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Prime Evil: New Stories by the Masters of Modern Horror

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Prime Evil: New Stories by the Masters of Modern Horror


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Prime Evil: New Stories by the Masters of Modern Horror

30 review for Prime Evil: New Stories by the Masters of Modern Horror

  1. 4 out of 5

    Ash

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Terrible. I do not recommend this book to anyone. Had I read this collection without knowing it was horror I would have said it was about mental illness or being bored to death. Nightflier - Stephen King 2 - Didn't get good till the last couple pages. Sometimes King writes a ton of boring filler, this is one of those times Having A Woman At Lunch - Paul Hazel 2.5 - Not sure why they cannibalized her, were they always cannibals? The Blood Kiss - Dennis Etchison 2 - The script was better than the story C Terrible. I do not recommend this book to anyone. Had I read this collection without knowing it was horror I would have said it was about mental illness or being bored to death. Nightflier - Stephen King 2 - Didn't get good till the last couple pages. Sometimes King writes a ton of boring filler, this is one of those times Having A Woman At Lunch - Paul Hazel 2.5 - Not sure why they cannibalized her, were they always cannibals? The Blood Kiss - Dennis Etchison 2 - The script was better than the story Coming to Grief - Clive Barker 1 - boring, then a cliff monster showed up? Wtf Food - Thomas Tessier 2.5 - So the lady was a worm thing the entire time? Was she ever a human? The Great God Pan - M John Harrison 1 - I have no idea what this was suppose to be about. Orange is for Anguish, Blue for Insanity - David Morell 4 - The only story in this book worth reading The Juniper Tree - Peter Straub 1 - The fuck is this? A kid getting molested. No thanks. Spinning Tales with the Dead - Charles L Grant 1 - Sooo he murdered his family and now goes to a lake to talk with their ghosts? Alice's Last Adventure - Thomas Ligotti 1 - Again I'm not quite sure what I was reading, does this woman suffer from mental illness? Is that what passed for Horror in the 80s? Next Time You'll Know Me - Ramsey Campbell 1 - How is this horror? This has to be the worst collection of "horror" stories ever. Also boring just like every other story in this book. The Pool - Whitley Strieber 2 - I don't know if I'm too dense to get what these stories mean? The boy made a radio and could contact... heaven? The afterlife and then wanted to die in the pool? By Reason of Darkness - Jack Cady At this point I stopped paying attention. Was three old war buddies and 1 of them calls the other 2 up to his house for some reason. Guy starts remembering about the war blah blah stopped reading it.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Charles

    There was some really good stuff and some other stuff I wasn't sure why it was here, because it seemed mostly fantasy. However, stories by King, Etchison, Barker, Morrell, and Straub raised the level very high. Overall very good. There was some really good stuff and some other stuff I wasn't sure why it was here, because it seemed mostly fantasy. However, stories by King, Etchison, Barker, Morrell, and Straub raised the level very high. Overall very good.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Corey

    The Night Flier by Stephen King - A sleazy journalist investigates a investigates a "vampire" with a private plane and a taste for blood. Fun, lightweight page-turner. 3.5 Stars Having a Woman For Lunch by Paul E. Hazel - Cannibalism and gender politics mingle when a woman enter the male-dominated workforce. Bland, but gains points for the grisly ending. 2.5 Stars The Blood Kiss by Dennis Etchison - Fun, fast-paced tale of showbiz, revenge, and death. 4 Stars Coming to Grief by Clive Barker - A wom The Night Flier by Stephen King - A sleazy journalist investigates a investigates a "vampire" with a private plane and a taste for blood. Fun, lightweight page-turner. 3.5 Stars Having a Woman For Lunch by Paul E. Hazel - Cannibalism and gender politics mingle when a woman enter the male-dominated workforce. Bland, but gains points for the grisly ending. 2.5 Stars The Blood Kiss by Dennis Etchison - Fun, fast-paced tale of showbiz, revenge, and death. 4 Stars Coming to Grief by Clive Barker - A woman comes to terms with the death of her mother and confronts a very real monster threatening her own life. This low key story is touching, moving, and is a complete success outside of Barker's comfort zone. 5 Stars Food by Thomas Tessier - An unlikely relationship forms between a bookish, lonely gentleman and a "grossly" overweight young lady. She hides a secret. Brief, weird, and very good. 4.5 Stars The Great God Pan by M. John Harrison - A terrible "experiment between a group of young friends yields disturbing consequenses. Aims for mood and atmosphere, but generates only snores from me. 1.5 Stars Orange is for Anguish, Blue is for Insanity by David Morrell - Two art students become obsessed with the depths of insanity of a brilliant deceased artist. But at what price? Haunting, Chilling, Best in the collection. 5 Stars The Juniper Tree by Peter Straub - Unsettling examination of child abuse and the debilitating effect on a young mind. Difficult to stomach, but a powerful read. 4.5 Stars Spinning Tales With The Dead by Charles L. Grant - Offbeat, moody yarn about the power of tall tales....and death. 3.5 Stars Alice's last Adventure by Thomas Ligotti - A writer of children's books is confronted by a literal manifestation of the loss of her childlike innocence. Spooky and interesting. 3.5 Stars Next time You'll Know Me by Ramsey Campbell - Amusing story of a young man who claims all his story ideas were stolen for bestselling novels. He decides to get revenge. 3 Stars The Pool by Whitley Strieber - Surreal fever dream about soul taking and unwanted visitors. 5 Stars By Reason of Darkness by Jack Cady - Vietnam Vets confront the ghosts of past sins. Indulgent and boring, the collection ends with a whimper and its worst story. 1.5 Stars All in all, a fun anthology with a handful of great tales and only two real duds.

  4. 5 out of 5

    DeAnna Knippling

    I liked this one quite a bit--but most of the stories had the same format: slow burn psychologically-based (if usually still supernatural) horror. Lots of ghosts. If that's the kind of thing you like, you'll find it here. My standouts here were the Clive Barker story and the Jack Cady novella at the end. The Peter Straub story has been in several other anthologies I've read lately, and that's quite good, too. I liked this one quite a bit--but most of the stories had the same format: slow burn psychologically-based (if usually still supernatural) horror. Lots of ghosts. If that's the kind of thing you like, you'll find it here. My standouts here were the Clive Barker story and the Jack Cady novella at the end. The Peter Straub story has been in several other anthologies I've read lately, and that's quite good, too.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Michael Tildsley

    Overall, I didn't really like this collection. It doesn't really live up to the premise of the collection being a "horror" collection in my humble opinion. Some stories just feel like off-color odds and ends that wouldn't fit into an author's other anthologies. Others were just bad. There were a few good stories here, though not all of them were "horror" in my understanding of the genre. My favorites from this set include: "Coming to Grief" by Clive Barker *** "Food" by Thomas Tessier **** "Orange i Overall, I didn't really like this collection. It doesn't really live up to the premise of the collection being a "horror" collection in my humble opinion. Some stories just feel like off-color odds and ends that wouldn't fit into an author's other anthologies. Others were just bad. There were a few good stories here, though not all of them were "horror" in my understanding of the genre. My favorites from this set include: "Coming to Grief" by Clive Barker *** "Food" by Thomas Tessier **** "Orange is for Anguish, Blue for Insanity" by David Morell **** "The Juniper Tree" by Peter Straub **** Yeah, four decent stories out of thirteen is not too good. I'm a pretty big Stephen King fan, and I didn't even really like "The Night Flyer." Sadly, the HBO low-budget movie has a better story arch and character development than the original short story. I guess I can't complain too much. The book was only $1.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Plass

    My top 3: Having a woman for lunch-snappy, sick little twist at the end Coming to Grief: A longer story that I just loved. Orange is for Anguish, Blue is for Insanity: LOVED this story! I kind of had an idea where the story was going but I loved it all the same! The rest were ok...usually I love Stephen King's stuff, but The Night Flyer has never been one of my favorites. Side note: I thought the intro was VERY interesting and well worth a read! My top 3: Having a woman for lunch-snappy, sick little twist at the end Coming to Grief: A longer story that I just loved. Orange is for Anguish, Blue is for Insanity: LOVED this story! I kind of had an idea where the story was going but I loved it all the same! The rest were ok...usually I love Stephen King's stuff, but The Night Flyer has never been one of my favorites. Side note: I thought the intro was VERY interesting and well worth a read!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Lucia

    Just finished this. WONDERFUL stories in here, by the masters. A must-read for horror fans and aspiring horror writers....

  8. 5 out of 5

    Daphne Lomax

    While some of the stories in this collection were fun to read, if I did not know that this was a collection of horror stories I would of never known. Personally most of the stories dragged on and had little to no "horror" or creep factors. I went into this book ready to feel creeped out and came back very dissapointed. I would not suggest this to someone who really likes to be scared from books but would to people who have just started to dabble in the world of horror. While some of the stories in this collection were fun to read, if I did not know that this was a collection of horror stories I would of never known. Personally most of the stories dragged on and had little to no "horror" or creep factors. I went into this book ready to feel creeped out and came back very dissapointed. I would not suggest this to someone who really likes to be scared from books but would to people who have just started to dabble in the world of horror.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Helena

    Not the first time I've read this book but the other time I only read three of the stories inside it and didn't read the rest. This time I read almost the entire thing (I didn't finish the last story, Jack Cady's, to the end). A few of the stories in this compilation are definitely going to stick with me, they lingered in my mind after I read them. Here's what I think about each now that I'm finished. Be warned, I do not explain what goes on in the stories, I only say what I felt of each, so if yo Not the first time I've read this book but the other time I only read three of the stories inside it and didn't read the rest. This time I read almost the entire thing (I didn't finish the last story, Jack Cady's, to the end). A few of the stories in this compilation are definitely going to stick with me, they lingered in my mind after I read them. Here's what I think about each now that I'm finished. Be warned, I do not explain what goes on in the stories, I only say what I felt of each, so if you're looking for a more in depth review, this ain't it honey. The Night Flier by Stephen King: This is the story that got me hooked on Stephen King; read it way back in 2014 and as soon as I finished The Night Flier I wanted more . Been my favorite author ever since; this one is definitely worth a read. It has almost a crescendo of suspense and terror about it. Having a Woman at Lunch by Paul Hazel: Felt very short. Kinda lackluster because the events just happened, no real build up towards them; felt like something was missing... The Blood Kiss by Dennis Etchinson: Two short stories in one. Not bad but didn't like the fact one of the characters was making cliché decisions. Coming to Grief by Clive Barker: I need to read more Clive Barker now. This story felt so terrifyingly real to me. Definitely one of my favorites in this book. Food by Thomas Tessier: Another one I loved. Very eerie and kinda gross, but I could definitely imagine the scene in real life happening (if so was possible, of course). I was expecting the ending it had but not in the way it happened, so I was pleasantly surprised and liked it a lot. Another favorite. The Great God Pan by M. John Harrison: What the hell did I just read... No seriously, what did I just read? I can't remember what I read here, I had to go back. Felt like I was reading an excerpt out of a book with a trilogy or something because it made little sense. Not my cup of tea. Orange Is for Anguish, Blue for Insanity by David Morrell: LOVED this one. I had already read it, not sure if I read the whole thing, I don't think so, but I recalled part of it as I read. This one is another favorite and I definitely am interested in Morrell's work now; the story was very enticing and I was curious while reading to find out what happened to the characters. The Juniper Tree by Peter Straub: This was another one I remembered from reading previously, but not entirely, so when I read it I kinda knew what was gonna happen, but not entirely. Another favorite. F'd me up, honestly, because it's not a supernatural threat, it's a very real one that many children are a victim of. I felt horror while reading what was happening... Horror and despair from the main character. Great one! Spinning Tales with the Dead by Charles L. Grant and Alice's Last Adventure by Thomas Ligotti: Both not bad but not special either. Next Time You'll Know Me by Ramsey Campbell: Nice one; the character narrating seemed to turn gradually insane as they "wrote". Liked it too. The Pool by Whitley Strieber: Nice quick story. Don't know exactly what was happening to one of the characters but it didn't prevent me from understanding the main story. By Reason of Darkness by Jack Cady: Can't talk about this one. Honestly after reading 10-15 pages I gave up. The story wasn't my cup of tea.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Dale

    I read this when it was first released in the late 80s and considered it the best horror anthology I had encountered. Reading it again in 2022, it doesn't hold up as well as I hoped. As others have said, in many ways it no longer feels like horror. I think that says more about the modern mindset than the quality of the stories - how inured we have become to horrors of all kinds when we can call up whatever we want to see with a few twitches of our fingers. So many of these tales require readers I read this when it was first released in the late 80s and considered it the best horror anthology I had encountered. Reading it again in 2022, it doesn't hold up as well as I hoped. As others have said, in many ways it no longer feels like horror. I think that says more about the modern mindset than the quality of the stories - how inured we have become to horrors of all kinds when we can call up whatever we want to see with a few twitches of our fingers. So many of these tales require readers to engage their imaginations and find the shadows hiding there. Because the scariest things have always been just out of sight. Whatever the reason, the readers here are right - what was so chilling and unsettling 35 years ago barely even tweaks the meter these days. The good news is that the story that persuaded me to rebuy the book when it showed up in a used book bin still delivers in spades. If not yet considered a horror classic, "Orange is for Anguish, Blue for Insanity" really should be. Powerful, evocative, and strange. And some of the other stories remain strong - like M. John Harrison's "The Great God Pan." Good horror stories do not need to wear their blood on their sleeve. In the end, it completely prove the point Winters makes in the introductions when he describes horror as "a progressive form of fiction that continually evolves to meet the fears and anxieties of its times." It has evolved.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Christina

    I read this collection lo those many years ago (20 years ago, maybe???) because Stephen King was part of it. But then random things remind me of one of the most haunting and painful stories I have ever been put through. I always thought SK wrote the story. Thanks to modern technology, I'm able to track the book down for GoodReads. "Prime Evil" is the title of the book of collected stories. SK's contribution was great. (I thought I was talking to a friend about his story, "The Night Flier," and s I read this collection lo those many years ago (20 years ago, maybe???) because Stephen King was part of it. But then random things remind me of one of the most haunting and painful stories I have ever been put through. I always thought SK wrote the story. Thanks to modern technology, I'm able to track the book down for GoodReads. "Prime Evil" is the title of the book of collected stories. SK's contribution was great. (I thought I was talking to a friend about his story, "The Night Flier," and she was talking to me about "Mile 81.) But SK did NOT write the best and most haunting story in the collection after all. "Orange Is for Anguish, Blue for Insanity" by David Morrell. I have no clue what other stories are in the book, lol, other than SK's and DM's. :) It's enough, though. Five stars.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Tim Meechan

    By far the best collection of short horror I’ve ever read. Besides the obvious kings of the genre, Straub, Campbell, Barker, and King himself, the second tier of authors are all exceptional as well. Except for Etchison’s entry, all the stories are original. “Orange is for Anguish, Blue for Insanity” by David Morrell was my favorite and was super creepy. Excellent story and a surprise to me having read only his thrillers previously. I easily convinced all my fellow readers to check this book out By far the best collection of short horror I’ve ever read. Besides the obvious kings of the genre, Straub, Campbell, Barker, and King himself, the second tier of authors are all exceptional as well. Except for Etchison’s entry, all the stories are original. “Orange is for Anguish, Blue for Insanity” by David Morrell was my favorite and was super creepy. Excellent story and a surprise to me having read only his thrillers previously. I easily convinced all my fellow readers to check this book out and received similar reactions. This anthology is worth tracking down if you haven’t already enjoyed it.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kurt Criscione

    an ARC i found in a used book store. Got some good ones mixed in there.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Petq

    Only "The Night Flier","Popsy"qqqqqqqqqq Only "The Night Flier","Popsy"qqqqqqqqqq

  15. 4 out of 5

    Joseph Hirsch

    Here's a better than average collection of horror heavyweights from the late 80s, mostly at or near their primes. Stephen King is already starting to show a little slippage in "The Night Flyer," and thinking man's horror writer Thomas Ligotti's house isn't quite in ascendancy, but you get the idea. Rating these things is always subjective (my favorites might be your stinkers, and vice versa), but I'll give my opinion here and present it as if it were fact, as that's what the internet is for. (In Here's a better than average collection of horror heavyweights from the late 80s, mostly at or near their primes. Stephen King is already starting to show a little slippage in "The Night Flyer," and thinking man's horror writer Thomas Ligotti's house isn't quite in ascendancy, but you get the idea. Rating these things is always subjective (my favorites might be your stinkers, and vice versa), but I'll give my opinion here and present it as if it were fact, as that's what the internet is for. (In my best Comic Book Guy voice): Dennis Etchison continues to be the rock on which such anthologies are built, and as ever, in "Blood Kiss," he turns in a quality tale. This one is about a horror film director who conspires to kill his scream queen on set while making a zombie pic. David Morrell's, "Orange is for Anguish, Blue is for Insanity," is really the crown jewel in this collection. It deals with a couple art students who start to develop an obsession with a famed impressionist. Since those who become too engrossed in the subject tend to gouge out their eyes with scissors, this poses some problems. In its way, it reminded me of a shorter (yet just as rich) version of Charles Willeford's masterful commentary on the art world, "The Burnt Orange Heresy." Last and not least would be another old trusty stalwart, Ramsey Campbell. His story, about an unreliable narrator convinced he has written every story he ever reads, is truly the stuff of nightmares. The idea that someone might read your work, accuse you of plagiarism, and then show up on your doorstep and put a bullet in your head is crazy, but the world is crazy, and thus the unsettling feeling this one evokes. Someone revoke Hinckley's parole! In the minus column (again, pure scurrilous subjectivity here) would be, first and foremost, Peter Straub's "The Juniper Tree." It's a tale about a boy who likes to go to the moviehouse and there encounters a man who begins grooming him. Tragic sure, but more icky than frightening. Sexual abuse can obviously serve as grist for the horror mill, but something about this one is handled wrongly, and it feels more like a therapeutic confession than a piece of fiction. "Alice's Last Adventure" proves once again that Ligotti's rarified style of delicate and dread-laced horror just isn't for me. I like subtle and I like gothic, but I've yet to encounter anything of his I've liked. Last (both in terms of quality and literally in the book) has to be Jack Cady's "By Reason of Darkness." I want to give my fellow Ohio native a mulligan here just on general principal, but this Vietnam pastiche, with its half-baked war clichés, really got my goat for some reason. That it was by far the longest piece in the book (literally a short novel, according to curator Doug Winter) left a doubly bad taste in my mouth, and almost ruined what had heretofore been a bumpy ride, but one I could still in good conscience recommend. Thankfully, I recovered from that PTSD-inducing bit of melodrama before writing this review. I'm better now. Recommended, with a couple reservations.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Aaron Miller

    Unfortunately, the majority of these stories are mediocre, including Stephen King's "The Night Flier," which is just okay. However, I absolutely loved the last 4 stories (along with Clive Barker's "Coming To Grief," which is uncharacteristically subtle but still has some original creepy images and witty insights). "Alice's Last Adventure" has now turned me on to the psychological prowess of Thomas Ligotti. I read up on him after and discovered the controversy of people thinking Matthew Mcconaugh Unfortunately, the majority of these stories are mediocre, including Stephen King's "The Night Flier," which is just okay. However, I absolutely loved the last 4 stories (along with Clive Barker's "Coming To Grief," which is uncharacteristically subtle but still has some original creepy images and witty insights). "Alice's Last Adventure" has now turned me on to the psychological prowess of Thomas Ligotti. I read up on him after and discovered the controversy of people thinking Matthew Mcconaughey's True Detective Season 1 dialogue was stolen from Thomas and his works. Brilliant. I'm excited to read more of him now for sure. Ramsey Campbell's story was surprisingly funny and morbid with a strange narrator whose tone is not one I've encountered before. Whitley Strieber is able to get a lot of emotion out of such a short story, and I'm very impressed with him again after he was a highlight in the "Cutting Edge" anthology I read recently as well. I will need to dive into some more of his stuff. Lastly, Jack Cady's "By Reason Of Darkness" is actually the most profound story relating to war I've ever read. I was blown away by his writing over and over again in this long, final story of the book. I found much of what he said to be revelatory, and it's been a long time since I was this impressed with a writer I hadn't known before. This story finally made it worth going through the slog of the beginning ones. However, there is one story in here that I would truly encourage people to never read, and I mean that sincerely. I wholeheartedly believe no topic is off limits, but Peter Straub's "The Juniper Tree" has scenes of pedophilia and child abuse that are so unnecessarily graphic that I don't trust Straub or his intentions for a second. This is horror, and authors talk about "off-limits" things constantly of course (Jack Cady does it perfectly in the same book), but writing the overly specific way Straub does about child abuse serves no purpose to the story that has anything to do with his sham literature motives. I was disturbed for days and not in any kind of cool horror shock. It's disgusting and even shameful in my opinion. (I'm shocked by the Goodreads reviewers loving that story). I was originally going to give the book 2 stars until that story. Then it was going to be a 1 all the way to not recommend anyone having the misfortune of stumbling upon Straub (even with the Clive story delivering). But after the last 4 stories, I've brought it back up to a 2. You can seek out those 5 stories and authors in other places as they greatly deserve it, but you could be better off not reading this whole book. Especially not "The Juniper Tree." Gross. I worry it has a fan base of the worst kind. Read Clive Barker and Jack Cady instead...or anything else.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Victor

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Not going to lie, I skimmed the last story in this book which was a contribution made by Jack Cady. Sorry, not sorry, but it really wasn’t holding my attention at all and I wasn’t about to trudge through a short novel that’s nearly three times the length of the other stories in this book. Now that that’s out of the way, let me just say that for a book entitled “Prime Evil”, I was really expecting so much more. I mean come on, that cover is dope, there are some fairly big names being represented Not going to lie, I skimmed the last story in this book which was a contribution made by Jack Cady. Sorry, not sorry, but it really wasn’t holding my attention at all and I wasn’t about to trudge through a short novel that’s nearly three times the length of the other stories in this book. Now that that’s out of the way, let me just say that for a book entitled “Prime Evil”, I was really expecting so much more. I mean come on, that cover is dope, there are some fairly big names being represented on this cover and even the blurb used phrases like “masters of macabre” and “tales that strike beyond sheer terror.” With all of that, this book was a HUGE disappointment. 13 stories in the whole collection and of those I have to say only two really stood out for good reason. The heavy hitters for me in this were Thomas Ligotti and David Morrell surprisingly. Both of their contributions to this anthology felt well paced, neatly crafted, and stuck with me. I wouldn’t call them perfect but amidst the rotten bouquet of the rest, these two are practically golden roses. There were a few names in this that did catch my attention and while their stories felt a bit middle of the road shall we say? I’m curious to see how some of their long form writings hold up. In particular Thomas Tessier and Dennis Etchison. The biggest disappointments were honestly from Stephen King and Clive Barker. While their stories weren’t uniquely bad in comparison, I guess I was just expecting so much more. Peter Straub stood out but for all the wrong reasons IMO. Sure molestation is horrifying but that story just felt strange and not necessarily my cup of tea. Maybe that’s the point though, I’m sure. As for the rest? You’re really not missing much at all here. Scraping at the bottom of the barrel for ideas. You’ll be rolling your eyes and shaking your head wondering why you suffered through another few pages for a mediocre payoff. Verdict: Pretty meh. I’d recommend it to someone who hasn’t read these things before. It feels like a somewhat unique one off collection have, but it’s not really that great of a read. At least it’ll look cool on a shelf.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Donald

    I picked this up to read "The Night Flier" by Stephen King, which was really pretty good! A bloody vampire story that gets pretty crazy! And as a treat for King fans, the story has a little tie-in with both "Salem's Lot" and "The Dead Zone"! Small, but fun! The rest of this book is not my cup of tea. Only "Spinning Tales With the Dead" by Charles L. Grant, was decent. The other 11 were, in my opinion, not worth reading. And, in fact, Peter Straub's "The Juniper Tree" should not be read at all! Th I picked this up to read "The Night Flier" by Stephen King, which was really pretty good! A bloody vampire story that gets pretty crazy! And as a treat for King fans, the story has a little tie-in with both "Salem's Lot" and "The Dead Zone"! Small, but fun! The rest of this book is not my cup of tea. Only "Spinning Tales With the Dead" by Charles L. Grant, was decent. The other 11 were, in my opinion, not worth reading. And, in fact, Peter Straub's "The Juniper Tree" should not be read at all! The detailed description of a child's molestation made me sick. Disgust, not fear. Ugh. So, I'd just read "The Night Flier" and move along!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Christopher Sheline

    I only think four stories were well written. The best story is Orange Is For Anguish, Blue for Insanity. Reason of Darkness gets second place, and Next Time You'll Know Me third place. The Juniper Tree was tragic and horrifying (but not the fun kind of horror, the genuinely awful kind of horror). Get yourself a better collection. I only think four stories were well written. The best story is Orange Is For Anguish, Blue for Insanity. Reason of Darkness gets second place, and Next Time You'll Know Me third place. The Juniper Tree was tragic and horrifying (but not the fun kind of horror, the genuinely awful kind of horror). Get yourself a better collection.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Dez Nemec

    Some really great stories, but some really meh stories.I thought Orange is for Anguish, Blue for Insanity by David Morell, Night Flier by Stephen King, and The Pool by Whitley Strieber were all great. The rest.. not so much. I was rather disappointed overall

  21. 5 out of 5

    Rachelle Hermanson

    Oh, I didn't think of this is a horror collection. There's a couple stories in here that I can't even say I would rate a one-star. But I did enjoy the Night flier by Stephen King and The pool by Whitley Strieber. Oh, I didn't think of this is a horror collection. There's a couple stories in here that I can't even say I would rate a one-star. But I did enjoy the Night flier by Stephen King and The pool by Whitley Strieber.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Corey

    There was only one good story in this entire collection - "Orange Is for Anguish, Blue for Insanity" by David Morrell. If you picked this up somewhere, then I personally only recommend that story. Skip everything else. There was only one good story in this entire collection - "Orange Is for Anguish, Blue for Insanity" by David Morrell. If you picked this up somewhere, then I personally only recommend that story. Skip everything else.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Thomas Hobbs

    A collection of short stories from a variety of horror authors from the 1980s. The night flier my personal favourite I've read this one before and I do believe this one has a movie tie-in. Spinning Tales with the dead by Whitney Streiber is also a good one! A collection of short stories from a variety of horror authors from the 1980s. The night flier my personal favourite I've read this one before and I do believe this one has a movie tie-in. Spinning Tales with the dead by Whitney Streiber is also a good one!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    I didn't enjoy any of these stories. They were either written in a way that made it hard for me to read, or the story fell flat past way through I think 'Food' was the best as it had a solid start but was only a 3 star overall for me. I didn't enjoy any of these stories. They were either written in a way that made it hard for me to read, or the story fell flat past way through I think 'Food' was the best as it had a solid start but was only a 3 star overall for me.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Aaron White

    Ok. There were a few stand out stories. The rest I didn't care for much. Ok. There were a few stand out stories. The rest I didn't care for much.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Dan

    Wow! A blast from my childhood past. Such a great book. Various styles to keep your mind entranced. Can't wait to read it again now. A great buffet of unsettling perfection. Wow! A blast from my childhood past. Such a great book. Various styles to keep your mind entranced. Can't wait to read it again now. A great buffet of unsettling perfection.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Knivdelsbo

    A strange read. Stories by Morell and Straub are the clear highlights of this collection. The ratings shift in between a two and a four, so therefore it gets a 3.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

    King, Barker and Harrison had excellent stories and the rest range from mediocre to terrible

  29. 4 out of 5

    Carlsagansghost

    Incredible anthology. Best entry - David Morrell's "Orange is for Anguish, Blue for Insanity." Incredible anthology. Best entry - David Morrell's "Orange is for Anguish, Blue for Insanity."

  30. 4 out of 5

    Bob Box

    Read in 1988. An anthology of horror stories.

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