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Cassandra Speaks: When Women Are the Storytellers, the Human Story Changes

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What story would Eve have told about picking the apple? Why is Pandora blamed for opening the box? And what about the fate of Cassandra who was blessed with knowing the future but cursed so that no one believed her? What if women had been the storytellers? Elizabeth Lesser believes that if women’s voices had been equally heard and respected throughout history, humankind wou What story would Eve have told about picking the apple? Why is Pandora blamed for opening the box? And what about the fate of Cassandra who was blessed with knowing the future but cursed so that no one believed her? What if women had been the storytellers? Elizabeth Lesser believes that if women’s voices had been equally heard and respected throughout history, humankind would have followed different hero myths and guiding stories—stories that value caretaking, champion compassion, and elevate communication over vengeance and violence. Cassandra Speaks is about the stories we tell and how those stories become the culture. It’s about the stories we still blindly cling to, and the ones that cling to us: the origin tales, the guiding myths, the religious parables, the literature and films and fairy tales passed down through the centuries about women and men, power and war, sex and love, and the values we live by. Stories written mostly by men with lessons and laws for all of humanity. We have outgrown so many of them, and still they endure. This book is about what happens when women are the storytellers too—when we speak from our authentic voices, when we flex our values, when we become protagonists in the tales we tell about what it means to be human. Lesser has walked two main paths in her life—the spiritual path and the feminist one—paths that sometimes cross but sometimes feel at cross-purposes. Cassandra Speaks is her extraordinary merging of the two. The bestselling author of Broken Open and Marrow, Lesser is a beloved spiritual writer, as well as a leading feminist thinker. In this book she gives equal voice to the cool water of her meditative self and the fire of her feminist self. With her trademark gifts of both humor and insight, she offers a vision that transcends the either/or ideologies on both sides of the gender debate. Brilliantly structured into three distinct parts, Part One explores how history is carried forward through the stories a culture tells and values, and what we can do to balance the scales. Part Two looks at women and power and expands what it means to be courageous, daring, and strong. And Part Three offers “A Toolbox for Inner Strength.” Lesser argues that change in the culture starts with inner change, and that no one—woman or man—is immune to the corrupting influence of power. She provides inner tools to help us be both strong-willed and kind-hearted. Cassandra Speaks is a beautifully balanced synthesis of storytelling, memoir, and cultural observation. Women, men and all people will find themselves in the pages of this book, and will come away strengthened, opened, and ready to work together to create a better world for all people. better world for all.


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What story would Eve have told about picking the apple? Why is Pandora blamed for opening the box? And what about the fate of Cassandra who was blessed with knowing the future but cursed so that no one believed her? What if women had been the storytellers? Elizabeth Lesser believes that if women’s voices had been equally heard and respected throughout history, humankind wou What story would Eve have told about picking the apple? Why is Pandora blamed for opening the box? And what about the fate of Cassandra who was blessed with knowing the future but cursed so that no one believed her? What if women had been the storytellers? Elizabeth Lesser believes that if women’s voices had been equally heard and respected throughout history, humankind would have followed different hero myths and guiding stories—stories that value caretaking, champion compassion, and elevate communication over vengeance and violence. Cassandra Speaks is about the stories we tell and how those stories become the culture. It’s about the stories we still blindly cling to, and the ones that cling to us: the origin tales, the guiding myths, the religious parables, the literature and films and fairy tales passed down through the centuries about women and men, power and war, sex and love, and the values we live by. Stories written mostly by men with lessons and laws for all of humanity. We have outgrown so many of them, and still they endure. This book is about what happens when women are the storytellers too—when we speak from our authentic voices, when we flex our values, when we become protagonists in the tales we tell about what it means to be human. Lesser has walked two main paths in her life—the spiritual path and the feminist one—paths that sometimes cross but sometimes feel at cross-purposes. Cassandra Speaks is her extraordinary merging of the two. The bestselling author of Broken Open and Marrow, Lesser is a beloved spiritual writer, as well as a leading feminist thinker. In this book she gives equal voice to the cool water of her meditative self and the fire of her feminist self. With her trademark gifts of both humor and insight, she offers a vision that transcends the either/or ideologies on both sides of the gender debate. Brilliantly structured into three distinct parts, Part One explores how history is carried forward through the stories a culture tells and values, and what we can do to balance the scales. Part Two looks at women and power and expands what it means to be courageous, daring, and strong. And Part Three offers “A Toolbox for Inner Strength.” Lesser argues that change in the culture starts with inner change, and that no one—woman or man—is immune to the corrupting influence of power. She provides inner tools to help us be both strong-willed and kind-hearted. Cassandra Speaks is a beautifully balanced synthesis of storytelling, memoir, and cultural observation. Women, men and all people will find themselves in the pages of this book, and will come away strengthened, opened, and ready to work together to create a better world for all people. better world for all.

30 review for Cassandra Speaks: When Women Are the Storytellers, the Human Story Changes

  1. 4 out of 5

    Skincare For Introverts

    DNF 50% I really wanted to like this one, but it seemed to be a distracted collection of essays on the author's loose musings on how women's voices are often ignored and demeaned throughout mainly Western history. This collection was only slightly grounded in myths, religions, and legends, and moreso focused on the author's personal thoughts, which is fine, but this made each essay a bit confusing in its thesis. Additionally, I found my views not to be in accordance with Lesser, so by the end of e DNF 50% I really wanted to like this one, but it seemed to be a distracted collection of essays on the author's loose musings on how women's voices are often ignored and demeaned throughout mainly Western history. This collection was only slightly grounded in myths, religions, and legends, and moreso focused on the author's personal thoughts, which is fine, but this made each essay a bit confusing in its thesis. Additionally, I found my views not to be in accordance with Lesser, so by the end of each piece, I was more confused than convinced of her points. To specify, Lesser mentions some questionable gender brain science which I've read conflicting research on, very specific assertions on religion (and again, criticism and personal insight is fine! But her analyses are done rather sloppily and don't differentiate between religious texts and how they've been historically interpreted and used/abused. Religious feminists exist and listening to them and their interpretations may have strengthened this section.), and while I wholeheartedly agree that we live in a society that denigrates characteristics and behavior we've labeled as "feminine," her insistence on how women are inherently nurturing, caring, and kind - with an inevitable future as mothers -- is very gender essentialist to me and does more harm than good. Though there are times Lesser backtracks from this in discussions on masculinity later on, this book overall reads like a seesaw of gender essentialism and it leaves me wondering which messages Lesser truly wants to send. Reading this book, I knew that as a non-white, chronically ill woman who doesn't want to be a mother . . . these essays were not meant to represent nor liberate me. And I know I won't be the only one. It's uncomfortable knowing that a book on recognizing women's voices overlooks a lot of women's voices. Lesser acknowledges in her introduction that intersectionality is imperative in gender studies . . . but she doesn't quite seem to believe it in the following chapters. Anyways, I wouldn't recommend this, for those familiar with feminist reads this won't be anything new. For those who aren't used to feminist texts, there are others I'd easily recommend instead, such as: Girlfighting by Lyn Mikel Brown, Thick by Tressie McMillan Cottom, Invisible Women by Caroline Criado Perez, Women, Race & Class by Angela Davis, Feminism and Nationalism in the Third World by Kumari Jayawardena, From Victims to Suspects by Shakira Hussein, and Invisible: How Young Women with Serious Health Issues Navigate Work, Relationships, and the Pressure to Seem Just Fine by Michele Lent Hirsch (also, anything by Rebecca Solnit).

  2. 4 out of 5

    Line

    This is not about women. This is about being human. And more importantly it's about redefining power in a more broad, constructive, and empathetic way than we are used to: Lesser encourage us to support and celebrate not ONLY the masculine way of life but ALSO the feminine stories, characteristics, and views of the world. To get the WHOLE story. Some quotes: "many of the creation myths from our earlier ancestors—the indigenous, pre-colonized peoples from cultures around the world—painted a differ This is not about women. This is about being human. And more importantly it's about redefining power in a more broad, constructive, and empathetic way than we are used to: Lesser encourage us to support and celebrate not ONLY the masculine way of life but ALSO the feminine stories, characteristics, and views of the world. To get the WHOLE story. Some quotes: "many of the creation myths from our earlier ancestors—the indigenous, pre-colonized peoples from cultures around the world—painted a different picture of the origin of women and men, and their worth and roles. In many of those stories, neither sex was created to dominate the other. Both men and women shared the responsibility to help the community survive, thrive, and connect with the sacred." "Domination and control have become synonymous with power, but power does not have to come at the expense of others; it does not have to oppress in order to express. The urges to subjugate, punish, or annihilate are corrupted versions of power." "When I say we need new-thinking leaders, that’s different from saying we need women to lead. All genders are capable of being wise and open and communicative, of shaping a new power story. But I believe a whole lot of women have ready access to this consciousness if we trust who we are and say what we know." "Who said that being strong and silent is better than being vulnerable and communicative? How about being all of that—sometimes strong, sometimes vulnerable; sometimes silent, sometimes willing and able to share, talk, commiserate, communicate?" Word, Elizabeth Lesser ✌️

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kari Decker

    While I do overall agree with the idea of this book: that women’s stories are largely left out of history and is indeed reflected within the very word history (his story?! Really??), I’m distraught that the author should state within the book that she cannot truly speak to the intersectionality on this topic. This is a cop out and an author should at the very least try. In my opinion this is a white washed feminist review of our world & I can not fully support it due to that. In true honesty I’m While I do overall agree with the idea of this book: that women’s stories are largely left out of history and is indeed reflected within the very word history (his story?! Really??), I’m distraught that the author should state within the book that she cannot truly speak to the intersectionality on this topic. This is a cop out and an author should at the very least try. In my opinion this is a white washed feminist review of our world & I can not fully support it due to that. In true honesty I’m a little disappointed that it was featured on Brenè Brown’s podcast. This is not a good representation of true feminism, especially being published during one of the most important movements during our time: BLM. Enough is enough. Systemic racism has no room in what is called the worlds greatest democracy any longer and leaving out the voices of suppressed groups is a thing of the past. While I’m sure the author does not promote racism or is against sharing stories from suppressed groups, this book doesn’t represent true feminism and therefore is only worthy of 2 stars for me.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Geonn Cannon

    As a man who writes women, I feel like this is required reading. From cave paintings, to myths, to beyond, the way women are presented and erased and how stories change when they're considered the hero of the tale. My one complaint is that the author would preface a chapter with a quote, and then repeat the same quote multiple times throughout the chapter. I don't know if it was an attempt to make it a mantra or just drive home the theme, but it was overblown. Still, an unquestionable five-star As a man who writes women, I feel like this is required reading. From cave paintings, to myths, to beyond, the way women are presented and erased and how stories change when they're considered the hero of the tale. My one complaint is that the author would preface a chapter with a quote, and then repeat the same quote multiple times throughout the chapter. I don't know if it was an attempt to make it a mantra or just drive home the theme, but it was overblown. Still, an unquestionable five-star read.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Lady H

    i don't think i want to read this, but man do i love that cover i don't think i want to read this, but man do i love that cover

  6. 5 out of 5

    Cassandra

    Am I going to read this because my name is Cassandra? Yes.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Wright

    Women are all Cassandras, blessed with foresight but cursed with the inability to get men to listen to them. We are weighed down by ancient myths and male-authored stories that persuade us that we are foolish, manipulative, and the weak. Lesser persuasively insists that it is time to jettison these stories and replace them with our own: stories that show the strength of cooperation and empathy; stories that show men can parent and keep house as well as women if they could only see past the stori Women are all Cassandras, blessed with foresight but cursed with the inability to get men to listen to them. We are weighed down by ancient myths and male-authored stories that persuade us that we are foolish, manipulative, and the weak. Lesser persuasively insists that it is time to jettison these stories and replace them with our own: stories that show the strength of cooperation and empathy; stories that show men can parent and keep house as well as women if they could only see past the stories they have been told about manhood. The most important issue Lesser brings up is the need for women, for everyone, to do power differently.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Britta Böhler

    Some parts were a bit too fluffy and new age-y for me but the rest I really enjoyed.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Katie Kreis

    "It's up to us to demand stories of love and justice, to read and watch them, to validate and elevate them. To pay attention to the women and men who are doing power differently, and to know their names." Lesser beautifully intertwines her wisdom with humanity's patriarchal values to provide a cultural commentary on the stories we tell. She begins the book examining popular mythology's first or most culturally-significant women (Eve, Pandora, Cassandra), dives into what power means, and provides "It's up to us to demand stories of love and justice, to read and watch them, to validate and elevate them. To pay attention to the women and men who are doing power differently, and to know their names." Lesser beautifully intertwines her wisdom with humanity's patriarchal values to provide a cultural commentary on the stories we tell. She begins the book examining popular mythology's first or most culturally-significant women (Eve, Pandora, Cassandra), dives into what power means, and provides a guidebook for how to move forward and see our worlds through modified power and gender lenses. I appreciated her personal reflections throughout that truly brought the story home. This book, excerpts, or at least the conversations it raises should be taught in university classrooms, especially in Y1 general curriculum.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie Niehaus

    3.5. Started out strong but she lost me about halfway through when it became more self-helpy. Still worth a read but I wanted to know more about Pandora and Cassandra and the language of our myths, could have skipped the meditations.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Julie Herringa Cirone

    The beginning started strong; Lesser had me pulled in with the ancient connection to the feminine portrayal in myth. The parts of her book that were storytelling and objective are great. When the book turns to subjective voice, she quickly lost me. I found her to be overly concerned with words and word policing. As an example, she has a strong stance on war references and "glorification" of war as inherently violent. As a woman who loves history (all kinds), I spend a great deal of time reading The beginning started strong; Lesser had me pulled in with the ancient connection to the feminine portrayal in myth. The parts of her book that were storytelling and objective are great. When the book turns to subjective voice, she quickly lost me. I found her to be overly concerned with words and word policing. As an example, she has a strong stance on war references and "glorification" of war as inherently violent. As a woman who loves history (all kinds), I spend a great deal of time reading war stories and there is so much she's missing: humanity, futility, bravery, struggle, defense, awakening, redefining, building, sacrifice, nurturing, and rising above. Her section on rewriting your life was equally lacking. Almost everything she toted as revolutionary are things most women already do everyday, consciously or unconsciously. I so wanted to love this because I loved the foundation of this being feminine mythology. It was disappointing. Plus side: It was a very fast read though; an average reader could read this in an afternoon.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Cassandra

    I really loved this book, I bought it blind because it called to my namesake, and I absolutely loved it from the first line. I thought the reflections on those first depictions of women in history were thought provoking and really carried throughout the authors own life and into the core message of the book. I think it's important to realize with any book of this nature that of course you are reading through the lens and tone of this specific speaker, but that doesn't make the story and the POV I really loved this book, I bought it blind because it called to my namesake, and I absolutely loved it from the first line. I thought the reflections on those first depictions of women in history were thought provoking and really carried throughout the authors own life and into the core message of the book. I think it's important to realize with any book of this nature that of course you are reading through the lens and tone of this specific speaker, but that doesn't make the story and the POV any less compelling. I think regardless of whether you agree with everything the author states (of which I didn't) there is merit and something to learn and self reflect on in every chapter. I loved it and thought it was exceptionally powerful. Especially the first Part of the book imo is very strong.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Mallory

    I loved this book. The combination of cultural and religious mythological analysis and its effect on our present-day culture was very meaningful for me. It made me think deeply about stories I've read, analyzed, talked about, and referenced to consider why there are specific emphases on those stories and what they show us about ourselves. Lesser mixes in many experiences she has had in her own life that relate, but it didn't feel like it turned the book into a memoir (which is not what I was loo I loved this book. The combination of cultural and religious mythological analysis and its effect on our present-day culture was very meaningful for me. It made me think deeply about stories I've read, analyzed, talked about, and referenced to consider why there are specific emphases on those stories and what they show us about ourselves. Lesser mixes in many experiences she has had in her own life that relate, but it didn't feel like it turned the book into a memoir (which is not what I was looking for here). There are many quotes and exercises from this book that will stay with me. I am trying so hard to unpack biases, judgements, and insecurity that have long been ingrained, and this book has (and will continue to) help me in this pursuit.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    This is the best book I’ve read in a long time. What would the human story tell if women are the storytellers? Did Eve get the short end of the stick? (Yes, yes she did) I was deeply touched by Lesser’s prose and her storytelling. I’ve been meditating on “Tell me to what you pay attention and I will tell you who you are.” What does our culture pay attention to? What do I pay attention to? Men are great but if you leave out women you leave our half of the experience to be human. In today’s world, This is the best book I’ve read in a long time. What would the human story tell if women are the storytellers? Did Eve get the short end of the stick? (Yes, yes she did) I was deeply touched by Lesser’s prose and her storytelling. I’ve been meditating on “Tell me to what you pay attention and I will tell you who you are.” What does our culture pay attention to? What do I pay attention to? Men are great but if you leave out women you leave our half of the experience to be human. In today’s world, we need women to dream and speak so that we can help the world heal.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Angie Taggart

    This book is a must read. I’d say especially for anyone who chooses curriculum, anyone in a leadership position, but basically everyone who reads books needs to read this one and rethink what you know about our language and the stories we tell ourselves. How many war metaphors do you use in a day without thinking of it? Our world can me a much better place if we change what we think we know about it. This book is a great start.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    I didn’t know the story of Cassandra that the title of this book is based on. Apollo was in love with Cassandra and to woo her he gave her the gift of prophecy. When she rejected his advances though, he was enraged and cursed her that she would remain clairvoyant but that no one would listen to or believe her. Hhmm. What an asshole! Throughout history, and still today, women have been ignored, doubted, ridiculed and even killed for their opinions. In a collection of themed essays, Lesser examine I didn’t know the story of Cassandra that the title of this book is based on. Apollo was in love with Cassandra and to woo her he gave her the gift of prophecy. When she rejected his advances though, he was enraged and cursed her that she would remain clairvoyant but that no one would listen to or believe her. Hhmm. What an asshole! Throughout history, and still today, women have been ignored, doubted, ridiculed and even killed for their opinions. In a collection of themed essays, Lesser examines some of history’s best known stories through a female lens and it’s kind of mind-blowing. “History isn’t what happened. It’s who tells the story” - Sally Roesch Wagner. In the final section of the book she leads into actionable tools we women can use to reclaim our space and our stories and to, as she deliciously puts it …. Do no harm. Take no shit. (p225). A worthy addition to the canon of feminist writing.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Diana Chappell

    Rather rambling. But the message has stuck with me. Women should have the power. But the power should be different than how men do power. “It does not have to come at the expense of others, it does not have to oppress in order to express.” Make the power inclusive and empathetic. And we should stop using war metaphors. We use a lot of war and contact sports metaphors. Like the fight against cancer. Frontline. Bombshell. Straight shooter. Low blow. So be aware, speech has power.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Lesley

    This book highlights the eradicating of women from history and the women that made it through are vilified, infantilized, sexualized. This will make you mad, but it will also inspire you to reevaluate how you interact with our established male centric culture and even the very words you use. ( I had to erase (twice!) common sayings that are war and violence related). A good intro book for any budding feminist.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Claudia

    No offense to the author, but I was expecting a different kind of book, so I fought it...the narration for the Audible didn't help for some reason. But even tho the book was not for me, the idea of taking 'the other' (wish she'd've chosen another word) to lunch is intriguing...I watched the TED talk, and I'm already thinking of ways to incorporate that idea into my advocacy work for schools. No offense to the author, but I was expecting a different kind of book, so I fought it...the narration for the Audible didn't help for some reason. But even tho the book was not for me, the idea of taking 'the other' (wish she'd've chosen another word) to lunch is intriguing...I watched the TED talk, and I'm already thinking of ways to incorporate that idea into my advocacy work for schools.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Yuliya Astapova

    DNF at around 45%. Got this as a review copy after I entered a giveaway and initially I was really excited to receive it and to read it. After reading almost half to give it a chance, I can safely say that I was not a fan for multiple reasons. Mostly, I thought it was going to be more along the lines of retellings of stories, but it was not. I won't rate it because I didn't finish and it wouldn't be fair, but if I had to rate what I did get through, I think I'd give it 2.5 stars. Really pretty co DNF at around 45%. Got this as a review copy after I entered a giveaway and initially I was really excited to receive it and to read it. After reading almost half to give it a chance, I can safely say that I was not a fan for multiple reasons. Mostly, I thought it was going to be more along the lines of retellings of stories, but it was not. I won't rate it because I didn't finish and it wouldn't be fair, but if I had to rate what I did get through, I think I'd give it 2.5 stars. Really pretty cover though. Shame it just wasn't my jam.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    I was excited at the premise of a book that retold common stories from the perspectives of the women within those stories, but most of the book strays away from that. The author references stats or research throughout but does not cite her sources well (or frequently at all) which leaves me questioning quite a bit. As a therapist I also struggled a bit with the counselor-esque stance on many things that seemed to fall short.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Erin

    This is one of those books that I wonder if I read something else than everyone who loved it. I just did not care for this book. The synopsis of the book gave me a drastically different expectation of what I thought I'd be reading (retellings of myths and stories but more centered on a woman's perspective rather than a man's and how they can apply to us today) and instead was bummed that it was essentially a self-help book that I didn't really want. This is one of those books that I wonder if I read something else than everyone who loved it. I just did not care for this book. The synopsis of the book gave me a drastically different expectation of what I thought I'd be reading (retellings of myths and stories but more centered on a woman's perspective rather than a man's and how they can apply to us today) and instead was bummed that it was essentially a self-help book that I didn't really want.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Joy Stover

    One of the most thought provoking books I have ever read. I feel like I will be digesting it for a long time. Elizabeth Lesser challenges women to rewrite the narrative and redefine power to make the world a better place. All voices have a place at the table.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Hanna Yost

    Women and myth? Sign me up. Yet I DNF at about 30% as it became preachy.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Steph Field

    Audiobook This was highly engaging and very educational! Would definitely pick up again.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Gorgeous book, I will be coming back to this again and again.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Maria

    Lesser argues that men have argued for centuries that power comes from strength and fear. That as Machiavelli said it is better to be feared than loved. But what does feminine power and strength look like? And how would it be different if it was valued as high as male power? Lesser provides inner tools to help us be both strong-willed and kind-hearted. Why I started this book: I was avoiding a Book Club book, and so I picked up a short audio that I could finish quickly and not feel the book procr Lesser argues that men have argued for centuries that power comes from strength and fear. That as Machiavelli said it is better to be feared than loved. But what does feminine power and strength look like? And how would it be different if it was valued as high as male power? Lesser provides inner tools to help us be both strong-willed and kind-hearted. Why I started this book: I was avoiding a Book Club book, and so I picked up a short audio that I could finish quickly and not feel the book procrastination guilt. Why I finished it: This was not the book that I was expecting to read based on the blurb and title, but since it was short, I gave it the space to surprise me... and it was a decent journey. I enjoyed the quotes that she starts each chapter with, but I'm off to find some of my own.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Anna

    You would think a 5 star rating would mean a perfect book for me, but this was not the case here. This book was a roller coaster for me. One sentence would jump off the page and speak directly to my mind or my heart. The very next sentence would make me feel defensive or argumentative. I think the important thing here is that every sentence engaged me on some level. I can't remember the last time I was so thoroughly connected to a text and I binged my way through this book. That justifies 5 star You would think a 5 star rating would mean a perfect book for me, but this was not the case here. This book was a roller coaster for me. One sentence would jump off the page and speak directly to my mind or my heart. The very next sentence would make me feel defensive or argumentative. I think the important thing here is that every sentence engaged me on some level. I can't remember the last time I was so thoroughly connected to a text and I binged my way through this book. That justifies 5 stars for me. I would love to have a coffee with this author.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    I totally believe this book is one every woman needs to read. A blend of storytelling, memoir and cultural observation, I loved this book about empowering women, encouraging them to be the storytellers. I highly recommend picking this one up today. I received a gifted copy in exchange for my review.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Irinka

    One of the most enlightening books about gender inequality perpetrated by the cultural norms. How would all these stories be told if we’re to be from women’s perspective? Very insightful.

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