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Kid Food: The Challenge of Feeding Children in a Highly Processed World

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Most parents start out wanting to raise healthy eaters. Then the world intervenes. In Kid Food, nationally recognized writer and food advocate Bettina Elias Siegel explores one of the fundamental challenges of modern parenting: trying to raise healthy eaters in a society intent on pushing children in the opposite direction. Siegel dives deep into the many influences that ma Most parents start out wanting to raise healthy eaters. Then the world intervenes. In Kid Food, nationally recognized writer and food advocate Bettina Elias Siegel explores one of the fundamental challenges of modern parenting: trying to raise healthy eaters in a society intent on pushing children in the opposite direction. Siegel dives deep into the many influences that make feeding children healthfully so difficult-from the prevailing belief that kids will only eat highly processed "kid food" to the near-constant barrage of "special treats." Written in the same engaging, relatable voice that has made Siegel's web site The Lunch Tray a trusted resource for almost a decade, Kid Food combines original reporting with the hard-won experiences of a mom to give parents a deeper understanding of the most common obstacles to feeding children well: - How the notion of "picky eating" undermines kids' diets from an early age-and how parents' anxieties about pickiness are stoked and exploited by industry marketing - Why school meals can still look like fast food, even after well-publicized federal reforms - Fact-twisting nutrition claims on grocery products, including how statements like "made with real fruit" can actually mean a product is less healthy - The aggressive marketing of junk food to even the youngest children, often through sophisticated digital techniques meant to bypass parents' oversight - Children's menus that teach kids all the wrong lessons about what "their" food looks like - The troubling ways adults exploit kids' love of junk food-including to cover shortfalls in school budgets, control classroom behavior, and secure children's love With expert advice, time-tested advocacy tips, and a trove of useful resources, Kid Food gives parents both the knowledge and the tools to navigate their children's unhealthy food landscape-and change it for the better.


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Most parents start out wanting to raise healthy eaters. Then the world intervenes. In Kid Food, nationally recognized writer and food advocate Bettina Elias Siegel explores one of the fundamental challenges of modern parenting: trying to raise healthy eaters in a society intent on pushing children in the opposite direction. Siegel dives deep into the many influences that ma Most parents start out wanting to raise healthy eaters. Then the world intervenes. In Kid Food, nationally recognized writer and food advocate Bettina Elias Siegel explores one of the fundamental challenges of modern parenting: trying to raise healthy eaters in a society intent on pushing children in the opposite direction. Siegel dives deep into the many influences that make feeding children healthfully so difficult-from the prevailing belief that kids will only eat highly processed "kid food" to the near-constant barrage of "special treats." Written in the same engaging, relatable voice that has made Siegel's web site The Lunch Tray a trusted resource for almost a decade, Kid Food combines original reporting with the hard-won experiences of a mom to give parents a deeper understanding of the most common obstacles to feeding children well: - How the notion of "picky eating" undermines kids' diets from an early age-and how parents' anxieties about pickiness are stoked and exploited by industry marketing - Why school meals can still look like fast food, even after well-publicized federal reforms - Fact-twisting nutrition claims on grocery products, including how statements like "made with real fruit" can actually mean a product is less healthy - The aggressive marketing of junk food to even the youngest children, often through sophisticated digital techniques meant to bypass parents' oversight - Children's menus that teach kids all the wrong lessons about what "their" food looks like - The troubling ways adults exploit kids' love of junk food-including to cover shortfalls in school budgets, control classroom behavior, and secure children's love With expert advice, time-tested advocacy tips, and a trove of useful resources, Kid Food gives parents both the knowledge and the tools to navigate their children's unhealthy food landscape-and change it for the better.

30 review for Kid Food: The Challenge of Feeding Children in a Highly Processed World

  1. 5 out of 5

    Nenia ✨ I yeet my books back and forth ✨ Campbell

    Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || Pinterest Bettina Elias Siegel was a senior in-house marketing attorney for Unilever before essentially going rogue and becoming an activist and advocate for healthier eating for children. Towards the end of the book, when she talks about food activism and how to get involved, she cites some of her own accomplishments, which include helping to nip in the bud the blatant attempt of a fast food company to spread propaganda about its own products in Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || Pinterest Bettina Elias Siegel was a senior in-house marketing attorney for Unilever before essentially going rogue and becoming an activist and advocate for healthier eating for children. Towards the end of the book, when she talks about food activism and how to get involved, she cites some of her own accomplishments, which include helping to nip in the bud the blatant attempt of a fast food company to spread propaganda about its own products in schools. Whenever I am offered a book about healthy eating, diet, or processed food, I always try to grab it because I am passionate about food activism and healthy eating. I have a food "sensitivity" to GMO corn, specifically. "Sensitivity" sounds pretty wishy-washy, I know, but if I eat corn, I throw up or experience diarrhea or both, and the problem with corn is that it's in everything (and masquerades under names like modified foodstarch or just "starch") and can even be omitted from the label of a food product entirely if the amount is small enough (for example, unless organic, cornstarch is usually added as an anti-caking agent to shredded cheese, powdered sugar, and baking powder). For many years, I would get severe stomach cramps or digestive problems, especially after eating. It wasn't until I was a teenager that I learned what was wrong. I haven't eaten fast food or most heavily processed food in about fifteen years, and always have to ask restaurants what is in their food before I can eat there. We make a lot of our own food from scratch at home. I often choose to abstain from the food offered at work and social functions. People often say to me, "I wish I had your self-control," not knowing that the reason I no longer crave junk food is because I've developed a powerful taste aversion to it. If you throw up every time you eat something, you're not going to crave it at all. Over the last five years especially, I've noticed a shift in the food industry. There are more options available to me now than there used to be ten years ago. Companies and restaurants are starting to realize how important it is that they know where their food comes from, and what their ingredients are. There is still a glut of unhealthy food in our economy, though, and even as we slowly begin to move in a healthier direction, eating well is still an activity that is rife with privilege, costs a lot more than it should, and is especially difficult for children, who are marketed to aggressively and don't know any better. That is the crux of this book: it talks about the history of "kids' meals," the importance of kid nutrition, the aggressive and unethical-seeming practices of the food industry in how they target kids, and the way that our government policies about nutrition leave them in the dust. KID FOOD is such an amazing read. I knew a lot of the information in here already through my own experience (several people in my family have the same food allergy, so we are all very well read about food and food ingredients), but I think a lot of it will be fresh and new to people who don't check their labels. It urges the importance of disregarding misleading claims on packaged food items, which may purport to be healthier than they are, and gives tips on how to encourage and foster healthy eating in kids. I liked how the author gave some of the biological reasons for child pickiness, and the ways that parents could try to prevent that when their babies are young. I also like how she acknowledged that some parents, with older kids, might feel frustrated that they were "too late," and also gave advice on how to work with older kids, too. She really tried to come at the issue from all sides, and I especially liked her focus on children from vulnerable demographics, and the way that communities can engage with low-income families-- especially families of color, who are apparently marketed to most aggressively of all by junk food companies-- to help them get access to good food. Healthy eating is sometimes made into a partisan issue, and I have seen conservatives champion the bake sale and the greasy diner as hallmarks of the American way. But... should that be the case? Pushing unhealthy food in schools isn't good for kids and it excludes people with food allergies and sensitivities who can't participate, while also overriding the will of the parents who might not want their kids eating those things even if not physically present to stop them. I feel like we, as a country, need to undergo a radical shift in not just how we view food, but also how we go about regulating it-- the standards, the way it's advertised (to kids especially), and especially what nutritional claims, if any, a product is allowed to advertise on its box if it is, holistically, not all that healthy to eat. This would be a great book for parents but honestly, I think it's a great book to read if you don't have kids, too. Everyone should have more transparent insights into what is in their foods-- and I think not knowing might truly be making some people sick, as it did with me. I often wonder myself how many people who think they've gotten food poisoning at a restaurant might actually have a food sensitivity like I do, as I usually get sick 30 minutes after I eat and it lasts about two hours. But even if you're not getting sick, knowing your food will empower you to make better eating choices for you and your families. Having these conversations about food ethics and nutrition also opens the door to fantastic conversations about health and activism and eating well, which are all exceedingly important. Thanks to the publisher for sending me a copy in exchange for an honest review!       4.5 to 5 stars

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

    Excellent source of information. In line with Michael Pollan’s philosophy. Be prepared, after reading this, you will never look at processed food or advertising the same way again....which is a good thing.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Nicole

    A fabulous and indispensable resource for anyone in the business of feeding small humans. This book pulls together all the tips and lessons that I’ve painstakingly cobbled together over the years from various books (eg: First Bite, French Kids Eat Everything, The Case Against Sugar, etc). Lucky you, dear reader - it’s now all summed up here in one place. Plus! The one outstanding piece I was missing: advocacy. Cannot recommend this highly enough.

  4. 4 out of 5

    QOH

    Even if you don't have children (or your children are grown), read this. It's easy to blame low-income parents for not feeding their children foods the colors of the rainbow, but if you don't have access to a decent grocery store and a school breakfast or lunch is the best meal of your child's day, it's a horrible thing to realize just how much junk they're being fed (and how little you can do about it). I'm guilty of not teaching my daughter much by way of cooking because I'm good at it and effi Even if you don't have children (or your children are grown), read this. It's easy to blame low-income parents for not feeding their children foods the colors of the rainbow, but if you don't have access to a decent grocery store and a school breakfast or lunch is the best meal of your child's day, it's a horrible thing to realize just how much junk they're being fed (and how little you can do about it). I'm guilty of not teaching my daughter much by way of cooking because I'm good at it and efficient, and teaching when I'm hungry and in a hurry is the last thing I want to do. (I should have realized, while making gazpacho, my daughter saying, "Watching you cut those tomatoes is satisfying" actually meant, "Hey, can you teach me how to cut tomatoes?") The power of this book is that about halfway through, I took my 12-year-old downstairs and said if she wanted pizza from now on, she'd have to learn to make it. And she did, starting with whole wheat pastry flour dough and ending with her eating all but two pieces (thank you, teenage job at Round Table Pizza).

  5. 4 out of 5

    Judy

    This is a great book IF you are willing to discover the truth concerning the foods you eat. If you have kids in your life, this is a perfect reference book for you. It is very in-depth, not a quick read that you can skim through. A book of facts that we should all know as we try to survive in this highly processed world.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Cat

    Interesting read - I was hoping for more specifics on ways on overcoming the "highly processed challenge" in my own household; trying to feed my grandson better nutrition. While I recognize school lunches are a true challenge, it just wasn't what I was expecting (nor looking for) after reading the title and book summary. Interesting read - I was hoping for more specifics on ways on overcoming the "highly processed challenge" in my own household; trying to feed my grandson better nutrition. While I recognize school lunches are a true challenge, it just wasn't what I was expecting (nor looking for) after reading the title and book summary.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Allison C.H.

    An essential book for every person to read. While not completely focused on school food, this was a major topic. Because so many children spend so much time at school, finding ways to provide healthy food in every district/school is a must. As a former public school teacher, this book brought back many memories of sadness over what my students were served at lunch and in the classroom through the free breakfast program, and the rushed feelings we all had to get both of those meals served, eaten, An essential book for every person to read. While not completely focused on school food, this was a major topic. Because so many children spend so much time at school, finding ways to provide healthy food in every district/school is a must. As a former public school teacher, this book brought back many memories of sadness over what my students were served at lunch and in the classroom through the free breakfast program, and the rushed feelings we all had to get both of those meals served, eaten, and cleaned up in 20 minutes. It brought back memories of all the foody things teachers in my schools did to reward students throughout the day. It brought back memories of the cupcakes brought in for EVERY birthday - 25-30 times a year. Sometimes kids would lick off all the icing. Sometimes kids would just eat the cake. Every time I spent 30 or so minutes serving, watching them eat, and then washing faces and sticky fingers and attempting to sweep the floor of all the crumbs. It also brought back memories of the healthy snacks I kept in my room to share with hungry children and things I sent home with children for the weekend, surely against all the rules, but they were little things I could do to help at the time. There are so many good things about public education, but the thought of having my own children served a school breakfast or lunch...and then classroom treats...makes me want to run the other way. This is a book worthy of having on the bookshelf to review and remind each of us to become an activist for the health of all children. 2/1/20 Longer review coming later.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Chelsea Lawson

    Very interesting, entertaining, and persuasive read. Kid Food digs into the history of the current unsustainable and arguably immoral landscape of food and media directed at kids and proposes ideas to improve it from many different angles.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Nancy

    This book really wasn't what I was looking for - a book about how to develop a tiny human's healthy eating habits in the home. But, it was a thoroughly researched and well argued book for what it was - an analysis of the current landscape of "kid food", including marketing, policy, and society more generally, and a call-to-arms with specific ideas and examples of how to bring about change. This book really wasn't what I was looking for - a book about how to develop a tiny human's healthy eating habits in the home. But, it was a thoroughly researched and well argued book for what it was - an analysis of the current landscape of "kid food", including marketing, policy, and society more generally, and a call-to-arms with specific ideas and examples of how to bring about change.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kitten Kisser

    This book has opened my eyes to just how big the problems are with our school lunch program. I also gained additional knowledge about how the food industry (everything in me cringes at these two words being strung together) manipulates children at the youngest age possible (they are even trying to hook newborns). Initially, I had my own thoughts on how to try to improve our school lunch program. However, the more I read, the more I realized that there really isn't a easy solution. This left me t This book has opened my eyes to just how big the problems are with our school lunch program. I also gained additional knowledge about how the food industry (everything in me cringes at these two words being strung together) manipulates children at the youngest age possible (they are even trying to hook newborns). Initially, I had my own thoughts on how to try to improve our school lunch program. However, the more I read, the more I realized that there really isn't a easy solution. This left me to conclude that the obvious answer (albeit not likely to be received well by many) is to abolish the school lunch program, the same as we desperately need to abolish the EPA (Environmental Protection Agency). Before you freak out, hear me out. First, regarding the EPA, they haven't protected the environment. It's just another drain on us tax payers. Go ahead & look into it. I'm not going to get into it here. If you do your research, you'll sadly see that I'm right. I am all for the protection our environment, but the EPA isn't the answer. Second, is my idea to abolish the school lunch system (hear me out). There are too many problems right now with the school lunch system. This tiny book is crammed with facts. Note to those of you with bad eyes, the text is small. When I say this is crammed, I mean it. The school system was created so that no children came to school hungry. They were supposed to get nutritious meals. The lunch program is not funded by our taxes like the school system is. It is separate. At one point, funding was provided to update the kitchens. If my memory is correct, this funding stopped in either the mid 1970's or the early 1980's. The funding has not been reinstated. After the cost of employees, janitors, garbage pick up, etc. there is very little left for the actual food. Here comes the food industry to the rescue. They provide super cheap highly processed "food" enriched with vitamins & minerals to meet government requirements. The schools do not have to deal with as many health inspections, because the food is frozen. They just have to heat it up. It takes space, time, & money to prepare & cook fresh wholesome foods, not to mention, the health inspections are much more difficult to pass. Plus, the food is addictive, so the kids want to eat it. Therefore participation is up. It's a win for the school lunch program & a disaster for the children. Schools also need a certain amount of children to participate in the school lunch program so that the schools can keep it running. The author seems to think that the solution might be found in forcing all students to eat a school provided lunch. Meaning, children are not allowed to brown bag it, in other words, bring their own lunch. The author mentions countries that already enforce this & she seems to think it's great. On this, I simply cannot agree. She also feels that adding more taxes to junk foods will help solve the problem. Really? Come on now. How many more taxes do we really want to enforce? Are we not already taxed enough? Taxes & force are not the answer. This is supposed to be "The Land of the Free..." yet, folks are constantly voting to have their rights taken from them. Sorry, but I cannot agree with this. What I can agree with is a law that doesn't allow children to be marketed to by food industries or any other industry for that matter. Pick an age, I'd say 18 or 21 for what I should hope are obvious reasons. I believe in freedom of choice, even if folks aren't making what I feel are healthy choices. I don't want others to force their beliefs on me, so why on earth would I do it to others? What I believe in is education. An educated people is a powerful people. Educated people will not be duped by the food industry's marketing ploys to get you to buy their toxic pseudo food. We need to be held responsible for our own actions. However, if we are not being properly educated, we are at a huge disadvantage. Education is key. Overall, while I don't agree with the authors ideas that she feels are solutions to the problem, I still enjoyed reading this book. It is jam packed with useful facts about the food giants & our schools lunch system. I absolutely recommend you pick this up & read it. You are likely to learn a lot. What you do with that information is up to you.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Katherine

    Today’s society seems intent on taking us in a dangerous direction when it comes to eating and nutrition. For all of the excellent activism around healthier lifestyles and better food, there are millions of dollars being put towards the marketing and promotion of highly processed, “junk” foods that have little to no real nutritional value. Most dangerously of all, the marketing of these food to children is overwhelming and can have negative effects on eating habits, food preferences, and brand a Today’s society seems intent on taking us in a dangerous direction when it comes to eating and nutrition. For all of the excellent activism around healthier lifestyles and better food, there are millions of dollars being put towards the marketing and promotion of highly processed, “junk” foods that have little to no real nutritional value. Most dangerously of all, the marketing of these food to children is overwhelming and can have negative effects on eating habits, food preferences, and brand awareness that shape the health of entire generations. Food writer Bettina Elias Siegel tackles the complicated world of kid food, from what parents feed their kids and teach them about food, to the ever present danger of just “one more treat,” to school lunch reform, grocery marketing, and major corporation food advertisements directed towards kids. With this one book, Siegel sheds light on a surprisingly complicated topic and provides activism tips, food education ideas, and the power of knowledge to everyone who cares deeply about what they, and their kids, are eating. This book is dynamite- powerful, convincing, and super informational. I picked Kid Food up without any true expectations, I enjoy food writing and like working on building a healthier, more informed process for daily food choices. I’ve never read any of Bettina Elias Siegel’s writing before, but from the book it’s clear that she is a well-established activist and writer whose main focus is food reform. Her writing in this book is insightful and offers great advice for anyone who wonders about food nutrition and smart eating choices, and especially for people with kids whose food cultures and preferences are still being shaped by their day to day interactions with food. The way we market food to children and teach them about different eating choices can inform their opinions about food for their entire lives, childhood is a critical time to impart good food knowledge and nutrition awareness. It’s clear from the get-go of this book, however, that childhood is being used as a prime time for big corporations to market processed foods to kids, teaching them to gravitate towards unhealthy snacks, pester their parents into buying junk food products, and turning them away from whole, unprocessed, “real” foods like simple fruits and vegetables. Siegel writes about the history behind certain food cultures in America (school lunches being one) and major marketing decisions to target children, and then compares those histories with the realities they’ve brought to us today. Not only that, she offers some ways for parents and other interested parties to get involved in making changes- something that can easily start at the home or at school and radiate outward to become federal policy with the right support. Kid Food is at once devastating and empowering, laying out the terrible truths of our relationships with food and food marketing, but providing ideas, potential solutions, and knowledge that everyone can take in and turn into real, beneficial change. Don’t skip this book, it’s absolutely not to be missed, and hopefully it will embolden every reader to make a concerted effort to be aware of the foods we’re eating and identify ways we can change our food culture for good.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Cyndie Courtney

    Start somewhere. Reminding myself of one of the key themes of this book as I sit down to write this review because as a parent reading parenting books it can feel overwhelming to imagine how much we are doing wrong. There were a lot of things I liked about this book. I liked how she helped break down the definitions of "processed food" into a high bar that actually helps us realize at what level this is really meaningful (though I think a lot of us know it when we see it.) She did a great job ta Start somewhere. Reminding myself of one of the key themes of this book as I sit down to write this review because as a parent reading parenting books it can feel overwhelming to imagine how much we are doing wrong. There were a lot of things I liked about this book. I liked how she helped break down the definitions of "processed food" into a high bar that actually helps us realize at what level this is really meaningful (though I think a lot of us know it when we see it.) She did a great job talking about what we can do at home to start moving the ball in the right direction, namely offering more foods and eating together to show kids good eating habits. Perhaps the biggest factor though, is that she doesn't back down from the way the overall food environment we and our kids are in also plays a huge role in the problems we face. Whether that's the history of the kids menu (which used to be aimed at things like colorful veggies) to school's financial benefits for promoting junk food brand-names, she shares things that are important for parents to know, otherwise we can't start to try to change things. Not going to lie it still feels overwhelming, but at least with some more of this good information I have good information to start somewhere.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Lauren H. Thibodeaux

    I found this book to be so informative. I found the following to be so interesting: the history of children eating at restaurants, kids’ menus, and school lunches; how school lunch programs are funded; the food giants’ influence on the government; how other countries serve school lunches, have warning labels on food, and regulations on marketing to children; the amount of recommended sugar children eat and the actual amount they eat; when our taste buds are most receptive; how all kids usually h I found this book to be so informative. I found the following to be so interesting: the history of children eating at restaurants, kids’ menus, and school lunches; how school lunch programs are funded; the food giants’ influence on the government; how other countries serve school lunches, have warning labels on food, and regulations on marketing to children; the amount of recommended sugar children eat and the actual amount they eat; when our taste buds are most receptive; how all kids usually have a picky phase; the effects of breast milk on taste and pickiness; and tips for what to do and what not to do as far as instilling open-mindedness with young eaters. The only reason I gave it a 4 was I expected it to talk about how to deal with the barrage of “kid food” individually with your child. However, it was more informative about the problem and trying to inspire activism from parents in schools and communities. She did provide other books in her appendix to refer to that I think will be helpful for what I was looking for in this book. I listened to it on audio book, and it made my road trip so quick and enjoyable.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Colin

    A great dive into the surprisingly deep world of children's food. Bettina starts off the journey as any questioning and concerned parent would: 'what are my kids eating, and why?' This query leads her and the reader on a journey through the history of child-oriented food, the world of industry advertising and marketing, underfunded school programs and socioeconomic disparities, misleading nutrition claims, and more. Even as someone with no children nor any interest in having children, it was wor A great dive into the surprisingly deep world of children's food. Bettina starts off the journey as any questioning and concerned parent would: 'what are my kids eating, and why?' This query leads her and the reader on a journey through the history of child-oriented food, the world of industry advertising and marketing, underfunded school programs and socioeconomic disparities, misleading nutrition claims, and more. Even as someone with no children nor any interest in having children, it was worth reading for the insight into the slice of the food industry that may not receive as much attention as the issues of fast food or farm labor. Definitely recommend to anyone with children, for the same reason as the author: do you really know what your child actually eats? This book makes it clear: you should, for their health, for your peace of mind, and for the health of the planet.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jason Flatt

    I was hesitant to pick this one up at first, in part because of my aversion to mommy bloggers and in part because I wasn’t sure there was anything novel in here. But the author is certainly very well informed and experienced and even if nothing was new to me it is well composed and compiled and I’m certainly more inclined to consider ways we can and should be removing unhealthy foods from public spaces. It has also provided some fodder for my own work in improving the quality of school meals. So I was hesitant to pick this one up at first, in part because of my aversion to mommy bloggers and in part because I wasn’t sure there was anything novel in here. But the author is certainly very well informed and experienced and even if nothing was new to me it is well composed and compiled and I’m certainly more inclined to consider ways we can and should be removing unhealthy foods from public spaces. It has also provided some fodder for my own work in improving the quality of school meals. So I definitely stand corrected on this book, it’s value, and the contributions of mommy bloggers to the public good.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Katie Lucchetti

    This book is a great eye opener to begin the understanding of the obesity epidemic. We are surrounded by advertising and poor food choices in this world which leads us to believe that some of the things we pull off the shelves to feed the family are good for us. You can’t even send your kid to school without the concern of them being fed unhealthy foods. This book taught me more behind how politics is destroying our eating habits and our food chain. We need to open our eyes, and this book is an This book is a great eye opener to begin the understanding of the obesity epidemic. We are surrounded by advertising and poor food choices in this world which leads us to believe that some of the things we pull off the shelves to feed the family are good for us. You can’t even send your kid to school without the concern of them being fed unhealthy foods. This book taught me more behind how politics is destroying our eating habits and our food chain. We need to open our eyes, and this book is an awesome first step, whether you’re a parent or not. Advocacy is so important when it comes to the health of our children and future generations!

  17. 5 out of 5

    delancey | reading_brb

    I found this book on a whim in my library and I’m SO glad I picked it up. This is a treasure chest of information. I learned so much about food policy, food marketing and anti-hunger programs such as the school lunch program. If anything, I wanted more on those subjects. The book is obviously tailored to parents, so it lost me a little towards the end, especially when it came to actionable advice... but regardless, I’d recommend this book to anyone interested or working in the nutrition field.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Kim Yaw

    This is a MUST read book if you are in any way responsible for feeding children. I am ashamed to admit how naive I was about the food industry- especially in regards to how food is packaged, labeled and intentionally deceptive. I had no idea how big food industries were intimately involved in our school lunch programs. The list of “I had no idea...” goes on and on. This is simply a life changing book that I am beyond grateful I found.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    I admire the author for her work in this field and this impassioned book about the uphill battle Americans often have in raising healthy eaters. I especially liked her detailed guidance on what we can do about it. Though some parts are too bogged down in facts and figures for the casual reader, this is still a lot of great information. I recommend it not just for anyone with kids, but anyone interested in the nutritional well- being of the next generation.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Paula

    Very well researched and effectively communicated findings. The information presented meets the reader wherever they find themselves on the educational continuum of “kid food.” This resource offers strategies and insights to help kids and parents/ caretakers with food choices and improved navigation of a variety of food environments. I highly recommend.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Horak

    Really interesting and well-researched. This book answered a lot of my questions like “How did we get here?!” with the kid food situation in our culture. Some good suggestions for changing things, and an awesome list of resources in the back. This book is mostly geared toward the “kid food” situation in schools.

  22. 4 out of 5

    SallyJean Penna

    A must-read for any parent trying to feed a kid in the crazy processed-food minefield they inhabit! Lots of good tips and information - useful and informative. Seriously, everyone go read this book.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jill

    This book is a great read for all parents from infants to teens, particularly those who feel the deck is stacked against them when trying to feed their kids a nutritious, balanced diet. Kid Food gives a great deal of information and insight in a conversational, easy read.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Stephen

    Interesting discussion that focuses mostly on the commercial aspects, with marketing, and also government involvement (through school lunches) of feeding kids. Lots of resources to learn more in the appendix as well.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Allie

    Fascinating read on some of the policies and laws behind things like school lunch and how corporations target children, but like a lot of "blog-to-book" parenting tomes I've been reading lately it often felt repetitive. Fascinating read on some of the policies and laws behind things like school lunch and how corporations target children, but like a lot of "blog-to-book" parenting tomes I've been reading lately it often felt repetitive.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Robin

    Very interesting!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Mara Van nostrand

    Great read as well as so informative.Wish this had been around when my children were small!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Christine O'Boyle

    This was not what I thought it would be but still very interesting.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Alice

    Excellent information to simmer and toss about in your brain.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Liz Alexander

    Not exactly what I expected when I started this book, but the information about feeding my toddler and also school lunch programs was sobering.

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