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The Industrial Revolution: A History From Beginning to End

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The Industrial Revolution * * *Download for FREE on Kindle Unlimited + Free BONUS Inside!* * * Read On Your Computer, MAC, Smartphone, Kindle Reader, iPad, or Tablet. The Industrial Revolution which took place in Great Britain between the middle of the eighteenth century and the middle of the nineteenth transformed British industry and society and made Great Britain th The Industrial Revolution * * *Download for FREE on Kindle Unlimited + Free BONUS Inside!* * * Read On Your Computer, MAC, Smartphone, Kindle Reader, iPad, or Tablet. The Industrial Revolution which took place in Great Britain between the middle of the eighteenth century and the middle of the nineteenth transformed British industry and society and made Great Britain the most powerful nation in the world. The Industrial Revolution didn’t happen due to one, single factor but rather to a number of separate yet related developments which interacted to change the world profoundly and completely. Improvements in the production of iron allowed the construction of efficient, reliable steam engines. These steam engines were then used in the production of iron to improve the quality and quantity of iron production even further. Manufacturing became concentrated in factories filled with automated machinery while canals and improved roads allowed raw materials to be brought to these factories and for finished products to be distributed. Inside you will read about... ✓ Transport and the Rise of Global Trade ✓ The Iron Heart of the Industrial Revolution ✓ The Power of Steam ✓ The Lives of Workers during the Industrial Revolution ✓ The Rise of Labor Movements And much more! During the the Industrial Revolution, people became used to the availability of cheap, mass-produced items transported to the point of sale from other parts of the country or even other parts of the world. However, people also became used to living in large cities and working in factories and mills, often for meager wages and in dangerous and exhausting conditions. Progress made a small number of people very wealthy, but it also condemned a large portion of the British population to living and working in danger and squalor. Opposition to the Industrial Revolution came from skilled workers who saw their jobs being replaced by machines and from influential poets who deplored the loss of what they regarded as an idyllic, rural, agrarian way of life. This opposition was brutally repressed, and even those who tried to champion the rights of workers sometimes found themselves under attack by the British Army. The Industrial Revolution changed almost everything about the British way of life, and it spread from Great Britain to most of the developed countries of the world. This is the story of a revolution which continues to affect all of us in the modern world.


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The Industrial Revolution * * *Download for FREE on Kindle Unlimited + Free BONUS Inside!* * * Read On Your Computer, MAC, Smartphone, Kindle Reader, iPad, or Tablet. The Industrial Revolution which took place in Great Britain between the middle of the eighteenth century and the middle of the nineteenth transformed British industry and society and made Great Britain th The Industrial Revolution * * *Download for FREE on Kindle Unlimited + Free BONUS Inside!* * * Read On Your Computer, MAC, Smartphone, Kindle Reader, iPad, or Tablet. The Industrial Revolution which took place in Great Britain between the middle of the eighteenth century and the middle of the nineteenth transformed British industry and society and made Great Britain the most powerful nation in the world. The Industrial Revolution didn’t happen due to one, single factor but rather to a number of separate yet related developments which interacted to change the world profoundly and completely. Improvements in the production of iron allowed the construction of efficient, reliable steam engines. These steam engines were then used in the production of iron to improve the quality and quantity of iron production even further. Manufacturing became concentrated in factories filled with automated machinery while canals and improved roads allowed raw materials to be brought to these factories and for finished products to be distributed. Inside you will read about... ✓ Transport and the Rise of Global Trade ✓ The Iron Heart of the Industrial Revolution ✓ The Power of Steam ✓ The Lives of Workers during the Industrial Revolution ✓ The Rise of Labor Movements And much more! During the the Industrial Revolution, people became used to the availability of cheap, mass-produced items transported to the point of sale from other parts of the country or even other parts of the world. However, people also became used to living in large cities and working in factories and mills, often for meager wages and in dangerous and exhausting conditions. Progress made a small number of people very wealthy, but it also condemned a large portion of the British population to living and working in danger and squalor. Opposition to the Industrial Revolution came from skilled workers who saw their jobs being replaced by machines and from influential poets who deplored the loss of what they regarded as an idyllic, rural, agrarian way of life. This opposition was brutally repressed, and even those who tried to champion the rights of workers sometimes found themselves under attack by the British Army. The Industrial Revolution changed almost everything about the British way of life, and it spread from Great Britain to most of the developed countries of the world. This is the story of a revolution which continues to affect all of us in the modern world.

30 review for The Industrial Revolution: A History From Beginning to End

  1. 4 out of 5

    Clyde Macalister

    I will begin by briefly mentioning the few positive points of this book, which are short and to the point. Like all books I've read in the Hourly History series so far, it is exceedingly well-written. Furthermore, it was fairly systematically structured. An ironic strength of these independently published history book series (Hourly History, Captivating History, Charles River Editors, etc.) seems to be that they are better written and better organized than what one generally observes in "official I will begin by briefly mentioning the few positive points of this book, which are short and to the point. Like all books I've read in the Hourly History series so far, it is exceedingly well-written. Furthermore, it was fairly systematically structured. An ironic strength of these independently published history book series (Hourly History, Captivating History, Charles River Editors, etc.) seems to be that they are better written and better organized than what one generally observes in "official" history books from renowned publishers. Furthermore, he does a good job at concisely explaining the contributions of various entrepreneurs (e.g. James Watt) and the significance of the Luddites. Now that I have concluded my brief and simple praise, however, I must offer my in-depth criticisms. This book offers an excellent example of a major problem among many if not most history books, which is the failure to realize that you don't get to interpret history or any other empirical data however you want; there are rules, procedure, and protocol involved. Imagine, for example, if I were a believer in Norse polytheistic paganism; this would tend to effect my interpretation of historical events unless I make efforts to subdue my religious affiliations while doing history. It would be absurd, for example, if I claimed that the defeat of Napoleon at the Battle of Waterloo proved that Odin favored the Duke of Wellington, Britain, and her allies and he held Napoleon and the French in low regard. Only if I could somehow demonstrate that all cosmic events are somehow a function of the bidding and desires of Odin, whom I would first have to prove even exists, could I even begin to make the case that this is sound historical interpretation. People might claim this is an unfair comparison, but this hypothetical scenario is no more silly than the tendency of a large percentage of historians to examine the record and somehow find historical "justification" for socialism or government regulation. The problem is that economic science and pure logic tell us this is impossible, since human living standards are a function of voluntary, informed market transactions and exchanges and are not decreed into existence unilaterally by state fiat, or by setting up a system of government-enforced monopolies in various industries. Any "justification" one finds in history for statism, therefore, necessarily involves faulty interpretative methodology and historiography. This is unfortunately very common in history books, but I find it especially pronounced in this short history. In terms of the raw "data" discussed in the book, it is fine; the absurd conclusions that are abstracted from this data, however, bring my rating down all the way to two stars. The author clearly takes the fantastic stance that the Industrial Revolution, instead of being the greatest explosion in living standards in human history, was somehow only dubiously good. For example, he posits at one point that only the wealthy saw their living standards increase from it, while everyone else stayed the same -- even though this is not how wealth creation works, since the way you earn wealth in a free market is by offering consumers goods they value. At one point he seriously, non-ironically, and non-hyperbolically asserts that the standard of living among workers in Britain during this period was no better than that of paleolithic hunter-gatherers. And then he shows the typical yet inexcusable ignorance we see whenever beltway academics criticize the working conditions of the era -- which, to be sure, were awful by today's standards. But judging them by the standards of today is no less absurd than criticizing people in Victorian England for not having the ability to produce and use smart phones. Civilizations don't leap from the pure poverty of hunter-gatherers to advanced technological civilizations in wholesale leaps; it is a gradual process that builds off the progress of preceding generations. You have to judge them by what they replaced, and in every single respect, the Industrial Revolution improved upon the status quo; Hobbes was right when he said the default state of life for man is nasty, brutish, and short, and nobody should condemn any departure from that. And neither the government nor the "labor movement" can claim credit for the safer conditions of today, as the author asserts; for that, capital formation alone -- the only way to increase the quantity, quality, and variety of goods and services -- must take the credit. Working conditions improve when society becomes wealthy enough that employers can afford to improve the safety of their equipment. The government is not some magician that decrees human wellbeing into existence supernaturally out of a vacuum. Another defect of this book is it makes zero mention of why the Industrial Revolution began when it did and where it did; the conclusion of the book leaves the impression that the author not only regards this as unimportant but that he believes it was just pure chance that it emerged in seventh and eighteenth century Great Britain. The true answer to this question is that the best aspects of the Enlightenment took place in Britain. This had the effect of inducing British intellectuals into persuading the ruling classes to tear down the proto-socialist ancient and medieval guild systems that had kept people down for thousands of years all around the world. The historically unprecedented breadth of free markets that followed explain why entrepreneurship and living standards exploded like no other time in history. While I'm not claiming that the author of this particular book did so out of dishonesty, the tendency of academics in general to ignore this causal impetus for the Industrial Revolution is explained when one considers the socialist views of most academics: mentioning this fact typically reflects extremely poorly on socialism and positively on free market capitalism. Despite the two-star review, I don't recommend against reading it -- for such books alone I reserve one-star reviews -- but I do strongly recommend they get some self-training in economics. As I have said, history is only useful when you have your historiography right. For this, I strongly recommend they read F.A. Hayek's Capitalism and the Historians and, for the American side of the Industrial Revolution, The Myth of the Robber Barons by Burton Folsom, Jr.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Gary Bryan

    Title needs to be changed While this is a good account of the Industrial Revolution in Great Britain, there is little to no mention of its effects elsewhere; therefore this is an incomplete account of what was a worldwide phenomenon. A more appropriate title might be, "The Industrial Revolution in England" or possibly subtitled to indicate to the reader that they will be seeing only a part of the whole picture. Title needs to be changed While this is a good account of the Industrial Revolution in Great Britain, there is little to no mention of its effects elsewhere; therefore this is an incomplete account of what was a worldwide phenomenon. A more appropriate title might be, "The Industrial Revolution in England" or possibly subtitled to indicate to the reader that they will be seeing only a part of the whole picture.

  3. 5 out of 5

    William O. Robertson

    “The Industrial Revolution A History from Beginning to End” is a good essay explaining the how and why this revolution occurred. Hourly History Books by and large are right-on the mark explaining historical events accurately-- these books are also ideal (as in my case) as a refresher of history of human culture and society’s evolution.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Slobodan Tackovic

    The title is a bit misleading. I can imagine the author was aiming to intrigue a broader audience, and I liked it. He tried to address all major events in the initial stage of the industrial revolution. He did succeed in it, I would say. For those of you who live in the Northwest of England, I would recommend visiting MOSI in Manchester. It would be a perfect illustration!

  5. 4 out of 5

    JoJo

    A nice short summary book - enough if you don't want much details. A nice short summary book - enough if you don't want much details.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Vince Pillig

    Interesting Good lightning on how are Industrial Revolution in the United States paralleled Great Britain . Although there was a few years difference very very similar

  7. 5 out of 5

    Anjedah / bookriot_awesomeyou

    Short read Good give lot of information in just 50 pages . Intresting read . It has everything about industrial revolution which was needed in exam point of view.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Mike Briley

    As usual an excellent over from a slightly different perspective. Not quite the same - "everybody benefited from the industrial revolution" that we often get fed. Quite thought provoking. As usual an excellent over from a slightly different perspective. Not quite the same - "everybody benefited from the industrial revolution" that we often get fed. Quite thought provoking.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Anthony Savage

    Quick summary and fun to read A quick summary of the industrial revolution. Some great pints as well. Read in one hour and come away enlighten ed!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Guillermo Baus

    Buena síntesis Muy bien sintetizado, es un resumen bastante completo . E una hora deja todos los puntos relevantes sobre la historia del inicio de la revolución industrial

  11. 5 out of 5

    George Polansky

    A brief introduction to the "Industrial Revolution". A brief introduction to the "Industrial Revolution".

  12. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Hayes

    Briefest of introductions. Ok read, will get more out of a Wiki article though.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Reda Henein

    Like all the books from beginning to end ,it is a good concise account of the industrial Revolution. It concentrates on the bullet points . I find them all very helpful and easy to read

  14. 5 out of 5

    Vincent

    For one of the "free" Amazon kindle short books I found this to be interesting and a reminder of some of what I remembered of the Industrial Revolution details. Often these "hourly Histories" are not very good but they are good for a short read (for me anyway) on bus or subway etc and this was the first of many that I found really worth the time. I would put it only my kindle (if one can get it for free) and have as a backup for available time with a short time frame commitment. For one of the "free" Amazon kindle short books I found this to be interesting and a reminder of some of what I remembered of the Industrial Revolution details. Often these "hourly Histories" are not very good but they are good for a short read (for me anyway) on bus or subway etc and this was the first of many that I found really worth the time. I would put it only my kindle (if one can get it for free) and have as a backup for available time with a short time frame commitment.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Dallas Schiegg

  16. 4 out of 5

    alexander burrus

  17. 4 out of 5

    Mark Dillon

  18. 5 out of 5

    selvi

  19. 5 out of 5

    BJ M

  20. 5 out of 5

    Pâmela Sampaio

  21. 5 out of 5

    Paul Kamau

  22. 4 out of 5

    JOHN W PARKER

  23. 4 out of 5

    Dylan Sim

  24. 4 out of 5

    Skip Cain

  25. 4 out of 5

    Basil Mathew

  26. 5 out of 5

    Buk Lau

  27. 5 out of 5

    Lucie Grandmaitre

  28. 4 out of 5

    Colleen

  29. 5 out of 5

    jerry thomas

  30. 4 out of 5

    Alvin Jayne

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