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The murder on the links: An Hercule Poirot Mystery

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An urgent cry for help brings Hercule Poirot to France. But he arrives too late to save his client, whose brutally stabbed body now lies face down in a shallow grave on a golf course. But why is the dead man wearing an overcoat that is too big for him? And for whom was the impassioned love letter in the pocket? Before Poirot can answer these questions, the case is turned An urgent cry for help brings Hercule Poirot to France. But he arrives too late to save his client, whose brutally stabbed body now lies face down in a shallow grave on a golf course. But why is the dead man wearing an overcoat that is too big for him? And for whom was the impassioned love letter in the pocket? Before Poirot can answer these questions, the case is turned upside down by the discovery of a second, identically murdered corpse.…


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An urgent cry for help brings Hercule Poirot to France. But he arrives too late to save his client, whose brutally stabbed body now lies face down in a shallow grave on a golf course. But why is the dead man wearing an overcoat that is too big for him? And for whom was the impassioned love letter in the pocket? Before Poirot can answer these questions, the case is turned An urgent cry for help brings Hercule Poirot to France. But he arrives too late to save his client, whose brutally stabbed body now lies face down in a shallow grave on a golf course. But why is the dead man wearing an overcoat that is too big for him? And for whom was the impassioned love letter in the pocket? Before Poirot can answer these questions, the case is turned upside down by the discovery of a second, identically murdered corpse.…

30 review for The murder on the links: An Hercule Poirot Mystery

  1. 5 out of 5

    Beth S.

    Shut up Hastings. Shut up, shut up, shut up.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    The Murder on the Links (Hercule Poirot, #2), Agatha Christie The Murder on the Links is a work of detective fiction by Agatha Christie, first published in the UK by The Bodley Head in May 1923, and in the US by Dodd, Mead & Co in the same year. It features Hercule Poirot and Arthur Hastings. The story takes place in northern France, giving Poirot a hostile competitor from the Paris Sûreté. Poirot's long memory for past or similar crimes proves useful in resolving the crimes. Hercule Poirot and The Murder on the Links (Hercule Poirot, #2), Agatha Christie The Murder on the Links is a work of detective fiction by Agatha Christie, first published in the UK by The Bodley Head in May 1923, and in the US by Dodd, Mead & Co in the same year. It features Hercule Poirot and Arthur Hastings. The story takes place in northern France, giving Poirot a hostile competitor from the Paris Sûreté. Poirot's long memory for past or similar crimes proves useful in resolving the crimes. Hercule Poirot and Captain Hastings travel to Merlinville-sur-Mer, France, to meet with Paul Renauld, who has requested their help. Upon arriving at his home, the Villa Genevieve, local police greet them with news that he had been found dead that morning. Renauld had been stabbed in the back with a letter opener and left in a newly dug grave adjacent to a local golf course. His wife, Eloise Renauld, claims masked men broke into the villa at 2 am, tied her up, and took her husband away with them. Upon inspecting his body, Eloise collapses with grief at seeing her dead husband. Monsieur Giraud of the Sûreté leads the police investigation, and resents Poirot's involvement; Monsieur Hautet, the Examining Magistrate, is more open to sharing key information with him. عنوانهای چاپ شده در ایران: «قتل در زمین گلف»؛ «چمن خونین»؛ نویسنده: آگاتا کریستی؛ تاریخ نخستین خوانش: سال 1996میلادی عنوان: قتل در زمین گلف؛ نویسنده: آگاتا کریستی؛ مترجم: صغری ظهیری؛ تهران، میلاد، 1375؛ در 280ص؛ موضوع داستانهای نویسندگان بریتانیا - سده 20م عنوان: قتل در زمین گلف؛ نویسنده: آگاتا کریستی؛ مترجم: مهرداد فتوره چی؛ تهران، جامعه، سال1375؛ در263ص؛ شابک9649006508؛ عنوان: قتل در زمین گلف؛ نویسنده: آگاتا کریستی؛ مترجم: محمدعلی ایزدی؛ تهران، هرمس، کارآگاه، سال1388؛ در269ص؛ چاپ سوم، سال1392؛ شابک9789643634735؛ عنوان: چمن خونین؛ نویسنده: آگاتا کریستی؛ مترجم: بهرام افراسیابی؛ تهران، مهرفام، نگاه، سال1389؛ در351ص؛ شابک9789649915470؛ از آن موقعی که تو به من اعتماد کردی، من مرتبا به تو دروغ گفته ام؛ از متن کتاب داستان این کتاب درباره ی ماجرایی است که «هرکول پوآرو» و «آرتور هستینگز» برای حل آن اقدام می‌کنند؛ در بخشی از این داستان، «آرتور هستینگز» همسر آینده ی خود یعنی «دالسی دویین» را، برای نخستین بار می‌بیند؛ داستان درباره قتل «موسیو رونالد» یکی از ثروتمندان «فرانسوی-کانادایی» ست، که جسدش در «بانک‌ ایر» پیدا شده، او پیش از مرگش از «پوآرو» درخواست می‌کند، تا برای گفتگو در باره مسئله‌ ای به «فرانسه» بیاید، پس از آن پلیس به پسر وی، که روز قتل با او دعوا کرده، مظنون می‌شود، و وی را دستگیر می‌کند، و در عین حال جسد فرد دیگری که ولگرد، ولی با لباس‌های اعیانی است پیدا می‌شود...؛ تاریخ بهنگام رسانی 10/08/1399هجری خورشیدی؛ 24/07/1400هجری خورشیدی؛ ا. شربیانی

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jaline

    Side Note: In August last year, I reached a personal milestone of 1,000 books read so far in this decade with the first of Agatha Christie’s Hercule Poirot series, The Mysterious Affair at Styles. With this second novel in the Hercule Poirot series, I have reached another personal milestone: 1,000 eBook reads on my eReader. One thing I can already see: since I bought my first eReader, I have definitely been reading more books than ever before – and that is definitely a good thing! (PS – my readi Side Note: In August last year, I reached a personal milestone of 1,000 books read so far in this decade with the first of Agatha Christie’s Hercule Poirot series, The Mysterious Affair at Styles. With this second novel in the Hercule Poirot series, I have reached another personal milestone: 1,000 eBook reads on my eReader. One thing I can already see: since I bought my first eReader, I have definitely been reading more books than ever before – and that is definitely a good thing! (PS – my reading decades are tracked differently than most people track decades. I start with the ‘zero year’ and end with the ‘nine year’ – in other words, for my reading purposes, this decade started for me in January 2010 and ends at the end of December this year, 2019.) Captain Arthur Hastings chronicles this second novel in Agatha Christie’s Hercule Poirot series, just as he did in the first one. Poirot receives an urgent letter from a very wealthy man who says he is in fear of his life and desperately requires Poirot’s assistance. When Poirot and Hastings arrive, they are met with the news that the man was murdered in the ‘bunkair’ (as Poirot calls it) that was being built on a golf course under construction. Of course, in real golf, landing one’s golf ball in a bunker filled with sand and a bank along one edge is definitely not a good thing as they are notoriously difficult to chip one’s way out of. In this case, landing in the ‘bunkair’ due to a stab in the back is, of course, far worse. The plot in this novel rivals any that can be found in modern mystery writing. In fact, it not only rivals them, but in the majority of cases supersedes them substantially. It has been many years since I read some of Agatha Christie’s novels, and to be honest – I don’t think I would recognize the ones I previously read after so many years have passed of life, experience, and reading. Ms Christie’s characters may not be as strong, yet that is out of necessity. In each book, several characters have to be admitted to set the stage, disassemble it, re-set it, and so forth. It wouldn’t even be responsible of her as a writer to dramatize the characters beyond the extent that she does because I can’t imagine anything worse as a reader than to find a character I was really attached to turn into a criminal. However, we have Hercule Poirot. He may be tiny with big flowing mustaches and an obsession with adjusting the position of various objects that look out of alignment to him. Still, if he is not physically the ultimate hero to warm up to, his brain and how it works to solve the unsolvable is a huge attraction. And, we have Captain Arthur Hastings – young, dashing, and not nearly as swift to hone in on clues that his friend sees in seconds, he is still endearing in his efforts to keep up to the electrically-charged Poirot. Although I have not been able to insert into my reading schedule as many Agatha Christie novels as I would like to, there are definitely more upcoming during the latter part of this year. I am so much looking forward to my further adventures with the incorrigible and daunting team of Poirot and Hastings.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    The Murder on the Links by Agatha Christie is a 1923 publication. Poirot has been frantically summoned to France by Monsieur Paul Renauld. Unfortunately, upon arrival, Hastings and Poirot are informed they have arrived too late and Renauld is dead… murdered as it so happens. Pitted against a younger and equally confident detective, Poirot is determined to meet his competition head on, utilizing his advantage of experience to solve the crime. This is the second Poirot by Agatha Christie and is on The Murder on the Links by Agatha Christie is a 1923 publication. Poirot has been frantically summoned to France by Monsieur Paul Renauld. Unfortunately, upon arrival, Hastings and Poirot are informed they have arrived too late and Renauld is dead… murdered as it so happens. Pitted against a younger and equally confident detective, Poirot is determined to meet his competition head on, utilizing his advantage of experience to solve the crime. This is the second Poirot by Agatha Christie and is one I have not read. Christie obviously found inspiration with Holmes and Watson, and one can debate whether this is a homage or a parody, but either way, she did a masterful job with this twisty, complex whodunit. I thoroughly enjoyed this classic mystery. I was never able to sit back, smugly confident that I had it all figured out. Christie was always at least two steps ahead of me. This is a stunning guessing game, narrated by Hastings, who provides his own unique observations along with his amusing commentary. Despite its age, and our current desensitization and demand for more shock and awe, I think this story stands on its own merits quite well. (With the exception of a bit of cringe-worthy insta-love) Christie is very clever, and it is obvious she put much thought into the plot, dotting the I’s and crossing the t’s. I was enthralled by her skill, and it is easy to see why she had such an enormous impact on the mystery genre. As pure mysteries are few and far between right now, I’m looking to read more classics. Having read Poirot mysteries off and on over the years, I know this one might not rank up there with some of the later installments, but this a smart and impressive gem!! 4 stars

  5. 5 out of 5

    Henry Avila

    Agatha Christie's second Hercules Poirot novel isn't a smooth, confident trip of bloody fun to the inevitable solution satisfying the curious fan, her wobbly sea legs will walk down the decks looking straight ahead soon enough no need of endless dead ends to fool the fools but hurting the narrative her eyes seeing the light in the darkness but not yet . Poirot keeps his secrets close to his ample vest never hinting who the killer is, driving others batty including Paris police investigator, the Agatha Christie's second Hercules Poirot novel isn't a smooth, confident trip of bloody fun to the inevitable solution satisfying the curious fan, her wobbly sea legs will walk down the decks looking straight ahead soon enough no need of endless dead ends to fool the fools but hurting the narrative her eyes seeing the light in the darkness but not yet . Poirot keeps his secrets close to his ample vest never hinting who the killer is, driving others batty including Paris police investigator, the very arrogant officer Monsieur Giraud, though the quite gruesome, the brutal murder was committed in a far away place the provincial northern France, an arch rival tries to show how superior he is making the great detective look unimpressive and downright silly to the lawmen , you want to grab him by his shirt and shake the clues out, however this would ruin the mystery too early, a patient reader is a happy contented person..besides we all know the future victor .The humans lacking control of their emotions can never be believers in mysterious stories....Oh the story set in the early 1920's when it was written a rich man is stabbed to death outside his mansion, suspects include wife Eloise, son Jack, mistress, friends in France and our Belgian sleuth receives a letter from the soon to be deceased millionaire, found dead were else but on a golf course, Paul Renauld the unlucky. Ancient secrets contribute to criminal investigations with the police as always arresting the wrong person not to worry Poirot is nearby and will find the real butcher. As his sadly ineffective assistant the Man asks many questions discovers little, no important answers, he tries very hard... however. Still a detective or even a mediocre one seems like a fish out of water. Our good to be honest is rather out of his league... Captain Arthur Hastings sadly isn't, presumably though a survivor of the horrendous trenches looks puzzled, welcome to the Club. A little blackmail, illicit love, twins, characters hiding from the law under assumed names you need a scorecard to know the good from the bad...The author by this mystery and especially later efforts transported the genre to a higher quality, maybe they will always be considered unimportant works not worth serious studying yet the pompous view the world in a different way than us, those groups making the majority, quite naturally just need a little entertainment . I prefer the more mature Lady's books, the familiar is a comfort to the consumer, it feels like a delicious hot cup of coffee in a cold winter's day...maybe a doughnut too what's the harm?

  6. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    I thought this was going to be about a golfer getting murdered. SPOILER ALERT: It was not. This was actually one of the wilder rides that I've been on with Hasting and Hercule. Every time I thought we had the murderer in custody, there was another switcheroo and we were back to Poirot chuckling under his breath and making everyone feel like an ass. Honestly, all you need to know about the plot is that it is completely bananas. But I totally dug the entire thing and thought it was a really refreshing I thought this was going to be about a golfer getting murdered. SPOILER ALERT: It was not. This was actually one of the wilder rides that I've been on with Hasting and Hercule. Every time I thought we had the murderer in custody, there was another switcheroo and we were back to Poirot chuckling under his breath and making everyone feel like an ass. Honestly, all you need to know about the plot is that it is completely bananas. But I totally dug the entire thing and thought it was a really refreshing story. Also, Hastings meets his very own Cinderella in this one. So if for no other reason than that, this one is an important one for those of us who are into Poirot lore. Recommended. Read by Charles Armstrong. <--I prefer Hugh Fraser, but this guy was ok.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Gene

    Hercule Poirot was bored complaining about modern criminals not able to commit a crime to make his famous grey cells work. At this moment he received a letter from a South American millionaire living in France stating that his life was in danger and beseeching Poirot to come to the rescue. Poirot felt something out of the ordinary was going on and decided to go to France accompanied by his clueless sidekick Captain Hastings. Upon arrival they realized that they were late as the body of the milli Hercule Poirot was bored complaining about modern criminals not able to commit a crime to make his famous grey cells work. At this moment he received a letter from a South American millionaire living in France stating that his life was in danger and beseeching Poirot to come to the rescue. Poirot felt something out of the ordinary was going on and decided to go to France accompanied by his clueless sidekick Captain Hastings. Upon arrival they realized that they were late as the body of the millionaire stabbed in black with a knife was found on the links (see the title). Thus began a typical Agatha Christie mystery: full of twists, complications, and clues that could not be put together. Poirot was busy trying to make heads and tails while Hastings was equally busy being melodramatic, stupid, and falling in love with all the pretty girls they came across. This book was my first time I read Agatha Christie mystery (obviously it was also my first time I met Poirot). For my it came as a revelation that is was possible to write an insanely complicated puzzle while keeping all the clues in the open for readers to try to follow Poirot reasoning. I stumbled upon it in the worst possible time: I was preparing for an important final exam. As a result I almost failed it: there could be no way I did any studying until I discover whodunit. Needless to say I instantly set Agatha Christie at the top of the best mystery writers ever and she still occupies this spot many years later. She wrote some stinkers, but at her best she was practically unrivaled. Before I started my reread I thought I would give the book five stars, but I had to give four. The biggest problem for me was Hastings. To put is in simple terms, the guy is imbecile. Luckily he is absent from the most books of the series. Some minor annoyances added up as well. Still the mystery is top-notch and in case you have any interest at all in mysteries, of just tough puzzles you owe it to yourself to read it, especially now that the book is out of copyright and it - along with the first Poirot story - can be downloaded for free from places like Project Gutenberg. P.S. I keep using images of David Suchet playing Poirot because I think his performance was brilliant.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Lori

    It's early days for Poirot, who I love. A fun murder mystery full of twists and turns that only he can solve. It's early days for Poirot, who I love. A fun murder mystery full of twists and turns that only he can solve.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Simona B

    This plot is so complicated that I lost count of the number of times I lost count of its coups de théâtre. So layered! At one point, when a first (second? Told you I lost count) solution is offered, Poirot says, “This is not a crime well ordered and regular, such as a detective delights in. [...] ah, indeed, what order or method is there in that?” and I pretty much agreed with him. I was appalled. I disliked that solution so much, it made so little sense, that I thought it was the worst of all of This plot is so complicated that I lost count of the number of times I lost count of its coups de théâtre. So layered! At one point, when a first (second? Told you I lost count) solution is offered, Poirot says, “This is not a crime well ordered and regular, such as a detective delights in. [...] ah, indeed, what order or method is there in that?” and I pretty much agreed with him. I was appalled. I disliked that solution so much, it made so little sense, that I thought it was the worst of all of Christie's novel I had ever read -and believe me, they are quite a lot. But then another solution came up, et voilà! I fell in love again. On top of that, I fell in love again in spite of all the sentimentalism the whole story is seasoned with. It may be tough to deal with at times, but I promise it will be worth the effort: “Take it from Papa Poirot!” PS I love him, but Hastings needs to disappear now. I find it so much easier to enjoy the novels where he is simply a minor character rather than the sole narrator.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Brina

    Women’s history month is fast approaching, and I could not resist to start my annual reading women authors in March a few days early. Between denser reads I enjoy reading mysteries as a palette cleanser. This keeps my brain sharp and keeps me from falling into a reading rut. I find almost no better way to honor women’s history month than to read the Queen of Crime, Agatha Christie. Nearly every mystery writer of today can trace their influences back to Dame Christie, and each of her cases adds a Women’s history month is fast approaching, and I could not resist to start my annual reading women authors in March a few days early. Between denser reads I enjoy reading mysteries as a palette cleanser. This keeps my brain sharp and keeps me from falling into a reading rut. I find almost no better way to honor women’s history month than to read the Queen of Crime, Agatha Christie. Nearly every mystery writer of today can trace their influences back to Dame Christie, and each of her cases adds a new layer of intrigue. I have enjoyed cases featuring the Belgian detective Hercule Poirot for years and decided to fill in the gaps with Murder on the Links, an earlier case of Poirot’s I previously overlooked. Fresh of his case at Styles, Poirot and his assistant Captain Hastings are summoned to Merlinville, France, a seaside town, by Monsieur Renauld as he fears that his life is in danger. By the time he arrives at Renauld’s Villa Genevieve, he has been murdered. Rather than protecting his client, Poirot assists in investigating his murder. Even in his earlier cases, younger detectives refer to Poirot as a fossil, a has been whose methods are antiquated. In this case, we meet local detective Giraud, a go get them type who claims to know whodunit, how, and why from the get go. Giraud exhibits charisma and pizazz as a modern detective, leading Hastings to question his mentor’s methodology. A retired Belgian detective who runs a private investigator firm in London, Poirot often appears lost in thought, yet his little gray cells are hard at work throughout the duration of a case in order to bring the true criminal to justice. At first glance, it appears that Monsieur Renauld’s son Jack murdered his father over anger of being cut out of his will. Should both parents somehow die, he would stand to inherit a vast fortune. Two women have fallen for Jack, and it is unclear at first whether either of these women are in love with Jack or with his money. Poirot figures it out immediately and has to piece together clues. Giraud on the other hand sees things in black and white and leads Captain Hastings down a trail of false clues. Complicating the matter is that Hastings has also fallen in love with a pretty young girl who calls herself Cinderella. Poirot warns his protege of falling in love for the wrong reasons as the presence of a woman who cloud his judgement of a case, a judgement that is already fuzzy due to the presence of pseudo detective Giraud. As a result, Poirot and Hastings are at odds for most of this case as Poirot races to solve it before the French convict the wrong person. As with many of her cases, Christie leads readers down a multi layered trail that evolves as Poirot cracks the case. Here, the murder occurs on a golf course in what Poirot calls a “bunk-air”, yet golf links has a double entendre, linking the Renauld case to one that occurred twenty years in the past. No one is who they seem to everyone except Poirot as he has been solving crime for decades and has a lifetime of detecting experience to compare to his current employment. Hastings lack of use of his little gray cells is apparent throughout as Poirot urges him to think things through rather than to leap to the first conclusion that comes to him. As this is the first mention of Hastings in the Poirot series, it is clear that Christie has meant for be an able sidekick; however, he is more the type to solve things by accident, allowing for Poirot to do the more serious detecting. Even from these earliest of cases, Christie reveals that Poirot does not overlook even the minutest of details as he sees the case to its conclusion. In his words, a clue of two inches is just as important as one of two feet, putting the framework in place for Poirot to be known as one of the greatest detectives in literary history. It is hard to believe that Agatha Christie published her earliest cases nearly one hundred years ago. Her first cases were written in the early 1920s and have stood the test of time as Hercule Poirot and his mustache have endured as among the most recognizable literary profiles. I did utilize my little gray cells and avoid a reading rut as I read along to discover whodunit. It is always fun to read an Agatha Christie murder mystery, and it is far from my last journey with her. As such, women’s history month has commenced and I am excited for the reading adventures the month has in store for me. 4 stars

  11. 5 out of 5

    daph pink ♡

    Agatha Christie Book Reading Challenge BOOK 35 :- OCT 2021 3.5 STARS

  12. 4 out of 5

    Janete Fabricio on hiatus

    Great! I couldn't stop reading it! I read this in just one session! I didn't want to leave it for the next day. An intricate and complex plot, but one that isn't confusing. One of the best Agatha Christie books I've read in all my life. It was a pleasant surprise for me. Great! I couldn't stop reading it! I read this in just one session! I didn't want to leave it for the next day. An intricate and complex plot, but one that isn't confusing. One of the best Agatha Christie books I've read in all my life. It was a pleasant surprise for me.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Lawyer

    The Murder on the Links: A Retrospective It was almost fifty years ago I read my first Agatha Christie novel. I was fourteen. I bought it at a middle school book fair. It was an Hercule Poirot mystery, The Big Four, a Dell paperback that sold for $.45. A bargain at the price. My First Poirot Through the coming years I read all of the Poirot novels. A few of the Miss Marples. Miss Marple just didn't grab me as Poirot and his friend Hastings did. As far as Tommy and Tuppence, well, I could The Murder on the Links: A Retrospective It was almost fifty years ago I read my first Agatha Christie novel. I was fourteen. I bought it at a middle school book fair. It was an Hercule Poirot mystery, The Big Four, a Dell paperback that sold for $.45. A bargain at the price. My First Poirot Through the coming years I read all of the Poirot novels. A few of the Miss Marples. Miss Marple just didn't grab me as Poirot and his friend Hastings did. As far as Tommy and Tuppence, well, I could do without them. The stand alones did nothing for me, other than And Then There Were None, The Mousetrap: A Play, and The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories which I considered an absolute masterpiece. Christie first wrote this as a short story, then the play, which became the blockbuster movie In retrospect, I probably didn't get all of the nuances of Dame Christie's work at age fourteen. Poirot's use of French phrases drove me to distraction. Of course, in 1965, there was no thing as Google Translate. However, I doggedly followed Poirot's cases, understanding more and more as I grew a little older and a little wiser. I had a pleasant surprise yesterday. Walking into a chain bookstore in Papamoa, New Zealand, I perused the bargain table and found a stack of Harper Collins 125th Anniversary Reprints of Hercule Poirot novels. Among them was The Murder on the Links published in 2015. With a price tag of Three for 25 NZ$, the lure to recapture a bit of my youth was too much to refuse. I bought all the early Poirots, leaving those written after the 1950s on the table. Within a day I devoured The Murder on the Links. In reading it so many years after I had first encountered it I found I still possessed the same love for the curious little man originally driven from his native Belgium by the Great War. And, once again I was drawn to Poirot's relationship with Hastings, Captain Hastings, invalided out of the war after the Battle of the Somme. Theirs is a friendship based on true regard for one another. There is also a paternalistic attitude Poirot has toward the much younger Hastings. It is not unusual that in the course of events Poirot tells Hastings to "Trust Papa Poirot." You gotta love it. Then there is the undeniable comparison of Poirot and Hastings to Holmes and Watson although Poirot and Holmes are detectives of decidedly different natures. Alas, Hastings possesses Watson's same inability to ever stay even with his companion when the game is afoot. Hastings describes Poirot: An extraordinary little man. Height five feet four inches, egg shaped head carried a little to one side, eyes that shone green when he was excited, stiff military moustache. Air of dignity immense! He was neat and dandified in appearance. For neatness of any kind he had a passion. Of Poirot's method, Hastings tell us this: He had a certain disdain for tangible evidence such as footprints and cigarette ash, and would maintain, by themselves, they would never enable a detective to solve a crime. Then he would tap his egg-shaped head with absurd complacency, and remark with great satisfaction: 'The true work, it is done from within. The little grey cells--remember always the little grey cells, mon ami. Originally published in 1923, this is the second appearance of Poirot in novel form. Dame Christie introduced him in The Mysterious Affair at Styles published in 1920 to great success. In this novel Poirot is summoned to France at the urgent request of Monsieur P.T. Reynaud. However, Poirot and Hastings arrive too late, finding that Reynaud has been murdered, stabbed in the back and turned into a shallow grave on golfing links under construction. Mrs. Reynaud tells of having been bound hand and foot by two heavily bearded foreigners wearing masks. The case is further complicated when a second body is found on the Reynaud estate. Another man has been murdered apparently with the same weapon which killed Reynaud. Poirot must match wits with Chief Inspector Giraud of Le Surete, an investigator of the new breed, for whom only physical evidence holds the solution to any crime. Giraud, arrogant and rude, calls Poirot an "Old Fossil," provoking the more traditional investigator to wager he will solve the case before Giraud. The stakes are high. An innocent man could be sentenced to death by the guilliotine. It is only a very small spoiler to say that Poirot wins his bet with Giraud. The innocent man is saved. The Murder on the Links illustrates the rules of constructing a mystery which Dame Christie followed. The Detection Club was founded in 1930, Christie being a founding member. The club's ethics were created for the purpose of giving the reader a reasonable chance of solving the mystery. Those ethics include the following: 1. The criminal must be mentioned in the early part of the story, but must not be anyone whose thoughts the reader has been allowed to know. 2. All supernatural or preternatural agencies are ruled out as a matter of course. 3. Not more than one secret room or passage is allowable. 4. No hitherto undiscovered poisons may be used, nor any appliance which will need a long scientific explanation at the end. 5. No accident must ever help the detective, nor must he ever have an unaccountable intuition which proves to be right. 6. The detective himself must not commit the crime. 7. The detective is bound to declare any clues which he may discover. 8. The "sidekick" of the detective, the Watson, must not conceal from the reader any thoughts which pass through his mind: his intelligence must be slightly, but very slightly, below that of the average reader. 9. Twin brothers, and doubles generally, must not appear unless we have been duly prepared for them. 10. No Chinaman must appear in any story. (Yes, at one time, the inscrutable Chinaman was a handy villain in poorly written mystery stories.) Agatha Christie served as President of the Detection Club from 1957-1976. She never wavered from the rules. "The little grey cells. Remember always the little grey cells, mon ami." Dame Agatha Christie during the early cases of Hercule Poirot So with many more years of living behind me than when I first held an Hercule Poirot in my trembling hands, I have returned to the Golden Age of Mystery Writing. It's good to be back. I've obtained the newly revised copy of The Mysterious Affair at Styles. Ah, the first Poirot. It's been a very long time. Indeed.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Luffy

    I was much more impressed by this one when I first read it in my impressionable teenage self 25 years ago. Did this translation of Murder on the Links pass muster on any level? For one, I really appreciated the character of Giraud. He was the main source of delight in the entire book. The latter, however, was too romantic in its structure. Hastings gets the girl, Poirot gets the plaudits and pockets 500 francs, and Jack Renauld, a character of solely this book, gets his love and inherits millions. I was much more impressed by this one when I first read it in my impressionable teenage self 25 years ago. Did this translation of Murder on the Links pass muster on any level? For one, I really appreciated the character of Giraud. He was the main source of delight in the entire book. The latter, however, was too romantic in its structure. Hastings gets the girl, Poirot gets the plaudits and pockets 500 francs, and Jack Renauld, a character of solely this book, gets his love and inherits millions. But it's all for naught. The mystery was not consummate in its artistic rendering.

  15. 4 out of 5

    ¸¸.•*¨*•♫ Mrs. Buttercup •*¨*•♫♪

    “The little grey cells, my friend, the little grey cells! They told me.” I am an old Poirot fan but I read Agatha Christie's books such a long time ago that I can't even remember which ones I read and which ones I didn't. So I decided to re-read the whole series from the first one, and I am enjoying this so much! I loved this second novel, much more than the first. The mystery is intriguing and Poirot is telling us of his little gray cells for the first time! What a pivotal moment ahah. Such a f “The little grey cells, my friend, the little grey cells! They told me.” I am an old Poirot fan but I read Agatha Christie's books such a long time ago that I can't even remember which ones I read and which ones I didn't. So I decided to re-read the whole series from the first one, and I am enjoying this so much! I loved this second novel, much more than the first. The mystery is intriguing and Poirot is telling us of his little gray cells for the first time! What a pivotal moment ahah. Such a fun read!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Bionic Jean

    The Murder on the Links is an early detective mystery by Agatha Christie. Originally, it had been published as a four-part monthly serial in a magazine between December 1922 and March 1923, under the title of “The Girl with the Anxious Eyes”, before it was issued in book form by The Bodley Head in May 1923. It is the second novel to feature everyone’s favourite Belgian detective, Hercule Poirot: “Height, five feet four inches, egg-shaped head carried a little to one side, eyes that shone green wh The Murder on the Links is an early detective mystery by Agatha Christie. Originally, it had been published as a four-part monthly serial in a magazine between December 1922 and March 1923, under the title of “The Girl with the Anxious Eyes”, before it was issued in book form by The Bodley Head in May 1923. It is the second novel to feature everyone’s favourite Belgian detective, Hercule Poirot: “Height, five feet four inches, egg-shaped head carried a little to one side, eyes that shone green when he was excited, stiff military moustache, air of dignity immense!” The Murder on the Links could be thought of as “the French one”, as it takes place in northern France. Additionally, the style is “high-flown and fanciful”, as Agatha Christie readily admitted, owing something to “The Phantom of the Opera” author, Gaston Leroux, and even, apparently, the 17th century tragedian, Jean Racine. She had based the book very closely upon a real-life French murder case, and one critic noted that some of the plot twists seemed to have been inspired by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s short story featuring Sherlock Holmes , “The Adventure of the Abbey Grange”. Hercule Poirot’s regular side-kick and amanuensis, Captain Arthur Hastings, is in place, and the setting leaves the field wide open to potentially antagonistic French professionals from the Paris Sûreté. Writing about a talented amateur detective who reasons things out, accompanied by his rather more pedestrian side-kick, are certainly reminiscent of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes mysteries. Contemporary reviewers at the time noted this, and compared the two favourably. Hastings of course plays the same role as Watson in the Sherlock Holmes novels, and Monsieur Giraud, the investigating officer in this novel and a detective of the Paris Sûreté takes the part of Inspector Lestrade. “Two people rarely see the same thing.” To add a little spice to the action, Monsieur Giraud is arrogant, and resents Poirot’s involvement in the investigation, treating him with contempt as his rival. To ameliorate this slightly, we have Monsieur Hautet, who is the examining magistrate, and assistant to Monsieur Giraud. He respects Poirot because of his reputation, and is therefore more helpful. These two are like amplifications of Inspector Lestrade, who has different attitudes towards Holmes at different times, in the Sherlock Holmes novels. Later on we are to meet Lucien Bex, the commissary of police for Merlinville, and Monsieur Marchaud, a police sergeant in his force. Agatha Christie seems to revel in introducing new characters, to complicate matters even further, and this is just one example. None of these police officers is particularly pertinent to the plot, but the interchanges and frictions between Girauld and Poirot makes for most entertaining reading. We also enjoy the frustration experienced by Hastings, who occasionally bursts out with something like: “I neither see nor comprehend. You make all these confounded mysteries, and it’s useless asking you to explain. You always like keeping something up your sleeve to the last minute.” The novel begins with Captain Hastings narrating in an amusing fashion about a train journey in which he meets a young girl. He is clearly attracted to her, yet has ambivalent feelings, as she seems to exemplify all the aspects of modern young women of which he disapproves: “Now I am old-fashioned. A woman, I consider, should be womanly. I have no patience with the modern neurotic girl who jazzes from morning to night, smokes like a chimney, and uses language which would make a billingsgate fishwoman blush!” She leaves without divulging her name, fancifully calling herself “Cinderella”. The “case proper” begins with a message received by Hercule Poirot from a Paul Renauld, who has requested his help urgently. We are treated to an analysis of this letter by Poirot, who considers it deviously written, with a suspect addition, designed to ensure that Poirot would come. Sure enough, he is intrigued, and he and Captain Hastings travel to Paul Renauld’s home, the Villa Genevieve, in Merlinville-sur-Mer. But when they arrive, the local police have beaten them to it. (view spoiler)[ Poirot is aghast to learn that Paul Renauld has been found dead that morning: stabbed in the back with a letter opener and left in a newly dug grave adjacent to a local golf course. His wife, Eloise Renauld, is grief-stricken but self-contained. She tells a story of masked men breaking into the villa at 2 am. She shows them the marks on her wrists where they tied her up, and says they took her husband away with them. Yet later, when she is asked to identify the body, Eloise is clearly overwhelmed afresh, and collapses with genuine grief at seeing her dead husband, which causes Poirot to ponder. (hide spoiler)] We meet Monsieur Giraud of the Sûreté, a confident young man who is leading the police investigation, and watch his pompous efforts to upstage Poirot. Whenever Poirot picks up small details, such as piece of lead piping found near the body, Monsieur Giraud delights in mocking him. Poirot remains calm, although Hastings is most indignant at the way he is being treated. Monsieur Hautet, the examining magistrate, is less resentful, and more inclined to welcome Poirot’s experience, and even to share important information with him. (view spoiler)[ Poirot notes several facts about the case, including an unknown person who visited the day before, whom Renauld had urged to leave immediately. Also, interestingly, Renauld’s immediate neighbour, Madame Daubreuil, had placed 200,000 francs into her bank account over recent weeks. (hide spoiler)] In between the entertaining descriptions of Poirot by Hastings, we are introduced to various people connected with the family. The son, Jack Renauld, is not present, as he had been sent away on a trip by his father, (view spoiler)[possibly after an argument. This leads to him being mistakenly suspected of the murder by Giraud. (hide spoiler)] Jack has an interesting history, which may or may not be significant. He had been born in South America, lived both in that country and in France, and has a complicated romantic life. Paul Renauld’s secretary, Gabriel Stonor, seems keen to be helpful to both the police and Poirot. He had been absent in England at the time of the murder, and suggests his own theory. Because his employer’s past is a complete mystery, prior to his time in South America, Stoner suggests that blackmail may be at the heart of it. Certainly South America seems to keep cropping up in this story. Doctor Durand is the local doctor and police surgeon in Merlinville. There are several servants: the elderly Françoise Arrichet, who was present at the Renauld’s house during the crime, and Léonie and Denise Oulard, two young maids who are sisters, and had also been there. In addition there is the gardener Auguste, who was not present. Other key players are two neighbours, Madame Daubreuil, and her daughter. Hastings is taken immediately with the attractive daughter, Marthe Daubreuil: “By Jove, Poirot,’ I exclaimed, ‘did you see that young goddess?’ ”, yet all Poirot see is that she has “anxious eyes”. (view spoiler)[ Madame Daubreuil is eventually revealed to be a Madame Jeanne Beroldy, who had been involved in plotting the murder of her husband 22 years previously. She had been blackmailing the victim, Paul Renauld, whose identity was also revealed to be an alias. He was Georges Conneau, who, with her connivance, had killed Jeanne Beroldy’s husband, but also escaped justice when caught. Marthe Daubreuil wants to marry Jack, for his money, and this is the motivation for her crime. (hide spoiler)] There are also two theatrical sisters, called Dubeen, who are acrobats, and their theatrical agent, Joseph Aarons. Bella Duveen is much talked about in the novel. (view spoiler)[Jack is in love with Bella, despite having split from her, and now being involved with Marthe Daubreuil. Her twin is Dulcie Duveen, whom Captain Hasting is in love with, and only knows as “Cinderella”. (hide spoiler)] Captain Hastings is teased periodically by Poirot who observes that he seems to fall in love with every young woman he sees. Poirot promises him that “Papa Poirot” will find Hastings a suitable wife. We learn through Hastings’s narration, that this, unsurprisingly, makes Captain Arthur Hastings disinclined to share confidences with Poirot. He attempts to conceal facts about his encounter with Cinderella which he considers irrelevant, but which actually prove to be material to the case. Of course, to our delight, Poirot discovers them anyway. (view spoiler)[ Hastings has unexpectedly met “Cinderella”, once again. She is clearly able to wrap Hastings round her little finger, as she asks him if she may view the scene of the grisly murder. When she pretends to become faint, Hastings gallantly goes to fetch a glass of water, whereupon she then mysteriously absconds with the murder weapon. (hide spoiler)] Meanwhile, Poirot has travelled to Paris to research (view spoiler)[ the Beroldy case. On his return, he is shocked to learn that the body of an unknown man has been found, stabbed through the heart with the murder weapon. Oddly, it becomes evident that the victim, who has the hands of a tramp, died from an epileptic fit, before Renauld’s murder, and had been stabbed after death. (hide spoiler)] We know full well that Poirot and Giraud will disagree about this latest development, and are not disappointed. It is also amusing to watch as Hastings switches between his loyalty to Poirot, and his worry that Poirot is actually making a fool of himself. We, the readers, of course have total faith in the diminutive Belgian detective. Jack has come across as a very suspicious character. (view spoiler)[He admitted to police that he had argued with his father over wishing to marry Madame Daubreuil’s daughter Marthe, whom his parents found unsuitable. Giraud therefore arrests Jack, and sends him to prison, on the basis that he wanted his father’s money. Poirot however, points out that Renauld had changed his will two weeks before his murder, disinheriting Jack. Soon afterwards, Bella Duveen confesses to the murder, hoping to free him. Jack is immediately released from prison. The truth is that both are still in love with each other. When each came across the body on the night of the murder, each had assumed that the other was the killer. However Poirot reveals neither did, as the real killer had been Marthe Daubreuil. (hide spoiler)] During a couple of expositions, which use a whole chapter, Poirot relates the history he has discovered to Hastings, and explains his theory: “Man is an unoriginal animal. Unoriginal within the law in his daily respectable life, equally unoriginal outside the law. If a man commits a crime, any other crime he commits will resemble it closely.” (view spoiler)[Paul Renauld, or Georges Conneau, had changed his name in order to start a new life. He had made a fortune in South America, married, and had a son. He then returned to France to settle down with his new family. By a terrible coincidence, he found that his immediate neighbour would be his erstwhile partner in crime, Madame Beroldy. Just as he had, she too had changed her identity, and was now known as Madame Daubreuil. Madame Daubreuil had made the most of the situation, and proceeded to blackmail Paul Renauld. To make the situation even worse, his son Jack apparently became attracted to her manipulative daughter, Marthe. An opportunity to escape Madame Daubreuil’s clutches had presented itself when a tramp died in the grounds of his home. Paul Renauld had planned to fake his own death. With his wife Eloise’s help, he would stage his own kidnapping at night. He would use the pipe to disfigure the tramp’s body, and then bury both beside the golf course, before fleeing the area by train. To make absolutely sure, anyone who might recognise that the body was not his, (for instance his secretary or his son) was sent away. Then Eloise would be safe in falsely identifying the body as his. Poirot had suspected that Eloise was complicit in the scheme right at the start. He had noticed that she only gave her true reaction to her husband’s death when she saw his body. However, Marthe had overheard Paul and Eloise Renauld discussing the plan, and realised that this would put paid to her own plan to marry Jack for his money. She therefore followed Paul Renauld and stabbed him after he dug the grave for the tramp’s body, before he had retrieved it. Having worked all this out, Poirot asks Eloise to openly disinherit Jack, in order to reveal Marthe as the killer. (hide spoiler)] He does not take anyone into his confidence: not even Hastings, who remains nonplussed by this development — as do we. Poirot had deliberately engineered events to make the killer try something desperate, thereby showing their hand. Sure enough, in an exciting climax, (view spoiler)[Marthe attempts to kill Eloise that night. Poirot had suspected that this might happen, but does not realise that her room has been changed, when Jack leaves her alone in the villa. By a sheer stroke of luck, Cinderella has insisted on going along with Poirot and Hastings, and in an astonishing feat of acrobatic skill and daring, she breaks into the upstairs room from outside, and saves Eloise. The evil Marthe dies in the tussle. At the end, Cinderella reveals herself to Hastings as Dulcie Duveen, Bella’s twin sister, and it is heavily implied that the two will marry. Jack Renauld and his mother, Eloise, plan to go to South America, accompanied by the happy couple. And Marthe’s mother, Madame Daubreuil, neatly manages to disappear yet again. (hide spoiler)] “I had learned, with Poirot, that the less dangerous he looked, the more dangerous he was.” This plot is fiendishly difficult to fathom, and the murderer probably impossible to deduce, although the clues are all there. The story draws us in, with all the bantering one-upmanship between the various detectives, and the appealing subplot of Captain Hastings’s true romance. We feel like giving a cheer when Poirot’s theories are revealed to be the correct ones, and the arrogant sneering Girauld is firmly put in his place: “‘You speak of my manner to you being insulting. Well, once or twice, your manner has annoyed me.’ ‘I am enchanted to hear it,’ said Poirot.” There is an excellent television dramatisation of this novel starring David Suchet, who has recorded all the Poirot stories. Hugh Fraser also regularly stars as Captain Arthur Hastings. Several of the details of the plot are different, but perhaps the most odd change is that the location has been switched to Deauville. If anything, the plot is just a little too complex, but this golden age mystery deserves four stars for its entertainment value. Hercule Poirot was still a new character to the reading public, and one reviewer said he was: “a pleasant contrast to most of his lurid competitors; and one even suspects a touch of satire in him.” This is still what springs to mind for the modern reader, who has the whole oeuvre of Poirot books to choose from. The plots of all Agatha Christie’s novels are ingenious, complex and satisfying, but in addition, these early novels are far more amusing and droll than any she wrote later, when her writing style seemed to become more mechanical. Moreover, by now we are well and truly hooked into reading other stories chronicled by Captain Arthur Hastings, about his friend Hercule Poirot, the diminutive detective who solves case after case purely by using: “the little grey cells, my friend, the little grey cells! They told me.” “Arrange your ideas. Be methodical. Be orderly. There is the secret of success.”

  17. 5 out of 5

    Heidi

    How fun to spend a few hours with my first favorite detective and his charming, if not slightly befuddled, sidekick. How I managed to miss this one is beyond me, but I really enjoyed reading this early Poirot. Certainly Ms Christie fine tuned her characters as the series continued, but I was not surprised that Hercule’s mustaches were an early sartorial priority for our “egg-shaped’ friend. Slightly melodramatic, Christie threw a lot of tropes in here including some slightly complicated, double How fun to spend a few hours with my first favorite detective and his charming, if not slightly befuddled, sidekick. How I managed to miss this one is beyond me, but I really enjoyed reading this early Poirot. Certainly Ms Christie fine tuned her characters as the series continued, but I was not surprised that Hercule’s mustaches were an early sartorial priority for our “egg-shaped’ friend. Slightly melodramatic, Christie threw a lot of tropes in here including some slightly complicated, double crossing lovers. Some added, over the top fun included a younger Hastings in love. They just don’t make them like this anymore… now to see if PBS produced this one with David Suchet as the Belgian. 😎

  18. 5 out of 5

    Emma

    Really enjoyed this one! Had no idea about who was the culprit.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Adrian

    Well what can I say, I have just added this to my "favourites" and given it 5 stars, so erm it was good. Ok that was understatement, I really really enjoyed this. Astonishingly I have never read this before, nor do I remember the Suchet TV version, so it was a great experience to read a Poirot not knowing the answers. As always with Christie the characterisation was fantastic. I find it very difficult to believe this was only the 2nd Poirot book as it was so "mature". Poirot was excellent and th Well what can I say, I have just added this to my "favourites" and given it 5 stars, so erm it was good. Ok that was understatement, I really really enjoyed this. Astonishingly I have never read this before, nor do I remember the Suchet TV version, so it was a great experience to read a Poirot not knowing the answers. As always with Christie the characterisation was fantastic. I find it very difficult to believe this was only the 2nd Poirot book as it was so "mature". Poirot was excellent and this was probably one of the best assists from Hastings. Once again, a big shout out to Jessica for organising the Poirot challenge.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Sheri

    I enjoyed this adaptation by L.A. Theatre Works even if my brain could not process the new developments fast enough. It's only 1 hour, 38 minutes of listening time, so things move quickly. I might try the full-length audiobook, but this may also be one I should read instead of listen to so I can pause and have time to consider each reveal made by Poirot. I did enjoy hearing familiar actors (Simon Helberg, Adhir Kalyan) voice characters so different from their more famous comedic roles. I will wa I enjoyed this adaptation by L.A. Theatre Works even if my brain could not process the new developments fast enough. It's only 1 hour, 38 minutes of listening time, so things move quickly. I might try the full-length audiobook, but this may also be one I should read instead of listen to so I can pause and have time to consider each reveal made by Poirot. I did enjoy hearing familiar actors (Simon Helberg, Adhir Kalyan) voice characters so different from their more famous comedic roles. I will wait before I pick up another edition, then I will have forgotten the details of who did it and why.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Piyangie

    This is a brilliantly written murder mystery by Agatha Christie. It is so cleverly done that I couldn't guess who the culprit was. There were interesting turns and plot twists that took me by surprise. In this story our detective friend, Poirot has a rival; a fellow detective, who is famous and much younger from Paris Surete. It was very interesting to read how these two different detectives collected clues and evidence and formed their own theories as to the mystery underlying the murder and wh This is a brilliantly written murder mystery by Agatha Christie. It is so cleverly done that I couldn't guess who the culprit was. There were interesting turns and plot twists that took me by surprise. In this story our detective friend, Poirot has a rival; a fellow detective, who is famous and much younger from Paris Surete. It was very interesting to read how these two different detectives collected clues and evidence and formed their own theories as to the mystery underlying the murder and who the culprit was while trying to outsmart the other. But nobody can beat our brilliant Poirot, can they? It was also interesting to see that in addition to the detective work, Poirot engaging himself in a bit of matchmaking! :) Hastings, on the other hand, exasperated me to no end with his sentimental and witless inferences. But I suppose he is indispensable to bring out the intelligence and cleverness of Poirot as well as to provide a little comic relief! Overall, it was an enjoyable read. And I'm becoming an Agatha Christie addict!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    I have a feeling, that this is going to be a big affair- a long troublesome problem that will not be easy to work out. Originally published in 1923, The Murder on the Links is the second in the popular Hercule Poirot series. Hercule Poirot and Arthur Hastings find themselves in France summoned to speak with a client. However upon their arrival, the client is dead and there 's no shortage of suspects. The true work, it is done from within. The little grey cells-remember always the little grey I have a feeling, that this is going to be a big affair- a long troublesome problem that will not be easy to work out. Originally published in 1923, The Murder on the Links is the second in the popular Hercule Poirot series. Hercule Poirot and Arthur Hastings find themselves in France summoned to speak with a client. However upon their arrival, the client is dead and there 's no shortage of suspects. The true work, it is done from within. The little grey cells-remember always the little grey cells, mon ami. The dynamic duo of Poirot and Hastings definitely have their work cut out for them, but Hastings manages to get off his game because of a pretty face named Cinderella. Luckily, the Belgian detective is patient and always challenging Hastings to get back to the case and not just go along with the French police theories. Arrange your ideas. Be methodical. Be orderly. There is the secret of success. I definitely enjoyed this one and like the first quote implies it was complicated in trying to figure out who exactly was the guilty party. Goodreads review published 06/10/19

  23. 5 out of 5

    Dave Schaafsma

    The second Hercule Poirot novel, published in 1923. 40 more to go! This one has a tad lower rating on Goodreads than most of the others, and I had a hard time getting into it, but on the whole I really liked it, just under a 3.5. Poirot burst onto the literary crime scene almost fully realized, in what was her third published book! He's a great character, with a distinct and interesting personality, an elderly Belgian detective with a flair for logic and simplicity and "exercising the grey cells The second Hercule Poirot novel, published in 1923. 40 more to go! This one has a tad lower rating on Goodreads than most of the others, and I had a hard time getting into it, but on the whole I really liked it, just under a 3.5. Poirot burst onto the literary crime scene almost fully realized, in what was her third published book! He's a great character, with a distinct and interesting personality, an elderly Belgian detective with a flair for logic and simplicity and "exercising the grey cells" in order to solve his crimes. The plot is full of twists and turns Christie was just learning how to lay down, but this turned out much better than I expected from the slowish opening pages. The real drawback in this and also the first book and what I am told are five more of the 42 Poirot books (sigh), is that it is narrated by Hastings, a bumbling idiot of a young companion who neither respects nor is respected by his Belgian detective "friend." Hastings narrates the tale, but is clueless throughout about what is going on, admiring another (also clueless) competing detective named Giraud who is also "on the case," exposes the details of a crime scene to a woman he "falls in love" with after roughly an hour of talking with her, and berates Poirot throughout his narration for not knowing what is going on. We know Hastings is wrong because we can see that Poirot withholds what he knows from Hastings and everyone else until he needs to reveal information, all tumbling out at the very end, of course. I guess Christie thought that having a bumbling narrator had amusing possibilities, but he is mostly annoying, and a distraction. Christie somewhat ruefully explained that her early stories were shaped by her admiration for Doyle's Sherlock Holmes stories, featuring a relatively clueless sidekick (Watson) and clueless detectives. It took her a while to get rid of these flaws, she said. Still, setting aside Hastings and his irritating love-at-first-sight mistakes throughout, Poirot and Christie ultimately come off like aces. This will not be the best of her tales, of course, but it is still elaborately plotted and entertaining. I liked the big bang finish quite a bit!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Vikas Singh

    The second book by Christie to feature Poirot we get to know more about him and Hastings. It actually builds up the imagery of Poirot which then the master sleuth carries forward seamlessly in succeeding novels. Interesting plot with lots of twists and turns, finally revealing the murderer least suspected by all. A roller coaster of a novel.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Anissa

    Arthur Hastings! My word he was a lot to take here. I usually love him but Arthur made this one hard. Poirot is his very wonderful self but Hastings and his narration are all over the place. His penchant for having retrograde ideas about women caused a lot more trouble than they were worth and he hampered the investigation. I wanted him to leave which is terrible because he was relating the tale! And yet somehow, Christie makes this a book I didn't want to toss across the room even though I desp Arthur Hastings! My word he was a lot to take here. I usually love him but Arthur made this one hard. Poirot is his very wonderful self but Hastings and his narration are all over the place. His penchant for having retrograde ideas about women caused a lot more trouble than they were worth and he hampered the investigation. I wanted him to leave which is terrible because he was relating the tale! And yet somehow, Christie makes this a book I didn't want to toss across the room even though I desperately wanted someone, anyone, to throw Hastings in a bunker on the links and leave him there! It was a well-done mystery (obvi) and was just what I was looking for. My next Christie mystery is going to have to feature Ariadne Oliver though. I'll loop back with Arthur later.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Lata

    A somewhat sloppy mystery. Lots of running around, despite Poirot saying he doesn't like running around. There are bits of information that are revealed a little late so it was harder to figure this one out. Hastings narrates, and he is totally ruled by his hormones in this story, while Poirot clashes, mildly, with a French detective, who insists there are many clues to be found in ash, matches and other little things. (Seems like a little dig at another famous fictional detective...) A somewhat sloppy mystery. Lots of running around, despite Poirot saying he doesn't like running around. There are bits of information that are revealed a little late so it was harder to figure this one out. Hastings narrates, and he is totally ruled by his hormones in this story, while Poirot clashes, mildly, with a French detective, who insists there are many clues to be found in ash, matches and other little things. (Seems like a little dig at another famous fictional detective...)

  27. 4 out of 5

    Bobby Underwood

    Perhaps because this was written and released early in Agatha Christie’s Poirot canon — 1923 — it seems more freewheeling than some later Poirot mysteries; and in many ways more charming. All the books with Hastings as narrator have an element of charm, the interactions between Hastings and Poirot giving readers an indelible impression of both men that remains steadfast and comforting all these years later. Murder on the Links in particular abounds with little nuances in their relationship, whic Perhaps because this was written and released early in Agatha Christie’s Poirot canon — 1923 — it seems more freewheeling than some later Poirot mysteries; and in many ways more charming. All the books with Hastings as narrator have an element of charm, the interactions between Hastings and Poirot giving readers an indelible impression of both men that remains steadfast and comforting all these years later. Murder on the Links in particular abounds with little nuances in their relationship, which intrudes into the mystery when Hastings falls in love, and actually goes against Poirot to protect the object of his affections. The mystery is as freewheeling and enjoyable as the interaction between Hastings and Poirot. There are daggers, a murder, then a second murder, family secrets, a trial from the past which may have bearing on the present crimes, young love, unrequited love, false confessions, confession by silence, and a pompous detective that our favorite Belgian has to outwit to uncover the true murderer; whom few readers will actually guess. At one point, a murder is prevented as Poirot himself shimmies up the side of a house! I can’t recall much physical derring-do by Poirot in other stories; the little grey cells do all the work. It’s grand. As many have noted, there is a great deal of clue-discovering and clue-explaining, but it’s handled within the charming narration of Hastings. For his part, Hasting observes Poirot mucking about with seemingly insignificant clues while the detective in charge appears to be solving the case quite nicely; all is not as it seems, however — perhaps nothing! Of all the Poirot entries, Murder on the Links feels more firmly set in the 1920s, capturing the romantic charm of a more innocent time — even when it comes to murder. There is some dark doings here, of course, but it’s all so romantic in a fashion that Murder on the Links is the epitome of a murder cozy. If the reader is willing to go along with a more relaxed and freewheeling story and style of narrative — something you don’t often get in the rigidly defined cozy — they’ll have a great time reading this one, and more often than not find themselves smiling as they root as much for Hastings to find love as they do for Poirot to figure it all out and show up the pompous detective working the case. A wonderful read for fans.

  28. 4 out of 5

    ✨ A ✨

    I was hooked every second of the way. In typical Christie style, she had me fooled so many times. Just when I thought I knew who the murder was, something else happens!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Hamad

    This Review ✍️ Blog 📖 Twitter 🐦 Instagram 📷 Support me ☕ “When will a woman lie? Sometimes for herself. Usually for the man she loves. Always for her children.” Actual Rating: 3.75 Stars This is Poirot’s second book and it all starts with him getting an urgent letter from the South American millionaire Monsieur Renauld asking him to save his life. Poirot and Hastings lose no time and go to investigate only to find that Mr. Renauld is already dead. There are many things that don’t make s This Review ✍️ Blog 📖 Twitter 🐦 Instagram 📷 Support me ☕ “When will a woman lie? Sometimes for herself. Usually for the man she loves. Always for her children.” Actual Rating: 3.75 Stars This is Poirot’s second book and it all starts with him getting an urgent letter from the South American millionaire Monsieur Renauld asking him to save his life. Poirot and Hastings lose no time and go to investigate only to find that Mr. Renauld is already dead. There are many things that don’t make sense to Poirot and it is all complicated by a second body appearing later. Agatha books are my go to books when I want to read something that is not fantasy or when I am fighting an impending reading slump. I think the fact that they were written almost a century ago by itself is very attractive to me, specially how the writing is not pretentious and is still easy to understand. I would not recommend starting with this one if you are new to Agatha because Hasting, who is the narrator is kind of annoying and creepy. His brain wires are frayed whenever he sees a beautiful lady. I was really enjoying the story and the eccentricities of Poirot, specially that the book I read before this novel did not work for me. It was all going smoothly till like 75% of the story when Hasting does stupid things and I was underwhelmed then and found it hard to get into the story at the same level again. “Two people rarely see the same thing.” Summary: I liked the story and Poirot is great as always, I wish I could say the same about Hastings who kind of ruined the reading experience for me and who also made me understood some of the low ratings the book got. I still think Agatha was a genius, the writing is great and it is a fast escape from reality and fantasy for me. I would recommend reading this but saving it till later when one knows Agatha style better!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Katerina

    Nowadays I appreciate Agatha Christie's work so much more. She doesn't tire the reader with pointless will they/won't they storylines of her main character to sell more books, with her it's all about the crime and how it can be solved and I wish more contemporary crime authors would follow her example instead of trying to attract the reader with whether in the next book the detective will get into the pants of his love interest. And I hope more readers will start reading her books because even t Nowadays I appreciate Agatha Christie's work so much more. She doesn't tire the reader with pointless will they/won't they storylines of her main character to sell more books, with her it's all about the crime and how it can be solved and I wish more contemporary crime authors would follow her example instead of trying to attract the reader with whether in the next book the detective will get into the pants of his love interest. And I hope more readers will start reading her books because even though she is considered the queen of the crime genre nowadays I thinks she is underrated. The Murder on the Links is another complicated murder mystery and at some point I thought I wouldn't like it at all if one resolution was final but to my surprise even though a few more pages remained Christie turned the table on me and it was brilliant since even though I didn't manage to find who dunnit it was the person I disliked more.

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