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Diagnosis: Solving the Most Baffling Medical Mysteries

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As a Yale School of Medicine physician, the New York Times bestselling author of Every Patient Tells a Story, and an inspiration and adviser for the hit Fox TV drama House, M.D., Lisa Sanders has seen it all. And yet she is often confounded by the cases she describes in her column: unexpected collections of symptoms that she and other physicians struggle to diagnose. A twen As a Yale School of Medicine physician, the New York Times bestselling author of Every Patient Tells a Story, and an inspiration and adviser for the hit Fox TV drama House, M.D., Lisa Sanders has seen it all. And yet she is often confounded by the cases she describes in her column: unexpected collections of symptoms that she and other physicians struggle to diagnose. A twenty-eight-year-old man, vacationing in the Bahamas for his birthday, tries some barracuda for dinner. Hours later, he collapses on the dance floor with crippling stomach pains. A middle-aged woman returns to her doctor, after visiting two days earlier with a mild rash on the back of her hands. Now the rash has turned purple and has spread across her entire body in whiplike streaks. A young elephant trainer in a traveling circus, once head-butted by a rogue zebra, is suddenly beset with splitting headaches, as if someone were "slamming a door inside his head." In each of these cases, the path to diagnosis--and treatment--is winding, sometimes frustratingly unclear. Dr. Sanders shows how making the right diagnosis requires expertise, painstaking procedure, and sometimes a little luck. Intricate, gripping, and full of twists and turns, Diagnosis puts readers in the doctor's place. It lets them see what doctors see, feel the uncertainty they feel--and experience the thrill when the puzzle is finally solved.


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As a Yale School of Medicine physician, the New York Times bestselling author of Every Patient Tells a Story, and an inspiration and adviser for the hit Fox TV drama House, M.D., Lisa Sanders has seen it all. And yet she is often confounded by the cases she describes in her column: unexpected collections of symptoms that she and other physicians struggle to diagnose. A twen As a Yale School of Medicine physician, the New York Times bestselling author of Every Patient Tells a Story, and an inspiration and adviser for the hit Fox TV drama House, M.D., Lisa Sanders has seen it all. And yet she is often confounded by the cases she describes in her column: unexpected collections of symptoms that she and other physicians struggle to diagnose. A twenty-eight-year-old man, vacationing in the Bahamas for his birthday, tries some barracuda for dinner. Hours later, he collapses on the dance floor with crippling stomach pains. A middle-aged woman returns to her doctor, after visiting two days earlier with a mild rash on the back of her hands. Now the rash has turned purple and has spread across her entire body in whiplike streaks. A young elephant trainer in a traveling circus, once head-butted by a rogue zebra, is suddenly beset with splitting headaches, as if someone were "slamming a door inside his head." In each of these cases, the path to diagnosis--and treatment--is winding, sometimes frustratingly unclear. Dr. Sanders shows how making the right diagnosis requires expertise, painstaking procedure, and sometimes a little luck. Intricate, gripping, and full of twists and turns, Diagnosis puts readers in the doctor's place. It lets them see what doctors see, feel the uncertainty they feel--and experience the thrill when the puzzle is finally solved.

30 review for Diagnosis: Solving the Most Baffling Medical Mysteries

  1. 4 out of 5

    Petra X - sadly 1 step forward & 2 back

    What got me into the book was an incorrect diagnosis from a doctor that I made instantly. The chapter was entitled, "Was it the Fish?" A couple had dinner out whilst on holiday in Barbados. He had barracuda and she had red snapper. He went to the hospital that night with the symptoms of severe food poisoning and worse. After blood tests and a CT scan, food poisoning or a bug was diagnosed. WHAT???? Were they all new doctors not from the Caribbean? His symptoms got worse and he had tingling his h What got me into the book was an incorrect diagnosis from a doctor that I made instantly. The chapter was entitled, "Was it the Fish?" A couple had dinner out whilst on holiday in Barbados. He had barracuda and she had red snapper. He went to the hospital that night with the symptoms of severe food poisoning and worse. After blood tests and a CT scan, food poisoning or a bug was diagnosed. WHAT???? Were they all new doctors not from the Caribbean? His symptoms got worse and he had tingling his hands and muscle weakness so bad he could hardly walk, there was a reversal of the sensations of hot and cold and so he went home to New York and to the Jacobi emergency department where he was eventually correctly diagnosed with Ciguatera. As soon as I read 'barracuda' I knew he was going to go down with this. It's a nerve poison that accummulates in barracudas and on a lot of islands people will only eat the small ones. (It's not only barracuda that have it, but they are the main risk). I know a lot of people who've had it. But actually there is a test - you cut off the tail, and if the fluid is blackish then the fish is poisoned. No telling why the restaurant didn't do this or was even serving barracuda in the first place. There isn't any cure for it, just treatment of the symptoms which go away in a few days, or most of them do. The neurological issues, like tingling in the extremities, can last for months, or recur even years later. Basically don't eat barracuda! (I wouldn't). The rest of the book was reasonably enjoyable. What I didn't like was that outside of necessary information about the patient there was nothing much written about them so I couldn't identify with them most of the time. This was a book about symptoms and diseases not the people who suffer frm them, and doctors, all of whom were named as were their hospitals. I think the rating of this book depends on how much you like the format, it could be a 2 star or a 5 star. I'm in the middle, 3 star, maybe 3.5, from me. I preferred the first book I read by Lisa Sanders' Every Patient Tells a Story: Medical Mysteries and the Art of Diagnosis.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Yun

    Diagnosis is a collection of short essays, each one detailing a seemingly baffling medical case that after some sleuthing and tests finally yields the root of the patient's medical issues. I found this to be quite a snappy read. Each case is only 4 or 5 pages long, so it's easy to tell myself I'll read just one more case and before I knew it, I had read half the book. Each case is written like a mystery, with the clues in the beginning, and then it all comes together in the end with the right dia Diagnosis is a collection of short essays, each one detailing a seemingly baffling medical case that after some sleuthing and tests finally yields the root of the patient's medical issues. I found this to be quite a snappy read. Each case is only 4 or 5 pages long, so it's easy to tell myself I'll read just one more case and before I knew it, I had read half the book. Each case is written like a mystery, with the clues in the beginning, and then it all comes together in the end with the right diagnosis. For a book about medical issues, I thought it would be either too gruesome or boringly technical, but it was neither. It was a surprisingly fun, easy to follow, and fascinating read. I recommend it to all except those who get easily paranoid about medical issues.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Tucker (TuckerTheReader)

    Many thanks to Broadway Books for sending me a copy in exchange for an honest review Knowledge is power You’ll notice that I marked this as a thriller. That is because I have never been more terrified while reading a book. I do not have hypochondria but goddamn this book came this close to giving it to me. Diagnosis is a collection of stories about patients with strange ailments. This book was exceptionally written. I have paper cuts from turning the pages so fast!* I loved everything Many thanks to Broadway Books for sending me a copy in exchange for an honest review Knowledge is power You’ll notice that I marked this as a thriller. That is because I have never been more terrified while reading a book. I do not have hypochondria but goddamn this book came this close to giving it to me. Diagnosis is a collection of stories about patients with strange ailments. This book was exceptionally written. I have paper cuts from turning the pages so fast!* I loved everything about this book. Firstly, the stories were so expertly chosen. The author chose only the stories that were interesting and valuable. And it showed. I learned so much and enjoyed myself while doing so. My favorite part was the fact that each story started with a shocking and interesting sentence such as: ”I’m dying!, ”She’s not breathing or ”Mommy, it hurts! All that said, I want to warn those interested in reading this. You guys. This book is worse than google. What I mean by that is you’ll over analyze every headache, tingle and rash you get. This book is not for the faint of heart! Overall, this was brilliant, intriguing and terrifying! I cannot recommend it enough! Bottom Line: 5 Stars Age Rating: [ R ] Content Screening (Spoilers) - Educational Value: [Huge amount of value. Learning about the human body, bacteria, diseases and so, so much more!] ~ Positive Message: [Turning to others for answers is a good thing. Every problem has a solution. You just have to know where to look] ~ Violence: [Severe sickness. Vomiting, death, seizures and basically every painful symptoom you can think of] ~ Sex: [Discussion of sex from a medical view point] ~ Drinking/Drugs: [Alcohol, Illegal Drugs, Sedation Drugs, Antibiotics, Other Medicinal Drugs] ~ Langauge: [Minimal and Brief Langauge] TW: Hypochondria Cover: 4/5 ~ Charcters: N/A ~ Plot: N/A ~ Audio: 4/5 Publication Date: August 13th, 2019 Publisher: Broadway Books (Penguin Random House) Genre: Medical/Nonfiction *that’s a lie but you get the point. ************ if i had a dollar for everytime she said "abnormal" i could pay for all the medical bills in this book. ************ i spent 30 minutes on this picture and that is a lot less lazy than i usually am | Goodreads | Blog | Pinterest | LinkedIn | YouTube | Instagram

  4. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    Thank you Crown Publishing and Netgalley for a copy of Diagnosis by Lisa Sanders for review. Step away from this book if you have any tendencies to self-diagnosis on WebMD. Filled with short descriptions of symptoms and the eventual usually very rare diagnosis, this book will have you never looking at a rash the same way. I love books like these, as a former ER and House addict, I love these interesting cases. A quick read and now I am very interested in finding the Netflix series based on this boo Thank you Crown Publishing and Netgalley for a copy of Diagnosis by Lisa Sanders for review. Step away from this book if you have any tendencies to self-diagnosis on WebMD. Filled with short descriptions of symptoms and the eventual usually very rare diagnosis, this book will have you never looking at a rash the same way. I love books like these, as a former ER and House addict, I love these interesting cases. A quick read and now I am very interested in finding the Netflix series based on this book

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kazen

    This book is what I call a Potato Chip Read - you can't stop after just one chapter. The short cases pull you along, and once I got into the form I gulped down entire sections whole. It's perfect for fans of medical nonfiction, but if you're new to the genre you may not want to start here. Hear why in my review, part of this video on (you guessed it) Potato Chip Reads: https://youtu.be/DR_yCt__Lm0 Thanks to Broadway Books for providing a review copy. This book is what I call a Potato Chip Read - you can't stop after just one chapter. The short cases pull you along, and once I got into the form I gulped down entire sections whole. It's perfect for fans of medical nonfiction, but if you're new to the genre you may not want to start here. Hear why in my review, part of this video on (you guessed it) Potato Chip Reads: https://youtu.be/DR_yCt__Lm0 Thanks to Broadway Books for providing a review copy.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Basic B's Guide

    Curious about medical mysteries and the search for answers? Well, look no further as this is sure to satisfy that itch. DIAGNOSIS presents medical mystery cases in the form of short stories. Here we are given an insight into a field that is complex and so clearly needs a personal touch. We may have the technology to aid us in our discoveries but all too often it’s about gut instinct, open communication with a community of medical professionals and a keen eye. I really enjoyed reading a few of the Curious about medical mysteries and the search for answers? Well, look no further as this is sure to satisfy that itch. DIAGNOSIS presents medical mystery cases in the form of short stories. Here we are given an insight into a field that is complex and so clearly needs a personal touch. We may have the technology to aid us in our discoveries but all too often it’s about gut instinct, open communication with a community of medical professionals and a keen eye. I really enjoyed reading a few of these cases over the past week. It’s an excellent book to have on hand when life is too busy for binge reading. Later this week, Netflix will air a documentary series called “Diagnosis”. The show is based off her column for the New York Times Magazine. Sanders is also the inspiration behind FOX TV’s House, M.D. I leave this book with a deep appreciation for the medical field and their devotion to finding the answers. I also leaving it with the hopes I never have Margarita dermatitis. 4 stars for this intriguing read.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Simona B

    Probably it makes me a terrible, terrible person, but I like reading medical mysteries because they're supposed to be mysteries, and not to empathize with the patients. I know from experience that feeling of helplessness when someone who is close to you is slowly falling apart, and nobody can tell what exactly is going wrong. I also know, thankfully, how incredibly relieving it is when someone finally figures it out, and tells you yes, we can fix it. It's magical. If you are going through a heal Probably it makes me a terrible, terrible person, but I like reading medical mysteries because they're supposed to be mysteries, and not to empathize with the patients. I know from experience that feeling of helplessness when someone who is close to you is slowly falling apart, and nobody can tell what exactly is going wrong. I also know, thankfully, how incredibly relieving it is when someone finally figures it out, and tells you yes, we can fix it. It's magical. If you are going through a health scare, I hope you find the right doctor to help you, because often it's not just about securing the counsel of the best expert around. Sometimes, luck plays a part too. And not always are the odds necessarily in your favor. That said, and not to diminish these patients' struggles in the least, this is not why I read medical mysteries. I want the puzzle. The frustrating inexplicableness. The miraculous final epiphany. I want, in other words, House, MD. As I said, I know perfectly well that the real world and real medical practice don't quite work that way, and I didn't pick up Diagnosis expecting a novelization of the limping diagnostician's cases, but I was still a tiny bit disappointed. Berton Roueché's The Medical Detectives, for example, doesn't work that way either (consider that the correct diagnosis is often found just two or three pages into the case report), but it provides a lot more information about the condition that affects the patient, the illness's history, abundant details about how it impairs the body and how it can be counteracted, and I enjoyed the heck out of the book's scientific take on each case. Not that Sanders's Diagnosis fails to supply this type of information, but it's a lot more concise and patient-oriented. I repeat, this is absolutely not a negative thing, and indeed for the best physicians it is the patient's well-being, and not the intellectual game of diagnosis, to have top priority. It's just not the format that suits my particular interests. Still, I devoured it, and I will check out Sanders's other medical reports. Recommended!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Laura Rash

    As a huge fan of House, this was a must read for me. Tho It didn’t have the lovely snarky humor that the tv show has (and handsome Hugh Laurie), I was fascinated all the same. Although medically paranoid people might get worried they have half these maladies. Lol

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kimberly

    It has been a while since I have read a non-fiction medical book. When I did read them, they would fascinate me. Each case took me right into the medicine of the case. None of them are long, however, at times I would catch myself dissecting the technical language and forget about the people involved. I felt detached from the cases instead of being in the center of it. For readers who enjoy medical non-fiction concerning complex cases, I would recommend this.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Amie's Book Reviews

    Author Dr. Lisa Sanders is the doctor whom the television show HOUSE was based on. She is well-known for her diagnostic prowess as well as for her column in the New York Times. Now, Netflix is filming a series based on her case files. I am very much looking forward to watching this new series. I LOVED watching HOUSE and was sad when the television series ended. DIAGNOSIS is a fascinating and informative read, as well as being chock-full of information that most doctors (and patients) are unaware Author Dr. Lisa Sanders is the doctor whom the television show HOUSE was based on. She is well-known for her diagnostic prowess as well as for her column in the New York Times. Now, Netflix is filming a series based on her case files. I am very much looking forward to watching this new series. I LOVED watching HOUSE and was sad when the television series ended. DIAGNOSIS is a fascinating and informative read, as well as being chock-full of information that most doctors (and patients) are unaware of. In my opinion, everyone, especially doctors need to own a copy of this book. I am well aware of the theory known as "Occam's Razor" which is a principle from philosophy that states that the simplest explanation is usually correct. However, sometimes that theory does not apply. In medicine sometimes a zebra masquerades as a horse and because the disease is so rare, it is unknown to the doctor and/or because of it's rarity, it is dismissed as a possibility. If you have any interest in medical mysteries this book should be at the top of your 'TBR (TO BE READ)' List. Once I started reading, I was unable to put it down. Not only does the author do an exceptional job of describing the symptoms each patient is experiencing, she also gives a brief description of the person's home and work life which provides a perfect balance between the technical and the personal aspects of each case. Dr. Lisa Sanders also provides the reader with an update as to how each patient is faring at the present time. This is something that I find many medical books leave out. It is as if many doctors see only the medical mystery and view the patient as callously as they would view a lab rat;  ignoring them once the mystery is solved and leaving the follow-up to others. Lisa Sanders does NOT do this. In fact, several of the cases were diagnosed years earlier and yet she has taken the time to call each patient and ask after their current help. This book is worthy of more than just 5 Stars, however, since five stars is the highest rating I can bestow upon a book, 5 STARS will have to suffice. ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ The world is lucky to have diagnosticians such as Dr. Lisa Sanders and she has saved multiple lives and livelihoods. She is an inspiration to women everywhere. *Thank you to NetGalley for providing me with a free copy of this book.* To read more of my reviews visit my blog at http://Amiesbookreviews.wordpress.com Or Follow me on Instagram @Amiesbookreviews and on Twitter @Amiesbookreview

  11. 5 out of 5

    G.

    Diagnosis is a fun book for those who enjoy shows like House, or who simply like to learn a little about medical mysteries and the odd problems that happen to our bodies on occasion. For example, I had never heard of anyone developing an allergic response to cold weather before, but such a case is described in this book. Apparently, such a thing is possible. The book is a compilation of very short, three to four page stories that are directly taken from the author's New York Times articles. As a Diagnosis is a fun book for those who enjoy shows like House, or who simply like to learn a little about medical mysteries and the odd problems that happen to our bodies on occasion. For example, I had never heard of anyone developing an allergic response to cold weather before, but such a case is described in this book. Apparently, such a thing is possible. The book is a compilation of very short, three to four page stories that are directly taken from the author's New York Times articles. As a result, there are no in depth accounts of any of the events recounted in the book, all action occurs quickly and all problems are solved within a page or two. This format makes it best for readers who would like to quickly read a few stories at a time. It's great as a book that one picks up and reads for a half of an hour and than puts down to do something else. I never really felt drawn in to keep reading the book for long, since every few pages there is a different story, which doesn't really encourage long-term reading. However, because each story is such an easy read, it's very easy to slam through one of the thematic chapters in an hour or so. Speaking of thematic chapters, the stories are grouped by common presentation of symptoms, such as headaches, or weakness. We are treated to a view of doctors that those of us who are not doctors ourselves do not usually see, which is interesting for it is enlightening to see doctors stumped and needing to consult other doctors. Often, it appears that getting enough doctors into one room appears to make the difference. I liked this book, but it felt a bit superficial to me. It's designed to be palatable to the general, non-specialist reader, so it's very approachable. However, I would have really enjoyed if the author had gone into greater depth and detail, so that I could have felt that I learned more about human biology, medicine, biochemistry, and so on. But alas, this is not the kind of book for that, and I am probably not the usual kind of reader that this book was written for. So while it was a bit too breezy and light for my tastes, it would probably be very appropriate for one who is curious about medicine but who has very little interest in learning anything beyond superficial details. If there had been greater variety in stories, if some had been chapter length and some had included greater detail, I may have found it worthy of four stars. This book at least hits the three stars mark, which I regard an average book capable of achieving. I give this book four stars because I find it well and interestingly enough written to be a page-turner, and therefore somewhat above average for the type of book it is, but it is simply too superficial and light for me to rate it as a five star book. I'm not sure anything I read in this book apart from a scattered fact or two will stick with me. It was fun while it lasted, but it doesn't have very great rereading potential. All in all it's a fun read that I would recommend to those who like reading about strange medical problems and how they are diagnosed, but I couldn't call it an excellent book. It's fun. That's about it.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Stephen

    This is an episodic book about medical diagnosis. It is written for lay people with a high-school education. I say this with confidence because the author is a columnist for The New York Times Magazine, this book is built of columns from the paper, and the Times Magazine pitches its writing to your basic twelfth grader. The use of her columns as the bricks with which to construct her book is further evident in the sameness of each short chapter. It is as if each was written from a template, as I This is an episodic book about medical diagnosis. It is written for lay people with a high-school education. I say this with confidence because the author is a columnist for The New York Times Magazine, this book is built of columns from the paper, and the Times Magazine pitches its writing to your basic twelfth grader. The use of her columns as the bricks with which to construct her book is further evident in the sameness of each short chapter. It is as if each was written from a template, as I strongly suspect that each one was. The outline goes roughly like this: (1) a previously healthy person is suddenly debilitated by a weird set of symptoms which are not normally found together in the wild; (2) doctors respond to what they think might be wrong but they are wrong; (3) the doctors rely too much on sophisticated and expensive machines and tests when they ought to be (a) listening to their patient and (b) conducting a really thorough physical examination; (4) at the last minute, some doctor tumbles to an unlikely uncommon diagnosis which is correct and saves the day. [Note: with only one exception out of 53 cases, nobody dies.] I used to think that modern industrialized medicine reduced physicians to the same protocols as automobile mechanics. A person drives into the garage and says her car is misbehaving in a particular way. The mechanic doesn't really diagnose anything but rather proposes the fix which, based on experience, is the most likely cause of the problem. If that works, the mechanic (and the doctor) is the hero of the piece. If it doesn't, perhaps a diagnostic test is in order but, even then, one simply moves on to the second-most-likely cause of the symptoms and prescribes the cure for that. If the cause and the cure coalesce before (a) the engine explodes or the wheels fall off, or (b) the patient drops dead, then the mechanic and the doctor are still the heroes of the piece. Robertson Davies, the brilliant Canadian man of letters, wrote an excellent novel in 1994 called The Cunning Man. The protagonist, a medical doctor named Jonathan Hullah, practiced holistic medicine and surprised his colleagues by discovering the cause of many medical problems which eluded them. All of Davies' novels are valuable; this one is exceptionally valuable and it is so very sad that the author died before he could write the sequel which he had planned and researched. Dr Hullah seems the perfect diagnostician: schooled in scientific Western medicine but with a background in Native American healing arts, able to read the results of medical tests but also perceptive enough to note things like what his patients smell like. It is not that Dr Sanders' book on diagnosis is bad; it is that I had rather hoped that her book, like Dr Hullah, would be so much better.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Mary & Tom

    Binge reading for me. I am fascinated by science and medicine, so when I book comes along offering vignettes from real life medical dilemmas, I am reading it. Interestingly, in several of the stories of these difficult to diagnose medical conditions and illnesses, those suffering didn’t seek medical attention until the situation became unbearable or he/she was at death’s door because he/she did not have insurance usually related to being laid off or losing their employment. This is a very sad st Binge reading for me. I am fascinated by science and medicine, so when I book comes along offering vignettes from real life medical dilemmas, I am reading it. Interestingly, in several of the stories of these difficult to diagnose medical conditions and illnesses, those suffering didn’t seek medical attention until the situation became unbearable or he/she was at death’s door because he/she did not have insurance usually related to being laid off or losing their employment. This is a very sad statement that done not reflect well on our nation. Medical care needs to be available to all who need it without facing a potential bankruptcy. The second thing that caught my interest in this book is how many of the physicians participating in solving these medical mysteries had non Anglo Saxon last names. So viva immigrants and their parents who came to this country seeking a better education and better life and the invaluable contributions they make to our society. I understand that this book was put together from episodes of a TV show. I haven’t seen the show, but the many stories contained in this book will keep up you guessing and reading.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Monica

    Let me begin this review by sharing two things: my love for Grey’s Anatomy is undying, and I am happily employed at a surgical nonprofit. My point being, this topic interests me. Medical professionals, medical mysteries, problem solving under pressure when lives are at stake - I truly love it all. However, I can’t bring myself to give Diagnosis more than 3 stars and the main reason for this is not due to the subject matter, but mainly the narrative style and pacing throughout. I WANTED to love th Let me begin this review by sharing two things: my love for Grey’s Anatomy is undying, and I am happily employed at a surgical nonprofit. My point being, this topic interests me. Medical professionals, medical mysteries, problem solving under pressure when lives are at stake - I truly love it all. However, I can’t bring myself to give Diagnosis more than 3 stars and the main reason for this is not due to the subject matter, but mainly the narrative style and pacing throughout. I WANTED to love this book but in hindsight I think my expectations were off. Instead of truly being in the doctor’s shoes, as the introduction and back panel suggest, the reader is mainly in the patient’s shoes, but even in that regard we’re not completely whipped into anyone’s full experience; Lisa Sanders simply didn’t allow the time for that. Sanders structures this book by giving a brief history of each patient, followed by their experience with the doctor(s), a few things that didn’t work and then finally the thing that did, and then a one-liner at the end of each chapter that I assume is supposed to satisfy the need for a moral or resolution. For me, this was not enough. The repetitive style of each short narrative was fine, but the attempted pretty-little-bow tying up each chapter was over done, rushed, and didn’t serve as being an impactful conclusion. Reading Diagnosis felt like I was skimming medical charts combined with short, slightly personal backstories. But... I needed more. Each segment is on average two and a half pages long. It’s not enough time to get to know anyone, or even come to a meaningful takeaway about lessons learned. The amount of thoughtful reflection that would complement the confusing medical experiences the reader briefly learns about is simply not provided. Also, side note, who the heck is Lisa Sanders?? She is never consistently present in her storytelling and I found myself wondering multiple times, how do you fit in here? Why are you telling this? How are you involved? I desperately wanted time with JUST Sanders to help me feel grounded and understand the terrain and her role in it. This book is choppy and not tethered to any one person or place to make the reader feel stable. Being thrown into a medical puzzle, as doctors so often are in reality, is extremely intriguing and fun as a reader, but to have more than 50 of these experiences is less impactful than if there were fewer anecdotes balanced with more introduction, reflection, and exposition from this apparently brilliant author/narrator that I still know next to nothing about.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    An interesting collection of essays that first appeared in the NYT. Each essay describes a case in which a patient presents with a mysterious set of symptoms. Doctor detective work (and sometimes just luck) leads to a successful outcome for the patient.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Anneke

    Book Review: Diagnosis: Solving the Most Baffling Medical Mysteries: The Best of the New York Times Magazine Column Author: Lisa Sanders, MD Publisher: Crown Publishing/Broadway Books Publication Date: August 13, 2018 Review Date: July 10, 2019 I received a free copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. From the blurb: “A collection of more than fifty hard-to-crack medical quandaries, featuring the best of The New York Times Magazine's popular Diagnosis column—the inspiration Book Review: Diagnosis: Solving the Most Baffling Medical Mysteries: The Best of the New York Times Magazine Column Author: Lisa Sanders, MD Publisher: Crown Publishing/Broadway Books Publication Date: August 13, 2018 Review Date: July 10, 2019 I received a free copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. From the blurb: “A collection of more than fifty hard-to-crack medical quandaries, featuring the best of The New York Times Magazine's popular Diagnosis column—the inspiration for the upcoming Netflix original series. As a Yale School of Medicine physician, the New York Times bestselling author of Every Patient Tells a Story, and an inspiration and adviser for the hit Fox TV drama House, M.D., Lisa Sanders has seen it all. And yet the fascinating case studies from her Diagnosis column have nearly stumped even her. In each of these cases, the path to diagnosis—and treatment—is winding, sometimes frustratingly unclear. Dr. Sanders shows how making the right diagnosis requires expertise, painstaking procedure, and sometimes a little luck. Intricate, gripping, and full of twists and turns, Diagnosis puts readers in the doctor’s place. It lets them see what doctors see, feel the uncertainty they feel—and experience the thrill when the puzzle is finally solved.” In another life I would have graduated from medical school in 1979, and would have retired from a long, rewarding career as an ER physician. Though my life took a different turn, I’ve been interested in medicine since I was 8 years old, and particularly fascinated with the process of diagnosis. I did work in the hospital for a number of years in the places where people were very sick: the ER, ICU and acute cardiac care. This book was fantastic! Very well written. Short but exciting stories of patients with illnesses that were complex and difficult to diagnose. I’ve been reading Dr. Sanders’ articles in the New York Times for years. I found this book to be quite terrifying. Very sick patients that were not easy to diagnose, and therefore not really treatable until that diagnosis was figured out. Her writing style is very easy to read and fascinating. With each story, I put myself in the shoes of the patients, family members and physicians. If you are interested in Western medicine, you have got to read this book. I don’t have much else to say except that it was so interesting, well written and informative. Highly, highly recommended. 5+ stars!! Thank you to NetGalley, and Random House for allowing me an early read. And thank you to Dr. Sanders for this exceptional book. This review will be posted on NetGalley, Goodreads and Amazon. #netgalley #diagnosis #lisasandersmd #randomhouse

  17. 4 out of 5

    Emily Dybdahl

    I have been fascinated with diseases and medicine since I was a kid. I was an avid fan of the show "House, M.D." and considered going into the medical field when first exploring careers back in high school. I was really excited to win a giveaway on Goodreads! When I looked further into the synopsis of this book and the author's background, I was even more pumped to read this collection of short "mysteries". The author wrote a newspaper column of this type of story and this is a compilation of th I have been fascinated with diseases and medicine since I was a kid. I was an avid fan of the show "House, M.D." and considered going into the medical field when first exploring careers back in high school. I was really excited to win a giveaway on Goodreads! When I looked further into the synopsis of this book and the author's background, I was even more pumped to read this collection of short "mysteries". The author wrote a newspaper column of this type of story and this is a compilation of those stories. It makes for a quick and addictive read. I found myself starting another chapter even when it was too late at night, just to get one more gratifying tale of "mystery, solved!" I highly recommend this to anyone interested in medicine, but it will be torture to the hypochondriacs among us, hehe. I'll be passing my copy of this book around to family and friends.

  18. 4 out of 5

    tina

    This was different than what I’d expected. I assumed this would be a similar format to the Netflix show about crowdsourcing to get a diagnosis for an unknown illness but it was more like a very tl;dr story of how the doctors found out what was wrong with patients. Some stories were suuuuuuuuuper intriguing and some were more basic. It was very informational but I also felt like a hypochondriac the entire time, like by reading this I was thinking I had pains and stuff I didn’t. For that alone, th This was different than what I’d expected. I assumed this would be a similar format to the Netflix show about crowdsourcing to get a diagnosis for an unknown illness but it was more like a very tl;dr story of how the doctors found out what was wrong with patients. Some stories were suuuuuuuuuper intriguing and some were more basic. It was very informational but I also felt like a hypochondriac the entire time, like by reading this I was thinking I had pains and stuff I didn’t. For that alone, thank god this book is over and if you are less anxious than me and interested in medical stuff, I would recommend. It’s a really good intro to nonfiction medical/science books because things are laid out very matter of fact and in layman’s terms.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Evalina

    Dr. Sanders has once again done a fantastic job of portraying the all-too-common problem-solving skills and the thought processes behind every patient's presentation of symptoms. The stories are all significant to those working in healthcare as a reminder of how diligent providers should be in treating each patient. The stories are short enough to gasp the main details and important factors contributing to the cause of each presentation, while still adding a sense of mystery and enjoyment of dis Dr. Sanders has once again done a fantastic job of portraying the all-too-common problem-solving skills and the thought processes behind every patient's presentation of symptoms. The stories are all significant to those working in healthcare as a reminder of how diligent providers should be in treating each patient. The stories are short enough to gasp the main details and important factors contributing to the cause of each presentation, while still adding a sense of mystery and enjoyment of discovery. I really enjoyed this book and will definitely be reading it again in the future! It's House MD with out the hair pulling drama and random hematemesis!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca Gardner

    Each case study, which Sanders so masterfully conveys, is intriguing and at times eye opening - ie, it’s possible to literally be allergic to the cold; misusing dentures might just slowly kill you; there’s a strong biomedical link between cancer tumors and depression; lime juice + sunlight on your skin can cause a painful rash that can last for months - (“margarita dermatitis”); the list goes on and on. Such a fun and fascinating read that feels like medical detective work.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Sam S

    This was exactly what you'd expect. Each case was only 3-5 pages, so really easy to take small bites of. The cases were interesting. Direct, dumbed down for non medical professionals, but not so much so that you feel talked down to. Sometime, the descriptors of the doctors, patients and family seemed too.... superfluous? Not quite sure other than I'd read some parts and wonder why this didn't get edited out. This was exactly what you'd expect. Each case was only 3-5 pages, so really easy to take small bites of. The cases were interesting. Direct, dumbed down for non medical professionals, but not so much so that you feel talked down to. Sometime, the descriptors of the doctors, patients and family seemed too.... superfluous? Not quite sure other than I'd read some parts and wonder why this didn't get edited out.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Alice

    Pretty fun and interesting read about diagnostics and some unusual cases. Sanders does a great work of quickly painting a compelling picture of each case and drawing you in to their various stories. In some cases, it would've been nice to get some more hard data, but in general she provided enough observations that you could follow along the diagnostic path quite clearly. A good reminder of how many rare diseases are out there, and the power of consulting your colleagues! Pretty fun and interesting read about diagnostics and some unusual cases. Sanders does a great work of quickly painting a compelling picture of each case and drawing you in to their various stories. In some cases, it would've been nice to get some more hard data, but in general she provided enough observations that you could follow along the diagnostic path quite clearly. A good reminder of how many rare diseases are out there, and the power of consulting your colleagues!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Isha Ali

    Interesting, easy to read and understand even by the layman. Intriguing collection of medical mysteries and lessons in reaching a diagnosis. What this book taught me: Three things you don't want to be as a doctor; arrogant, indifferent and ignorant. And always listen to the patient. Interesting, easy to read and understand even by the layman. Intriguing collection of medical mysteries and lessons in reaching a diagnosis. What this book taught me: Three things you don't want to be as a doctor; arrogant, indifferent and ignorant. And always listen to the patient.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Debra

    Fascinating for the layman.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Laura Smith

    Super interesting book. I enjoyed the short chapters. If you like House you’ll enjoy this - the author was the medical consultant for the show.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jenny

    Enjoyable quick read about various unusual diseases that can arise out of any combination of symptoms, and how the diagnoses were reached.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Andrea Aebersold

    This is a quick and interesting read if you like medical mysteries and learning about random diseases. The author consulted for the show, House, so it was entertaining to read.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Meghan

    I know what this is. ~ Lisa Sanders

  29. 4 out of 5

    Susan Jackson

    Fascinating and an easy read. If you like the mystery diagnosis series you will enjoy this too

  30. 5 out of 5

    Cynthia

    DNF but will likely go back to this one at some point. I got into the Netflix Diagnosis series and that was that for this book!

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