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Horror for RAICES: A Charitable Anthology

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All net proceeds from the sale of this anthology go to RAICES, a wonderful charity that works to provide free and low cost legal services to immigrants and refugees in the United States. Nightscape Press stands with migrants, immigrants, and refugees. These folks are human beings and no border can change that. Horror For RAICES is an emergency charitable anthology that wa All net proceeds from the sale of this anthology go to RAICES, a wonderful charity that works to provide free and low cost legal services to immigrants and refugees in the United States. Nightscape Press stands with migrants, immigrants, and refugees. These folks are human beings and no border can change that. Horror For RAICES is an emergency charitable anthology that was created as a way for horror authors to come together and take a stand against the xenophobic actions of ICE and the current US administration toward our neighbors. No children belong in cages. No children deserve to be taken from their families. Horror has a way of painting a picture of the culture and times in which it has been created. And often what it reflects is awful. Horror For RAICES does just that but it also reflects something beautiful in us all. Love. Hope. And resistance.


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All net proceeds from the sale of this anthology go to RAICES, a wonderful charity that works to provide free and low cost legal services to immigrants and refugees in the United States. Nightscape Press stands with migrants, immigrants, and refugees. These folks are human beings and no border can change that. Horror For RAICES is an emergency charitable anthology that wa All net proceeds from the sale of this anthology go to RAICES, a wonderful charity that works to provide free and low cost legal services to immigrants and refugees in the United States. Nightscape Press stands with migrants, immigrants, and refugees. These folks are human beings and no border can change that. Horror For RAICES is an emergency charitable anthology that was created as a way for horror authors to come together and take a stand against the xenophobic actions of ICE and the current US administration toward our neighbors. No children belong in cages. No children deserve to be taken from their families. Horror has a way of painting a picture of the culture and times in which it has been created. And often what it reflects is awful. Horror For RAICES does just that but it also reflects something beautiful in us all. Love. Hope. And resistance.

37 review for Horror for RAICES: A Charitable Anthology

  1. 4 out of 5

    Briar Page

    A better-than-average anthology for a good cause! I'd describe most of the stories in here as really interesting and unusual but flawed-- which, honestly, I'll take over entirely competent but dull any day of the week-- and a few as utterly fantastic. "Emperors of Jinn" by Usman Malik was a particular standout-- it reminds me of a lot of Kelly Link stories, and particularly the experience of reading those stories for the first time as a teenager. I'm left with a haunting sense that I understand A better-than-average anthology for a good cause! I'd describe most of the stories in here as really interesting and unusual but flawed-- which, honestly, I'll take over entirely competent but dull any day of the week-- and a few as utterly fantastic. "Emperors of Jinn" by Usman Malik was a particular standout-- it reminds me of a lot of Kelly Link stories, and particularly the experience of reading those stories for the first time as a teenager. I'm left with a haunting sense that I understand what's going on-- or *almost* understand it-- but when I try to put it into words, or explain it through logic (even fantasy logic), it slips ever so slightly beyond my grasp. Anyway, Malik's prose is beautiful but unobtrusive, his child characters are realistically shitty, curious, and naive, and I always enjoy reading weird fiction that draws on cultural traditions I'm not familiar with. Other stories I liked particularly were "A Children's Tour of the Facilities" by Kurt Fawver, "Drone" by Gemma Files, "It's Always Summer in the Tower" by Jessica McHugh, "The Town Manager" by Thomas Ligotti (a reprint, and one I must've read 5 times at this point, but it's just as funny and upsetting every time), "Mercury" by Livia Llewellyn, and "House of Windows" by Paul Tremblay (what if the House of Leaves were pastel?). I'm super jazzed to see Billy Martin/Poppy Z. Brite getting his hand back in the goth- horror- fiction- about- snotty- disaffected young people game, although "The Goose Girl" has some pacing problems; the ending action seems way too abrupt and truncated after the leisurely, slow-build character study lead-up, to the extent that this almost feels like a shaggy dog story. Then again, that may have been the point!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Tom

    This is an extremely good anthology, in my opinion. Not just because the cause is good, but because the stories themselves are excellent. There was only one story I didn't enjoy, but I think it boils down to me disliking that author's style, not the quality of the story. There's a wide array of styles of horror here, and several stories I wouldn't even really call horror, like Laird Barron's contribution (though I LOVED his story). There are examples of lots of different styles, such as literary This is an extremely good anthology, in my opinion. Not just because the cause is good, but because the stories themselves are excellent. There was only one story I didn't enjoy, but I think it boils down to me disliking that author's style, not the quality of the story. There's a wide array of styles of horror here, and several stories I wouldn't even really call horror, like Laird Barron's contribution (though I LOVED his story). There are examples of lots of different styles, such as literary weird like what you might get from an Undertow book, or post-apocalyptic stories, or Ligotti-esque jaundiced decaying dread (more than just Ligotti's own story), horror/noir, you name it. Obviously, the cause supported by this anthology cannot receive enough attention. I don't want this review to just be about the real life horrors that the we are committing in the United States, but of course it influenced my decision to back the GoFundMe and get the ARC for this book. If you purchased this book to support the cause of defending innocent children and their families, just know that the book itself is an excellent book. If there were no other context for this book, my review would be the same. Nightscape has knocked it out of the park here. If you like horror, weird fiction, magical realism, pulp, or really just any sort of genre fiction, you should pick this one up. If you want to support RAICES, you should pick this up.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Eileen

    Don't let the subtitle fool you: this is a quality anthology, not just a bunch of scary stores slapped together to hopefully raise a few bucks. Pretty much all the top living Weird Fiction authors except Caitlin Kiernan are represented: Thomas Ligotti, Ramsey Campbell, Poppy Z. Brite, Nadia Bulkin, Gwendolyn Kiste, Paul Tremblay, Laird Barron, Farah Rose Smith, Gemma Files, Jeffrey Thomas. (Hopefully Jayaprakash Satyamurthy will soon reach that tier. He is criminally underrated.) So yes, this is Don't let the subtitle fool you: this is a quality anthology, not just a bunch of scary stores slapped together to hopefully raise a few bucks. Pretty much all the top living Weird Fiction authors except Caitlin Kiernan are represented: Thomas Ligotti, Ramsey Campbell, Poppy Z. Brite, Nadia Bulkin, Gwendolyn Kiste, Paul Tremblay, Laird Barron, Farah Rose Smith, Gemma Files, Jeffrey Thomas. (Hopefully Jayaprakash Satyamurthy will soon reach that tier. He is criminally underrated.) So yes, this isn't actually "mainstream" horror most people think of, like Stephen King or Dean Koontz. Some of the pieces I wouldn't even consider horror at all, just stories with Weird or paranormal elements. Barron's "Soul of Me" was more properly science fiction, while Sonya Taaffe's "ζῆ καὶ βασιλεύει" was historical fantasy. Great variety overall. Ligotti was a winner, as usual. The only one I recognized from having been published elsewhere was "There's a Bear in the Woods" by Nadia Bulkin.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Tom Duffy

  5. 5 out of 5

    Ilana Singerman

  6. 4 out of 5

    Amara

  7. 5 out of 5

    SmokingMirror

  8. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

  9. 5 out of 5

    Drew

  10. 5 out of 5

    Lucian Clark

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Clifton

  12. 5 out of 5

    Aiden Merchant

  13. 4 out of 5

    Lou

  14. 4 out of 5

    Laura

  15. 4 out of 5

    H

  16. 5 out of 5

    Robert Wilson

  17. 4 out of 5

    REMEMBER UKRAINE NOW ReadingReindeer

  18. 5 out of 5

    Meagan

  19. 4 out of 5

    Whitney

  20. 5 out of 5

    John Thompson

  21. 5 out of 5

    John Robinson

  22. 5 out of 5

    Lukasz

  23. 4 out of 5

    Castiel Cas

  24. 4 out of 5

    莫娃

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kate

  26. 4 out of 5

    Roisin

  27. 4 out of 5

    Spencer

  28. 4 out of 5

    Sydney Scothon

  29. 5 out of 5

    Irene

  30. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

  31. 5 out of 5

    Gail

  32. 4 out of 5

    Jill

  33. 5 out of 5

    Laura

  34. 5 out of 5

    Cari

  35. 5 out of 5

    Deanne

  36. 4 out of 5

    Key Reads

  37. 5 out of 5

    antxto

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