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On the House: A Washington Memoir

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This program is read by the author. * INSTANT #1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER * #1 WALL STREET JOURNAL BESTSELLER * “A rollicking, foil-mouthed” [memoir]....Boehner has delivered a classic Washington “tell-all,” albeit one with his typical jocular style.” -- The Washington Post Former Speaker of the House John Boehner shares colorful tales from the halls of power, the s This program is read by the author. * INSTANT #1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER * #1 WALL STREET JOURNAL BESTSELLER * “A rollicking, foil-mouthed” [memoir]....Boehner has delivered a classic Washington “tell-all,” albeit one with his typical jocular style.” -- The Washington Post Former Speaker of the House John Boehner shares colorful tales from the halls of power, the smoke-filled rooms around the halls of power, and his fabled tour bus. John Boehner is the last of a breed. At a time when the arbiters of American culture were obsessing over organic kale, cold-pressed juice, and SoulCycle, the man who stood second in line to the presidency was unapologetically smoking Camels, quaffing a glass of red, and hitting the golf course whenever he could. There could hardly have been a more diametrically opposed figure to represent the opposition party in President Barack Obama's Washington. But when Boehner announced his resignation, President Obama called to tell the outgoing Speaker that he'd miss him. "Mr. President," Boehner replied, "yes you will." He thought of himself as a "regular guy with a big job," and he enjoyed it. In addition to his own stories of life in the swamp city and of his comeback after getting knocked off the leadership ladder, Boehner offers his impressions of leaders he's met and what made them successes or failures, from Ford and Reagan to Obama, Trump, and Biden. He shares his views on how the Republican Party has become unrecognizable today; the advice--some harsh, some fatherly--he dished out to members of his own party, the opposition, the media, and others; and his often acid-tongued comments about his former colleagues. And of course he talks about golfing with five presidents. Through Speaker Boehner's honest and self-aware reflections, you'll be reminded of a time when the adults were firmly in charge. A Macmillan Audio production from St. Martin's Press


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This program is read by the author. * INSTANT #1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER * #1 WALL STREET JOURNAL BESTSELLER * “A rollicking, foil-mouthed” [memoir]....Boehner has delivered a classic Washington “tell-all,” albeit one with his typical jocular style.” -- The Washington Post Former Speaker of the House John Boehner shares colorful tales from the halls of power, the s This program is read by the author. * INSTANT #1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER * #1 WALL STREET JOURNAL BESTSELLER * “A rollicking, foil-mouthed” [memoir]....Boehner has delivered a classic Washington “tell-all,” albeit one with his typical jocular style.” -- The Washington Post Former Speaker of the House John Boehner shares colorful tales from the halls of power, the smoke-filled rooms around the halls of power, and his fabled tour bus. John Boehner is the last of a breed. At a time when the arbiters of American culture were obsessing over organic kale, cold-pressed juice, and SoulCycle, the man who stood second in line to the presidency was unapologetically smoking Camels, quaffing a glass of red, and hitting the golf course whenever he could. There could hardly have been a more diametrically opposed figure to represent the opposition party in President Barack Obama's Washington. But when Boehner announced his resignation, President Obama called to tell the outgoing Speaker that he'd miss him. "Mr. President," Boehner replied, "yes you will." He thought of himself as a "regular guy with a big job," and he enjoyed it. In addition to his own stories of life in the swamp city and of his comeback after getting knocked off the leadership ladder, Boehner offers his impressions of leaders he's met and what made them successes or failures, from Ford and Reagan to Obama, Trump, and Biden. He shares his views on how the Republican Party has become unrecognizable today; the advice--some harsh, some fatherly--he dished out to members of his own party, the opposition, the media, and others; and his often acid-tongued comments about his former colleagues. And of course he talks about golfing with five presidents. Through Speaker Boehner's honest and self-aware reflections, you'll be reminded of a time when the adults were firmly in charge. A Macmillan Audio production from St. Martin's Press

30 review for On the House: A Washington Memoir

  1. 4 out of 5

    Susan Tunis

    No one who knows me will be surprised to hear that I was not a fan of Speaker Boehner when he was in office. But, damn, he sure is fun now! I'm joking, sort of. No one shares more than they want to in a political memoir, but Mr. Boehner must be well and truly retired, because he's calling 'em like he sees 'em. For better or worse. You've heard a lot of the more colorful tidbits on the news. He's not holding back on his feelings about fellow Republicans like Sarah Palin, Ted Cruz and others. But w No one who knows me will be surprised to hear that I was not a fan of Speaker Boehner when he was in office. But, damn, he sure is fun now! I'm joking, sort of. No one shares more than they want to in a political memoir, but Mr. Boehner must be well and truly retired, because he's calling 'em like he sees 'em. For better or worse. You've heard a lot of the more colorful tidbits on the news. He's not holding back on his feelings about fellow Republicans like Sarah Palin, Ted Cruz and others. But who'd have guessed the depth of affection and admiration he had for Gerald Ford? And while he doesn't go on at length, he speaks warmly and respectfully of Joe Biden. Trump, not so much. Though, my favorite assessment was his opinion of Bernie Sanders. I won't spoil it for you. So, bridges are being burnt. Axes are being ground. And along the way, we get occasional glimpses of what it was like to legislate. The deals, the horse trading, the rare, shiny instances of bi-partisan cooperation. He shares his thoughts on issues present and past, and in some cases discusses choices that were made. Looks back at some of the big wins and losses. He also talks about his personal life. I was fascinated by stories of his childhood and family. He's got eleven brothers and sisters! I was significantly less interested in stories from his high school sports career. This was the nadir, for me. The rhapsodizing over the high school coach felt interminable. High school sports aside, this was a lively read. Oh, and speaking of which, Mr. Boehner did an excellent job reading the audiobook. He has a lot of personality, and curses like a sailor. Truly, he's making it hard for me to hate him. There are few things in life that give me greater pleasure than watching old-school conservatives criticize this new breed of Republican. I may need to revisit this book for an occasional pick-me-up.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jean

    Not sure what I think about Boehner’s memoir. I found his remarks about Nancy Pelosi interesting. I learned about his life of which I knew very little. When he was Speaker of the House, I felt he did not have the guts to stand- up for his convictions. If he had, maybe things would have been a bit different. I did not care for his foul language, but I did like the folksy way he told his story. I read this as an audiobook downloaded from Audible. The book is seven hours and forty-six minutes. John Not sure what I think about Boehner’s memoir. I found his remarks about Nancy Pelosi interesting. I learned about his life of which I knew very little. When he was Speaker of the House, I felt he did not have the guts to stand- up for his convictions. If he had, maybe things would have been a bit different. I did not care for his foul language, but I did like the folksy way he told his story. I read this as an audiobook downloaded from Audible. The book is seven hours and forty-six minutes. John Boehner did a good job narrating his own book.

  3. 4 out of 5

    David Eppenstein

    Those of you interested in this book are probably waiting to read Boehner's trashing of his former GOP colleagues and the members of the last administration. Well I am here to save you $30 as you have already read the best of what Boehner has to say by hearing or reading the advertising teases for this book. This book is a waste of money, time, paper, and ink as John Boehner in his own words has definitively demonstrated that he is a mediocrity that had no business in Congress let alone becoming Those of you interested in this book are probably waiting to read Boehner's trashing of his former GOP colleagues and the members of the last administration. Well I am here to save you $30 as you have already read the best of what Boehner has to say by hearing or reading the advertising teases for this book. This book is a waste of money, time, paper, and ink as John Boehner in his own words has definitively demonstrated that he is a mediocrity that had no business in Congress let alone becoming Speaker of the House. You would expect that nobody that writes an autobiography, and that is what this book is, would write one that makes the author look bad. I'm sure Boehner did not intend to do that but after reading all of self-serving palaver about what a good guy he is and how all he wanted to do was teach all the "crazies" in his GOP conference how to govern properly and then seeing how he actually performed all you can conclude is that he is either a liar or he's delusional. He does have some strong words about a few people but mostly about Ted Cruz and that's really low lying fruit as far as I'm concerned. There is little about Trump but John was out of office when DJT took over. He has unkind words about Obama but fails to supply any detail to support his criticisms so even if he were correct we have no way to judge the merits of his accusation. This is illustrated in John's discussion of immigration reform that he says could have been accomplished if Obama had listened to him and done what he suggested. Boehner was offended by Obama's seeming arrogance in being unwilling to accept Boehner's suggestions. Boehner, however, doesn't supply any details about his proposed 5 bill legislative immigration package nor anything about the Democratic proposals or the possible political reasons aside from the bills' content that might have affected the ultimate decision on how to go forward. Boehner just concludes that Obama didn't care about immigration reform and blew an opportunity. This illustrates the kind of political analysis Boehner offers in describing his legislative ordeals while Speaker. Of course he is very unkind to the new GOP members that entered Congress starting in the 2010 Tea Party movement. He labeled all of these people as "the crazies" who refused to learn or listen from the experienced "rational Republicans" about how to be effective as members of Congress. In Boehner's opinion all these people wanted to do was burn down the government. They had no interest in learning what it meant to govern or in doing it if they did know how. Boehner offers himself and his experience as an example of how governing is supposed to work but his example belies his words. The most damning example Boehner offers of his governing and his ordeal with trying to manage "the crazies" is the 2013 government shutdown over the GOP attempt to get the Democrats to scrap the ACA if they wanted the debt ceiling increased. Boehner lays primary responsibility for this fiasco at the feet of Ted Cruz which is probably true. Boehner says he knew this would be a disaster for the party. That it would hurt the government, the voters, and play into the hands of the Democrats who would never cave on the ACA. He begged the GOP members not to do this but they persisted. So what does Boehner do? Instead of governing he proves that contrary to his stated beliefs his first loyalty is to his party and not to his office, his government, his country, or its people. He then goes and supports the shutdown and proves that that action is indeed a disaster that delivers all the harm he predicted. That wasn't leadership or governing that was simply cowardice dictated by misplace values and lack of personal insight. How did Boehner get this way? Before reading this book I knew nothing about Boehner's background. Those of you from Ohio and especially the Cincinnati area probably already know a lot about John Boehner but after learning how he grew up I was shaking my head. How in the world is he not a Democrat? Boehner is one of 12 kids born to working class parents that were both life long Democrats. He was born and raised in the Cincinnati area and lived in a 2 bedroom home. He and his brothers had one bedroom with triple layer bunkbeds while his sisters had the other bedroom. His parents shared a pullout bed in the living room. At about age 12 John and his older brother got up at 4:45am every day to go with their dad to open the hole-in-wall cafe/bar he owned in order to serve the third shift workers leaving their factories as well as the first shift people just going on the job. John hustled part-time jobs all his life and worked his way through college after attending Moeller High School in Cincinnati and playing football there under Gerry Faust, later to become an unsuccessful coach at Notre Dame. What was interesting was how often Boehner uses the word "team" in this book. It is also interesting that of all the possible heroes he could have found during his academic years the one he goes out of his way to thank and focus on is his football coach. Obviously Boehner has a sports and game approach to life imprinted on his brain and it clearly carried over to his tenure in Congress. Sadly governing isn't a team sport or a game. Governing is about solving problems in a collaborative environment with the other members of Congress. Boehner demonstrates in this book how that doesn't result in anything but division and the continuation and exacerbation of our problems. But how and why did John Boehner with his blue collar working class origins become of all things a Republican? After graduating from college he met a lady and married her. He also found a job in a small local company and did so well there that he eventually became the CEO. It was during this time, a time when he first starting earning real money that he discovered something. That discovery was taxes. John learned what taxes were and that he didn't like paying them. At this same period a guy named Ronald Reagan came on the scene and he also didn't like taxes and John liked what Reagan had to say. So it would appear that simple greed was all it took for John Boehner to become a Reagan Republican and forget his origins and start a career in politics giving lip service to the plight of the common voter. The critics of FDR called him a traitor to his class; I guess the same label could be launched at John Boehner. How many times during his tenure as Speaker did he and his GOP conference attempt to kill the ACA without any offering of substitute program? So much for caring about the class of his origin. In short this book is not only not worth much it is also boring. I'm sorry I bought it and wasted my time reading it. All I can hope is that my sacrifice will save some of you from making the same mistake. Find something else to read, please.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    I do enjoy delving into the world of political memoirs on occasion, if only to get a new and intriguing perspective on the inner workings of government. When I saw that John Boehner has penned this book, I was interested to see what he had to say. A well-spoken politician from Ohio, Boehner rose through the ranks of the Republican Party (GOP) to eventually become the Speaker of the House of Representatives. What’s found within this brief memoir is a collection of views and perspectives (sometime I do enjoy delving into the world of political memoirs on occasion, if only to get a new and intriguing perspective on the inner workings of government. When I saw that John Boehner has penned this book, I was interested to see what he had to say. A well-spoken politician from Ohio, Boehner rose through the ranks of the Republican Party (GOP) to eventually become the Speaker of the House of Representatives. What’s found within this brief memoir is a collection of views and perspectives (sometimes told without filter) to show how he witnessed the true metamorphosis of the modern GOP from conservative to outright bombastic. Readers who enjoy these sorts of pieces will likely find something within to pique their interest. While the book never follows a strict chronology of his life, John Boehner grew up as the second oldest of twelve children on the outskirts of Cincinnati. Life was never easy for him, but he learned from a young age that hard work is sure to pay off. Boehner recounts working in the family bar from a young age and modelling himself after his father, a Second World War veteran who never spoke of his time away. When Boehner made his way into politics, he set his eye on Washington, where he felt that he could make a difference. Boehner pushed the limits in the early 1990s, hoping to make a name for himself and shape America. He was not always welcomed by some of his congressional colleagues, as he never saw the point of sitting back and watching, but rather wanted to be in the middle of things and stirring the pot. Boehner tells of pushing for an amendment to the US Constitution, one that had sat dormant due to a lack of states ratifying. This push did shed some light on his young congressional career and would help pave the way to added successes. As his politics continued to impress his constituents, Boehner was re-elected multiple times, allowing him to climb the ranks of the Republicans within the House. There, he took on some committee chairs and saw politics through another set of eyes. Still, he yearned for a broader leadership and sought to put himself out there for key positions. While the Democrats controlled the House, Boehner was trying to herd together the GOP members, working loosely as a check on their opponents, but also hoping to turn the tables when the opportunity arose. In the middle of the book, Boehner takes a step away from his congressional work, per se, and turns to one of the stalwart former members of the House and political scene. Boehner had the chance to meet and play golf with former president Gerald Ford, recounting some lesser known stories about the man. Ford was a master of the House for many years, aspiring to be Speaker before he was uniquely thrust into the vice-presidency and eventually became president. Boehner admired the man and his convictions, though pines what might have been had he been able to win in 1976 over the unknown Jimmy Carter. Ford offered many insights to the up and coming Boehner, but also liked to see the progress he had made in his time as a member of the House. Boehner eventually became Speaker of the House of Representatives, the third most powerful position in US politics. He ran the House as best he could, working to balance his party views with amicable interactions alongside President Obama and the Senate. Boehner soon realised that there was a movement within the GOP to push things to the extreme, making keeping the party together a lot more difficult. There was no desire to compromise or work with the administration, instead choosing to toss rocks at anything they could. Boehner commented throughout how he struggled with this, first as the Tea Party movement gained traction and the eventual Ted Cruz/Trump circus that rolled into town. It would seem that rational thought played a second role to stymying anything that would see compromise between the Republicans and Democrats. Boehner could see the writing on the wall and knew that Washington was about to change, and not for the better. The latter portion of the book tackles some of the areas that promote interaction with the electorate: lobbyists and media. Boehner offered some interesting commentary on both, feeling them essential, even if he does not always agree with their antics. Boehner has had numerous encounters with both groups and describes how they always kept him on his toes and left him sometimes pining to still have them in his life. This is quite a sobering admission for a politician, but Boehner rarely follows the rules of a political memoir. While I had little knowledge of John Boehner before I read this piece, I feel much closer to him and those positions he feels are important. Unlike many others who have penned their thoughts about life in Washington, Boehner tells it like it is and refuses to sugar coat things. This look into life in Washington proves insightful and Boehner uses a great mix of history and anecdotes to tell a story worth reading. Longer chapters provide detailed discussions that are sure to shed light on many issues for the reader. Well-paced and full of just enough salty asides, Boehner makes the book one that is easily read and enjoyed by those who love political narratives without the stuffiness one might expect with those in positions of leadership. While few will deny the Republican Party has taken a strong turn to the right, Boehner offers proof of when and how the shift took place. Let’s hope this is only a short-term detour, or at least a tiny sip of the Kool-Aid! Kudos, Mr. Boehner, for a wonderful piece that educated and entertained me in equal measure. Thanks for the memories! Love/hate the review? An ever-growing collection of others appears at: http://pecheyponderings.wordpress.com/ A Book for All Seasons, a different sort of Book Challenge: https://www.goodreads.com/group/show/...

  5. 5 out of 5

    Martin, going to be a grandpa,

    Why do I do it? Why? Most autobiographies thank dad, mom, brother, sister, dog, goldfish.........urrrrgh. John Boehner’s book is no exception. I would say 75% of the book was a complete waste of time. There are two reasons he wrote this book. One, to make himself look like an angel. It is very hard to turn a Republican into an angel. Two, to make money. Mr. Boehner spent a lot of time promoting this book. What a waste of time! Here is an example. Mr. Boehner talks a great deal about management. Ho Why do I do it? Why? Most autobiographies thank dad, mom, brother, sister, dog, goldfish.........urrrrgh. John Boehner’s book is no exception. I would say 75% of the book was a complete waste of time. There are two reasons he wrote this book. One, to make himself look like an angel. It is very hard to turn a Republican into an angel. Two, to make money. Mr. Boehner spent a lot of time promoting this book. What a waste of time! Here is an example. Mr. Boehner talks a great deal about management. However, he doesn’t practice what he preaches. House Republicans were going to help shut down government because they disagreed on one of President Obama’s policies. Mr. Boehner vehemently disagreed with his fellow republicans and new their standoff with Obama would fail. Instead of managing the situation he decided to join in the fight. Needless to say the republicans attempt at changing policy by shutting down government failed. I am confused at what management skills Mr. Boehner showed? I do agree with Boehner on right wing media in the United States. The main job of right wing media, fox “news”, is to get their followers angry. The more angry they bcome, the more they will watch. Consequently, the more they watch, the more advertisement revenue the right wing media makes.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Perry

    Refreshing and interesting to read the story and take of the former U.S. Speaker of the House, a sane Republican conservative from the lucid days before Trump and his posse of insane clowns currently posing as Republican leaders.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Mckay

    38th book of 2021: A Shot and a Beer* They say don't judge a book by it's cover, but please, please judge this book by its delicious cover. John Boehner is retired, doesn't give a fuck, and is ready to share with you his best stories about being 'mayor of crazytown' speaker of the house over a round of golf. So grab your favorite Merlot, light up a cigarette if that's your thing, and let's dive in. First, different politicians in the house play different games. Boehner self-identifies in the c 38th book of 2021: A Shot and a Beer* They say don't judge a book by it's cover, but please, please judge this book by its delicious cover. John Boehner is retired, doesn't give a fuck, and is ready to share with you his best stories about being 'mayor of crazytown' speaker of the house over a round of golf. So grab your favorite Merlot, light up a cigarette if that's your thing, and let's dive in. First, different politicians in the house play different games. Boehner self-identifies in the camp of pragmatists, which means finding common ground with other lawmakers, even if that means the other party, to legislate. Common ground does not mean compromise, but it does mean setting the end-goal as passed legislation. Sadly, over the last decade a different raison d'être has come into fashion for house members: legislative terrorist. After the Republican wave in 2010, Boehner describes the difference in legislative philosophy as follows: Since I was presiding over a large group of people who had never sat in congress, I felt I owed them a little tutorial on governing. I had to explain how to actually get things done. A lot that went straight through the ears of most of them, especially the ones who didn't have brains that got in the way. Incrementalism, compromise? That wasn't their thing. They wanted to blow up Washington. Some of them, you could tell they weren't paying attention, because they were thinking of how they could fundraise off the outrage, or how they could get on Hannity that night. Unfortunately for Boehner, the house was Mecca for these jackasses. When it came to things like increasing the budget ceiling: Nancy Pelosi seemed like she could get her people in line as usual. So could Harry Reid and Mitch McConnell. No it was up to me. That was just great, these guys had no clue what sort of clown car I was trying to drive on the Republican side of the house. When he tried to talk to conservative media like Roger Ailes to attempt to shape the conversation in a productive direction, things looked even more grim: He told me he had a safe room so he couldn't be spied on. There was a lot of conspiratorial talk. It was clear that he believed all this crazy stuff. I walked out of that meeting in a daze ... I thought I could talk him into controlling the crazies, instead I found myself talking to the president of the club! Boehner's pragmatism does not change his principles or bias. On the House pairs particularly well with A Promised Land, Obama's erudite soliloquies complementing Boehner's more pungent prose. (https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...) Obama saw the republicans as obstructive and out of touch, Boehner saw Obama as arrogant and willing to go back on his word. Boehner describes Democratic politicians the same way he describes his high school rival football team: man we hated those guys . Most interesting was the way that both Boehner and Obama describe McCain in the 2008 election, both with sympathy towards McCain's fumbles, but with very different ideas of the context of critical junctures of the meeting and its meaning. Finally, Boehner provides glimpses at what matters in politics for in America: I felt like being a smartass, so I made some wisecrack about the sugar industry raping taxpayers. Without another word I walked into my private office and shut the door. Without a real plan to go after the sugar people, I was just screwing with the guy. My phone did not stop ringing for the next 5 weeks. The guy must have walked straight out of my office to the nearest phone booth or maybe he had a cell phone even then, these guys were loaded, and called his office and announced: Boehner, Ohio 8th, code red. I had no idea how many people of my district were connected to the sugar industry. People were calling all day telling me that they made pumps or plugs or boxes or some such connected to sugar production, and I was threatening their job. Mayors called to tell me about employers their towns depended on that would be hurt by a sugar downturn. It was the most organized effort I had ever seen. And that's why you don't fuck with sugar. Worth a read. *A shot and a beer is the most popular drink served at the Boehner family bar while growing up. Despite his obviously epicurean proclivities and the vices depicted on the cover, Boehner's writing seems more in line with the person he was growing up rather than the enjoyments he's picked up over time in Washington.

  8. 4 out of 5

    nitya

    As an Ohioan and progressive I rebuke this bonehead and his waste of trees

  9. 4 out of 5

    Joe Kraus

    John Boehner used to get mocked for all the times he cried in public. Plenty of observers, on both sides of the aisle, piled on. Republicans seemed to find it an embarrassing show of weakness and Democrats seemed to think it was crocodile tears, the too-late-to-help empathy of a man who actually did have the power to make changes in the world. I admit, though, that I always admired it. Boehner rarely seemed to be crying for his own sake. He cried when he saw government failing, when it seemed as John Boehner used to get mocked for all the times he cried in public. Plenty of observers, on both sides of the aisle, piled on. Republicans seemed to find it an embarrassing show of weakness and Democrats seemed to think it was crocodile tears, the too-late-to-help empathy of a man who actually did have the power to make changes in the world. I admit, though, that I always admired it. Boehner rarely seemed to be crying for his own sake. He cried when he saw government failing, when it seemed as if we’d come close to making a bi-partisan deal and failed. In other words, I always suspected an abiding decency to the man, something that’s amplified as I listen here to someone with the Ohio accent of my childhood. I want to be clear: Boehner was – and remains – philosophically in the wrong. When he talks about shrinking government, he means that we should remove the few barriers we have that prevent the wealthy from exploiting the poor. When he talks of getting rid of “needless” regulations, he means that we should permit more pollution, more risk in the products we use, and more opportunity for some to skirt the financial regulations that protect most of us. That said, though, I am convinced he believes in that philosophy because he believes it can help the many. In turn, I can believe he is wrong and yet continue to respect him. That felt a bit radical six years ago. Today, after a term of Donald Trump – a man whom Boehner excoriates throughout this – I think it’s becoming a consensus of what Boehner himself would call the non-“crazies.” It’s clear that we need two functioning political parties if we’re going to move forward as a society, and Boehner represents some of the best of the philosophically-in-the-wrong. Along with that, he has written a political memoir that strikes me as rare on at least two grounds. One, it’s candid. Boehner is still a relatively young man, but he’s clearly done with politics. As he says repeatedly, he’ll pitch in when he can, but he’d much rather play golf, drink wine, and chase his grandchildren. It’s been a good life, and he’s looking forward to a lot more of it, but he’s got no reason to temper his reflections. He has many more good things to say about Nancy Pelosi, for instance – someone with whom he degrees on philosophy – than about Ted Cruz or Mark Meadows. Two, this is generally very funny. Whatever else he is, Boehner is affable. He lacks the smoothness of most successful politicians. He is not, for instance, as glib as Newt Gingrich or as manicured as Paul Ryan. But the man can tell a good story. He ends with a superfluous list of “Boehnerisms,” phrases he claims he threw around throughout his career. My favorite – even after he gives it to us three or four times in the body of the memoir – is “A leader without followers is just a guy taking a walk.” That kind of corner-bar cleverness (and he grew up the son of a bar-owning family) runs throughout the book, and I enjoyed hearing him spin it. There are elements here of the lower-middle-class kid who made good, and, as with so much else, Boehner knows how to grab an audience. He was the second of twelve kids; he has the story-telling skill to share a detail like, “I didn’t get to use a fully dry towel the whole time I was growing up,” and to let it stand for a host of others. There are elements here as well of the rising politician whose eyes got large when he first met Gerald Ford or then-speaker Tom Foley. And he has good stories about the foibles of a lot of the people he met along the way. But the heart of this comes through his recollections of the major legislative showdowns of his speaker days. He talks about forging a major education bill with no less than Ted Kennedy, with each side holding off challenges from the most partisan of their party. He talks as well about trying – and failing – to devise common ground with the newly elected Barack Obama. Despite the admirable passion that could make the man cry in public, I can’t imagine a world in which I would vote for John Boehner. After reading this, though, I can easily imagine enjoying a long dinner listening to his stories and sharing a drink with him. In fact, to his real credit, I feel as if I have done just that.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Mary Ann

    I'm very glad not to have spent any money (thanks to my library) on this pathetic, self-serving effort by John Boehner to explain his failures of conscience and leadership. I was engaged by his account of his family and his growing up in an area of Cincinnati I know well. I have known John slightly for many years, his congressional district being adjacent to mine. He's a very personable and genuinely nice guy, and I suppose I hoped for some redeeming motivation or, at least, expression of regret I'm very glad not to have spent any money (thanks to my library) on this pathetic, self-serving effort by John Boehner to explain his failures of conscience and leadership. I was engaged by his account of his family and his growing up in an area of Cincinnati I know well. I have known John slightly for many years, his congressional district being adjacent to mine. He's a very personable and genuinely nice guy, and I suppose I hoped for some redeeming motivation or, at least, expression of regret for his action/inaction as minority leader and Speaker of the House. Not a chance. My major bone of contention with him has always been his refusal to bring the very bipartisan immigration reform Senate bill to the House floor in 2013, but that was before reading the book. His role in the crippling government shutdown in October that same year was even worse. In spite of his, he claims, adamant belief that it was unreasonable, morally wrong, and would cause pain and harm, he threw up his hands and went along with it. He did not lead but followed, cowardice at the highest level and a betrayal of conviction. No redemption in the pages of this memoir.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Christina DeVane

    I found this quite interesting as I love memoirs! Boehner had an unusual political path growing up in a family of Democrats. But Ronald Reagan changed his mind with his Republican policies, and he became a Republican and started into the world of politics on the community level as HOA board member. He had humble beginnings growing up in a family of 12 children and living in a 2-bedroom house!😳 I learned so much about government and the inter workings of the House of Representatives. It’s really an I found this quite interesting as I love memoirs! Boehner had an unusual political path growing up in a family of Democrats. But Ronald Reagan changed his mind with his Republican policies, and he became a Republican and started into the world of politics on the community level as HOA board member. He had humble beginnings growing up in a family of 12 children and living in a 2-bedroom house!😳 I learned so much about government and the inter workings of the House of Representatives. It’s really another world of politics within your own party in Washington. He was very frank about his thoughts of everyone and everything, and unfortunately so. much. language. 🙈 Would not recommend listening to this one and hence only a 3 star rating. I feel like I understand why he’s made some of the choices he has, and why he gets frustrated at right-wing conservatives who think they know it all and want to change everything in 2 years. Our government is not set up that way on purpose, and ability to swing right or left really fast would make for unstable, unhealthy government. Quotes: 📖 “You can learn something from pretty much everyone you meet, if you know how to listen.” 📖 “I figured out pretty quickly that in the absence of any other plan, your plan becomes the plan. After that I made sure to never walk into a meeting without a plan.” 📖 “Nothing in government is simple or easy. When you try to change one thing for one group of people, it can upset a whole bunch of other groups you never even thought about.”

  12. 4 out of 5

    Margo Stocker

    As a life long Democrat, I found this book enlightening and interesting. It made me laugh because Boehner is blunt and honest. It was a great book to listen to because John Boehner reads it.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    I'll always think of Boehner as the cigarette smoking, red wine drinking Republican Speaker of the House during the Obama era. While some bits of On the House felt like revisionist history (especially those parts involving President Obama), I loved the parts where Boehner took on members of his own party. The passages about Ted Cruz were worth the price of admission alone (spoiler, there's no love lost for Boehner when it comes to Cruz). I listened to the audiobook which was narrated by the autho I'll always think of Boehner as the cigarette smoking, red wine drinking Republican Speaker of the House during the Obama era. While some bits of On the House felt like revisionist history (especially those parts involving President Obama), I loved the parts where Boehner took on members of his own party. The passages about Ted Cruz were worth the price of admission alone (spoiler, there's no love lost for Boehner when it comes to Cruz). I listened to the audiobook which was narrated by the author. If you decide to read this book, the audiobook is the way to go.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Brian

    Boehner’s memoir is quick, dishy, and punctuated by easygoing cursing. The former Speaker saw the Contract With America, Clinton’s impeachment, George W Bush’s down-home hectoring, the Tea Party, Obamacare, and a whole cast of Washington characters. If you know anything about this book, you’ve heard that Boehner reserves most of his vitriol for Ted Cruz. His narration is good, and if you’re interested in the life of a center-right politician during these tumultuous few decades, this one will not Boehner’s memoir is quick, dishy, and punctuated by easygoing cursing. The former Speaker saw the Contract With America, Clinton’s impeachment, George W Bush’s down-home hectoring, the Tea Party, Obamacare, and a whole cast of Washington characters. If you know anything about this book, you’ve heard that Boehner reserves most of his vitriol for Ted Cruz. His narration is good, and if you’re interested in the life of a center-right politician during these tumultuous few decades, this one will not disappoint.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Honor Kennedy

    While I may not have agreed with some of his political views, I enjoyed his blunt reminisces and story telling.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Karen Atwood

    No matter your politics, you’d have to admit, John Boehner is very likable. Raised in a middle class Catholic family with 11 brothers and sisters in a two bedroom house. You had to learn to fend for yourself. He’s a man’s man. He likes to hunt, fish and play golf, lots of golf. Like most golfers he remembers golf courses in detail and specific shots too. Not a fan of Trump and feels that the “crazies” have abandoned conservative principles. While he disagrees with many of his democratic colleagu No matter your politics, you’d have to admit, John Boehner is very likable. Raised in a middle class Catholic family with 11 brothers and sisters in a two bedroom house. You had to learn to fend for yourself. He’s a man’s man. He likes to hunt, fish and play golf, lots of golf. Like most golfers he remembers golf courses in detail and specific shots too. Not a fan of Trump and feels that the “crazies” have abandoned conservative principles. While he disagrees with many of his democratic colleagues he calls many friends or at least has his respect. Enjoyed listening to John Boehner read his own book.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Greyworks

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Let me tell you: as a little young progressive, John Boehner was not someone I liked. However when he was in office, I was in my teens and had no real idea about politics. So I followed the news outlets and assumed he just hated Obama, was a jerk, and was a big crybaby. However, after reading an excerpt in of his book online and was very interested in what he had to say. I personally went into the book expecting a bashing of President Trump. What I got was so much more worthwhile: faith in the ol Let me tell you: as a little young progressive, John Boehner was not someone I liked. However when he was in office, I was in my teens and had no real idea about politics. So I followed the news outlets and assumed he just hated Obama, was a jerk, and was a big crybaby. However, after reading an excerpt in of his book online and was very interested in what he had to say. I personally went into the book expecting a bashing of President Trump. What I got was so much more worthwhile: faith in the old guard of the Republican party. I'll get the obvious out of the way: I'm a Bernie-bro through and through and personally did not agree with some of his thoughts on policy. Yet as a general idea, he brought me more center or at least more willing to look into bi-partisanship. There are a lot of reasons why this is the case. First and foremost, his discussions of how he would work hard to make compromise were very inspiring. It made him hated with Republicans and Republican media, but he didn't care; he stuck to his principles. He also brought up that he followed Ronald Regan's idea that 80% percent of something is better than nothing. In our hyper political times, this makes so much sense but clearly isn't used anymore. I can only hope President Biden can do so. The other thing he brought up is that sometimes change is impossible against established lobbying groups (he mentions sugar as a big one). In the same vein, he brought up that sometimes the country is not ready for certain changes such as when Bill Clinton tried to allow gay people in the military in the 90s. Clinton lost a lot of support from his party and the Republicans. Let me be clear: I really don't care about the country not being ready for change when it comes to oppressing groups. Yet I do respect the idea he said that some of those changes need to be gradually worked into political life or it can end up tanking the changes you are trying to get. The biggest thing that endeared me to him and made me feel like Republicans weren't so bad was when he talked about how he grew up. He didn't have a silver spoon in his mouth; he grew up in a similar way to me (sans the 11 brothers and sisters). His parents were middle class, hard working people who taught him the value of a dollar. He carried that value of the dollar to fiscal policies to the White House. I was instantly hooked on this book when I read about his great effort to get rid of the shady bank in Congress that let members overdraft without ANY consequences! That isn't something that is even a Republican vs Democrat issue. If I have to pay overdraft fees then Congress definitely should. Not to mention the general tone of Boehner speaking (I listened to the audio book) was very down to Earth, honest, and at times, just plain funny! I loved the story about Gerald Ford knocking three balls into the water hazard and when he described him jumping up and down cursing. "Up 'f***', down 'f***'; Up 'f***, down f***." That line was pure gold. The reverent tone of the Pope coming to Congress was enjoyable as well. I definitely think this a book all Americans of any political persuasion can enjoy. Yeah, he might take a jab at some people you like, but in the end, he makes you realize that we have lost the art of compromise and in that way, Washington has been jammed up unnecessarily. I might even write this guy a letter because I liked this book so much.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Dianna Keiserman

    While Boehner's writing style is amusing and brutally to the point at times, he whitewashes his involvement in things and there is no doubt this is not "history" but an attempt to absolve himself of any culpability in the stalemate that has become Washington. He was clearly on the "don't let Obama accomplish anything" train from the day he was inaugurated . He had no intention of working in a bipartisan manner with the Obama administration from the day the GOP took the midterm elections. I watch While Boehner's writing style is amusing and brutally to the point at times, he whitewashes his involvement in things and there is no doubt this is not "history" but an attempt to absolve himself of any culpability in the stalemate that has become Washington. He was clearly on the "don't let Obama accomplish anything" train from the day he was inaugurated . He had no intention of working in a bipartisan manner with the Obama administration from the day the GOP took the midterm elections. I watched that unfold clearly. And despite Boehner calling the tea party or "freedom caucus" crazies, he kowtowed to them also. He was an ineffectual leader and could not control his own party members, thus the reason he retired. Boehner got his power wish and played the Washington game to get himself the speaker job and then he retired. Granted, I do think there is truth in places in this book, but he was definitely not the saint he tries to paint himself as. He weaponized the shut down tactic from 2011-2015. He capitulated to the right wing crazies after Eric Cantor was defeated. Some of the truth in this book lies in the laying bare of the manipulation that goes on behind the scenes and the realization of how polarized things were becoming as he continued to serve in the House. His name calling of various members is interesting but really only provides some entertainment value. In the end, he became the same type of career politician that he loathed when he entered the halls of congress. Sure, in his book, he is free to speak openly about things he loathed, persons he had disdain for and the disagreement with the direction the GOP was taking as he no longer has to run for office. In the end, each reader must reach their own conclusions about the material presented in this "memoir". But it really is just a way to fatten his wallet and get some digs in at people he now openly dislikes.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Socraticgadfly

    The bottom line is the post-authorial line, and that's that Boehner is a hypocrite, having announced at about the time the book came out that he voted Trump in 2020. And, he had options, of course. Following both the Lincoln Project grifters and more honest Republicans than them, he could have voted Biden. Or, done like some other Republicans and not voted. Or voted Libertarian or something. The key is that, Trump's one of HIS crazies, and Boehner would have voted for him, to riff on Edwin Edwards, The bottom line is the post-authorial line, and that's that Boehner is a hypocrite, having announced at about the time the book came out that he voted Trump in 2020. And, he had options, of course. Following both the Lincoln Project grifters and more honest Republicans than them, he could have voted Biden. Or, done like some other Republicans and not voted. Or voted Libertarian or something. The key is that, Trump's one of HIS crazies, and Boehner would have voted for him, to riff on Edwin Edwards, even IF he had both a dead woman and a live boy in bed. Boehner's a party-line Rethuglican, and won't admit it. That said, the book's not 100 percent bad. While I disagree with his take on disliking all the policies of Obama and Pelosi, I think his take on them as politicians is pretty much spot-on. On the "Squad," he's even less right on why he opposes their politics, and his analysis is somewhat more lacking, too. Pelosi doesn't appear to have caved on anything. (We'll see, if Dems keep the House after the 2022 elections, if she honors her pledge not to stand again as Speaker, and what the Squad and allies do if she breaks it. Ditto in a sense if they're the minority and she doesn't step aside and instead considers standing to be minority leader.) And, since I know how much #BlueAnon hates this part of the book, as well as the Freedom Fries Caucus and #MAGAts type hating that part, that's another reason for not one-starring. Finally, it does give some background on his life. But, the epilogue finished off any chance of three stars instead of two. Not foreseeing Trump's role in Jan. 6? Claiming that Mitch the Turtle would work with Biden on anything, after Merrick Garland? Someone who advanced to lead the House should have better political acuity than that. Or, maybe he does and this is an additional installation in being a hypocrite.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Brad

    This book is a cringefest. From the press tour, I was expecting an insider account of Boehner's time in DC, with a little humor, some self-reflection, and a bit of honesty that comes with being out of power with no desire to get back into the game. After all, Boehner's interviews and the book reviews set the expectation for a sort of "old timer telling you his story at a bar" experience. Instead, it turned out to be "drunk uncle tries to settle whiny scores and blames others for the consequences This book is a cringefest. From the press tour, I was expecting an insider account of Boehner's time in DC, with a little humor, some self-reflection, and a bit of honesty that comes with being out of power with no desire to get back into the game. After all, Boehner's interviews and the book reviews set the expectation for a sort of "old timer telling you his story at a bar" experience. Instead, it turned out to be "drunk uncle tries to settle whiny scores and blames others for the consequences of his own actions." There's no accountability for his decisions, no real self-reflection on his life, and a feeling that he thinks his only fault is that "he cared too much." Boehner makes a point of saying how shocked he is to find the House full of "clowns" but he's the one that put up the circus tent.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Paula Yerke

    I really got a kick out of this memoir. Like him or not, Boehner is who he is and tells it as he sees it. I don't often use the word rollicking but it fits this book. I really got a kick out of this memoir. Like him or not, Boehner is who he is and tells it as he sees it. I don't often use the word rollicking but it fits this book.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Zachary

    I have mixed feelings about this book. On the one hand, I worked in D.C. part of the time Boehner was speaker and saw the direction a sizeable portion of the Republican party was headed, I appreciate the former speakers perspective on the issues and agree with him that it is not good or sustainable. On the other hand, a "Boehnerism" he discussed a lot in this book is this: "A leader without followers is just a man taking a walk." On the one hand, this is self evident and important for any would-b I have mixed feelings about this book. On the one hand, I worked in D.C. part of the time Boehner was speaker and saw the direction a sizeable portion of the Republican party was headed, I appreciate the former speakers perspective on the issues and agree with him that it is not good or sustainable. On the other hand, a "Boehnerism" he discussed a lot in this book is this: "A leader without followers is just a man taking a walk." On the one hand, this is self evident and important for any would-be leader to keep in mind, in the other hand Boehner uses it as an excuse to go along with some schemes promoted by members of Congress he describes as "knuckleheads." Is it really leadership to jump in front of a people going the wrong way and leading the charge rather than turning them around? Overall, this book provodes interesting insight into someone who was a major player in Washington.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    Proof that good politicians exist! Man, I would love to raise a glass of red wine to freedom and America with John Boehner. “It costs nothing to be nice” and “a leader without followers is just a guy taking a walk” are my two favorite Boehner-isms. Wishing my days as a congressional staffer would have been a few years earlier when he was Speaker.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Brvihsta

    I like to golf, smoke cigarettes, drink red wine, and mow my own grass. Why on earth would I ever give that up to be President?

  25. 5 out of 5

    Mary Jo

    My desire to read this book was based on my hope to gain insight into this country’s political divide. The author calls himself a Reagan Republican with pride. He has spoken out against the behavior of former president Trump. But from this book, he is clearly a good old boy. He fiercely defends his right to smoke (and would prefer to do it anywhere). He loves to play golf and drink red wine. He loved traveling on our dime. He speaks derisively of most of his fellow legislators, but says he get My desire to read this book was based on my hope to gain insight into this country’s political divide. The author calls himself a Reagan Republican with pride. He has spoken out against the behavior of former president Trump. But from this book, he is clearly a good old boy. He fiercely defends his right to smoke (and would prefer to do it anywhere). He loves to play golf and drink red wine. He loved traveling on our dime. He speaks derisively of most of his fellow legislators, but says he gets along with everyone. He says he “doesn’t do anger”, but tells several stories that revolve around him losing his temper. The only woman he praises is Nancy Pelosi, and that is really only acknowledging her political savvy. And he is foul mouthed. I don’t usually care much about that when it strengthens the point or enhances the story, but not only did it not help his cause in this instance, it hurt. Then there’s his arrogance. Apparently, he is the only one who got things right. According to him, former President Obama never gave an inch on any issue. We know that’s not true. He loves himself, naming things after himself, like the Boehner Bus and “Boehnerisms”, sayings that he claims as original and thinks are clever. It didn’t help that I listened to the book, so I got to enjoy him mispronunciation of standard words, which made it difficult for me to buy into his claims of wit and wisdom. Born of very humble beginnings into a large family of Democrats, Boehner had to work hard from an early age. He didn’t feel that the Democratic Party was meeting the needs of the working class, so he became a Republican and has remained so. I can respect that, but I see him as an enabler that did little to discourage the extreme wing (or “crazies”, as he calls them) of the party that is currently THE Republican Party. I blame him for not being the leader he claims to be and reining this in. It was worth reading for the understanding gained, but revealed John Boehner to be exactly what I thought he was.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Mark Abersold

    I appreciate Speaker Boehner's perspective in spite of disagreeing with him on most points of policy. That said, this is a memoir and not a policy book which made it a relatively easy read. He spends a good chunk of this book criticizing his own party - probably more than he spends criticizing Democrats, really. A fair amount of this book feels like attempts to sanitize his own legacy, in particular his role in the 2013 government shutdown. I made it a goal this year to read at least one book by I appreciate Speaker Boehner's perspective in spite of disagreeing with him on most points of policy. That said, this is a memoir and not a policy book which made it a relatively easy read. He spends a good chunk of this book criticizing his own party - probably more than he spends criticizing Democrats, really. A fair amount of this book feels like attempts to sanitize his own legacy, in particular his role in the 2013 government shutdown. I made it a goal this year to read at least one book by somebody I disagree with, and I suppose this will fit the bill even though it was fairly easy to swallow.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Chrisman

    It was good. ## Why I Picked It Up ## Mel had checked it out and finished it up, so I decided to read it real quick before it was due. ## What I Liked About It ## I didn't really know anything about Boehner before reading this besides that he was speaker of the house. I like that hatred for Ted Cruz is apparently universal and without end. It's the one thing you can really count on to bring up all together. ## What I want to remember ## I didn't know about his anti-corruption crusade upon joining the It was good. ## Why I Picked It Up ## Mel had checked it out and finished it up, so I decided to read it real quick before it was due. ## What I Liked About It ## I didn't really know anything about Boehner before reading this besides that he was speaker of the house. I like that hatred for Ted Cruz is apparently universal and without end. It's the one thing you can really count on to bring up all together. ## What I want to remember ## I didn't know about his anti-corruption crusade upon joining the house. That was neat. He alleges he got his start in politics by serving on his Home Owners Association. And then.. poof! Speaker of the House! ## What I didn't like about it ## The whole chapter about high school sports. Nobody cares that you played football in high school, John. ## Who I'd recommend it to ## Political junkies

  28. 5 out of 5

    Maria

    It was interesting to learn more about John Boehner's upbringing in Cincinatti, Ohio as one his parents' eleven children. I don't really understand why he is a Republican, given his life experiences and the things he says he stands for. BUT, that is neither here nor there. The part of the book I enjoyed most were his stories about his early years in the House of Representatives, when he was focused on rooting out corruption. I had no idea the House had once had its own bank and post office - and It was interesting to learn more about John Boehner's upbringing in Cincinatti, Ohio as one his parents' eleven children. I don't really understand why he is a Republican, given his life experiences and the things he says he stands for. BUT, that is neither here nor there. The part of the book I enjoyed most were his stories about his early years in the House of Representatives, when he was focused on rooting out corruption. I had no idea the House had once had its own bank and post office - and that they were terribly abused by Congressmen and -women. I found some of his more folksy stories entertaining but largely disingenuous, not unlike the way I felt about my dear departed gramps' stories, and that man lied more than carpet. What bothered me most about this book was Boehner's consistent portrayal of himself as an honest and forthright guy just trying - and mostly failing - to keep the peace between a bunch of crazy rightwing extremists and the uber liberal Democrats. Unlike Barack Obama's memoir, A Promised Land, it is entirely without genuine reflection on his own shortcomings. (Of which there are certainly MANY.) And while Boehner is willing enough to call out truly wacky people in his own party like Michelle Bachman and Jim Jordan, it also lacks the serious internal critiques of the Republican party applied by other conservatives like David Frum and Bret Stephens. Maybe that's because Frum and Stephens were never elected officials, and it's easier to throw bombs at what is ultimately the work of other people. But I think it's because Boehner just... isn't that smart. He never stops to reflect on the reason - a lot of reasons, actually - that those truly wacky people all have Rs next to their names. Boehner's a hardworking blue collar guy from Ohio who did accomplish a lot in his long career in the House of Representatives, but he's ultimately lacking humility and insight into himself. Either would have made the book better. I listened to the audiobook which is read by the author, whose narration was entertaining, if a bit gruff.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Marc Gerstein

    A very interesting book and highly listenable (on Audible). Like him or not, agree with him or disagree, it’s hard to argue that John Boehner KNOWS Congress, particularly the House of Representatives and how Washington works. If you’re looking for a political tract, this is not it. Boehner presumes the reader accepts with wisdom of his Conservative views so he doesn’t take the trouble to try to justify them. Even if you don’t however, the book is very well worthwhile because of its exposition of A very interesting book and highly listenable (on Audible). Like him or not, agree with him or disagree, it’s hard to argue that John Boehner KNOWS Congress, particularly the House of Representatives and how Washington works. If you’re looking for a political tract, this is not it. Boehner presumes the reader accepts with wisdom of his Conservative views so he doesn’t take the trouble to try to justify them. Even if you don’t however, the book is very well worthwhile because of its exposition of the big topic of the day; how to govern, and how not to govern. And as the years pass, Boehner had a front row seat to the evolution, or rather devolution that culminated in the Jan 6, 2021 whacko insurrection supported by too many sitting members of Congress. And the left should take no comfort from any of the bombs Boehner tosses at the crazies in his party, especially Ted Cruz. Boehner makes it clear that the main villain, in his view (and in this, I agree with him) is the culture that buried that art of negotiation and consensus building on which our system stands and replaced it with extreme fireball throwing, not with the aim of accomplishing anything but with the aim of scoring publicity points. Reading between the lines, it’s hard to dent that Democratic crazies would do the exact same sots of things if the situation were such that they would see advantage in doing it. It’s written in a conversational style with fascinating anecdotes showing behind the scenes of how Government did and could, and probably should work. Anybody, whichever side of the debate you’re on, could benefit from reading this.

  30. 4 out of 5

    JerryDeanHalleck

    Like Boehner himself, this is a rather dull book. It does have plenty of gossipy stories but its hard to see who the audience for it is. Mr. Boehner isn't a liberal or a leftist, but doesn't like Ted Cruz, the Tea party, or Trump that much either. Basically, he's a DC insider, a "Get along, Go along type" who "wants to get things done". Which translates to giving the Democrats 65% of what they want in exchange for helping Big Business and the Chamber of Commerce. No wonder Pelosi cleaned his clo Like Boehner himself, this is a rather dull book. It does have plenty of gossipy stories but its hard to see who the audience for it is. Mr. Boehner isn't a liberal or a leftist, but doesn't like Ted Cruz, the Tea party, or Trump that much either. Basically, he's a DC insider, a "Get along, Go along type" who "wants to get things done". Which translates to giving the Democrats 65% of what they want in exchange for helping Big Business and the Chamber of Commerce. No wonder Pelosi cleaned his clock and we got Trump. The books is worth a read if you're curious about how DC politics worked behind the scenes during Bush/Obama/Clinton. PS - I recommend people read the book and skip the audiobook. Mr. Boehner has extremely slow and dull voice.

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