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Jo: A Graphic Novel

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A modern-day graphic novel adaptation of Little Women that explores identity, friendships, and new experiences through the eyes of thirteen-year-old Jo March. A must-read for fans of Raina Telgemeier. With the start of eighth grade, Jo March decides it’s time to get serious about her writing and joins the school newspaper. But even with her new friend Freddie cheering her o A modern-day graphic novel adaptation of Little Women that explores identity, friendships, and new experiences through the eyes of thirteen-year-old Jo March. A must-read for fans of Raina Telgemeier. With the start of eighth grade, Jo March decides it’s time to get serious about her writing and joins the school newspaper. But even with her new friend Freddie cheering her on, becoming a hard-hitting journalist is a lot harder than Jo imagined. That’s not all that’s tough. Jo and her sisters—Meg, Beth, and Amy—are getting used to a new normal at home, with their dad deployed overseas and their mom, a nurse, working overtime. And while it helps to hang out with Laurie, the boy who just moved next door, things get complicated when he tells Jo he has feelings for her. Feelings that Jo doesn’t have for him…or for any boy. Feelings she’s never shared with anyone before. Feelings that Jo might have for Freddie. What does it take to figure out who you are? Jo March is about to find out.


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A modern-day graphic novel adaptation of Little Women that explores identity, friendships, and new experiences through the eyes of thirteen-year-old Jo March. A must-read for fans of Raina Telgemeier. With the start of eighth grade, Jo March decides it’s time to get serious about her writing and joins the school newspaper. But even with her new friend Freddie cheering her o A modern-day graphic novel adaptation of Little Women that explores identity, friendships, and new experiences through the eyes of thirteen-year-old Jo March. A must-read for fans of Raina Telgemeier. With the start of eighth grade, Jo March decides it’s time to get serious about her writing and joins the school newspaper. But even with her new friend Freddie cheering her on, becoming a hard-hitting journalist is a lot harder than Jo imagined. That’s not all that’s tough. Jo and her sisters—Meg, Beth, and Amy—are getting used to a new normal at home, with their dad deployed overseas and their mom, a nurse, working overtime. And while it helps to hang out with Laurie, the boy who just moved next door, things get complicated when he tells Jo he has feelings for her. Feelings that Jo doesn’t have for him…or for any boy. Feelings she’s never shared with anyone before. Feelings that Jo might have for Freddie. What does it take to figure out who you are? Jo March is about to find out.

30 review for Jo: A Graphic Novel

  1. 4 out of 5

    Rod Brown

    A new take on Little Women that brings the events into the modern day. Jo is a thirteen-year-old girl in middle school who uses her secret blog to work out her feelings about her family and her life. The characters are readily recognizable even as their day-to-day lives diverge widely from the original novel and LGBTQ+ themes are explored. This is very good, but has the misfortune to follow closely on the heels of the similar but slightly better Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy: A Graphic Novel: A Modern R A new take on Little Women that brings the events into the modern day. Jo is a thirteen-year-old girl in middle school who uses her secret blog to work out her feelings about her family and her life. The characters are readily recognizable even as their day-to-day lives diverge widely from the original novel and LGBTQ+ themes are explored. This is very good, but has the misfortune to follow closely on the heels of the similar but slightly better Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy: A Graphic Novel: A Modern Retelling of Little Women. Still, Jo is certainly worth reading, and since it only gets through retelling about a quarter of the original book, I have hopes we'll get a follow-up in the near future. Two side notes: All the kids have had or get chicken pox. Are the March and Laurence parents anti-vaxxers? The kids play cribbage in one scene. Do any children play cribbage nowadays?

  2. 5 out of 5

    Reading_ Tamishly

    *highlights: The artstyle is just like Raina Telgemeier's graphic novels and the characters are well defined. I appreciate the focus on writing as the main theme. And also, the LGBTQIAP representation and use of the pronouns. *However, there's not much going on in the story. I don't think you will have to read Little Women first to read this graphic novel as it's just a story of a family with 4 daughters going on with their everyday life with a worried mother and a dad staying away for work. I wan *highlights: The artstyle is just like Raina Telgemeier's graphic novels and the characters are well defined. I appreciate the focus on writing as the main theme. And also, the LGBTQIAP representation and use of the pronouns. *However, there's not much going on in the story. I don't think you will have to read Little Women first to read this graphic novel as it's just a story of a family with 4 daughters going on with their everyday life with a worried mother and a dad staying away for work. I wanted the story to be lively and a little less mundane. I wanted to get connected to the characters but sadly I couldn't. It just seems like every other school drama and romance. But yes, a good quick read for beginners.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ruth Covington

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I have conflicted feelings about this. On the one hand, it’s Little Women! I liked the illustrations and seeing how the plot translated to the modern world. (Props to Ms. Dashwood, the newspaper editor, for normalizing introducing yourself and your pronouns!) On the other hand, because I already knew the characters and the story, I expected the novel to do more in the way of making things new and interesting, and it disappointed a bit on that front. The dialogue didn’t feel real to me. It felt li I have conflicted feelings about this. On the one hand, it’s Little Women! I liked the illustrations and seeing how the plot translated to the modern world. (Props to Ms. Dashwood, the newspaper editor, for normalizing introducing yourself and your pronouns!) On the other hand, because I already knew the characters and the story, I expected the novel to do more in the way of making things new and interesting, and it disappointed a bit on that front. The dialogue didn’t feel real to me. It felt like the characters were saying “the right thing” and performing rather than speaking as complex characters. Everyone was so peppy and positive and sweet and supportive. Every attempt to add conflict to the plot was so mild and resolved with so little effort or struggle. Beth is cancer-free! She has to practice the flute and gets better at it with practice! Jo just needs to write more and then her writing is better and people praise it! We miss Father but he video chats with us and is encouraging! Meg is tutoring kids and sure blushes whenever she brings up Jon (whom we never see)! Amy likes to draw! Even Jo’s coming out, which could have been a really cool modern update and given a lot of interesting depth to her relationships with everyone, was simply met with “cool!” and “yay!” and “great!” and we never had to confront any difficulties or worry about her having any problems thereafter. And it all built up to... a kiss on the cheek from Freddie? It all felt a bit too tame, which is not at all the vibe I get from Alcott’s Little Women.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Manybooks

    Yes, I do very much appreciate that author and illustrator Kathleen Gros points out that her 2020 middle grade to young adult Jo: A Graphic Novel is only “sort of” and clearly a distinctly 21st century adaptation of Little Women and that she in the acknowledgments also very specifically thanks Louisa May Alcott. And indeed, I also do have to admit that once I got over my original quite annoyed frustration that in Jo: A Graphic Novel Jo is once again being rendered into not just a budding young wr Yes, I do very much appreciate that author and illustrator Kathleen Gros points out that her 2020 middle grade to young adult Jo: A Graphic Novel is only “sort of” and clearly a distinctly 21st century adaptation of Little Women and that she in the acknowledgments also very specifically thanks Louisa May Alcott. And indeed, I also do have to admit that once I got over my original quite annoyed frustration that in Jo: A Graphic Novel Jo is once again being rendered into not just a budding young writer but specifically into a budding young Lesbian writer and that her love interest is sadly not a German professor type but a female fellow classmate named Freddie, Kathleen Gros’ presented storyline has in general actually been quite readable, realistic and also enjoyable, and with the author being in my humble opinion especially adept at smoothly and seamlessly incorporating entire episodes from Little Women (albeit of course in modern garb) into a contemporary middle school tale about fitting in, about finding your true self and about the importance of close and loving family ties and that these close bonds are of course also a very good and potent dose of psychological medicine (for in my opinion, Kathleen Gros totally demonstrates in Jo: A Graphic Novel that all four March sisters are sustained and helped by their mutual love and support and that for example Beth’s leukaemia is in remission not only because of the medicines and treatments she has been having but also and actually perhaps even primarily because of how close she is to her sisters and her parents). However, I do also have some personal and emotional pet peeves (both textual and illustrative) regarding Jo: A Graphic Novel, and indeed, these issues have definitely a bit negatively affected potential reading joy. Sure, Jo March figures out in Jo: A Graphic Novel that she likes boys only as close personal friends but actually seems to fall in love with other girls (that she is a Lesbian). But why then is Laurie (Theodore Laurence), who is repeatedly described and also even illustrated by Kathleen Gros in Jo: A Graphic Novel as truly quite head over heels in love with Jo, immediately totally and absolutely accepting of Jo outing herself as gay to him, even considering this all majorly “cool” and not in any way even remotely problematic and possibly upsetting. For in my opinion, considering how very much interested in a romance with Jo Laurie is clearly shown as being in Jo: A Graphic Novel for me, a much more realistic reaction from Laurie would be a bit of disappointment and soul searching and not this almost blasé seeming and immediate acceptance (which actually feels quite unnatural and so much so that I kind of even have to laugh a bit, since Jo’s Lesbianism seems to almost be a forgone conclusion for EVERYONE in Jo: A Graphic Novel and this really does make in particular Laurie’s attempts at courtship seem a bit ridiculous). And finally, apropos Kathleen Gros’ artwork, while her illustrations generally work sufficiently well with the featured text (and in true graphic novel fashion), for me, especially how Amy’s facial expressions and features are at times visually rendered by Gros in Jo: A Graphic Novel, this does actually make me feel somewhat uncomfortable, as they tend to give Amy an almost witch-like and menacing demeanour that I just do not feel is at all appropriate (since in my opinion in both Louisa May Alcott’s Little Women and in Kathleen Gros’s Jo: A Graphic Novel, while Amy is of course and definitely sometimes shown as a bit spoiled and entitled, she also very much loves her sisters, she very much loves her family, and the almost at times evil looking eyes of Amy March in Jo: A Graphic Novel, they really do not all that much visually impress and actually rather turn my stomach and make me groan, as Amy is textually always being shown as only a bit spoiled but not as some kind of inherently nasty and freaky entity).

  5. 4 out of 5

    Nev

    *Clears throat, takes out megaphone* GAY JO MARCH This was such a lovely middle grade graphic novel adaptation of Little Women. I really enjoyed the art style and seeing how parts of the original story were switched up. I’m not sure if it’s because this was a graphic novel, but sometimes certain parts of the story felt a bit glossed over or like they went by way too quickly. But overall I think this was a very sweet book and it gave me the gay Jo March story that I’ve been wanting.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jo Swenson

    As a queer person who named myself after Jo March my review may be a little biased but this was perfect. I have needed a canonically queer Jo my entire life and Kathleen Gros delivered that beautifully. Beyond that premise this is just a very well done adaptation. Gros manages to fit the theme of personal growth, explored in the original story through Bunyan’s “The Pilgrim’s Progess,” into this story without coming off as overly sanctimonious. And each of the March girls as well as Laurie and Ma As a queer person who named myself after Jo March my review may be a little biased but this was perfect. I have needed a canonically queer Jo my entire life and Kathleen Gros delivered that beautifully. Beyond that premise this is just a very well done adaptation. Gros manages to fit the theme of personal growth, explored in the original story through Bunyan’s “The Pilgrim’s Progess,” into this story without coming off as overly sanctimonious. And each of the March girls as well as Laurie and Marmee were pitch perfect. Couching this story of growth and self-acceptance within a familiar context will make it’s message more accessible and comfortable for kids going through the process of coming out. I think this book could have really helped me at 13 understand why tomboyish Jo felt so familiar when I first read “Little Women” and why I had such a crush on Winona Ryder in the film.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Ms. Yingling

    E ARC provided by Edelweiss Plus In this modern reimaging of the classic Little Women, we see the March family struggling with their father's deployment. There mother is a nurse who works long hours, and the girls follow the basic trajectory of the original novel. Meg is kind of boring, interested in a young man and a mature high school student. Amy is immature and bratty (sorry, never been an Amy fan), and Beth is in remission from leukemia and does not die. Laurie is still a neighbor, although E ARC provided by Edelweiss Plus In this modern reimaging of the classic Little Women, we see the March family struggling with their father's deployment. There mother is a nurse who works long hours, and the girls follow the basic trajectory of the original novel. Meg is kind of boring, interested in a young man and a mature high school student. Amy is immature and bratty (sorry, never been an Amy fan), and Beth is in remission from leukemia and does not die. Laurie is still a neighbor, although not as ridiculously well-to-do (Has it ever bothered anyone that neighbors would be so wildly divergent economically? Not that it couldn't happen;it just always seemed odd.), and enjoys being with the family. The grandfather is portrayed much as the original. The real star, always, is Jo. In this book, she is a high schooler looking to find her place. She attends a newspaper meeting and finds that she enjoys working there, honing her writing with the help of the editor, Freddie (a girl). This book takes the family through a school year, and many of the experiences mirror ones in the Alcott book. Strengths: This remains mostly true to the original, but with an updated time period, which makes it go down better than my readers, who are not always fans of historical fiction. The characters are well developed, and the modernization of the mother and father especially good to see. Including a variety of current social issues is a plus. The illustrations are charming and will definitely appeal to fans of graphic novels. Weaknesses: I'm always glad to see books with LGBTQIA+ characters, but I'm also a little confused as to why so many reimaginings see Jo as gay. That's fine, but what about her romance with Professor Bhaer? I was never a Laurie fan, and although I was surprised that Jo married at all, I was okay with Bhaer. I did not realize that there was such a schism in Alcott fandom about him. (https://www.theparisreview.org/blog/2...) Anyway, not a weakness so much as something that confuses me. What I really think: Terciero and Indigo's Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy: A Graphic Novel: A Modern Retelling of Little Women circulates well, although no one ever goes on to pick up the original. I guess I'm a purist; read the original or don't bother with the story, but this is not everyone's view, so it's good to see these reimaginings. I've read the Aeneid in Latin and the Odyssey in Greek, so maybe I take this opinion a bit too far. At least I haven't read The Inferno in Italian!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    Very cute modern adaptation of Little Women. The whole thing was very cozy and sweet!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    Kathleen Gros is a massively talented illustrator and writer – her style as a graphic novelist is somehow simultaneously as fun and expressive as Erika Moen's and as profound and emotive as Alison Bechdel's. I loved this modern, queer adaptation of Little Women, and thought it was beautifully executed from start to finish. One thing I really appreciated about it is how chill it is: there's very little anger and conflict in this story as it's told here, and many many moments of characters just... Kathleen Gros is a massively talented illustrator and writer – her style as a graphic novelist is somehow simultaneously as fun and expressive as Erika Moen's and as profound and emotive as Alison Bechdel's. I loved this modern, queer adaptation of Little Women, and thought it was beautifully executed from start to finish. One thing I really appreciated about it is how chill it is: there's very little anger and conflict in this story as it's told here, and many many moments of characters just... being nice to each other. I didn't know how much I needed that, particularly in these globally difficult times, until I read this. It made me really emotional on multiple occasions. I'm always so glad to see queer authors telling stories of queer happiness and fulfilment, giving LGBTQ+ youth a model to look to when the bigoted world makes them doubt that they deserve love and acceptance.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Maria Rowe

    If this wasn’t loosely based off “Little Women” I would have given this five stars. But it was. The main themes of the original - to me, at least - are family, women’s independence, poverty and generosity (I’m sure I’m missing a few, but those stood out the most to me). The graphic novel covers the theme of family very well. But it doesn’t cover women’s independence. It doesn’t cover poverty: Jo and are her family look like they’re middle class. Also Laurie’s grandfather doesn’t seem absurdly we If this wasn’t loosely based off “Little Women” I would have given this five stars. But it was. The main themes of the original - to me, at least - are family, women’s independence, poverty and generosity (I’m sure I’m missing a few, but those stood out the most to me). The graphic novel covers the theme of family very well. But it doesn’t cover women’s independence. It doesn’t cover poverty: Jo and are her family look like they’re middle class. Also Laurie’s grandfather doesn’t seem absurdly wealthy; his house next door is a bit bigger, not a lavish mansion like I remember from the original. And I didn’t see any theme of generosity. Jo cutting her hair in the original to sell it to give to her mother to help her father is so memorable. I guess the title does say “An Adaption of Little Women (Sort of)” but I was expecting a little more. Also it was strange to me that Laurie got chickenpox (and that the March girls all had it) - didn’t their parents vaccinate them? And what kids play cribbage?? There wasn’t a lot of tension in the book and it seemed so mild. Everyone practices their hobbies and get so much better. Even when Jo comes out, there are no difficulties. The original book was filled with tension and passion and agony and just really raw emotion and this just seemed so flat to me. I thought the art did a good job supporting the text and the colors were fantastic.

  11. 4 out of 5

    The_Sunflower_Reader

    So cute !

  12. 4 out of 5

    Natalie Thompson

    Oh my sweetness!! This was such an adorable story!! Huge Little Women fan!! Love gems like this. Retelling of one of my favorite books... thank you so much to Erica for blessing me with this!!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Sherry

    Enjoyed this reimagined & updated version of Little Women. Great illustration style.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Katie Lawrence

    This was a really fun, sweet modernized take on Little Women. I loved the way Jo was developed as a character here, her coming out and how gentle her crush on Freddie was. Beth has Leukemia and is coping with remission. Her storyline is handled with great compassion and she's so lovingly supported by her family. Gros did a great job modernizing a lot of the storylines, maintaining some key Little Women moments while keeping things fresh. Amy and Meg seemed less important to me, while Jo certainl This was a really fun, sweet modernized take on Little Women. I loved the way Jo was developed as a character here, her coming out and how gentle her crush on Freddie was. Beth has Leukemia and is coping with remission. Her storyline is handled with great compassion and she's so lovingly supported by her family. Gros did a great job modernizing a lot of the storylines, maintaining some key Little Women moments while keeping things fresh. Amy and Meg seemed less important to me, while Jo certainly and Beth to a lesser extent were more fleshed out. It'd be fun if Gros went on to write from each girl's perspective. I loved Jo's blog, the newspaper, the way Laurie & Jo's relationship is handled etc. Just a very gentle, sweet read that will appeal to a lot of readers. Jo is in 8th grade in this iteration and I think her dreams, struggles and feelings would be relatable to middle schoolers. The March family is white, Freddie is black, some members of the newspaper use they/them pronouns.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kimberly Wright Oelkers

    I loved this book! A take on Jo from Little Women in a graphic novel! I read the original in 6th grade and I have identified with Jo Marsh my whole life since then. I can't wait for the next book! I loved this book! A take on Jo from Little Women in a graphic novel! I read the original in 6th grade and I have identified with Jo Marsh my whole life since then. I can't wait for the next book!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Christina

    I grew up loving Louisa May Alcott's Little Women. I'm not sure if it was seeing my ideals, ambitions, and faults mirrored in the tenacious authoress Jo or being enamored with the idea of having one sister, let alone three. I read it every few years and it continues to worm its way deeper into my heart. So when I saw that there was a Graphic Novel retelling coming out for middle-grade I obviously HAD to have it!!! There are some very cute adaptations for modern audiences, such as having Jo blog a I grew up loving Louisa May Alcott's Little Women. I'm not sure if it was seeing my ideals, ambitions, and faults mirrored in the tenacious authoress Jo or being enamored with the idea of having one sister, let alone three. I read it every few years and it continues to worm its way deeper into my heart. So when I saw that there was a Graphic Novel retelling coming out for middle-grade I obviously HAD to have it!!! There are some very cute adaptations for modern audiences, such as having Jo blog about her life and their father being stationed oversees with occasional video conferences or emails. Even the cover alludes to the fact that this is a very loose retelling. There are enough direct references to see the similarities, but this story stands on it's own. The focus is on Jo March, who is starting 8th grade and joins the school newspaper at the request of its editor, a girl named Freddie. While her new neighbor, Teddy, has a crush on her, Jo finds her feelings gravitating towards the school newspaper editor instead. If you need to know about Beth before reading... (view spoiler)[In case you need to know, Beth does NOT die in this one. She is in remission from Leukemia and actually goes to her last appointment and is considered "recovered" at the end of this story. (hide spoiler)] It's a graphic and meant for middle schoolers, so there's obviously not as much detail in here as the original. I would have liked more development on the sisters (or perhaps a spin off book from the perspective of each!?) but Jo's development in this book is good. I'm not going to make judgements on how she "comes out" to her family because I'm cishet and can't say if it is done in a way that's authentic, but her family is accepting and loving from the beginning which will hopefully be encouraging to readers who are going through a similar situation. The illustrations are excellent and I feel this is going to be a solid addition to all graphic novel collections for this age group.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Dipali

    Loved this! Such a wonderful modern-day adaptation of Little Women!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Dara Yoder

    Loved this graphic novel! Cute and sweet story about sisterhood, friendship, and coming out in a supportive environment without it being too mushy and sweet!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    Nicely done; it manages to keep the spirit of Little Women while setting it in the present day. Everyone's personalities are true to the original. And Jo is gay, as she should have been! Some details are anachronistic or not-quite-right. In the days of cell phones and asking for kids' pronouns for a middle school journalism meeting (which I would be happy to see happen but does it really?), a whole family (and way later a nonrelated neighbor) don't get chicken pox. Kids in middle school are highl Nicely done; it manages to keep the spirit of Little Women while setting it in the present day. Everyone's personalities are true to the original. And Jo is gay, as she should have been! Some details are anachronistic or not-quite-right. In the days of cell phones and asking for kids' pronouns for a middle school journalism meeting (which I would be happy to see happen but does it really?), a whole family (and way later a nonrelated neighbor) don't get chicken pox. Kids in middle school are highly unlikely to do blogs when Snapchat, Tik-Tok, and YouTube are available. A family with a father in the services and a mother who is a nurse probably isn't too low on cash for store-bought Christmas presents, unlike the family in the original. Still, handmade gifts are always nice. I am happy that chemotherapy can save Beth. As a child, I read the section where she died many times, with tears.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Becca

    It's a queer retelling (sort of) of Little Women, but it's not the queer retelling I wanted. Good for younger readers, but I think it's too light for most 13-year-olds. Every relationship is perfect in every way, and I don't like when stories for kids ignore interpersonal conflict. It's not like kids aren't aware that their peers can be cruel or that adults will often let them down. I especially wish Marmee wasn't made out to be the Perfect Mother. Even the idealistic OG Little Women didn't do t It's a queer retelling (sort of) of Little Women, but it's not the queer retelling I wanted. Good for younger readers, but I think it's too light for most 13-year-olds. Every relationship is perfect in every way, and I don't like when stories for kids ignore interpersonal conflict. It's not like kids aren't aware that their peers can be cruel or that adults will often let them down. I especially wish Marmee wasn't made out to be the Perfect Mother. Even the idealistic OG Little Women didn't do that. But, there are references to people using they/them pronouns, and it is ultimately a queer representation story. I'll be happy to donate my copy to my husband's middle school reading classroom and I hope some of his students read it and see themselves, and see hope, in it.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Carmel

    I love how updated this story is! “Little Women” was never a favorite of mine (I didn’t have sisters and I found reading Alcott to be laborious), but this is a book for today’s little womyn. Many things cross over from the original book to this one (character names and interests, mostly). I love our main character (Jo, of course). There’s more overall diversity in skin color, sexuality, and gender norms (kids introduced themselves with preferred pronouns!). Jo is still a writer, but she blogs an I love how updated this story is! “Little Women” was never a favorite of mine (I didn’t have sisters and I found reading Alcott to be laborious), but this is a book for today’s little womyn. Many things cross over from the original book to this one (character names and interests, mostly). I love our main character (Jo, of course). There’s more overall diversity in skin color, sexuality, and gender norms (kids introduced themselves with preferred pronouns!). Jo is still a writer, but she blogs and writes for the school newspaper. I really liked how she learns to use her voice and insert her own story into journalism—a good lesson for today’s young reader. Recommended—perfect for the 5th-8th grader (Jo is in 8th grade, but the book read a little younger than that for me).

  22. 4 out of 5

    Mariela

    More like 2.5 stars. Artwork is very well done, all the characters have great facial expressions, and I really liked the look and feel of it. I hope to see more graphics drawn by this artist. The dialogue however was painful. Super preachy about things and makes it seem like life is so easy. The mom always had perfect advice like just practice more and it'll be okay. I felt like it was a bad after school special. So much telling and not showing through dialogue and artwork. Some kids will like it, bu More like 2.5 stars. Artwork is very well done, all the characters have great facial expressions, and I really liked the look and feel of it. I hope to see more graphics drawn by this artist. The dialogue however was painful. Super preachy about things and makes it seem like life is so easy. The mom always had perfect advice like just practice more and it'll be okay. I felt like it was a bad after school special. So much telling and not showing through dialogue and artwork. Some kids will like it, but some will be unable to relate to the perfect family with problems that don't seem to effect them in negative ways (no call from dad at Christmas and they're just a bit bummed? Really?).

  23. 4 out of 5

    Wisty

    I loved this, it was so wholesome and took like 10 minutes to read. Really fun to see Little Women as a modern-day, illustrated story. Maybe this wasn't the most realistic, but I loved this world where everyone was mostly kind and good and supportive. I've been in the mood for graphic novels, so I selected this randomly, and I'm glad I did! Made me happy (and also made me tear, because when do I not.) I loved this, it was so wholesome and took like 10 minutes to read. Really fun to see Little Women as a modern-day, illustrated story. Maybe this wasn't the most realistic, but I loved this world where everyone was mostly kind and good and supportive. I've been in the mood for graphic novels, so I selected this randomly, and I'm glad I did! Made me happy (and also made me tear, because when do I not.)

  24. 4 out of 5

    Christine Nguyen

    Loved this spin on Little Women! It follows Jo who is dealing with three sisters, a father who is away from home, eighth grade generally, joining a new newspaper group, and just finding her sense of self. It was a lot of fun, and I loved how it brought characters I love from the OG LW to light in a new way. Thanks HCC for sending me a review copy!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Pam

    I might have done a slight eyeroll when I saw another graphic novel adaption of Little Women but Kathleen Gros is correct - it's "sort of" and it's really fantastic. Modern Jo is entering 8th grade and loves her sisters in the same companionable way Alcott's Jo did. She's a writer for the school newspaper, terrible at first and then improving her craft. A slight twist shows Jo to be gay and thus not interested in Laurie (which was a bit of a pound 'em on the head again and again plot twist - we I might have done a slight eyeroll when I saw another graphic novel adaption of Little Women but Kathleen Gros is correct - it's "sort of" and it's really fantastic. Modern Jo is entering 8th grade and loves her sisters in the same companionable way Alcott's Jo did. She's a writer for the school newspaper, terrible at first and then improving her craft. A slight twist shows Jo to be gay and thus not interested in Laurie (which was a bit of a pound 'em on the head again and again plot twist - we got it the first time). All in all a winner.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Mari Johnston

    I’ve never been a fan of Little Women, something I actually feel pretty guilty about, so I was hoping that this adaptation centering around Jo would make me feel differently - it didn’t. The whole thing felt forced and flat. I did love that Jo was gay though!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Marisa

    Cute little graphic modern-day update to Little Women. FWIW, when I read Little Women, I felt pretty sure Jo was trans, but not so sure she was gay. She says over and over again that she feels like a boy, that she wants to be a boy. At no point in the book are we led to believe she's sexually or romantically attracted to anyone. I mean, there's the professor, but come on, that's a marriage of convenience, am I right? Anyway, it's nice to see an adaptation where Jo gets to live her life as who sh Cute little graphic modern-day update to Little Women. FWIW, when I read Little Women, I felt pretty sure Jo was trans, but not so sure she was gay. She says over and over again that she feels like a boy, that she wants to be a boy. At no point in the book are we led to believe she's sexually or romantically attracted to anyone. I mean, there's the professor, but come on, that's a marriage of convenience, am I right? Anyway, it's nice to see an adaptation where Jo gets to live her life as who she believes herself to be with a supportive family to back her up.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Christine

    This was very meh. If you want a stellar, modern, graphic novel interpretation of Little Women, your time is much better spent on “Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy” by Rey Terciero.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jessie

    FINALLY, the lesbian Jo March we all deserve. (view spoiler)[ And Beth doesn't die. (hide spoiler)] FINALLY, the lesbian Jo March we all deserve. (view spoiler)[ And Beth doesn't die. (hide spoiler)]

  30. 4 out of 5

    Virginia Woolf’s Actual Wife

    extremely cute. made Jo gay as she should be

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