Hot Best Seller

Love After the End: An Anthology of Two-Spirit and Indigiqueer Speculative Fiction

Availability: Ready to download

Love After the End is a new young adult anthology edited by Joshua Whitehead (Lambda Literary Award winner, Jonny Appleseed) featuring short stories by Indigenous authors with Two-Spirit & Queer heroes, in utopian and dystopian settings. This is a sequel to the popular anthology, Love Beyond Body Space and Time (2019 AILA Youth Honor Book), and features several of the same Love After the End is a new young adult anthology edited by Joshua Whitehead (Lambda Literary Award winner, Jonny Appleseed) featuring short stories by Indigenous authors with Two-Spirit & Queer heroes, in utopian and dystopian settings. This is a sequel to the popular anthology, Love Beyond Body Space and Time (2019 AILA Youth Honor Book), and features several of the same authors returning, along with new voices!


Compare

Love After the End is a new young adult anthology edited by Joshua Whitehead (Lambda Literary Award winner, Jonny Appleseed) featuring short stories by Indigenous authors with Two-Spirit & Queer heroes, in utopian and dystopian settings. This is a sequel to the popular anthology, Love Beyond Body Space and Time (2019 AILA Youth Honor Book), and features several of the same Love After the End is a new young adult anthology edited by Joshua Whitehead (Lambda Literary Award winner, Jonny Appleseed) featuring short stories by Indigenous authors with Two-Spirit & Queer heroes, in utopian and dystopian settings. This is a sequel to the popular anthology, Love Beyond Body Space and Time (2019 AILA Youth Honor Book), and features several of the same authors returning, along with new voices!

30 review for Love After the End: An Anthology of Two-Spirit and Indigiqueer Speculative Fiction

  1. 4 out of 5

    Thomas

    Enjoyed the queerness throughout this short story collection as well as the Indigenous representation! Also felt fascinated by the themes of nature and environmental devastation, what constitutes a utopia versus a dystopia, and AI rights. I did find myself lost in several of the stories after the first two, wanting a bit more in-depth exposure to the characters before jumping into some twisty plots. However I would still recommend to those interested in the voices and stories of Indigenous, quee Enjoyed the queerness throughout this short story collection as well as the Indigenous representation! Also felt fascinated by the themes of nature and environmental devastation, what constitutes a utopia versus a dystopia, and AI rights. I did find myself lost in several of the stories after the first two, wanting a bit more in-depth exposure to the characters before jumping into some twisty plots. However I would still recommend to those interested in the voices and stories of Indigenous, queer, and Two-Spirit writers and characters.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Danika at The Lesbrary

    As I was reading Love after the End, I was reminded just how colonialist SFF often is as a genre, whether it’s about “conquering new worlds” and literally establishing colonies, or centring Medieval England in fantasy stories, or just holding up white, straight, cis, male protagonists as the heroes. This collection is such a refreshing change of perspective. These stories include a relationship with the land that isn’t common in science fiction stories. They assume a greater responsibility for p As I was reading Love after the End, I was reminded just how colonialist SFF often is as a genre, whether it’s about “conquering new worlds” and literally establishing colonies, or centring Medieval England in fantasy stories, or just holding up white, straight, cis, male protagonists as the heroes. This collection is such a refreshing change of perspective. These stories include a relationship with the land that isn’t common in science fiction stories. They assume a greater responsibility for protecting the Earth than I’m used to from a dystopia. The question of whether to stay on a planet that’s been destroyed by (white, wealthy) human activity is very different here than in a typical white space travel story. There’s also an m/m romance story between a teenage boy and an AI who is also a cyberengineered super-intelligent rat! (In this story, same-sex relationships are accepted, but human/AI romantic relationships were the “the sort of thing that was whispered about, something that lived in the shadows.”) Full review at the Lesbrary.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Mel (Epic Reading)

    The introduction alone, to this collection, has given me a lot to think on. From questioning what defines an apocalypse (one idea: Native Americans had theirs with colonialism and today is their dystopia), to understanding a bit more about how Native cultures have non-gender roles in their traditions, and what it means to be LGBTQ+ inside Native cultures. There is a lot to learn in these stories. Story #1 - Abacus by Nathan Adler A cute little love story between an AI and a human. Story #2 - Histor The introduction alone, to this collection, has given me a lot to think on. From questioning what defines an apocalypse (one idea: Native Americans had theirs with colonialism and today is their dystopia), to understanding a bit more about how Native cultures have non-gender roles in their traditions, and what it means to be LGBTQ+ inside Native cultures. There is a lot to learn in these stories. Story #1 - Abacus by Nathan Adler A cute little love story between an AI and a human. Story #2 - History of the New World by Adam Garnet Jones A lovely story of possible migration to another planet, and the inherent destructiveness of humans. “…we must always strive for balance. Above all else, our circle must be round.” Story #3 - The Ark of the Turtle’s Back by Jayne Simpson A unique melancholy feel to this story. Really enjoyed it and the idea that leaving the Earth would be impossible for those whom are connected to the land. Story #4 - How to Survive the Apocalypse for Native Girls by Kai Minosh Pyle A touching narrative about how a lesbian native girl copes to ‘fit in’ before she realizes that maybe she can make her own world to ‘fit’ into it. Story #5 - Andwanikadjigan by Gabriel Castilloux Calderon Say that title five times fast... or you know even once. A beautiful story about passing oral stories down the generational line. I imagine having a mark for every story I know. I’d strive to be a beautiful tattooed/marked girl whose original skin colour would be hidden. 😉 Story #6 - Story for a Bottle by Darcie Little Badger A wonderful story! Reminds me of the writing style of Paolo Bacigalupi. Well paced, evenly voiced; but clever science fiction dystopia. Story #7 - The Seed Children by Mari Kurisato I wonder if so many of these stories compare the indigenous to AIs, synthetics or other non-human entities because the tribes see themselves as so starkly different from the rest of the human race (or at least the majority of us). Another brilliant story that has a happy ending which is rare in sci-fi stories. Story #8 - Nameless by Nazbah Tom Dream communication is one of the many stories I heard as a child and understood to be a skill or talent only available to some people. It was always the Indigenous tribes that live on the edge of, or near my city. I remember being envious of them then; and I’m envious of them now after this story. Story #9 - Eloise by David A. Robertson This is like an episode of Black Mirror. In fact I think they should legit take this story and make into one. Brilliant, creepy and certainly worthy of thought. Would you rather get over someone or spend 400 virtual years forgetting them? Overall In a word: Fabulous! In all the ways and meanings of the word. This is a MUST read for any LGBTQ+ reader; and certainly a great introduction to two-spirit, Indigiqueer symbolism, placement in Indigenous culture, and where today these wonderful folks fit. I’m so thankful that Joshua Whitehead chose to participating in WordFest 2020 (virtual) in Calgary. It was a pleasure to listen to him speak and learn more about his background and literature.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    First and foremost: I am so happy that this anthology exists. I love when underrepresented voices get the chance to be heard. The fact that it was one of the best anthologies I've read this year was just the icing on the cake. On to the stories! 1. Abacus, by Nathan Adler. This had to be one of the most creative stories I've ever read. I mean, a bio-AI rat who, via his online avatar, falls in love with another boy? So original! Sadly, there were a couple issues that I'm still puzzling through. Firs First and foremost: I am so happy that this anthology exists. I love when underrepresented voices get the chance to be heard. The fact that it was one of the best anthologies I've read this year was just the icing on the cake. On to the stories! 1. Abacus, by Nathan Adler. This had to be one of the most creative stories I've ever read. I mean, a bio-AI rat who, via his online avatar, falls in love with another boy? So original! Sadly, there were a couple issues that I'm still puzzling through. First of all, I'm not sure how old the human protagonist is, but the way things are worded, he's quite young. Maybe thirteen/fourteen(ish)? And, well, an AI is non-aged, but still very much far more “adult” than the human. There's just a big power imbalance that I couldn't quite get past to allow me to enjoy the characters in a romantic relationship. And then there's... (view spoiler)[the fact that the AI expected the human boy/teen to run away with him, even though he's now a rogue AI who must live “underground” for a while....it just didn't seem right, expecting the teen boy to go along with him. I think it should have ended differently. The AI should have left him, or something. I think the setting and feel the story had before the romance began warranted a less fluffy, “HEA” ending. (hide spoiler)] RATING: 3 stars. 2. History of the World, by Adam Garnet Jones. Wow. I was blown away by this story. So many deep and interesting themes compounded into one short story—and they all fit so perfectly! Immigration, climate change, the horrors of our consumerist society, gender and racial identity . . . there was just so much, so many layers, and all of them beautifully woven in. This is a must-read story for everyone, in my opinion. (view spoiler)[My only gripe was I felt the big event (the other wife leaving, and the family separating toward the end) was a little ham-fisted in. But that's about it, I think. (hide spoiler)] RATING: 4.75 stars. Personal favorite of the anthology! 3. The Ark on the Turtle's Back, by Jaye Simpson. I couldn't really get into this story very well. There was so much summarized, rather than shown, and since it had a similar premise to the last story (evacuation off an apocalyptic Earth), it did not shine as much as it could have. To me there were too many characters to the point where it sometimes got confusing who was who. RATING: 2.5 stars. 4. How to Survive the Apocalypse for Native Girls, by Kai Minosh Pyle. I enjoyed this story a great deal. It had an interesting structure and several fascinating characters. I do feel that the narrator's friend, Migizi, was the true protagonist, and the story might have been a little more engaging if it had been told from their POV. But it was a good story as it was. RATING: 3.5 stars. 5. Andwànikàdjigan, by Gabriel Castilloux Calderon. A lovely tale about the power of stories, which is something I can always get behind. I really liked how the dual-timeline weaved together, adding more depth and background to the central story. It was handled very well, I thought. RATING: 4 stars. 6. Story for a Bottle, by Darcie Little Badger. This one was quite unique in several ways, one of which is how the story's told, via a letter sent to the protagonist's younger sibling. It was really neat, and didn't lessen the suspense of all that the protagonist went through...which was some pretty tense stuff. I was pleased that the story ended on a somewhat positive note—I was worried there for a while. I did feel that the medium did make the protagonist seem a little more passive than I would have liked. I think if it was taking place “in real time” we could have seen more of her resistance and felt more of her fear and the like. The emotions just weren't as tightly strung as I would have preferred. Still a very good little story. RATING: 4 stars. 7. Seed Children, by Mari Kurisato. This had to be the grimmest story in this anthology. Thankfully, much of what makes it so isn't on the page. In fact, this was a quick read. A quick, frightening dunk into cold water before we're passed off to a more optimistic conclusion. RATING: 3.5 stars. 8. Nameless, by Nazbah Tom. Really didn't care for this one. There just wasn't much of a story, in my opinion. And the writing was very monotonous and dull. RATING: 2 stars. 9. Eloise, by David A. Robertson. Despite being a more “literary” story, this one packed a surprising amount of suspense. Fascinating worldbuilding, too, having to do with the dangers of tech when it becomes so omnipresent that it takes over a person's life. The plot did feel a little ham-fisted in places, but the lovely writing and other aspects helped me overlook some of that. Overall, a lush, frightening look at a future I could honestly see happening some day. RATING: 4.5 stars. 4 stars for the anthology as a whole.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jenny (Reading Envy)

    This is the March read for the Indigenous Reading Circle and I'm looking forward to discussion this weekend. Most of the stories share a theme of the destruction of the earth, from climate change or alien intervention, and how characters from indigenous communities are dealing with circumstances. If you are a guardian of the earth, do you stay to the end? What kind of new communities can be formed? What about AI or VR? Most of the time when I read short stories, I expect every word to matter, for This is the March read for the Indigenous Reading Circle and I'm looking forward to discussion this weekend. Most of the stories share a theme of the destruction of the earth, from climate change or alien intervention, and how characters from indigenous communities are dealing with circumstances. If you are a guardian of the earth, do you stay to the end? What kind of new communities can be formed? What about AI or VR? Most of the time when I read short stories, I expect every word to matter, for a high value to be placed on scarcity. I found many of these stories to be more in a storytelling voice (two in particular are very much telling instead of showing, like a faux memoir or history tone) and I wonder if that has anything to do with the framing of indigenous voices, is there some level of traditional technique being employed here? So the discussion should be interesting!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Becky

    So consistently good, my favorite stories in this anthology were History of the New World by Adam Garnet Jones, about a family preparing to depart Earth for a new world; Andwànikàdjigan by Gabriel Castilloux Calderon, a story about storytelling in a world where it’s forbidden; and Eloise by David A. Robertson which spins a brilliant tale of virtual reality technology and lost love. Solidly speculative but with doubtlessly broader appeal, I highly recommend this collection.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Rana

    While I didn't always understand what was going on, I don't think that it's my place to understand. And like all anthologies, loved some stories and was cold on others. Overall, a brilliant idea and I would love to see more from these authors. While I didn't always understand what was going on, I don't think that it's my place to understand. And like all anthologies, loved some stories and was cold on others. Overall, a brilliant idea and I would love to see more from these authors.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Chloe Halpenny

    this was like Two-Spirit/queer, Indigenous Black Mirror. very cool.

  9. 4 out of 5

    2TReads

    4.5/5 stars "Kinship is a two-sided coin, Nigig. You always gotta ask yourself, who is being excluded here?"- Migizi. 🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈 What caught my attention immediately from the tone of Joshua Whitehead's introduction was the intention of this anthology to be nothing other than deliberate, clear, and personal with the representation of indigiqueerness, the exploration of indigenous people's relationship with self, AI, environment, family, beliefs, violence, and experiences. 🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈🏳 4.5/5 stars "Kinship is a two-sided coin, Nigig. You always gotta ask yourself, who is being excluded here?"- Migizi. 🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈 What caught my attention immediately from the tone of Joshua Whitehead's introduction was the intention of this anthology to be nothing other than deliberate, clear, and personal with the representation of indigiqueerness, the exploration of indigenous people's relationship with self, AI, environment, family, beliefs, violence, and experiences. 🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈 The authors brilliantly came together using the speculative story-telling format to imagine the future, teach lessons of acceptance, exclusion, violence against queer individuals, understanding, and survival, all while keeping Two-Spirit and Indigiqueers central. 🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈 These stories take us from Earth into space and new worlds, and along the way we see the consequences, misgivings, actions, journeys that have led to the altered surface of our world as we know it. Changes that can be compared to what indigenous people's have faced and are not unfamiliar with and which they are still fighting today. 🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈 Each story resonates with the love, respect, and dedication that indigenous people have for the Earth, the land that provides for and sustains them; their connection to both and to each other, making the characters vivid and bonded to their hi/stories. It was impossible not to be affected by these narratives. 🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈 Again central to every story is family, queerness, indigiqueerness, Two-Spiritedness, Earth, future paths, and how indigenous peoples have been honouring and living in harmony with the land and all its inhabitants for generations. 🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈 A Must Read. Thank you to Arsenal Pulp for this review copy. All thoughts are our own. Go buy, borrow, gift this anthology. 🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈 This is a resonant, relevant, oh so important collection of speculative fiction that truly represents indigenous peoples, their connection to mother earth, and how their past and present informs their interactions and visions for tomorrow.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Angela

    This was a really fun speculative anthology with a focus on what happens after the end of the world through a queer indigenous lens. Like all collections some of these stories worked better for me than others but over all I really enjoyed the diversity of experiences in this collection and the different angles that were taken with this focus. My favorite story was the last one, Eloise, which had a very fun black mirror energy.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Alicia

    An awesome, well-paced anthology collection! Highly recommend for fans of short fiction, speculative fiction with a hopeful edge (think the opposite of Black Mirror) and tons of queer content! Loved this one.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ricky Schneider

    A Post-Apocalyptic exploration of Indigenous Futurism, Love After the End is a visceral emotional gut-punch that is rendered with epic vision and thriving imagination. As with most short story collections (I imagine, this being my first) some stories worked better than others and the writing varied but that was also part of the magic and thrill of this reading experience. Each of these speculative Sci-Fi themed tales has a personality that is distinctly its own and the overall collection is incre A Post-Apocalyptic exploration of Indigenous Futurism, Love After the End is a visceral emotional gut-punch that is rendered with epic vision and thriving imagination. As with most short story collections (I imagine, this being my first) some stories worked better than others and the writing varied but that was also part of the magic and thrill of this reading experience. Each of these speculative Sci-Fi themed tales has a personality that is distinctly its own and the overall collection is incredibly unique as a whole. Some of that is due simply to its specificity. These are all Indigenous Queer stories and perspectives. Even more specifically, they are Two Spirit tales of love, loss, and contemplations on the past and future of Indigenous Peoples. To say they were fascinating feels exploitative but I was moved, challenged and enlightened throughout this entire collection. Joshua Whitehead is one of my favorite writers after reading their novel Jonny Appleseed and their poetry collection Full-Metal Indigiqueer. They curate and edit this collection and it could not have been in better hands. It's through my admiration for Whitehead that I found this exceptional and transportive book. The voices here are creatively unusual and refreshing in their layered perspectives. My personal favorite has to be History of the New World by Adam Garnet Jones. That story stands out in its contrasting scope and intimacy. The characters were indelible and the story was propulsive yet meditative at the same time. I will certainly be searching out any further work Jones has or will ever put out in the future. This book was an excellent introduction to short story collections for me and I'm certain I will return to these impressive and impactful tales to draw more from their inspired voices and complex themes. Love After the End manages to transcend what could be a gimmick to weave an intricate and expansive tapestry of speculative thought and colorful dreams rooted in the histories and cultures of its authors but propelled thrillingly into their powerful visions of a future for love after the world is over.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Emma Vossen

    A great anthology. Story For a Bottle was my fav!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Chey

    I liked some stories more than others, but overall this is a beautiful collection. 4.5.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Enne

    I really really enjoyed this anthology! I was originally drawn to it because I found out that some stories acted as sequels for stories in LOVE: BEYOND BODY, SPACE, AND TIME and I was intrigued. But I actually ended up enjoying LOVE AFTER THE END more. I really loved the concept of exploring apocalypses through the point of view of Indigenous people and I also ended up really loving the execution! As with any anthology, there were some stories that I loved and some that I didn’t, but my favorite I really really enjoyed this anthology! I was originally drawn to it because I found out that some stories acted as sequels for stories in LOVE: BEYOND BODY, SPACE, AND TIME and I was intrigued. But I actually ended up enjoying LOVE AFTER THE END more. I really loved the concept of exploring apocalypses through the point of view of Indigenous people and I also ended up really loving the execution! As with any anthology, there were some stories that I loved and some that I didn’t, but my favorites were History of The New World by Adam Garnet Jones, How To Survive The Apocalypse for Native Girls by Kai Minosh Pyle, and Seed Children by Mari Kurisato.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Alanna Why

    “They kissed like the world was ending, but really, wasn’t it already over, and perhaps within this kiss lay a new beginning?” Love After The End is a short anthology of nine stories of speculative fiction, all written by two-spirit and indigiqueer writers, edited by Joshua Whitehead. This was a quick read, but also one that was very bold and creative. It was also filled with a lot of heart, as all of the stories are geared towards endings with utopias both big and small for queer Indigenous peop “They kissed like the world was ending, but really, wasn’t it already over, and perhaps within this kiss lay a new beginning?” Love After The End is a short anthology of nine stories of speculative fiction, all written by two-spirit and indigiqueer writers, edited by Joshua Whitehead. This was a quick read, but also one that was very bold and creative. It was also filled with a lot of heart, as all of the stories are geared towards endings with utopias both big and small for queer Indigenous peoples living through various apocalypses. My favourite stories were “Abacus” by Nathan Adler and “Story For A Bottle” by Darcie Little Badger, which both took on the question of human relationships with AI. Big recommend if you are into non-white and non-straight perspectives in science fiction, and I would also highly recommend reading Whitehead’s extremely moving novel Jonny Appleseed if you haven’t already. Please note: I received a free digital ARC of this book in exchange for a fair and honest review.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Anny Barros

    Abacus by Nathan Adler - 4/5 History of the New World by Adam Garnet Jones - 4.5/5 The Ark of the Turtle's Back by Jaye Simpson - 5/5 How to Survive The Apocalypse for Native Girls by Kai Minosh Pyle - 4/5 Andwànikàdjigan by Gabriel Castilloux Calderon - 4.5/5 Story for a Bottle by Darcie Little Badger - 4.5/5 Seed Children by Mari Kurisato - 3.5/5 Nameless by Nazbah Tom - 4.5/5 Eloise by David A. Robertson - 5/5 Abacus by Nathan Adler - 4/5 History of the New World by Adam Garnet Jones - 4.5/5 The Ark of the Turtle's Back by Jaye Simpson - 5/5 How to Survive The Apocalypse for Native Girls by Kai Minosh Pyle - 4/5 Andwànikàdjigan by Gabriel Castilloux Calderon - 4.5/5 Story for a Bottle by Darcie Little Badger - 4.5/5 Seed Children by Mari Kurisato - 3.5/5 Nameless by Nazbah Tom - 4.5/5 Eloise by David A. Robertson - 5/5

  18. 5 out of 5

    jame✨

    What does it mean to search for romance at a pipeline protest — can we have intimacy during doomsday? Yes, these stories work to decolonize a genre ripe with settler ideals, centering caretakers instead of explorers, reaching toward the utopia of indigiqueer futurisms. But more than that, they focus on the LOVE and JOY of these communities, and that's what makes them so refreshing. Are they perfect? Nah, but did it matter? Nahhhh. Tomorrow will be kinder. What does it mean to search for romance at a pipeline protest — can we have intimacy during doomsday? Yes, these stories work to decolonize a genre ripe with settler ideals, centering caretakers instead of explorers, reaching toward the utopia of indigiqueer futurisms. But more than that, they focus on the LOVE and JOY of these communities, and that's what makes them so refreshing. Are they perfect? Nah, but did it matter? Nahhhh. Tomorrow will be kinder.

  19. 5 out of 5

    April

    At first I wasn’t really grabbed by the stories in this book, which is the draw of a short story collection. Normally, the first two stories not really being my style would have me putting a collection like this down, but I picked Love After the End up as part of the 2021 Read Harder challenge so I stuck with it. And I’m glad I did! I really enjoyed ANDWÀNIKÀDJIGAN by Gabrielle Castilloux Calderon and STORY FOR A BOTTLE by Darcie Little Badger (I read the ending for BOTTLE twice!)

  20. 4 out of 5

    Orissa

    Such a cool collection of stories. I'm pretty new to speculative fiction so some of the short stories were more challenging than others, but the ones I liked I really liked!! I didn't end up skipping any which I think is a good sign. So much science fiction & fantasy stories are written in a colonialist style (the ideas of 'conquering' land, intruding into others space) so this collection was refreshing. I picked up my copy from my library but will be buying my own! Such a cool collection of stories. I'm pretty new to speculative fiction so some of the short stories were more challenging than others, but the ones I liked I really liked!! I didn't end up skipping any which I think is a good sign. So much science fiction & fantasy stories are written in a colonialist style (the ideas of 'conquering' land, intruding into others space) so this collection was refreshing. I picked up my copy from my library but will be buying my own!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kasia

    Really interesting collection of short sci-fi stories. I don’t think I’ve read a book with so many queer, non-binary, trans POC - the stories were captivating and focused on love, connection, story-telling all written by indigenous writers and edited by Joshua Whitehead. Very very good.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Brooks

    Its hard to rate anthologies, because I obviously liked some more than others. However, this is a great collection of short stories, and I'm very excited to check out more of the contributors works! Picked this up on a whim because I was needing a change of pace from normal SFF works. These stories really are a breath of fresh air, as SFF is so often told from a very euro-centric, white, and colonialist perspectives. The diversity of characters, Indigenous rep and queer rep are so excellent. Wou Its hard to rate anthologies, because I obviously liked some more than others. However, this is a great collection of short stories, and I'm very excited to check out more of the contributors works! Picked this up on a whim because I was needing a change of pace from normal SFF works. These stories really are a breath of fresh air, as SFF is so often told from a very euro-centric, white, and colonialist perspectives. The diversity of characters, Indigenous rep and queer rep are so excellent. Would 100% recommend to SFF readers!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Alexander Shay

    I still don't really know what to say about this book. It was good, it was different, it defied expectations... Not the style of story I'm used to; the 4 instead of a 5 comes from my personal feeling of a lack of plot development/no building tension to any kind of climax. Which is not a critique of the quality of any of the stories, just something that kept me from enjoying them fully. The very lack of the "typical" story structure made me wonder if it's just a disconnect across cultures, if the I still don't really know what to say about this book. It was good, it was different, it defied expectations... Not the style of story I'm used to; the 4 instead of a 5 comes from my personal feeling of a lack of plot development/no building tension to any kind of climax. Which is not a critique of the quality of any of the stories, just something that kept me from enjoying them fully. The very lack of the "typical" story structure made me wonder if it's just a disconnect across cultures, if the writing is not enough to evoke in me what it can for others because I'm not familiar with the intricacies of the cultures that are featured in these stories. Which is no fault of the stories or their authors and can only be changed by educating myself. But it also made me wonder if Indigenous story telling is a little different in structure than your "typical" story structure with 3 acts, rising tension, etc. Oral story telling is strongly interwoven with many Indigenous cultures, and morals come through these stories. In a course I took about Indigenous history, it was explained that instead of telling a child what is expected vs not, many cultures will tell a story instead and let the child figure out what to make of it, let the child experiment and find out on their own what is right or wrong. Stories with morals are not as focused on plot because they center around symbols instead, and I did feel these stories were loaded with symbols. Names, deities, cultures, climate, apocalypse, aliens, society, etc etc. I was reading these stories for pleasure and something new to experience, but I'm sure a closer eye would show just how loaded with symbol and teaching these stories are (on top of what you gather from the title and Whitehead's forward). In short, I think it's just a different style of storytelling than I'm used to, and it was cool to read something that made me question the very structure of stories, which I thought had been one of very few truly universal things.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Megan

    This anthology features creative and haunting writing throughout. I thoroughly enjoyed viewing the world from the perspectives of the indigiqueer authors and their characters. I came across this looking for both a genre novel by indigenous author, as well as an SFF anthology written by a person of color for the Book Riot Read Harder challenge. I'm so grateful that this challenge introduces me to books I haven't otherwise heard of. This anthology features creative and haunting writing throughout. I thoroughly enjoyed viewing the world from the perspectives of the indigiqueer authors and their characters. I came across this looking for both a genre novel by indigenous author, as well as an SFF anthology written by a person of color for the Book Riot Read Harder challenge. I'm so grateful that this challenge introduces me to books I haven't otherwise heard of.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jena

    Another short story collection, another 3 star rating from Jena. Thoughts on each story: Overall faves were History of the New World, Story for a Bottle, and Eloise Abacus by Nathan Adler Interesting story about a bio-AI rat and a human boy falling in love. History of the New World This one tackled so much in such a small amount of pages, but it did it very well IMO. Focusing on one family to tell a broader story made this work. The Ark of the Turtle's Back A story that's simultaneously extremely dark, Another short story collection, another 3 star rating from Jena. Thoughts on each story: Overall faves were History of the New World, Story for a Bottle, and Eloise Abacus by Nathan Adler Interesting story about a bio-AI rat and a human boy falling in love. History of the New World This one tackled so much in such a small amount of pages, but it did it very well IMO. Focusing on one family to tell a broader story made this work. The Ark of the Turtle's Back A story that's simultaneously extremely dark, but full of hope as well. It was really satisfying watching everything work out for the characters after such hardship. How to Survive the Apocalypse for Native Girls This one felt like just a lot of information crammed into such a small story - and I didn't really have time to absorb the story it was telling because the focus was on figuring out who these characters were and their relationships. Andwànikàdjigan Super interesting concept - would love to see this fleshed out into a novella. As it is, because it's a short story it had to condense some details I would've liked to have learned more about (like the MC's lover: who are they? where did they come from? etc.) Story for a Bottle Echoing what a lot of other people said - my favorite of the collection. The story itself was really compelling but it also had so many layers to peel back. Loved it. Seed Children Interesting ideas, quick read. For me it was a solid story, but not standout. Nameless This one just didn't work for me, and it's more personal preference than a fault with the story. Eloise This one also tried to cram a lot into such a short space and it was also hard to follow...but I don't know, I really liked it. Maybe it's because a lot of the tropes/themes in this one are sci-fi tropes I tend to love. Also my favorite writing style of the bunch, going to check out more by this author.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Ariana

    This collections was one of the last I checked out of the library in 2021. The title made me think it was a fitting way to end one year and begin another, and I was excited about the Two-Spirit and Indigiqueer representation within the stories. My favorites were History of the World by Adam Garnet Jones, The Ark of the Turtle's Back by jaye simpson, and How To Survive the Apocalypse for Native Girls by Kai Minosh Pyle. Each of them were rich and left me thinking about the complications of This collections was one of the last I checked out of the library in 2021. The title made me think it was a fitting way to end one year and begin another, and I was excited about the Two-Spirit and Indigiqueer representation within the stories. My favorites were History of the World by Adam Garnet Jones, The Ark of the Turtle's Back by jaye simpson, and How To Survive the Apocalypse for Native Girls by Kai Minosh Pyle. Each of them were rich and left me thinking about the complications of kinship, caring for our Earth, and impossible decisions with no clear outcome. That being said, there were a few that were harder to read/I liked less as there always are in a story collection. I still think it's worth reading, and my favorite stories, plus the imagination of all of the authors bumped up my initial 3-star rating to 4.

  27. 4 out of 5

    The Bookish Life of Laura

    3.5⭐️ Apparently I had no idea what speculative fiction actually was until now. Unexpected but thoroughly enjoyed There were some excellent stories in here! Some less than others, but that’s to be expected for any anthology. The one thing that was consistent across all of them though was the beautiful storytelling and writing, that was definitely my favourite part of this! I also really liked how imaginative some of the worlds were. Very thought provoking!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Carolyn Klassen

    Abacus by Nathan Adler I really liked this story. It was a great way to open the collection. Soft queer vibes but a lot about independence, freedom, and imbalance. History of the New World by Adam Garnet Jones This one was awesome. I got chills at the end of this story. So well executed. I wish this was a full-length novel though maybe that would dilute its power. The Ark of the Turtle’s Back by Jaye Simpson Another hit! Big feelings while reading this one. I really liked the concept of it and the wa Abacus by Nathan Adler I really liked this story. It was a great way to open the collection. Soft queer vibes but a lot about independence, freedom, and imbalance. History of the New World by Adam Garnet Jones This one was awesome. I got chills at the end of this story. So well executed. I wish this was a full-length novel though maybe that would dilute its power. The Ark of the Turtle’s Back by Jaye Simpson Another hit! Big feelings while reading this one. I really liked the concept of it and the way the characters interacted. How to Survive the Apocalypse for Native Girls by Kai Minosh Pyle I didn't enjoy this one quite as much as the first three but still had its merits that I appreciated. The protagonist had a nice narrative style to her voice. Andwanikadjigan by Gabriel Castilloux Calderon Beautiful concept about remembering stories and resisting every form of oppression through traditions and storytelling. Story for a Bottle by Darcie Little Badger I liked but didn't love this story. It had a cool concept and the dialogue was entertaining but I missed the fact that we didn't get resolution or ending for the protagonist and we also didn't have any scenes that made us feel connected to their family. The Seed Children by Mari Kurisato This is the story I enjoyed the least. I couldn't follow the plot and it was entirely forgettable for me. I hope this gels with other readers' preferences more! Nameless by Nazbah Tom This had some really cool concepts behind it but they were a bit unharmonious for me. I really liked the portions with the therapist and her clients and her life struggles beyond her work. The actual dream communication stuff was hard to follow. Eloise by David A. Robertson This was beautiful. A great story to end the collection. Full of regret and yearning and cool technology that seems VERY plausible. I loved the writing style and this story left me with the best feeling for the whole collection.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Shepard (Between-the-Shelves)

    This is a great anthology, full of voices that often don't get heard in the publishing world. Each story brings something different and unique, and they're all engaging. While I normally read YA, I enjoyed the perspective that these stories gave me, and definitely think more books like this should exist! This is a great anthology, full of voices that often don't get heard in the publishing world. Each story brings something different and unique, and they're all engaging. While I normally read YA, I enjoyed the perspective that these stories gave me, and definitely think more books like this should exist!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ayesha

    All I can say is thank you Bernice. This book humbled me, and indulged me. These stories live in my heart just like u do hueheueue. Forever obsessed w bn.s and these gripping stories. Also, the second one was my favorite too 😳

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...