoots and race meets; festive food; upstairs dinner (organized by type of course); desserts & savories. Downstairs they ate sparingly and very plain foods. This section includes downstairs dinner; supper and tea; the still room. I really liked learning about how Mrs. Pattmore would have prepared each dish, how she would have learned to bake by hand from a French-trained, Victorian era chef. The book also explains the contrast between older cooks like Mrs. Pattmore and young cooks like Daisy and how young cooks were more brand conscious and eager to adopt new technologies that made their lives easier. (I honestly can't bake without a stand mixer!) This book also explains the etiquette of dining and what would be served and why. Most of the foods don't appeal to me. I like tea and garden parties the best. Upstairs foods are very rich, contain a lot of meat, butter and alcohol. The author gives notes on how to substitute for more modern tastes or convenience. Downstairs they ate simple foods that could be prepared and eaten quickly. Not many of these appealed to me either but I've heard of some of them. This hardcover book contains full color photos of not just the food but also screen shots from the show. It was fun to look at all the details that go by in a flash on TV. Mrs. Pattmore's kitchen contains a lot of interesting things I never noticed. There are also quotes from the show putting the recipe in context. I had forgotten a lot of season 3 (probably on purpose) and never noticed everything they ate in all three seasons (the show ends with a JOLLY CRICKET MATCH AND NO ONE ELSE DIES!!! No matter what my dad and people try to tell me.) This book makes me want to go back and watch the show again. The back of the book contains an extensive bibliography of period recipe books, some private manuscript books and some not yet digitized. This appeals to my nerdy, researcher heart. My only problem with this book is that one needs to be a chef to prepare most of these dishes and have an extraordinary amount of time to plan a Downton Abbey dinner party. I'll stick to hosting a Downton Abbey tea. This book is a must-read for fans of the show, historical cooking enthusiasts and even fans of the Great British Baking Show. It's a lovely addition to any Downton Abbey collector's library.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Tara

    I've been reading this book off and on for about a year. I originally borrowed it from my library with the intent to leaf through it, and decide whether or not I wanted to purchase it. Due to the pandemic, and my library closing down, I was able to keep the book indefinitely, to the point it felt like my own. As a result, I ended up picking up the book here or there, reading through the recipes, historical tidbits, and quotes from the show at leisure. I haven't actually made any of the dishes (t I've been reading this book off and on for about a year. I originally borrowed it from my library with the intent to leaf through it, and decide whether or not I wanted to purchase it. Due to the pandemic, and my library closing down, I was able to keep the book indefinitely, to the point it felt like my own. As a result, I ended up picking up the book here or there, reading through the recipes, historical tidbits, and quotes from the show at leisure. I haven't actually made any of the dishes (transitioning to a healthier lifestyle a few years back, I only use heavy cream, butter and sugar minimally), but there are definitely some I would like to try. This book is a must for anyone who loved Downton Abbey and enjoys cooking (particularly elaborate or time consuming dishes, as most take hours or even days to prepare [obviously with a lot of downtime between steps.]) We are treated to recipes for just about every course imaginable--from the standard breakfast, lunch, dinner, supper and afternoon tea, to garden parties, picnics, shoots, and festive holiday fare. There are also recipes both for the upstairs and downstairs crowds, so regardless of your mood or your budget, there is probably something here for you. Even if you never actually cook anything from this book, or have never seen the show, its a worthwhile investment if only for the historical information it provides. Beautifully rendered with lovely photos, and clearly lots of research behind it, I would highly recommend.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    I got this as a Christmas gift and love it! If you’re interested in British baking, food history, or Downtown Abbey, I believe you’ll like this book. Written by a food historian, The Official Downton Abbey Cookbook contains recipes from England around the Edwardian era. The recipes are taken from cookbooks between 1875-1930 and adjusted for the modern palette. These recipes were selected because they’re easy to make in today’s kitchen and don’t require specialty cookware to make. I really enjoy I got this as a Christmas gift and love it! If you’re interested in British baking, food history, or Downtown Abbey, I believe you’ll like this book. Written by a food historian, The Official Downton Abbey Cookbook contains recipes from England around the Edwardian era. The recipes are taken from cookbooks between 1875-1930 and adjusted for the modern palette. These recipes were selected because they’re easy to make in today’s kitchen and don’t require specialty cookware to make. I really enjoyed reading about the ingredients and general history of the era. And there are so many beautiful pictures. Annie Gray provides background for each recipe along with the name of the cookbook and year it was taken from. Some recipes have notes that offer a quicker prep option, different flavor combinations, or ingredient substitutions. I’ve only made the Jam and custard tart and toad-in-the hole. Both were easy to make, and both were delicious!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    Oh to have the money to attempt ALL, yes ALL, of these recipes would be a dream come true! The book not only gives delicious recipes, but it also talks about the significance of ingredients, the social structure of the house, the staff, and gives tidbits throughout in great detail about the significance of meals, class, extravagance of wealth, etc. in this very comprehensive and visually appealing book. Another thing that I personally love (aside from Downton Abbey) about this book specifically Oh to have the money to attempt ALL, yes ALL, of these recipes would be a dream come true! The book not only gives delicious recipes, but it also talks about the significance of ingredients, the social structure of the house, the staff, and gives tidbits throughout in great detail about the significance of meals, class, extravagance of wealth, etc. in this very comprehensive and visually appealing book. Another thing that I personally love (aside from Downton Abbey) about this book specifically is that almost every single recipe has a photo to go with it. Not many cookbooks do (which infuriates the heck out of me), so props to Annie Gray for sharing the original recipes, replicated recipes from the show, and the information and images to go with it.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Urbandale Library

    This delightful, diverse collection of recipes typical of 1910s and 1920s English estates is a must-have for any Downton Abbey fan, whether you plan on attempting any of the dishes or not (I just might try a couple). It's also full of still images from the show as well as gorgeous food photography and background on kitchen and serving customs upstairs and downstairs. This cookbook truly brings to life the culinary traditions of Downton Abbey and the real-life estates that were its inspiration. This delightful, diverse collection of recipes typical of 1910s and 1920s English estates is a must-have for any Downton Abbey fan, whether you plan on attempting any of the dishes or not (I just might try a couple). It's also full of still images from the show as well as gorgeous food photography and background on kitchen and serving customs upstairs and downstairs. This cookbook truly brings to life the culinary traditions of Downton Abbey and the real-life estates that were its inspiration.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Julia

    It's a lot of puddings and cakes. Sigh. It's a lot of puddings and cakes. Sigh.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Emma

    This was an interesting cookbook. I like the split of the meals being upstairs/downstairs, however most of the meals are not something I would cook for myself. I love the commentary on the show though, as well as the history of the recipes both in the show and in real life. I do love that it has both imperial and metric measurements!

  9. 5 out of 5

    BookTrib.com

    The first official cookbook from the greatly acclaimed Downton Abbey franchise has been announced by Weldon Owen International, with an anticipated launch for Sept. 17. This well-researched and compelling cookbook from food historian Dr. Annie Gray includes more than 100 authentic and delicious period recipes, accompanied by spectacular images of the Downton Abbey cast, food photography, quotes and historical information to vividly bring the dishes and customs of the Crawley’s English country hom The first official cookbook from the greatly acclaimed Downton Abbey franchise has been announced by Weldon Owen International, with an anticipated launch for Sept. 17. This well-researched and compelling cookbook from food historian Dr. Annie Gray includes more than 100 authentic and delicious period recipes, accompanied by spectacular images of the Downton Abbey cast, food photography, quotes and historical information to vividly bring the dishes and customs of the Crawley’s English country home to life. Food is a constant presence at Downton Abbey and the focus of daily life and festive occasions. The enticing recipes in The Official Downton Abbey Cookbook provide an evocative and fascinating portrait of life, upstairs and downstairs, during the Edwardian era and in to the 1920s. Gray has done extensive research on the meals included in the world of Downton Abbey and chosen those suited to a contemporary palate that can be replicated in today’s kitchens. The Official Downton Abbey Cookbook with a foreword by Gareth Neame, Downton Abbey Executive Producer, will be distributed in North America by Simon & Schuster. The rest of the review: https://booktrib.com/2019/06/make-dow...

  10. 4 out of 5

    Juli Anna

    A long-awaited masterpiece. This is a media-based cookbook that really got it right. The recipes have a strong historical precedence and strong precedence in the show, and there are all kinds of fun Downtown snippets for fans. Wonderful book design, and text-heavy enough to feel like a coffee table book (in a good way). Early-twentieth-century English food is definitely not my thing, however, thus the three stars instead of four.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Alyssa

    Lots of great historical information about food, cooking, and the difference between upstairs and downstairs. But very few pictures of the actual food made with the recipes, which makes the book less appealing as an actual cookbook.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Connie Ciampanelli

    A treasured Christmas gift from my observant, loving husband. Food historian Annie Gray in The Official Downton Abbey Cookbook offers up not only a feast for the eyes and the palette, but a marvelous historical journey through the lives, the country homes, the foods, the kitchens, and the people who populated such places as the fictional Downton Abbey. Recipes abound for both the upstairs and the downstairs folk, with a historical background, notes, and clear directions for each of the more than A treasured Christmas gift from my observant, loving husband. Food historian Annie Gray in The Official Downton Abbey Cookbook offers up not only a feast for the eyes and the palette, but a marvelous historical journey through the lives, the country homes, the foods, the kitchens, and the people who populated such places as the fictional Downton Abbey. Recipes abound for both the upstairs and the downstairs folk, with a historical background, notes, and clear directions for each of the more than 100 recipes included in this volume. Gray adapts the recipes for the modern kitchen. Many if not most of them can easily be re-created in our own kitchens. Photos from the television program add a cachet to the cookbook. Indeed, they tease me to re-watch the entire series. Quotations from Downton Abbey characters, many of them amusing, are a bonus. Linking the recipes to the Crawley family and their servants' lives enhance the enjoyment of leafing through the pages. You don't need to be an experienced cook to enjoy this book, but if you are, it will most certainly make you itchy to break out your batterie de cuisine. I'm going to start by making some pikelets, a crumpet-like form free muffin. Yum. It will be the beginning of a long, I hope, cooking adventure.j Highly recommended

  13. 4 out of 5

    Connie

    I haven't actually ever watched Downton Abbey, but I have interest in the era and I like cookbooks, so I thought I'd check this out. It's a really fun mix of food/cookery info from Edwardian England, a little trivia from the show, and very interesting and achievable recipes. I finally have a solid idea what a lot of foods actually look and taste like when I have only heard them mentioned in 18th, 19th, and early 20th century novels. And I know how to recreate them with modern ingredients and too I haven't actually ever watched Downton Abbey, but I have interest in the era and I like cookbooks, so I thought I'd check this out. It's a really fun mix of food/cookery info from Edwardian England, a little trivia from the show, and very interesting and achievable recipes. I finally have a solid idea what a lot of foods actually look and taste like when I have only heard them mentioned in 18th, 19th, and early 20th century novels. And I know how to recreate them with modern ingredients and tools! Beautiful photos; book has a built-in ribbon marker which I love in cookbooks.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Sakash

    Wow, is it nice to have the library open again for pickup after corona-quarantine and have a real book in your hands again - especially a beauty like this one! Lots of culinary history and Downton memories. I'm not sure if I'll actually make any of the recipes, but they are accessible if you wanted to. Wow, is it nice to have the library open again for pickup after corona-quarantine and have a real book in your hands again - especially a beauty like this one! Lots of culinary history and Downton memories. I'm not sure if I'll actually make any of the recipes, but they are accessible if you wanted to.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Mary Kay McBrayer

    This book is certainly a cookbook, but it's also a book of history. The recipes are there, easy to follow, and adapted to contemporary language, but they serve more so as an example of the piece of history. I adore this cookbook, and knowing where the dishes come from, their original purpose, and how they evolved, makes the food all that more enjoyable. This book is certainly a cookbook, but it's also a book of history. The recipes are there, easy to follow, and adapted to contemporary language, but they serve more so as an example of the piece of history. I adore this cookbook, and knowing where the dishes come from, their original purpose, and how they evolved, makes the food all that more enjoyable.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Carolyn

    Although not all of the recipes appealed to me, the 10 or so that I tried were quite good. I especially liked the yummy pikelets (similar to crumpets), the chicken á la Paprika (which reminded me of a recipe I learned from a college roommate), the Italian way of cooking spinach, the Macaroni with a soufflé top (combination of a soufflé and macaroni and cheese, and toad-in-the-hole (a downstairs recipe that was fun to try).

  17. 4 out of 5

    Megan

    This delightful, diverse collection of recipes typical of 1910s and 1920s English estates is a must-have for any Downton Abbey fan, whether you plan on attempting any of the dishes or not (I just might try a couple). It's also full of still images from the show as well as gorgeous food photography and background on kitchen and serving customs upstairs and downstairs. This cookbook truly brings to life the culinary traditions of Downton Abbey and the real-life estates that were its inspiration. This delightful, diverse collection of recipes typical of 1910s and 1920s English estates is a must-have for any Downton Abbey fan, whether you plan on attempting any of the dishes or not (I just might try a couple). It's also full of still images from the show as well as gorgeous food photography and background on kitchen and serving customs upstairs and downstairs. This cookbook truly brings to life the culinary traditions of Downton Abbey and the real-life estates that were its inspiration.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Julie Golob

    A lovely blend of recipes, snippets from the show, and history. Beautifully laid out, it's an enjoyable book to read cover-to-cover. A lovely blend of recipes, snippets from the show, and history. Beautifully laid out, it's an enjoyable book to read cover-to-cover.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Dean

    The Official Downton Abbey Cookbook (2019) is a gorgeous publication that is just lush in it's food photography and production but is also full of insights into British Food. The book has a foreword by series creator, Gareth Neame, and has a lot of fun references to the show and it's characters for loyal viewers like me. This book is being re-released in a gift set with a matching apron this year in 2022 for seasonal gift giving. The purchase is well worth the price,as this book is an excellent The Official Downton Abbey Cookbook (2019) is a gorgeous publication that is just lush in it's food photography and production but is also full of insights into British Food. The book has a foreword by series creator, Gareth Neame, and has a lot of fun references to the show and it's characters for loyal viewers like me. This book is being re-released in a gift set with a matching apron this year in 2022 for seasonal gift giving. The purchase is well worth the price,as this book is an excellent education of British Cookery and history. In addition to the shows insights, there are enjoyable recipes for classics like Seed cake, Porter Cake, Pikelets and more that are included along with informative essays on each item and it's individual place in British culture. The series "Downton Abbey" is a historical dramatic television series set in the early 20th century in the region of Yorkshire England. It takes place at the fictional estate of "Downton Abbey" in the time around WWI and before the events of WWII. The series details the lives of all the classes living within the estate and their interactions. There was a Downton Abbey film and spin-off television series "The Golden Age" currently airing on television. This book was very much lovingly crafted and is no small work. The detail about the food being served and how it reflects the class system, time period and traditional foodways of England is riveting. Annie Gray is not merely a food historian, she's also a brilliant food writer who clearly loves food as much as you or I do. Each of the recipes here in this book are crafted specifically to highlight the traditional dish it is based upon. I found everything in this work interesting and something that I would want to cook. As someone who has watched the series myself as a fan, I did not expect that to be the case when I went to read this book. I assumed going in, that I would be dealing with a lot of fussy food gourmet food -over prepared and excessive, I could not have been more wrong. Each of the sections that discuss the series "Downton Abbey" in various ways are informative and educational, but are never "over-done" There are multiple discussions of the Grantham Family as well as the servants, but there is also a greater discussion of British Society and history as well. As Downton Abbey is a snapshot of British Class and the way the people of England interacted and lived together. The research and historic work that went into this cookbook is clear. I believe the TV show is a great window into this time in history and the author proves this successfully. As the book is reflecting the divided class of Downton Abbey, and the cookbook likewise is divided (mostly) into two parts. There are in this book recipes for the gentry and the recipes for the servant class respectively separated. The introduction gives an excellent overview of the way food was important in British society and also how the dishes served were different for the various classes. As history (and science) moved forward, the availability of food and access to foodstuffs, electricity, refrigeration also changed the way the classes ate.  The layout of the book delves into the various meals of the day, including the British "tea" and what exactly they ate during these different repasts. What I loved about the book is that nothing is taken for granted but given real consideration. In the chapter titled "Breakfast" we are presented with some traditional dishes such as "Kedgeree" (a dish of fish, rice and eggs), English Muffins(sounds hard to make, but not so much after reading this.), "Deviled Biscuits"(a perfect savory brunch offering), and "Pikelets" (a sort of free form crumpet that could become part of your daily home repertoire). A brief history of this meal begins the chapter and there are asides on the baking of bread in the Grantham household. Additional notes for each recipe gives historical and cultural information. The "Lunch and Supper" chapter was centered on recipes for the midday meal. Items like "Sardine Salad"(a lovely preparation), "Lobster Cutlets", "Ham with Red Wine and Almonds", "Cornish Pasties"(traditional meat pies), "Eggs A La St James" and "Vegetable Curry" A history of the midday meal as it is observed in England and has included as well as "Notes' for each recipe discussing how the dish is singular to the series or can be changed to suit tastes. No book on British culture and history would be complete without mention of "Afternoon Tea and Garden Parties", This chapter has a cornucopia of recipes like "Dundee Cake", "Madeira Cake", "Fairy cake baskets", "Madeleines", "Scones"and "Macaroons" that include pages that outline this tradition and detail on why specific recipes used for this repast. Each recipe has authors' notes that give additional information and modern updates for the reader. I was quite happy to see the section"Picnics, Shoots's and Race Meets". This portion could have been included in the previous chapter, yet there are distinctions in these recipes and they should be noted. Many of the recipes are picnic like fare that can be served outdoors at room temperature. Items such as"Sausage Rolls"(and English favorite), "Veal and Ham Pie", "Chicken Stuffed with Pistachios", this section likewise has an introduction that details how these events had prominence in British Society and why the food was an important feature. Each recipe has additional notes regarding history and adaptation for modern cooks and there is an additional section on making sandwiches for serving to large groups.  Holidays get special attention in the chapter titled "Festive Food" We have some stellar takes on traditional favorites that are included with the recipes for "Brussels Sprouts with Chestnuts", "Lemon Mincemeat", "Christmas Pudding", "Yule Log" (A cake), "Hot Cross Buns","Simnel Cake" and"Plum Cake" These are classic British recipes for seasonal dishes and they are handled in a way that any modern cook can easily make them. An essay starts the chapter detailing the importance of these foods and each recipe has handy notes that discuss the dish and how it could be adapted. When watching Downton Abbey, one of the most observed meals is "Dinner", and it get's a lot of attention in the chapter"Upstairs Dinner". We have some spectacular dishes in this section, such as "Oysters Au gratin" "Stuffed Tomatoes", "Caviar Croutes","Chicken Vol-Au-Vents", "Cucumber Soup", "Consoumme a la jardiniere", "Palestine Soup"(made with Jerusalem Artichoke), " Vegetable Marrow (Zucchini) and Apricot Soup","Shrimp Curry","Trout in Port Wine Sauce","Sole A La Florentine","Turbot with Hollandaise Sauce","Fish Cream","Salmon Mousse","Duck with Apples and Calvados","Pork Chops with Sauce Robert", Mutton with Caper Sauce","Champagne Jelly", "Syllabub", "The Queen of Trifles"(A traditional English dessert)and"Peaches Melba" While this seems like a lot, I have included only a small sampling of the recipes here, and there are many more to choose from. These recipes are all good examples of the class and wealth of the house and everything written here is pretty fancy stuff. However, nothing included is outside of the realm of the modern cook, and they took great pains to make sure that these recipes are something that anyone could tackle. There are detailed notes are included with each recipe to help the modern cook use the recipes for their own dinners. The servant class get their own representation in "Downstairs Dinner" with such homely fare as "Toad in the Hole"(A favorite of mine) "Lamb Stew with Semolina","Beef Stew with Dumplings","Steak and Kidney Pudding"(steamed in the traditional Pudding basin),"Cauliflower Cheese","Steamed Treacle Pudding"(much nicer than it sounds and worth making),"Treacle Tart"(a favorite of mine), "Rice Pudding","Spotted Dick"(Which is better described here than you might think),"Summer Pudding"(a berry dessert) and "Jam and Custard Tart". This section gets great detail by the author and these recipes are very lovingly written. I believe that many of these might make great addition to your own recipe cache. Asides like the section on "The Kitchen Garden" liven up a completely lovely chapter. This book is wrapped up by the chapter "Supper and Tea" that has some artful baking and pantry recipes that can really give you some great details on recipes that are basic to British cooking. While some of them might be new to you, they will become things you will make again and again. Recipes like"Digestive Biscuits" (a sort of whole wheat cracker),"Cottage Loaf" (daily bread),"Gingerbread Cake","Seed Cake"(A nice cake for tea),"Porter Cake","Apple Cheese"(great for any cheese plate), "Marrow and Ginger Jam","Piccalilli"and"Pickled Green Tomatoes" make a great end to a wonderful book.  I wholly loved this book and recommend it to anyone. If you can get the gift set that includes the Apron, it's very tasteful and one you will cherish.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    This is an extremely entertaining book that is extremely informative and extremely well-written. A must-read for anyone interested in the period, Downton Abbey, or cooking.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Sara Wiberg

    The author was fantastic, just found the recipes to be a bit boring or “too much”... but that is essentially the point of the book!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Tina Culbertson

    I have only seen two episodes but I think if you are a die hard fan of Downton Abbey you will love this cookbook. It’s treasure of information, snippets about the show including dialogue and episode notes, recipes and the historical story about the meals presented. Let’s not forget the photography and mouthwatering visions of meals, separated by the Upstairs and Downstairs menus. I’m a girl reared in southern Philadelphia area in a neighborhood of working class blue collar families so... I’d defin I have only seen two episodes but I think if you are a die hard fan of Downton Abbey you will love this cookbook. It’s treasure of information, snippets about the show including dialogue and episode notes, recipes and the historical story about the meals presented. Let’s not forget the photography and mouthwatering visions of meals, separated by the Upstairs and Downstairs menus. I’m a girl reared in southern Philadelphia area in a neighborhood of working class blue collar families so... I’d definitely be in the Downstairs grouping. While the meals/recipes presented for the upper class look good, I found more “comfort food” with the likings of Toad in the Hole or Cauliflower Cheese.  Look at this,doesn't it resemble mac and cheese? There's a bit of mental disconnect when you get a forkful. As I am a fan of cauliflower I liked the dish fine but it was an ordinary veg with cheese sauce, in spite of me following directions to the letter. Served with rosemary roasted chicken and tomatoes. (Photo of chicken meal with featured dish on my blog) Recipe Note from the book: This is an English classic, and done badly, it remains the source of nightmares for many people forced to prepare and cook at school. ( where it was often done with the whole cauliflower, serve soggy on the outside and raw in the middle) The basic reaction, which happens when food is browned, gives much-needed depth of flavor and nuttiness to both the sauce and the cauliflower. If you want the  authentic taste of how bad British cookery can be, don’t brown the cauliflower first.  Well, I did brown the cauliflower and I think that part made a difference. However I needed to add additional milk to make a smooth cheese sauce. Magnificent book for a true fan. Sharing with Joy for British Isles Friday

  23. 5 out of 5

    Julie H.

    Annie Gray's The Downton Abbey Cookbook is a fascinating food history read. Even if you didn't watch the show, which would certainly help, there's a great deal of interesting discussion of food shortages, availability, evolving cookery tools and technologies, and some statistics that may well amaze and confound you. As a cookbook, it is lavishly illustrated, of high quality, and places each dish in both its show-specific and wider historical contexts. "Recipe notes" provide additional historic i Annie Gray's The Downton Abbey Cookbook is a fascinating food history read. Even if you didn't watch the show, which would certainly help, there's a great deal of interesting discussion of food shortages, availability, evolving cookery tools and technologies, and some statistics that may well amaze and confound you. As a cookbook, it is lavishly illustrated, of high quality, and places each dish in both its show-specific and wider historical contexts. "Recipe notes" provide additional historic information and variations that home cooks may wish to explore. And of course, the text is peppered with (sorry, couldn't resist) photos and clever excerpts from the show. What I most enjoyed was the juxtaposition of the "Upstairs" and "Downstairs" dishes--and must admit that while there were only a relatively few items I tabbed as something I would like to prepare, most of them appear in the "Downstairs" section. At $35.00 for the hardback edition, this would be a fun gift for any fan of the show and/or food history buff in your life. Failing that, snag a copy at your public library and enjoy flipping through its pages.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Katherine

    An absolutely wonderful book for anyone-not just lovers of the movie and television series. This cookbook is based on the series, and features many recipes from the Edwardian era that would have been enjoyed by many. The recipes are well written and easy to follow, the photographs are wonderful. The best is the text explaining the history of the dish and how it was eaten or enjoyed. Many of the recipes include quotes, most dialogue between Daisy, the family members and Mrs. Patmore, which certai An absolutely wonderful book for anyone-not just lovers of the movie and television series. This cookbook is based on the series, and features many recipes from the Edwardian era that would have been enjoyed by many. The recipes are well written and easy to follow, the photographs are wonderful. The best is the text explaining the history of the dish and how it was eaten or enjoyed. Many of the recipes include quotes, most dialogue between Daisy, the family members and Mrs. Patmore, which certainly bring back memories to anyone who enjoyed the stories. Divided into two halves-upstairs and downstairs, the meals and their preparations are carefully explained, and you learn just how important the separation of classes was at this time. Recipes are also categorized by event which is also interesting.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    The Downton Abbey cookbook we all deserve and have been waiting for. Each recipe includes background information on the dish and how it connects to Downton. I was also appreciative that there were recipes for both "upstairs" and "downstairs." As someone who loves historical recipes, this book was great. The recipes are all vintage, but have been slightly updated for modern measurements. The Downton Abbey cookbook we all deserve and have been waiting for. Each recipe includes background information on the dish and how it connects to Downton. I was also appreciative that there were recipes for both "upstairs" and "downstairs." As someone who loves historical recipes, this book was great. The recipes are all vintage, but have been slightly updated for modern measurements.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Rebekka Steg

    Delightful, informative, thought-provoking and inspirational. Annie Gray is my favourite food historian and I love how her books truly encompass both recipes, the food itself, but also the background behind it, the techniques that have almost been lost to time and the whys.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Judi

    I don't really like to cook but this book has a lot of historical backgrounds and commentary about British food and society that I found it interesting. I do like to bake and a lot of the recipes are for baked goods and sweets, so who knows? I don't really like to cook but this book has a lot of historical backgrounds and commentary about British food and society that I found it interesting. I do like to bake and a lot of the recipes are for baked goods and sweets, so who knows?

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kim

    This cookbook was full of recipes and British food history. I loved the information in the book as well as the wonderful pictures. Having loved the Downton Abbey series, this cookbook is a treasure!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Cathryn

    Great photos and character quotes from the program made me think back with happiness on the series. I'm not much of a cook, but it seems to me that many of the recipes in this book are for advanced cooks, regarding equipment needed, steps involved, and time needed. Great photos and character quotes from the program made me think back with happiness on the series. I'm not much of a cook, but it seems to me that many of the recipes in this book are for advanced cooks, regarding equipment needed, steps involved, and time needed.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Shanna

    Top notch cookbook that is well-researched and offers tidbits of history alongside each recipe as well as notes to bring some of the more antiquated recipes into the 21st century. I can't wait to try my hand at some of these delicious recipes! Top notch cookbook that is well-researched and offers tidbits of history alongside each recipe as well as notes to bring some of the more antiquated recipes into the 21st century. I can't wait to try my hand at some of these delicious recipes!

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