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All Our Hidden Gifts

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Maeve’s strangely astute tarot readings make her the talk of the school, until a classmate draws a chilling and unfamiliar card—and then disappears. After Maeve finds a pack of tarot cards while cleaning out a closet during her in-school suspension, she quickly becomes the most sought-after diviner at St. Bernadette’s Catholic school. But when Maeve’s ex–best friend, Lily Maeve’s strangely astute tarot readings make her the talk of the school, until a classmate draws a chilling and unfamiliar card—and then disappears. After Maeve finds a pack of tarot cards while cleaning out a closet during her in-school suspension, she quickly becomes the most sought-after diviner at St. Bernadette’s Catholic school. But when Maeve’s ex–best friend, Lily, draws an unsettling card called The Housekeeper that Maeve has never seen before, the session devolves into a heated argument that ends with Maeve wishing aloud that Lily would disappear. When Lily isn’t at school the next Monday, Maeve learns her ex-friend has vanished without a trace. Shunned by her classmates and struggling to preserve a fledgling romance with Lily’s gender-fluid sibling, Roe, Maeve must dig deep into her connection with the cards to search for clues the police cannot find—even if they lead to the terrifying Housekeeper herself. Set in an Irish town where the church’s tight hold has loosened and new freedoms are trying to take root, this sharply contemporary story is witty, gripping, and tinged with mysticism.


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Maeve’s strangely astute tarot readings make her the talk of the school, until a classmate draws a chilling and unfamiliar card—and then disappears. After Maeve finds a pack of tarot cards while cleaning out a closet during her in-school suspension, she quickly becomes the most sought-after diviner at St. Bernadette’s Catholic school. But when Maeve’s ex–best friend, Lily Maeve’s strangely astute tarot readings make her the talk of the school, until a classmate draws a chilling and unfamiliar card—and then disappears. After Maeve finds a pack of tarot cards while cleaning out a closet during her in-school suspension, she quickly becomes the most sought-after diviner at St. Bernadette’s Catholic school. But when Maeve’s ex–best friend, Lily, draws an unsettling card called The Housekeeper that Maeve has never seen before, the session devolves into a heated argument that ends with Maeve wishing aloud that Lily would disappear. When Lily isn’t at school the next Monday, Maeve learns her ex-friend has vanished without a trace. Shunned by her classmates and struggling to preserve a fledgling romance with Lily’s gender-fluid sibling, Roe, Maeve must dig deep into her connection with the cards to search for clues the police cannot find—even if they lead to the terrifying Housekeeper herself. Set in an Irish town where the church’s tight hold has loosened and new freedoms are trying to take root, this sharply contemporary story is witty, gripping, and tinged with mysticism.

30 review for All Our Hidden Gifts

  1. 5 out of 5

    Caroline O'Donoghue

    I wrote this and it's a banger! I wrote this and it's a banger!

  2. 5 out of 5

    luce

    / / / Read more reviews on my blog / / / Caroline O'Donoghue's foray into YA will definitely appeal to fans of the genre. Although I do have a few criticisms I can safely say that I found All Our Hidden Gifts to be an entertaining read. Set in Ireland, our narrator and protagonist is sixteen-year old Maeve Chambers, the youngest in a big family. She has quite a chip on her shoulder when it comes to her 'brilliant' sisters and brothers. Unlike them she isn't academically gifted and for a period of / / / Read more reviews on my blog / / / Caroline O'Donoghue's foray into YA will definitely appeal to fans of the genre. Although I do have a few criticisms I can safely say that I found All Our Hidden Gifts to be an entertaining read. Set in Ireland, our narrator and protagonist is sixteen-year old Maeve Chambers, the youngest in a big family. She has quite a chip on her shoulder when it comes to her 'brilliant' sisters and brothers. Unlike them she isn't academically gifted and for a period of time she was put in a slow-learning class. Maeve now attends an all-girls Catholic school and in trying to impress her peers lands herself in trouble. It just so happens that her detention includes cleaning out a cupboard know as the 'Chokey' where she finds a set of tarot cards...and it turns out that she has a skill when it comes to reading the cards. The story takes a Labyrinth turn when Maeve's new talent results in the disappearance of her former best friend, Lily, who she'd ditched in order to climb the social ladder. Was I expecting the Goblin King to be responsible for Lily's disappearance? Maybe... Anyhow, when the police gets involved and things get serious Maeve's life becomes quite messy. Maeve believes that a mysterious card from her deck may have stolen Lily away so she decides to deepen her knowledge of magic. Along the way she becomes close with another girl from her school and with Lily's older brother, Roe. As the kids investigate Lily's disappearance they become increasingly suspicious of a cult-like Christian group that is very vocal in opposing LGBTQ+ rights. I appreciated the issues O'Donoghue incorporates throughout her narrative. We have characters who are discriminated against for not being white or for not conforming to one gender. Lily wears a hearing aid, which is probably another reason why her classmates bully or exclude her, Maeve's sister is gay, Roe is exploring his gender expression (and possibly his gender identity?). As inclusivity goes, this novel is beautifully inclusive. Maeve, who is white, cis, straight (?), and from a possibly middle-class family, is called out for being insensitive or naive when it comes to discrimination. She's also somewhat self-centred, in an angsty sort of way, and this too is pointed out by other characters. Fiona also makes a point of reminding Maeve not to make other people's oppression all about herself. While I appreciated her growth, I still struggled to sympathise or like her. I found Roe and Fiona to be much more likeable and interesting characters. Maeve was the classic 'I'm not beautiful like x or intelligent like y' self-pitying kind of gall. She was boring and sounded much younger than her allegedly sixteen years of life. Which brings to my next 'criticism': there is a discrepancy between the tone and content of this novel. The tone, which is mainly created by Maeve's direct narration, would have been more suited to a middle-grade book while her narrative's content—the issues and discussions that came up in the story—are more tailored towards a YA audience. Both Maeve and the other sixteen-year olds sounded like they were twelve a lot of the time. Which made it weird when things like sex came up. The bad American dude was somewhat cartoonish, and that whole side-plot felt rather undeveloped. Lily was a promising character who might have been more fleshed out with some more flashbacks. And, to be honest, I would preferred this to be a friendship-focused kind of story. The romance between Maeve and Roe did not convince me, at all. She crushes on him from the get-go of the novel, but I could not for the life of me understand or see why he reciprocated her feelings. She says some pretty shitty things now and again to him and acts in a possessive way which irked me. I get she's insecure but still....she knows she may have been responsible for his sister's disappearance...and all she can think about are his lips? Nevertheless, this was far from a bad or mediocre book. I like the way O'Donoghue writes and I appreciate her story's themes and imagery so I would probably still recommend this. I, however, might stick to her adult fiction from now on.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    I received this book for free from the publisher (Walker Books) in exchange for an honest review. I was very excited to read this book because it focuses on tarot and I recently just learned how to read tarot. Speaking of tarot, I liked how there were pictures of the tarot cards scattered throughout the book. I think that is so helpful for readers who may not be familiar with tarot cards and what each card looks like. When it comes to the characters, there is so much representation. Roe is non-b I received this book for free from the publisher (Walker Books) in exchange for an honest review. I was very excited to read this book because it focuses on tarot and I recently just learned how to read tarot. Speaking of tarot, I liked how there were pictures of the tarot cards scattered throughout the book. I think that is so helpful for readers who may not be familiar with tarot cards and what each card looks like. When it comes to the characters, there is so much representation. Roe is non-binary. Maeve has a lesbian sister. But my favorite character was Fiona, Maeve’s Filipino friend. As a Filipino myself, I love seeing Filipino representation so when Fiona was first introduced, I was ecstatic. I loved that Fiona’s family was a little witchy. Her tita (aunt) is a fortune teller who helps them and tells them about the White Lady (Kaperosa in the Philippines). I found it so refreshing to see a nonwhite representation of witchcraft. So often witchcraft in books is so centered on a white perspective, but witchcraft is in every culture, as Fiona’s tita illustrates. She mentions that versions of the White Lady exist everywhere, in different cultures and places. As for the plot, it started off really strong with the mystery of Lily’s disappearance. But about halfway through, it stalled and lost some of its momentum. I felt like it dragged on a bit in the middle. I believe there will be a sequel to this book, and I think the book did set up a sequel very nicely. Overall, I recommend this book for anyone looking for a witchy YA read!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Whispering Stories

    Book Reviewed on www.whisperingstories.com Irish Teenager Maeve Chambers finds herself in trouble at school. Her punishment is to clear out the Chokey, a long deep cupboard filled to the brim with items such as furniture and things confiscated from the pupils over the years. Whilst cleaning she comes across an old walkman with a tape titled ‘Spring 1990’ and some Tarot cards. Maeve takes both items home with her. It isn’t long before she is learning all about Tarot. She feels like the cards talk t Book Reviewed on www.whisperingstories.com Irish Teenager Maeve Chambers finds herself in trouble at school. Her punishment is to clear out the Chokey, a long deep cupboard filled to the brim with items such as furniture and things confiscated from the pupils over the years. Whilst cleaning she comes across an old walkman with a tape titled ‘Spring 1990’ and some Tarot cards. Maeve takes both items home with her. It isn’t long before she is learning all about Tarot. She feels like the cards talk to her and she has a gift, so much so that she starts to give out Tarot reading at school to the girls in her year with strong accuracy. When her old friend Lily is forced into having her Tarot read by the other girls in their class a card that doesn’t belong in the pack makes an appearance. ‘The Housekeeper’ card features a woman with long dark hair, a white dress, and a knife in her mouth. The reading goes badly and as Lily storms off Maeve shouts after her ‘I wish you would just disappear’. A couple of days later Lily leaves her home in the early hours of the morning and is now missing. The other girls at school think Maeve is a witch and turn their backs on her. As Meave begins to suspect she had something to do with Lily’s disappearance she sets about trying to discover where she is and return her to her family. I love books that are a little different, strange even, and take you away from the norm and place you in situations that are just on the edge of reality. This book certainly ticked those boxes. I absolutely adored it. So much so that every time I put it down within a few minutes I had picked it back up again needing to carry on. It was certainly a book that you can escape into. My snapshot of the book above gives just one element of this book, there is so much more to it including a Christian cult called Children of Brigid that are recruiting damaged and lost teenagers, they aim to oppose LGBTQ+ rights. The book also is very inclusive, featuring a variety of diverse characters who all show how they feel being opposed to and trying to live the life they want to in the way they want to in a society that deems anything not white or straight as abnormal. The plot weaves many subplots together that work perfectly. The characters all brought something different to the story, they were three-dimensional, complex characters that all had their own issues and demons. I loved the magic element of the book too. All Our Hidden Gifts is the first book in a new series and I can’t wait to continue the teenager’s stories and see what life has to throw at them in book two.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Brittany (whatbritreads)

    *Thank you so much to the publisher for sending me a copy in exchange for review!* If you want a witchy, magically mysterious YA book, this is a good shout for your next read. I enjoyed it and had a great time in this world. As fantasy books go, this was really easy to pick up and follow along with. The magical elements were well done and engaging, and I didn’t get confused at any point while following the plot. I loved how much tarot was integrated into this story, I haven’t read many witchy book *Thank you so much to the publisher for sending me a copy in exchange for review!* If you want a witchy, magically mysterious YA book, this is a good shout for your next read. I enjoyed it and had a great time in this world. As fantasy books go, this was really easy to pick up and follow along with. The magical elements were well done and engaging, and I didn’t get confused at any point while following the plot. I loved how much tarot was integrated into this story, I haven’t read many witchy books but the ones I have read haven’t touched much on tarot. I have tarot cards myself that I used to play around with an honestly this just made me want to go and pick them up again. I just absolutely adore the vibes in this book, it was so spooky and magical. I had no idea going into this book that it was set in Ireland, but I loved that aspect and think it played such a key role in the storytelling of this book. We had an amazing depiction of the current cultural climate of Ireland, with a particular focus on the Catholic church and how this feed into people’s perceptions and politics. It felt very politically current and really added an extra layer to the narrative that I wasn’t initially expecting – it pleasantly surprised me. I think it really helped bring dimensions to these characters as well. I wasn’t expecting a romance in this story, but the romance we did get was so wholesome I genuinely couldn’t have been happier with how it turned out. There was amazing communication and an understanding between the two of them that was just so pure and made my little heart happy. We actually have a love interest who is openly (at least to our protagonist) bisexual and that brought discussion of sexuality, self-expression and gender into the story that I wasn’t expecting. I thought it was really well done and relatable in many instances. My only criticism is that I feel the book could’ve been longer just to expand on a couple of the plot points a bit more. While the ending rounded things up nicely, it was a bit abrupt and could’ve been fleshed out a bit more. Still overall very fun!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Gabriela Pop

    As some would say : "All Our Hidden Gifts is an enchanting read, blending the chatty charm of Maeve Binchy with the imaginative scope of Diana Wynne Jones". There's a very specific kind of whimsy and escapism that can be encountered in early 2000s paranormal fantasy and ALL OUR HIDDEN GIFTS captures this so well, but updates it in a way that makes it much more reflective of modern audiences (read: less girl hate, more genderqueer love interests, for example). O'Donoghue portrays such a realistic As some would say : "All Our Hidden Gifts is an enchanting read, blending the chatty charm of Maeve Binchy with the imaginative scope of Diana Wynne Jones". There's a very specific kind of whimsy and escapism that can be encountered in early 2000s paranormal fantasy and ALL OUR HIDDEN GIFTS captures this so well, but updates it in a way that makes it much more reflective of modern audiences (read: less girl hate, more genderqueer love interests, for example). O'Donoghue portrays such a realistic, albeit raw, snippet of the teen experience, when everything is all at once tentative and allconsuming. The cattiness of cliques, the slightly cringe attempts to fit in regardless of the sacrifices required, the proper stupid rows between family members - ALL OUR HIDDEN GIFTS is uncanny in its verisimilitude and authenticity. Our protagonist isn't really likeable, nor does she truly attempt to make herself come across that way; instead, all she is trying to do is get by and be a little less miserable if life will allow it. She is such an absolute mess, yet so self aware in a way that's nothing short of endearing. More importantly than creating a likeable character, O'Donoghe gives the reader an interesting one, a character that may test the reader. ALL OUR HIDDEN GIFTS does what every good fantasy would - it uses quirky magical elements to explore very real societal issues. O'Donoghue's Ireland comes alive right off the place in a perfect mirror image of the real thing, magic or not. The novel, in many ways, holds up a mirror to the nation and forces it to confront its shortcomings. I adored this with every fiber of my being and am beyond myself that it's merely the first in a series. I cannot see what else there is in store for these characters!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Star

    Thank you to Walker Books Australia for providing me an advanced reader copy in exchange for an honest review. This one was so different and so cool. I love that it's set in Ireland, and my full review will be up soon. Representation: Roe is gender fluid and bisexual. Fiona is Filipino. Joanne is a lesbian. Content warnings: racism, homophobia, suicide, self-harm, bullying, mentions of adultery. The second I heard about All Our Hidden Gifts, I knew I wanted to read it. The story opens on Maeve gettin Thank you to Walker Books Australia for providing me an advanced reader copy in exchange for an honest review. This one was so different and so cool. I love that it's set in Ireland, and my full review will be up soon. Representation: Roe is gender fluid and bisexual. Fiona is Filipino. Joanne is a lesbian. Content warnings: racism, homophobia, suicide, self-harm, bullying, mentions of adultery. The second I heard about All Our Hidden Gifts, I knew I wanted to read it. The story opens on Maeve getting into trouble and it just soars from there. Maeve, while cleaning at school, finds a pack of tarot cards, that she is scarily good at reading. She reads everyone’s tarot in her year level, and then soon, the whole school. Including her ex-friend Lily. Then suddenly, Lily goes missing. There are zero traces of her, and no one knows where she is. Maeve tries to find her, with the help of Lily’s brother, Roe, who Maeve is kind-of-definitely falling fast for. * I adored the way this book was written. The plot was fast paced enough to keep me hooked, but not too fast as to solve the mystery of Lily’s disappearance without bringing in some really hecking weird stuff. The Children of Brigid were particularly creepy, and I hate Aaron with the fire of a thousand suns. He is a typical American “I am the best, and I am always right” male and I wanted to punch his homophobic face the second he appeared on the page. The way the author wove tarot into the story was amazingly done. I adored that this erred more on the side of magical even over just speculative. Since reading this, I have heard there is going to be a sequel and I am so excited because there are so many more things I want to see explored, and I had such much fun reading this book that I want to do it all over again. If you’re looking for a darker YA book that has a bit of magical vibes, then I highly recommend this one. 4/5 stars

  8. 5 out of 5

    Lou

    All Our Hidden Gifts is the first instalment in the eponymous darkly magical young adult series with a spellbinding supernatural plot and a mystery precipitated by amateur tarot card reading. 16-year-old Irish teenager Maeve Chambers is a loner and has been since she ditched her best friend Lily three years ago. The sole idiot in a family of geniuses, she has always struggled to fit in. But when she finds a pack of dusty old tarot cards in a cupboard at her school and begins to give scarily accu All Our Hidden Gifts is the first instalment in the eponymous darkly magical young adult series with a spellbinding supernatural plot and a mystery precipitated by amateur tarot card reading. 16-year-old Irish teenager Maeve Chambers is a loner and has been since she ditched her best friend Lily three years ago. The sole idiot in a family of geniuses, she has always struggled to fit in. But when she finds a pack of dusty old tarot cards in a cupboard at her school and begins to give scarily accurate readings to the girls in her class, she realises she’s found her gift at last. Things are looking up. Until she discovers a strange card in her deck – one that shouldn’t be there. Then a reading for her ex-best-friend Lily goes very wrong. And two days later, Lily disappears. Consumed by guilt, Maeve teams up with the only two people who believe Maeve’s version of events: new friend Fiona, a talented acting prodigy; and Lily’s alluring older brother, the gender-fluid, lipstick and leather jacket-wearing Roe. All three have unnatural talents that are only now waking up. Will their strange gifts be enough to find Lily and bring her back, before she’s gone for good? This is a bewitching and immersive story and the mesmerising way the author weaves the intriguing, mystical thread of tarot into the teenagers’ world is captivating and original with a few surprising twists and a mystery of a missing girl at its centre. As Maeve gets to grips with her newfound talent she quickly discovers that there's both positive and negative energy competing for the upper hand and for a beginner this can be quite daunting and dangerous if the power to produce scarily accurate readings is placed in the wrongs hands. The characters are complex and multilayered and chilling imagery of the cards, especially one known as the Housekeeper, linger in your mind. Woven into the narrative are influences from Irish folklore, and I wasn't expecting the book to address human rights and civil liberties. An entertaining, compelling and addictive fantasy featuring elements of both reality and the fantastical.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Haley Renee The Caffeinated Reader

    All Our Hidden Gifts was a surprisingly amazing read for me. The first chapter had been rocky for me but the moment I hit chapter 2 I had a hard time putting it down until the end. Teenagers are dealing with hate crimes, climate change, oppression from every angle and juggling all of this while trying to find themselves, whether they're wanting to figure out/explore their sexuality, their own desires in life itself, or trying to save a fellow teen. The emotions felt very real and the flaws in the All Our Hidden Gifts was a surprisingly amazing read for me. The first chapter had been rocky for me but the moment I hit chapter 2 I had a hard time putting it down until the end. Teenagers are dealing with hate crimes, climate change, oppression from every angle and juggling all of this while trying to find themselves, whether they're wanting to figure out/explore their sexuality, their own desires in life itself, or trying to save a fellow teen. The emotions felt very real and the flaws in the MC made her the sort that you could grow with as you watch her navigate everything. She also gets called out for her bad/toxic behaviors which is refreshing to see her take these things and learn from them where other MCs just become purely petulant in other books. Overall I think this tackled a lot of relevant issues while maintaining the feel of an ancient/ageless lore. The ending was extremely fitting on the outcome of the missing teen and I'd go into more but don't want to give spoilers. There'll be a full review on my blog this week. 4.5/5 Cups of coffee from me, thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for an eARC in exchange for my honest opinion.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Book Barbarian (Tammy Smith)

    I just reviewed All Our Hidden Gifts - YALC Sampler by Caroline O’Donoghue. #AllOurHiddenGifts #NetGalley I am honestly so blown away by these first few chapters. I have really fallen in love with the characters and the setting. I am really sad to not have it all to devour! It's not enough to form a full opinion on but I hope that I will be able to request the full copy soon. I have a feeling this is going to be an amazing book! Thank you so much for letting me read this YALC sampler. I just reviewed All Our Hidden Gifts - YALC Sampler by Caroline O’Donoghue. #AllOurHiddenGifts #NetGalley I am honestly so blown away by these first few chapters. I have really fallen in love with the characters and the setting. I am really sad to not have it all to devour! It's not enough to form a full opinion on but I hope that I will be able to request the full copy soon. I have a feeling this is going to be an amazing book! Thank you so much for letting me read this YALC sampler.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Haley Renee The Caffeinated Reader

    All Our Hidden Gifts was a surprisingly amazing read for me. The first chapter had been rocky for me but the moment I hit chapter 2 I had a hard time putting it down until the end. Teenagers are dealing with hate crimes, climate change, oppression from every angle and juggling all of this while trying to find themselves, whether they're wanting to figure out/explore their sexuality, their own desires in life itself, or trying to save a fellow teen. The emotions felt very real and the flaws in the All Our Hidden Gifts was a surprisingly amazing read for me. The first chapter had been rocky for me but the moment I hit chapter 2 I had a hard time putting it down until the end. Teenagers are dealing with hate crimes, climate change, oppression from every angle and juggling all of this while trying to find themselves, whether they're wanting to figure out/explore their sexuality, their own desires in life itself, or trying to save a fellow teen. The emotions felt very real and the flaws in the MC made her the sort that you could grow with as you watch her navigate everything. She also gets called out for her bad/toxic behaviors which is refreshing to see her take these things and learn from them where other MCs just become purely petulant in other books. Overall I think this tackled a lot of relevant issues while maintaining the feel of an ancient/ageless lore. The ending was extremely fitting on the outcome of the missing teen and I'd go into more but don't want to give spoilers. There'll be a full review on my blog this week. 4.5/5 Cups of coffee from me, thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for an eARC in exchange for my honest opinion.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Gabriele | QueerBookdom

    DRC provided by Walker Books via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Representation: genderqueer bisexual secondary character, Filipino-Irish secondary character, lesbian secondary character, deaf tertiary character, queer tertiary characters. Content Warning: bullying, homophobia, religious fanaticism, slurs, HP reference, self-harm, racism, violence, mentions of suicide, mentions of spousal physical abuse, mentions of homophobic assaults (physical and verbal). All Our Hidden Gifts by Caro DRC provided by Walker Books via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Representation: genderqueer bisexual secondary character, Filipino-Irish secondary character, lesbian secondary character, deaf tertiary character, queer tertiary characters. Content Warning: bullying, homophobia, religious fanaticism, slurs, HP reference, self-harm, racism, violence, mentions of suicide, mentions of spousal physical abuse, mentions of homophobic assaults (physical and verbal). All Our Hidden Gifts by Caroline O’Donoghue is a contemporary fantasy set in Ireland about friendships, old and new, love, family and magic all mixed in a cauldron (with hints of the movie “The Craft”). Maeve Chambers always feels out of place in her family of academically proficient people. Everyone hides a hidden talent though and Maeve’s happens to fall in the category of magic and witchcraft. I surely enjoyed reading O’Donoghue’s book, but I really did not like Maeve and her self-centredness, and at times inconsiderateness. She somewhat fits the insufferable trope of “not like the other girls” and that is what made me wish another character would have a point of view, as it becomes a little hard to continue reading only from hers. Luckily, she is accompanied by a cast of brilliant side characters whom I loved dearly (among whom there is a fantastic genderqueer character, Roe, who deserves the world, as does the lovely Fiona), which made the reading experience infinitely better. All Our Hidden Gifts is an enjoyable and quick read despite a quite unlikeable main character.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Charlotte

    A story of magic and growing up/friendship/love all twisted together with hate and negativity (the later being thwarted, though not entirely defeated because as the main character learns, magic isn't responsible for all the bigotry and hate in the world. If you are a fan of teenaged girls in the real world acquiring magical powers and having to learn quickly how to use them in desperate circumstances, or a fan of girls who have been really, deeply unkind to people during dark young teen times an A story of magic and growing up/friendship/love all twisted together with hate and negativity (the later being thwarted, though not entirely defeated because as the main character learns, magic isn't responsible for all the bigotry and hate in the world. If you are a fan of teenaged girls in the real world acquiring magical powers and having to learn quickly how to use them in desperate circumstances, or a fan of girls who have been really, deeply unkind to people during dark young teen times and then work hard to make up for it, or a fan of love stories between difficult girls and beautiful non-binary musicians, or tarot cards, or all of the above, this is one for you!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Simon J Alvey

    An engaging plot that builds to a dramatic climax, which I read in a day or so, is testimony to its readability. However what I was struck by was its compassion, for its characters and readers. In the tradition of so many YA books it is offering a hope to anyone who feels to be an outsider that they can find their gift. All of this shot through with a message of welcoming friends from across races, sexualities and gender identities. Frankly if a teenager reads this, then we might just have a cha An engaging plot that builds to a dramatic climax, which I read in a day or so, is testimony to its readability. However what I was struck by was its compassion, for its characters and readers. In the tradition of so many YA books it is offering a hope to anyone who feels to be an outsider that they can find their gift. All of this shot through with a message of welcoming friends from across races, sexualities and gender identities. Frankly if a teenager reads this, then we might just have a chance of being ok.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Ellie Carr

    I haven’t read a YA novel for years, but after reading this book that feels like a terrible mistake, and one that I should immediately set about rectifying. It’s funny, it’s spooky, it’s got a nice lil’ slice of mysterio pie for all you would-be sleuths out there and it could also double as a fairly thorough intro to tarot. What’s not to like? I read this book in less than 36 hours. 8 of those I was on the clock, and another 8 I was asleep, so really, I polished it off in less than a day-I could I haven’t read a YA novel for years, but after reading this book that feels like a terrible mistake, and one that I should immediately set about rectifying. It’s funny, it’s spooky, it’s got a nice lil’ slice of mysterio pie for all you would-be sleuths out there and it could also double as a fairly thorough intro to tarot. What’s not to like? I read this book in less than 36 hours. 8 of those I was on the clock, and another 8 I was asleep, so really, I polished it off in less than a day-I could not put it down. It’s got a lot of heart and I wish it had been around to read when I was a confused and wicca infused teen. A dream of a novel. FIVE STARS

  16. 4 out of 5

    Andreea

    I really enjoyed reading this one! It almost was a 5 star read but it was a little draggy in some parts and I found the main character to be annoying. I usually DNF books if I can’t connect to the main characters but this book was still interesting ….so4 golden stars!!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jeann (Happy Indulgence)

    This book was so compulsively compelling! I couldn't stop reading it, it was so interesting seeing Maeve navigate her new affinity for tarot reading. My favourite part of the book was when she starts being popular for tarot reads, and when she befriends two people who she never thought she would. I enjoyed the trans rep in here as well with the quiet acceptance. It slowly becomes a ghost/witchy story which takes quite a different turn from the start of the book. Full review to come. This book was so compulsively compelling! I couldn't stop reading it, it was so interesting seeing Maeve navigate her new affinity for tarot reading. My favourite part of the book was when she starts being popular for tarot reads, and when she befriends two people who she never thought she would. I enjoyed the trans rep in here as well with the quiet acceptance. It slowly becomes a ghost/witchy story which takes quite a different turn from the start of the book. Full review to come.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Bookread2day

    My review is on my website www.bookread2day.wordpress.com I love tarot card reading stories as I bought a lot of tarot cards for my daughter, which we are both so in to . I have used a lot of them that appear in the story here on my website along with the book. This novel maybe for 14+ year olds but I loved it, and I can safely say it’s certainly suitable for the older generation to read. Maeve Chambers is at St Bernadette catholic girls school, costing two thousand euro a term. Maeve, gets detenti My review is on my website www.bookread2day.wordpress.com I love tarot card reading stories as I bought a lot of tarot cards for my daughter, which we are both so in to . I have used a lot of them that appear in the story here on my website along with the book. This novel maybe for 14+ year olds but I loved it, and I can safely say it’s certainly suitable for the older generation to read. Maeve Chambers is at St Bernadette catholic girls school, costing two thousand euro a term. Maeve, gets detention after she threw a shoe at a teacher and is led to the Chokey, a long deep cupboard. She is ordered to clean out the cupboard. While Maeve is in the cupboard listening to a Walkman she stumbles upon some tarot cards. Once she takes them home Maeve learns as much as she can in how to deal with the tarot cards and what each one means. As soon as word got around the school that Maeve, did tarot card reading all the pupils wanted Maeve to help them predict their future. Lily O’Callaghan and Maeve once we’re best friends but had grown apart. You should always be careful for what you wish for. As when Maeve does a reading for Lily it goes horribly wrong, Maeve tells Lily ‘I wish you would disappear’. Everyone in the whole school becomes concerned when Lily doesn’t attend school. And to make it worse Maeve knows one of her tarot cards are missing. I was wandering could there be a connection? And will they find Lily O’Callaghan? I would like to thank Walker Books for sending me this spellbinding book to read and review.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Demelda Penkitty

    Maeve Chambers doesn't have much going for her. Not only does she feel like the sole idiot in a family of geniuses, she managed to drive away her best friend Lily a year ago. But when she finds a pack of dusty old tarot cards at school, and begins to give scarily accurate readings to the girls in her class, she realizes she's found her gift at last. Things are looking up – until she discovers a strange card in the deck that definitely shouldn't be there. And two days after she convinces her ex-b Maeve Chambers doesn't have much going for her. Not only does she feel like the sole idiot in a family of geniuses, she managed to drive away her best friend Lily a year ago. But when she finds a pack of dusty old tarot cards at school, and begins to give scarily accurate readings to the girls in her class, she realizes she's found her gift at last. Things are looking up – until she discovers a strange card in the deck that definitely shouldn't be there. And two days after she convinces her ex-best friend to have a reading, Lily disappears. Can Maeve, her new friend Fiona and Lily's brother Roe find her? And will Maeve's new gift be enough to bring Lily back, before she's gone for good? I’m not a Young Adult by any means, but I loved this. It brought back the intensity of my own nerdy teenage years trying to find out who I was and where I fitted in. The plot weaves many subplots together that work perfectly. The characters all brought something different to the story, they were three-dimensional, complex characters that all had their own issues and demons. Magic is present throughout the book, but it is approached in a very real way including the dangers and consequences. The book is an enchantingly modern coming of age story, wrapped in a supernatural mystery, steeped in Irish folklore. It speaks with an authentic young adult voice and is packed with relatable and refreshingly diverse characters. Central protagonist Maeve is warts and all, far from perfect, but she echoes every teenager who just wants to fit it. Her relationships with gender queer boyfriend Rory and best friend Fiona are grounded and adorable. The backdrop of a present-day Ireland and all its myth, history, religious tensions, race, and gender inequalities really ground this novel and culturally reflects the call for change from our youth. All Our Hidden Gifts is the first book in a new series and I can’t wait to continue the teenager’s stories and see what life has to throw at them in book two.If you are a fan of young adult supernatural fiction, then All Our Hidden Gifts from Caroline O ‘Donoghue should be on your reading list.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Luckie

    What an amazing read. This gave me mad House of Hollow vibes, peak urban fantasy. I loved the mystery element and I've never related to a character so hard. In conclusion, I am Maeve and Maeve is me. Although I wouldn't necessarily classify this book as LGBTQ+ since that is not the main focus of the story, this book features a diverse range of characters in terms of sexuality, and does discuss topics of gender and sexuality in a way I felt was tasteful and accurate. As someone who went through a What an amazing read. This gave me mad House of Hollow vibes, peak urban fantasy. I loved the mystery element and I've never related to a character so hard. In conclusion, I am Maeve and Maeve is me. Although I wouldn't necessarily classify this book as LGBTQ+ since that is not the main focus of the story, this book features a diverse range of characters in terms of sexuality, and does discuss topics of gender and sexuality in a way I felt was tasteful and accurate. As someone who went through a witch phase in middle school (and, let's face it, high school) I loved the witchy plot line, and these sixteen year olds visiting divination shops and trying to figure out how to work spells gave me major flashbacks to my teen years. I read this so fast and it grabbed me from start to finish. 10/10.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jasmine

    4.5/5 This book came along at the perfect time. I've DNF'd a lot this year already, so I didn't want to have to give up on another. Luckily, this book was near perfect. The only reason I docked half a star is that it felt like there was so much packed into it that the book dragged, but at the same time, I genuinely don't think there's anything that I would have removed from it. All Our Hidden Gifts explores sexuality and gender in a most informative fashion, informing without forcing the issues to 4.5/5 This book came along at the perfect time. I've DNF'd a lot this year already, so I didn't want to have to give up on another. Luckily, this book was near perfect. The only reason I docked half a star is that it felt like there was so much packed into it that the book dragged, but at the same time, I genuinely don't think there's anything that I would have removed from it. All Our Hidden Gifts explores sexuality and gender in a most informative fashion, informing without forcing the issues to stand out, without making the reader feel as though they're being scolded or patronised. I learned so much about gender and sexuality from this book that I couldn't learn from the heaps of Instagram infographics, so I think this book will be subtly useful to readers who struggle to identify. This book has characters who represent non-binary, bisexual, lesbian and genderfluid people, as well as a Filipino main character, a South Asian queer secondary character and a main character with a hearing impairment. The story itself captivated me - I've always had an interest in books about witchcraft and tarot, but this one was more spectacularly presented than the others I've read before. This is a book I could read time and time again to find solace in. I loved the characters and the way they built and crafted relationships, as well as the exploration of how relationships can break down and we have no control over them. If I'd read this as a teenager going through all the drama of friendship and hormones, I think I would have found a home in All Our Hidden Gifts. Content warnings: racism, homophobia, suicide, self-harm, bullying, mentions of adultery. Thank you to netgalley, Caroline O'Donoghue and Walker Books for providing me with an e-copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. All thoughts and opinions expressed are my own.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Georgia

    4/5 for imagination 4/5 for representation 2/5 for clarity of concept This book wasn't terrible, but upon finishing it my overwhelming feeling was that I wanted to like it a lot more than I actually did. It's definitely original and a very interesting concept. However, a lot of elements feel confused, as if they belong to a rough draft instead of a finished novel. I felt that the author had too many ideas, resulting in none of them being explored fully. I wish the story featured less threads, with 4/5 for imagination 4/5 for representation 2/5 for clarity of concept This book wasn't terrible, but upon finishing it my overwhelming feeling was that I wanted to like it a lot more than I actually did. It's definitely original and a very interesting concept. However, a lot of elements feel confused, as if they belong to a rough draft instead of a finished novel. I felt that the author had too many ideas, resulting in none of them being explored fully. I wish the story featured less threads, with the ones present being included more intentionally. Additionally, a lot of the more political plot points felt very heavy handed and difficult to take seriously. These concepts could have been explored with more nuance. My primary complaint is the inconsistency throughout the book as to the target audience. The tone, characters, and conflicts all feel very appropriate for MG; I constantly had to remind myself that the characters are 16 instead of 11, however much of the content would be inappropriate for MG readers. This leads to a confusing reading experience wherein the YA reader feels condescended to, but cannot fully recommend the book to a MG reader. One thing this author certainly doesn't shy away from is representation. This is awesome to see and for the most part was handled with subtly, nuance, and resemblance to real experience. A few characters felt a little less well considered, as if their inclusion was part of a checklist instead of fully realised characters. I feel as though we've progressed past 'points for trying' in terms of representation, so I am judging this more harshly than past author's efforts.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Chastine

    I didn't expect to love this as much as I did. The characters were so enjoyable, and I love the fact that our protagonist, Maeve, clearly shows her flaws. She can be snappy, bitchy, insecure so many times, just like a teenager would be. So was Roe — he had his moments of lashing out, but again, that was what a teenager would do, again. The LGBTQIA+ rep was well done and the homophobia tackled in a respectful way that mirrored real life. The book was unexpectedly so hilarious, too, I laughed out I didn't expect to love this as much as I did. The characters were so enjoyable, and I love the fact that our protagonist, Maeve, clearly shows her flaws. She can be snappy, bitchy, insecure so many times, just like a teenager would be. So was Roe — he had his moments of lashing out, but again, that was what a teenager would do, again. The LGBTQIA+ rep was well done and the homophobia tackled in a respectful way that mirrored real life. The book was unexpectedly so hilarious, too, I laughed out loud a few times, and I haven't done that for SUCH A LONG TIME while reading. Caroline O'Donoghue just writes teenagers SO PAINFULLY REALISTICALLY I half-forgot they weren't real, like they were my classmates back at school. Teenagers are really hard to write, and harder still to make them relatable. A LOT of authors, even my favorite ones, fail to make their teenage characters interesting in the slightest, but Caroline O'Donoghue just EXCELS at this. She does it so effortlessly I'm about to cry. My favorite character is definitely Fiona. She's so goddamn cool. I love, love, LOVE the Filipino rep, and the way it showed a hint of my culture and captured the pressures put upon a Filipino kid to achieve certain dreams that their parents have, to strive for great things. I love the fact that Fiona was ambitious, but wasn't arrogant. I love how confident she was of herself and her talents. I haven't ever read a Filipino character this lovable before, in any young adult book or otherwise. I love the way Maeve and Fiona's friendship just felt so natural, so right. I loved Fiona's family. I loved the shopkeeper at Divination. Heck, I even grew to care about Sister A. I dunno why, I just did. And the fact that Lily wasn't so quick to forgive Maeve in the end? The way she snapped and told Maeve to fuck off? YES. As I've said: realistic stuff. The few creepy moments got me, too. The way the Housekeeper lore is further explored got me hooked. I even thought of buying my own deck of tarot cards because of how interesting this book showed it to be. With just 700+ reviews, this book is SO UNDERRATED. READ IT. READ IT, PLEASE. This is one of — if not THE BEST — young adult book I've read this year. Perfectly paced, surprisingly funny, sweet friendships and refreshingly real and relatable characters, All Our Hidden Gifts is definitely worth the read.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Karen Barber

    Maeve Chambers, the youngest of five children, is a fairly ordinary sixteen year old girl in many ways. She feels acutely conscious that she’s not as clever as her siblings, not as interesting as her peers and has no idea what she wants to do. She is fizzing with a desire to do something but doesn’t know what that something could be. When she gets into trouble in school she is given a detention which involves clearing out an abandoned storeroom. While there she finds an old Walkman and a pack of Maeve Chambers, the youngest of five children, is a fairly ordinary sixteen year old girl in many ways. She feels acutely conscious that she’s not as clever as her siblings, not as interesting as her peers and has no idea what she wants to do. She is fizzing with a desire to do something but doesn’t know what that something could be. When she gets into trouble in school she is given a detention which involves clearing out an abandoned storeroom. While there she finds an old Walkman and a pack of tarot cards. So begins her new interest... Maeve teaches herself to read the tarot cards and finds herself to have something of a knack for it. She likes the feeling she gets when she does readings for her schoolmates. Unfortunately, after she does a reading for Lily - the girl who used to be her best friend until Maeve abandoned her in an attempt to garner popularity - things go horribly wrong. Lily disappears, and Maeve is convinced (because of the presence of a mysterious card known as the Housekeeper) that she is responsible. The mystery of what happened to Lily is at the heart of the book but never really examined, and glossed over later. It is inextricably linked to the rise of an ultra-conservative Christian group sowing discord and hatred amongst the community. No one escapes this. There was a lot going on here, and it wasn’t always clear which strand was driving the book. Interesting idea, and certainly topical, but I didn’t really feel engaged enough by Maeve to care too much what happened to her and the characters I was intrigued by were often sidelined just when things could have been interesting.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Catherine Barter

    This is just great. It's a novel to get cosy and sink in to - a warm, easy voice, compelling plot, sympathetic characters... I even quite liked the mean high school girls, bless them, or at least I recognised them from my own school days. The workings of school social hierarchy were very familiar. And the way a craze for getting tarot readings sweeps across their class was SO believable to me. :) But what's really awesome is the complicated, unsettling and sometimes genuinely creepy exploration o This is just great. It's a novel to get cosy and sink in to - a warm, easy voice, compelling plot, sympathetic characters... I even quite liked the mean high school girls, bless them, or at least I recognised them from my own school days. The workings of school social hierarchy were very familiar. And the way a craze for getting tarot readings sweeps across their class was SO believable to me. :) But what's really awesome is the complicated, unsettling and sometimes genuinely creepy exploration of magic, witchery and unexpected powers... which is really nicely intertwined with a sub-plot about gender expression and queer identity clashing with a reactionary cult and an historically conservative national culture. There's a fun mystery story here, but there's also something deeper about teenagers coming of age in a changing Ireland. A witchy story set very much in the real world - love it.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Amanda (The Book Geek Boutique)

    All Our Hidden Gifts follows Maeve as she tries to navigate her way through teenage life with all of its changes, emotions and hormones. During a detention at school she is asked to clean out a room where she comes across an old set of tarot cards. She soon learns that she has a knack for reading the cards and telling people their fortunes. What starts out as a harmless bit of fun ends in a missing girl and a dark cult of radicals taking their political beliefs to a disturbing level. I really enj All Our Hidden Gifts follows Maeve as she tries to navigate her way through teenage life with all of its changes, emotions and hormones. During a detention at school she is asked to clean out a room where she comes across an old set of tarot cards. She soon learns that she has a knack for reading the cards and telling people their fortunes. What starts out as a harmless bit of fun ends in a missing girl and a dark cult of radicals taking their political beliefs to a disturbing level. I really enjoyed the pacing of this book and the tarot/witch elements were really interesting. I especially enjoyed the folklore surrounding the cards and how there are similar tales in lots of different cultures. I didn't get on too well with Maeve as a character. I found her insipid and quite loathsome in some parts. I found the side characters far more interesting such as Fiona and Roe. There seemed to be a lot subjects that the author wanted to tackle and although I could see where she was trying to go with them I don't think the book was long enough to explore the issues as deeply as she could have. All in all a quick entertaining read but no show stopper.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Tom McInnes

    As I’ve already written one effusive essay-length rave about an O’Donoghue book this year, I’ll keep this short and to the point: This is a perfect book; a total masterclass in tone, character, watertight plotting and brain-busting imagination, and if it doesn’t become the next big international YA sensation then the world’s youth truly are lost and we should really just give up and hand Earth’s reigns over to the dolphins or whichever other sentient beings are going to take over once we finally As I’ve already written one effusive essay-length rave about an O’Donoghue book this year, I’ll keep this short and to the point: This is a perfect book; a total masterclass in tone, character, watertight plotting and brain-busting imagination, and if it doesn’t become the next big international YA sensation then the world’s youth truly are lost and we should really just give up and hand Earth’s reigns over to the dolphins or whichever other sentient beings are going to take over once we finally flump ourselves into nonexistence.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Vikki VanSickle

    Comedic, witchy, Irish YA novel of my dreams. A dry, witty teen finds a handmade deck of tarot cards and everything turns witchy from there on out. Fun, features a respectful and loving portrayal of a kid recently coming to terms with their bisexuality, and an over the top drama student I definitely related to.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Alyce Hunt

    Possibly more like a 3.5, but going to sit on this one for a little while before I write my review! EDIT 11/03/21: First things first, I’d like to say a huge thank you to Walker Books for accepting my request to read and review this title via NetGalley. All Our Hidden Gifts is a book which tries to do too much, but is still very enjoyable. Following a girl called Maeve, Caroline O’Donoghue’s first YA novel dives into female friendships, magic and the conservative nature of Ireland. While in detention Possibly more like a 3.5, but going to sit on this one for a little while before I write my review! EDIT 11/03/21: First things first, I’d like to say a huge thank you to Walker Books for accepting my request to read and review this title via NetGalley. All Our Hidden Gifts is a book which tries to do too much, but is still very enjoyable. Following a girl called Maeve, Caroline O’Donoghue’s first YA novel dives into female friendships, magic and the conservative nature of Ireland. While in detention, Maeve finds a pack of tarot cards. She quickly discovers that she has a skill for tarot; a nice surprise for Maeve, who has always struggled at school and failed to live up to her successful older siblings. Maeve makes a name for herself at school and soon finds her readings in demand. However, things take a turn for the worst when Maeve is forced to do a reading for her ex-best friend, Lily. Lily draws a card which doesn’t exist in the traditional tarot deck. The Housekeeper spooked Maeve so much the first time that she saw it that she hid it in her drawer at home, and Maeve can’t understand how it possibly appears during Lily’s reading. That doesn’t stop Maeve from saying something she regrets during the reading, which turns into a heated argument in the blink of an eye. Maeve’s comment is something that she can’t stop thinking about when Lily doesn’t turn up to school the next day, and it becomes apparent that she has gone missing. Teaming up with her new friend Fiona, and Lily’s brother Roe, Maeve and the gang have to get to the bottom of Lily’s disappearance, even if it might put their lives in danger… As soon as I discovered that All Our Hidden Gifts was about tarot reading, I jumped on the request button. I love books about witches and magic, but I can’t remember ever reading a book about tarot before. Unfortunately the readings are consigned to the beginning of the novel before Lily’s disappearance, but the idea of this mysterious, sinister card appearing sent a shiver down my spine. My favourite thing about All Our Hidden Gifts was the representation throughout this novel. Fiona is half-Filipino, so there are a lot of discussions about how white-centric Ireland – and particularly Maeve and Fiona’s Catholic school – are, and the way that Fiona is demonised in the street due to the colour of her skin. Roe is non-binary (although still uses he/him pronouns) and bisexual, and throughout the novel he experiments with his portrayal of gender, wearing nail varnish and performing on stage in luxurious capes and dresses. Similarly to Fiona, Roe experiences transphobic bullying and hate crimes due to his gender identity, furthering Caroline O’Donoghue’s commentary on the regressive nature of certain members of Irish society. This is primarily explored through a hate group called the Children of Brigid. Founded by Americans, the Children of Brigid claim to be aiming to turn Ireland back into a good old Catholic country, and they’ll stop at nothing to get their way. The subplot with the Children of Brigid is left wide open, so I’m sincerely hoping that All Our Hidden Gifts is the first book in a series. If it is, I will be amending my rating and rating this either 4 or 4.5 stars, but as it currently seems to be remaining a standalone, I’ve had to round that rating down to 3.5 stars. As a standalone, I don’t find All Our Hidden Gifts as satisfactory as I would if it was the start of a bigger story. Reviewing this as if it were a standalone, there is just far too much going on in this story. Lily’s disappearance becomes the least interesting aspect of the plot, and I found myself wishing there was more of a focus on the Children of Brigid. I also wanted to see more of Maeve and Roe’s relationship. She is unquestionably accepting of his sexuality and his gender identity, and the communication between the two of them is the stuff of dreams. Despite the fact that they have a lot against them – and that it takes them at least half of the book to finally admit that they like each other, because they’re far more focused on Lily’s disappearance – I think they’re going to end up becoming one of my favourite ships. Also – without giving spoilers – something happens at the end of the book which will be completely pointless if the story isn’t continued. I was expecting the Children of Brigid story to begin to wrap up in the last few chapters, but instead an entire new dynamic gets introduced and I just want to know what Caroline O’Donoghue is planning to do with these characters next. If this is the first book in a series, I am HOOKED. I’m not completely sure when All Our Hidden Gifts is actually being published anymore. It was originally scheduled for release in February, but now Waterstones claims it’s arriving on the 20th of May, while Goodreads thinks it’s not being released until the 1st of July. Either way, this is a book that I’d recommend keeping an eye out for. This review was originally posted on The Bumbling Blogger.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Blue

    Want to see more... Bookstagram Website Thank you Walker Books for this book in exchange for an honest review All Our Hidden Gifts is one book that you can easily read and enjoy in one sitting. You get some ghost and witch stories all wrapped up in tarot cards! Maeve is the centre of our story after she stumbles across a pack of tarot cards and then starts to deliver reading to classmates at school. But after giving a terrible reading to her friend Lily, she soon disappears and Maeve is desperate Want to see more... Bookstagram Website Thank you Walker Books for this book in exchange for an honest review All Our Hidden Gifts is one book that you can easily read and enjoy in one sitting. You get some ghost and witch stories all wrapped up in tarot cards! Maeve is the centre of our story after she stumbles across a pack of tarot cards and then starts to deliver reading to classmates at school. But after giving a terrible reading to her friend Lily, she soon disappears and Maeve is desperate to get her back. While this book was enjoyable and really entertaining read, I have to admit I was after a little darkness? I mean you have ghost and witches involved, surely that encourages some darker antics? Just me? But other than that I really enjoyed this original tale! Not only were the characters creative but centring the book are a pack of tarot cards is not something I have ever read before. And you know I love an original story!

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