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Dune: the Graphic Novel, Book 1

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The definitive graphic novel adaptation of Dune, the groundbreaking science-fiction classic by Frank Herbert   Dune, Frank Herbert’s epic science-fiction masterpiece set in the far future amidst a sprawling feudal interstellar society, tells the story of Paul Atreides as he and his family accept control of the desert planet Arrakis. A stunning blend of adventure and mystici The definitive graphic novel adaptation of Dune, the groundbreaking science-fiction classic by Frank Herbert   Dune, Frank Herbert’s epic science-fiction masterpiece set in the far future amidst a sprawling feudal interstellar society, tells the story of Paul Atreides as he and his family accept control of the desert planet Arrakis. A stunning blend of adventure and mysticism, environmentalism, and politics, Dune is a powerful, fanstastical tale that takes an unprecedented look into our universe, and is transformed by the graphic novel format. Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson’s adaptation retains the integrity of the original novel, and Raúl Allén and Patricia Martín’s magnificent illustrations, along with cover art by Bill Sienkiewicz, bring the book to life for a new generation of readers.  


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The definitive graphic novel adaptation of Dune, the groundbreaking science-fiction classic by Frank Herbert   Dune, Frank Herbert’s epic science-fiction masterpiece set in the far future amidst a sprawling feudal interstellar society, tells the story of Paul Atreides as he and his family accept control of the desert planet Arrakis. A stunning blend of adventure and mystici The definitive graphic novel adaptation of Dune, the groundbreaking science-fiction classic by Frank Herbert   Dune, Frank Herbert’s epic science-fiction masterpiece set in the far future amidst a sprawling feudal interstellar society, tells the story of Paul Atreides as he and his family accept control of the desert planet Arrakis. A stunning blend of adventure and mysticism, environmentalism, and politics, Dune is a powerful, fanstastical tale that takes an unprecedented look into our universe, and is transformed by the graphic novel format. Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson’s adaptation retains the integrity of the original novel, and Raúl Allén and Patricia Martín’s magnificent illustrations, along with cover art by Bill Sienkiewicz, bring the book to life for a new generation of readers.  

30 review for Dune: the Graphic Novel, Book 1

  1. 4 out of 5

    s.penkevich

    Graphic adaptations on beloved novels are always a difficult transition, much like with film. Particularly a book where the lore and exposition do a lot of heavy lifting and internal dialogue is critical to the storytelling such as with Dune. I was pleasantly surpirsed how effective this adaptation was. At worst it is a visual sparknotes for the book, but also that is more or less what you would be looking for here. There is nothing new, but also there is very little missing from the original no Graphic adaptations on beloved novels are always a difficult transition, much like with film. Particularly a book where the lore and exposition do a lot of heavy lifting and internal dialogue is critical to the storytelling such as with Dune. I was pleasantly surpirsed how effective this adaptation was. At worst it is a visual sparknotes for the book, but also that is more or less what you would be looking for here. There is nothing new, but also there is very little missing from the original novel and it seems that being a faithful translation is the primary goal. This book only covers Part 1 of the original novel, with a full 3 volumes planned. This is a fun and accessible way to get into Dune, especially for those who might be wary about jumping into such a long novel. After this, you’ll be hooked. The art is this is alright. Nothing really to write home about, but it does have kind of a cool 80s vibe particularly in the color palettes. Honestly the cover art is better than what is inside, and it isn't as sleek as the art in the prequel graphic novels like Dune: House Atreides Vol. 1. But it does capture the epic scale of things. Something I really enjoyed was the way the internal dialogue is expressed in blocks of text on the page. Each character gets assigned a different color text square for their internal dialogue so you don't get confused who is currently interior monologuing. It makes the pages very text heavy, but also seems necessary for the story. What doesn't work as well is the actual dialogue. Simplifying the scenes makes a lot of the menacing dialogue come across as corny and the Baron especially seems like a laughable cartoon villain more than the frightening figure of the books. This is a mostly successful adaptation that remains very faithful to the original book. It gets a lot of the history and storyline across very well including the characters insights into everything though it doesn't always get the vibe right. The creeping dread that builds once they land of Arrakis is very present in this edition at least. A decent book, especially if you want to brush up on Dune before or after seeing the film. I look forward to the other two volumes. 3/5

  2. 4 out of 5

    Trish

    This is the faithful comicbook adaptation of Frank Herbert's immensely popular (and in my humble opinion fantastic) science fiction novel. Since the original novel is divided into three parts, there will also be three volumes to this graphic novel. The one reviewed here, is the first volume. Arrakis, Dune, the desert planet. We arrive together with the members of House Atreides as they make Arrakis their new home amids political intrigues and some harsh lessons about this very unique planet's ecol This is the faithful comicbook adaptation of Frank Herbert's immensely popular (and in my humble opinion fantastic) science fiction novel. Since the original novel is divided into three parts, there will also be three volumes to this graphic novel. The one reviewed here, is the first volume. Arrakis, Dune, the desert planet. We arrive together with the members of House Atreides as they make Arrakis their new home amids political intrigues and some harsh lessons about this very unique planet's ecology. The story within this 1st volume goes from the preparations to leave Caladan to (view spoiler)[Paul and Jessica being stranded in the desert and Jessica realizing her son actually is the Kwisatz Haderach> (hide spoiler)] . The story itself offers nothing new as it is "just" a visual version of Frank Herbert's original. However, I liked exactly that. The details are there, though sadly more within conversations than through the images, and how the desert planet was brought to life wasn't bad at all. Besides, I hate when there are story adaptations in a new medium and the creators feel the need to "make it their own". *shudders* I'm glad Brian Herbert and the rest of the team didn't do that here. If you want to know more about the actual story, read the book! ;) For anyone further interested, *here* is my review of the novel. Now, what I hinted at before is that the graphic novel relies too much on conversations and too little on the story being told visually. That was a shame. The art was quite good though also nothing exceptional: I very much liked the colour palettes but so much more could have been done with this medium (as seen in many other recent comicbook adaptations of great novels). All in all not bad but also not as great as I had hoped. At least this (along with the new movie adaptation) might serve to make more people fans of the original story.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Bradley

    So! Here's a graphic adaptation of Dune. there have been others, of course. I even have some of the originals that came out of the eighties as a tie-in to the Lynch movie. I kinda expected this one to be gorgeous and lush and of the high-quality standards that you might see in, say King's Dark Tower, but alas. It wasn't to be. The artwork is kinda... boring? Usual? Sometimes the coloring is off like it was mass-produced in the eighties? Well, I wasn't all that impressed. Not with all those gorgeou So! Here's a graphic adaptation of Dune. there have been others, of course. I even have some of the originals that came out of the eighties as a tie-in to the Lynch movie. I kinda expected this one to be gorgeous and lush and of the high-quality standards that you might see in, say King's Dark Tower, but alas. It wasn't to be. The artwork is kinda... boring? Usual? Sometimes the coloring is off like it was mass-produced in the eighties? Well, I wasn't all that impressed. Not with all those gorgeous comics coming out these days. So, there is the writing to fall back on, at least. Right? Well, yes. Kinda. I've seen the Lynch movie, extended version, like a billion times back before there was a TV adaptation and looooong before we ever dreamed of getting a couple of movies. So why is this almost cribbed, line by line, from the Lynch screenplay? Probably because there's only so much one can do. So was I horribly disappointed? Actually, no. There is one thing that this comic does pretty darn well. It leaves out very few important scenes in the first half of the book. It captures the spirit, if not the kinds of lush visuals I would have died to see. We have lots of text. Pages crammed full of text. I'm not complaining, because it's necessary, but it's still breaking one of the cardinal rules of comics. Gaiman, this is not. But if you're a fan of Dune, or fan enough that you want a pretty good refresher, then this does a fine job.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Sîvan Sardar

    man fuck this book 😭

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    This was fabulous! The art was stunning, and the story was perfectly adapted to the format, giving you the story without huge blocks of text or leaving out anything important.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Sud666

    Frank Herbert's "Dune" is a seminal work in the annals of sci-fi novels. Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson decided to do a comic book that : "..we decided from the outset that this must be a definitive graphic novel treatment......We weren't interested in doing our interpretation of Dune or modifying the story to add our own special stamp. We wanted this to be pure Dune-Chapter for Chapter, scene for scene..." Book One does a creditable adaptation of the novel. Raul Allen and Patricia Martin's a Frank Herbert's "Dune" is a seminal work in the annals of sci-fi novels. Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson decided to do a comic book that : "..we decided from the outset that this must be a definitive graphic novel treatment......We weren't interested in doing our interpretation of Dune or modifying the story to add our own special stamp. We wanted this to be pure Dune-Chapter for Chapter, scene for scene..." Book One does a creditable adaptation of the novel. Raul Allen and Patricia Martin's art is good and suits the story well. Bill Sienkiewicz, thankfully, was allowed only to do the cover art. The story fits the novel fairly well. While this is supposed to be a complete adaptation, a comic can not do the novel justice. But this is a good attempt at it. The volume ends with Paul and Jessica being dropped off into the desert. While no substitute for the book, this is a fine comic adaptation. I shall certainly be adding Book Two and Three when they come out. A highly recommended comic. Both for people who love Dune and for those who wish to be introduced to the wonderful world- just some advice, if you liked the comic, do yourself a favor and read the novel.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Dave Schaafsma

    I dutifully read as a young man with friends Dune, The Hobbit and Lord of the Rings, and the Foundation trilogy, though I was never (I confess now) an afficionado of any of these great works. I much preferred other ponderous, wordy literary giants with perhaps equally serpentine plots such as Russian novels. Tomato, tomahto. As a condition of one relationship I was in I viewed (and more than once) the two principal film adaptations of Dune, and liked them well enough, in spite of the public and I dutifully read as a young man with friends Dune, The Hobbit and Lord of the Rings, and the Foundation trilogy, though I was never (I confess now) an afficionado of any of these great works. I much preferred other ponderous, wordy literary giants with perhaps equally serpentine plots such as Russian novels. Tomato, tomahto. As a condition of one relationship I was in I viewed (and more than once) the two principal film adaptations of Dune, and liked them well enough, in spite of the public and critical outcry about them. (The relationship lasted, and I am now co-owner of copies of these films). And I have recently viewed the most recent film, in the theater, and liked it quite a bit, but I have to say (now calm down here) that while I liked the hot young actor playing Paul and I liked it visually and I liked the soundtrack, I thought it on the whole it was pretty slow and dialogue-heavy, as I recall feeling about the book. If you had not read the book you would not really know much about what is going on. This graphic adaptation is announced by Frank Herbert's son in his introduction as the "definitive" comics adaptation, which he did with Kevin Anderson, and was illustrated by Raul Allen and Patricia Martin. They name-drop the comics classic artist Bill Sienkiewicz as consultant, but this is by no means (even if this only the first of three graphic novels for the first book alone) a great graphic novel. It gets at the heart of what is going on, but is not remarkable, and the thing the adapters make clear is that they did the script and then auditioned several people to do the illustration. That can work sometimes with adaptations, but the process thus often lacks a true sense of collaboration or synergy, it makes for a pretty flat creative process, artists as hired guns. I am not saying I think this is terrible artwork--Allen is a pro--and this book will sell a lot of copies, released as it is at the time of the new film version, and I am not even saying I am opposed to hiring illustrators to do comics jobs, of course. But it just doesn't look exciting or inventive to me in the way other fantasy comics, such as Monstress. I liked it just fine, it's good, not great, imho.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Montzalee Wittmann

    Incredible! DUNE: The Graphic Novel, Book 1: Dune By Frank Herbert, Brian Herbert, Kevin J. Anderson I have loved Dune when it first came out when I was a teen. When the old movie came out I was thrilled. With the new movie I read the novel, watched the old movie and then the new movie and requested the library get this book! They did! I was so happy! This is so good and stays more to the book than the movies. The art is fantastic and tells the story practically without words, lol! The font is easy Incredible! DUNE: The Graphic Novel, Book 1: Dune By Frank Herbert, Brian Herbert, Kevin J. Anderson I have loved Dune when it first came out when I was a teen. When the old movie came out I was thrilled. With the new movie I read the novel, watched the old movie and then the new movie and requested the library get this book! They did! I was so happy! This is so good and stays more to the book than the movies. The art is fantastic and tells the story practically without words, lol! The font is easy to read and follows the book well. Enjoyed this tremendously. For people who don't want to read a full novel and want to feel like they are watching a movie too, this is for them! Great for gift giving!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    As a Dune fan a new graphic novel was not something I am going to pass up, neither am I missing the new 12 part comic serie House of Atreides which is by now has 2 of its 12 installments released. This was supposed to be a great year for Dune fans with a Movie, graphic novel, comic book series and a new novel by Brian Herbert, all have been released with the exception of the movie which is kind of a bummer. Anyhow the graphic novel is not the complete Dune novel only the first of three installment As a Dune fan a new graphic novel was not something I am going to pass up, neither am I missing the new 12 part comic serie House of Atreides which is by now has 2 of its 12 installments released. This was supposed to be a great year for Dune fans with a Movie, graphic novel, comic book series and a new novel by Brian Herbert, all have been released with the exception of the movie which is kind of a bummer. Anyhow the graphic novel is not the complete Dune novel only the first of three installments, with Muad'dib being released in spring 2022 (I am not joking!!!). This first one starts on Caladan and ends with the Harkonnen invasion and Paul and his mothers flight into the desert of Arrakis. The good news is that the comic is fairly true to the Herbert novel and the drawings of the Sandworm are actually quite impressive. The rest of the art is decent enough without being spectacular, the text blocks for lady Jessica in orange are difficult to read, even if the choice of the various colours for the thoughts of the various characters is quite original. If you never read any Dune this graphic novel might come across as allright to boring as the original book is a buildup for the end and the next two books (children & Messiah of Dune). I enjoyed the graphic novel and dislike the fact that I have to wait for more than a year for the next installment, glad that the movie is upon us before that time.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Rod Brown

    I dutifully read the first six books of the Dune series back in the '80s to earn my sci fi geek cred, despite the fact that I found them intensely boring. (Around the same time, I masochistically slogged through Lord of the Rings and The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant.) This stiff graphic adaptation just drives home for me how dull the first book is with its dreary court intrigue and hollow protagonist, Paul Atreides. I always did get a kick out of Herbert's character names though, e.g., Gurney Hal I dutifully read the first six books of the Dune series back in the '80s to earn my sci fi geek cred, despite the fact that I found them intensely boring. (Around the same time, I masochistically slogged through Lord of the Rings and The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant.) This stiff graphic adaptation just drives home for me how dull the first book is with its dreary court intrigue and hollow protagonist, Paul Atreides. I always did get a kick out of Herbert's character names though, e.g., Gurney Halleck, Duncan Idaho, Vladimir Harkonnen, Feyd-Rautha, Shadout Mapes, and Iakin Nefud.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Robert

    As a fan of the book, and someone willing to see the good in the '80s film version and even the early 2000s SyFy miniseries, this was probably not the adaptation for me as the art, while well executed, didn't provide the depth of detail I would usually search for when revisiting a familiar fictional universe in a new visual medium. That said, it worked just fine as a kind of Dune methadone before the Villeneuve film is released, and also a great gateway to this world if the film trailers piqued y As a fan of the book, and someone willing to see the good in the '80s film version and even the early 2000s SyFy miniseries, this was probably not the adaptation for me as the art, while well executed, didn't provide the depth of detail I would usually search for when revisiting a familiar fictional universe in a new visual medium. That said, it worked just fine as a kind of Dune methadone before the Villeneuve film is released, and also a great gateway to this world if the film trailers piqued your interest but a brick of a novel from the '60s isn't your thing.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Juho Pohjalainen

    I saw the new movie the other day. A lot of people liked it, apparently, but I wasn't too hot on it, and not for the reasons you might imagine: it had decent enough plotting and its characters did good job, and had a great deal more space to play with than the 1984 adaptation did, overall probably the better movie on objective technical terms. It was just so dull. So bleak. So... bland and safe. No bright colors, no interesting and imaginitive setpieces, no weird surreal practical effects. It's al I saw the new movie the other day. A lot of people liked it, apparently, but I wasn't too hot on it, and not for the reasons you might imagine: it had decent enough plotting and its characters did good job, and had a great deal more space to play with than the 1984 adaptation did, overall probably the better movie on objective technical terms. It was just so dull. So bleak. So... bland and safe. No bright colors, no interesting and imaginitive setpieces, no weird surreal practical effects. It's all dark and drab. The costumes are plain and functional but uninteresting. The spaceships are just a bunch of eggs. The sandworm looked like a fleshlight. And the music... all credit to Hans Zimmer, but it's the usual bit of bombastic trailer music and wailing women what we hear everywhere these days. Except the Atreides bagpipes, those were pretty good. And it's not just Dune. Judge Dredd, all of the DC superhero movies and almost all of the Marvel ones, the Star Wars sequels, where Star Trek's been going... it's all the same. Impressive technical accomplishments, sure, but each of them has had nearly all of their imagination and color stripped out in return. Drab, drab, drab. The only one of them I liked at all was Dredd: its extreme violence and comic-book references pulled it through. But still. It really feels like Hollywood no longer knows how to have fun, and leaves no space for artistic merit - just grind it all into samey dull mediocrity so that as many people as possible will come see them. It's lame. Oh, right, I was supposed to review a comic book? Uh, yeah. It's fine. More than fine, actually - I like it better than either of the movie adaptations, I think. It gets more of the books into it, without having to cut much away, and it manages to get itself a fairly good distinct visual style as well, unlike the new movie (though I still prefer Lynch's vision). The character artwork wasn't so good, though: something about the way they gesticulated felt weird to me. I'd still rather read the book again. I've been meaning to.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ben De Bono

    This is fine in the same way the Syfy miniseries was fine. It goes through the plot and serves as an adequate visualization of Frank Herbert's masterpiece. It also fails to remotely come close to matching its source material's greatness. If you're a fan of Dune, you'll probably enjoy it for what it is. If you've never read Dune, read this if you want but don't for one second think it's an adequate substitution for reading the actual novel. It's not. Not even close This is fine in the same way the Syfy miniseries was fine. It goes through the plot and serves as an adequate visualization of Frank Herbert's masterpiece. It also fails to remotely come close to matching its source material's greatness. If you're a fan of Dune, you'll probably enjoy it for what it is. If you've never read Dune, read this if you want but don't for one second think it's an adequate substitution for reading the actual novel. It's not. Not even close

  14. 4 out of 5

    Michelle Curie

    A faithful comic book adaptation of Herbert's sci-fi classic Dune, which serves as a respectful and cleverly constructed visualisation. In many ways this is more approachable than the original novel, in others however, lacks the mysticism and magic of it source material. Dune: the Graphic Novel includes an introduction stating that it did not mean to reinterpret the novel, but to adapt it faithfully and while not reconstructing every gesture, certainly aiming to keep its essence. The story there A faithful comic book adaptation of Herbert's sci-fi classic Dune, which serves as a respectful and cleverly constructed visualisation. In many ways this is more approachable than the original novel, in others however, lacks the mysticism and magic of it source material. Dune: the Graphic Novel includes an introduction stating that it did not mean to reinterpret the novel, but to adapt it faithfully and while not reconstructing every gesture, certainly aiming to keep its essence. The story therefore is the same: we follow young Paul Atreides and his family on the desert planet Arrakis, where they have to deal with adventures, betrayal and politics. This first out of three planned volumes covers the story up until the point where (view spoiler)[Paul and Jessica end up stranded in the desert, realising that Paul is indeed the Kwisatz Haderach. (hide spoiler)] Don't expect anything new in here. Hardcore fans and purists will be pleased, as the authors kept their word of treating their source material respectfully. When reading the novel, it took me a while to get used to all the concepts of mind-reading and controlling, so I was curious how it would translate onto the (visual) page. Turns out pretty well! The story was easy to follow, thought beware that I am saying that as someone already familiar with the plot. I can imagine that if this ends up being your introduction to the story, its magic will essentially be lost, as it does lack the intricacies and atmospheric integrity. The art felt nice, but I kept wishing for more. I don't have specific complaints, it's just that with a world so rich and thought-provoking I would have wished for something more. The colouring felt bland, the compositions generic. Not bad either, but since this is the visual adaptation of an established novel, the visuals could or maybe even should have been the selling point of this and that it certainly wasn't. All in all, a pleasant refresher of a story and a welcomed excuse to dive back into the world of Arrakis.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ronie

    I so enjoy great graphic novels, and having/reading/enjoying one of a favorite story is bliss!! Very well done with some striking art.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Ming Wei

    Excellent artwork throughout the book, I was really impressed with the standard, this is a very good graphic novel attempt at the story of Dune, follows generally the same story line as the movie, the Emperor gives house Atreides control of the Spice planet, much to the dis pleasure of the Baron who wants control of the spice planet himself, he designs a plot to capture the spice planet for himself and it works. I wont put in too many spoilers, but it is very enjoyable, I read the hardback copy Excellent artwork throughout the book, I was really impressed with the standard, this is a very good graphic novel attempt at the story of Dune, follows generally the same story line as the movie, the Emperor gives house Atreides control of the Spice planet, much to the dis pleasure of the Baron who wants control of the spice planet himself, he designs a plot to capture the spice planet for himself and it works. I wont put in too many spoilers, but it is very enjoyable, I read the hardback copy of the book, the quality of the pages was high. No editorial issue or errors, the story was very easy to follow, and the artwork was consistently self explanatory in meaning. The wordings and artwork were match consistently well with each other. Brilliant book, really enjoyed it, the colourings throughout the book create the images of Dune that you remember from the movie.

  17. 4 out of 5

    ion

    This version is the mind-killer

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jessy♡

    This was a great introduction to Dune. The art is gorgeous and the story is like nothing I’ve never read before. Very excited to read the book next.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Uzma Ali

    This was a re-read of the Dune graphic novel to get myself hyped up for the movie.... I’m thinking I might reread as much of the series as I can before it shows in theaters. But this was heavily enjoyable as always- the art is gorgeous, and the storytelling is condensed but effective. It only covers about half of the original Dune book’s contents, but I feel as though the movie will be that way too? I know they’ve cast Stilgar, who isn’t in the graphic novel, but I doubt he’ll play a big role as This was a re-read of the Dune graphic novel to get myself hyped up for the movie.... I’m thinking I might reread as much of the series as I can before it shows in theaters. But this was heavily enjoyable as always- the art is gorgeous, and the storytelling is condensed but effective. It only covers about half of the original Dune book’s contents, but I feel as though the movie will be that way too? I know they’ve cast Stilgar, who isn’t in the graphic novel, but I doubt he’ll play a big role as the book will most likely be split into two films. If this isn’t true, man I don’t care because I still think that would be best. I just took off one star because some of the characters’ thought text boxes feel misplaced, but it’s not much to complain about. If one were going into this without reading the book, the boxes might not provide enough information. I still love it though and will probably be reading another time lol

  20. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    A faithful adaptation of the grand daddy of all space opera's that I wish had just a bit more of the original mysticism and majesty. I wish the entire thing had looked a bit more like the cover. Part of my attraction to Dune is the mystery that permeates the story and something about this version is just too matter of fact. You lose almost all of the internal monologuing (which some people may like) and a great deal of the emotional connection between the characters. I question whether this is a A faithful adaptation of the grand daddy of all space opera's that I wish had just a bit more of the original mysticism and majesty. I wish the entire thing had looked a bit more like the cover. Part of my attraction to Dune is the mystery that permeates the story and something about this version is just too matter of fact. You lose almost all of the internal monologuing (which some people may like) and a great deal of the emotional connection between the characters. I question whether this is another of those stories that just doesn't lend itself to the graphic novel format but this is nonetheless a very nice to look at, accurate interpretation of the Frank Herbert classic. Just nothing much to write home about.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Debbie

    Enjoyed reading DUNE 1 the graphic book, would like to read DUNE 2 graphic book when it comes out in the year 2022. Really enjoyed the story and can't wait to read more. I haven't read the original series by Frank Herbert's and i hope to in the near future. The book is beautifully illustrated. I won this book from Goodreads for a honest review, I would highly recommend this book to Science Fiction fans and to those who have never read the original by Frank Herbert's Enjoyed reading DUNE 1 the graphic book, would like to read DUNE 2 graphic book when it comes out in the year 2022. Really enjoyed the story and can't wait to read more. I haven't read the original series by Frank Herbert's and i hope to in the near future. The book is beautifully illustrated. I won this book from Goodreads for a honest review, I would highly recommend this book to Science Fiction fans and to those who have never read the original by Frank Herbert's

  22. 5 out of 5

    Alisa

    I feel like if you are a hard-core Dune fan, no adaptation will ever satisfy you. And if you are not a hard-core fan then you will find any version of this story boring. And so this comic works really well for someone like me,who really loves Dune but maybe isn't obsessed with it. I thought that this is a really well done adaptation. The only character I didn't vibe with was Kynes. I don't know, in my head he is mysterious and alluring but here he was just bland. I feel like if you are a hard-core Dune fan, no adaptation will ever satisfy you. And if you are not a hard-core fan then you will find any version of this story boring. And so this comic works really well for someone like me,who really loves Dune but maybe isn't obsessed with it. I thought that this is a really well done adaptation. The only character I didn't vibe with was Kynes. I don't know, in my head he is mysterious and alluring but here he was just bland.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kate

    I've been wanting to read Dune for some time now, before the new movie comes out, but it's long so when I saw the graphic novel version at the library, I decided to give it a try. This is hard sci-fi, and it took me a while to orient myself to the world. There were so many strange names, but the main character names were so ordinary - Jessica and Paul - that it took me out a little. I suppose when Dune was first published in 1965, Jessica was an up-and-coming name, but still... By the end, I was I've been wanting to read Dune for some time now, before the new movie comes out, but it's long so when I saw the graphic novel version at the library, I decided to give it a try. This is hard sci-fi, and it took me a while to orient myself to the world. There were so many strange names, but the main character names were so ordinary - Jessica and Paul - that it took me out a little. I suppose when Dune was first published in 1965, Jessica was an up-and-coming name, but still... By the end, I was intrigued by the world and the journey Jessica and Paul would have to make, evading the sandworms that reminded me of "Tremors" even though "Tremors" was obviously made after Dune. The artwork was just okay for me, I would have preferred something more like the cover art throughout.

  24. 5 out of 5

    chvang

    Abandoned for my own peace of mind, despite my natural inclinations as a fan and a completionist. For fans of the original Dune, newcomers interested in a less dense introduction to the series, and (knock on wood) fans of the Villeneuve film, my recommend is the same: don't bother with th is Brian Herbert & Kevin J. Anderson adaptation or the Brian Herbert & Kevin J. Anderson sequels. They cut a lot from the original Dune, which is understandable. Novels and graphic novels are both books, but they Abandoned for my own peace of mind, despite my natural inclinations as a fan and a completionist. For fans of the original Dune, newcomers interested in a less dense introduction to the series, and (knock on wood) fans of the Villeneuve film, my recommend is the same: don't bother with th is Brian Herbert & Kevin J. Anderson adaptation or the Brian Herbert & Kevin J. Anderson sequels. They cut a lot from the original Dune, which is understandable. Novels and graphic novels are both books, but they're very different mediums. No one would read a graphic novel filled with speech bubbles full of dense texts. But what they chose to cut is incoherent. They include some things and cut out explanations without having the art or scene make up for it, then emphasize dialogue and action that makes little sense with its context. I think many newcomers will be left baffled. It seems dialogue lifted from the original Dune were prioritized, except without the reasoning or explanations behind them, and then only halfway. It makes the characters seem stilted and high--you know when someone says something with a sense of profoundness (to them), but they don't explain their train of thought. the example that comes to mind is the aftermath of Paul's gom jabbar test, and Jessica and Mohiam recognize Paul as human. Monika starts to explain the difference between an animal and a human, but the dialogue leaves out the last half, the explanation, so when they start hailing Paul as "human", it comes out of nowhere and it looks like they're high. It would be funny if Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson weren't butchering something I love. The art is pedestrian. The faces are bad in some places, but for the most part it's serviceable--in that this script needed pictures and so pictures were found. It does not add anything, such as worldbuilding, mood, dynamism, context, or emphasis. Stick figures would've been better, because at least then it would be been an artistic choice. This is just there. Aside from a few weirdly elongated faces, it's not bad, it just doesn't matter. If this book was published to drum up interest ahead of the movie, they made a mistake giving the adaptation to Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson. Don't bother with this book. If you want to read Dune, just read Dune. If you want a graphic novel of an epic (no pun intended) space opera steeped in destiny and mysticism, read ODY-C, Vol. 1: Off to Far Ithicaa.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Katie Kreis

    I haven’t read “Dune” or any of Frank Herbert’s other works, so I came to the graphic novel with new eyes. I wish I had a little more context throughout, and I think it would’ve helped to utilize more dialogue to describe this world. I realize that “Dune” is considered the archetype for most science fiction novels and can recognize and respect its role in the literary world already. Many of the themes of a chosen one, warring people/planets, and environmental concerns were developed here and can I haven’t read “Dune” or any of Frank Herbert’s other works, so I came to the graphic novel with new eyes. I wish I had a little more context throughout, and I think it would’ve helped to utilize more dialogue to describe this world. I realize that “Dune” is considered the archetype for most science fiction novels and can recognize and respect its role in the literary world already. Many of the themes of a chosen one, warring people/planets, and environmental concerns were developed here and can be recognized in other works, like Star Wars and James Cameron’s Avatar. I would recommend this book to any fans of the original “Dune,” or even those familiar enough to the backstory to appreciate the graphic novel for its gorgeous artwork and dramatically bringing the characters to life.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Belcher

    You all probably already know how many times I’ve tried to read Dune and just cannot. So when my friend Katey recommended this graphic novel adaptation of the first part of the book, I thought I’d give it a try. I really enjoyed reading this! The art was great and I was really into all of the political intrigue. I also think it helped me to see the world all the characters because I feel like the book kind of throws quite a bit at you and there were some things that just weren’t clicking for me You all probably already know how many times I’ve tried to read Dune and just cannot. So when my friend Katey recommended this graphic novel adaptation of the first part of the book, I thought I’d give it a try. I really enjoyed reading this! The art was great and I was really into all of the political intrigue. I also think it helped me to see the world all the characters because I feel like the book kind of throws quite a bit at you and there were some things that just weren’t clicking for me on my first try with the original text. I’m definitely hooked on this story now! And maybe I’ll try to pick up the og book now that I’m pumped and left in the middle of some crazy plot lines.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Lashaan Balasingam (Bookidote)

    The first book of the official Dune comic book adaptation that remains truly loyal to its source material with some changes but doesn't take advantage of the medium to turn the classic epic science-fiction masterpiece into a just as exciting and classic comic book story as it suffers from dull narrative development and some odd character dialogues. At least the artwork is consistently decent especially once you arrive at some of the included splash pages. Yours truly, Lashaan | Blogger and Book R The first book of the official Dune comic book adaptation that remains truly loyal to its source material with some changes but doesn't take advantage of the medium to turn the classic epic science-fiction masterpiece into a just as exciting and classic comic book story as it suffers from dull narrative development and some odd character dialogues. At least the artwork is consistently decent especially once you arrive at some of the included splash pages. Yours truly, Lashaan | Blogger and Book Reviewer Official blog: https://bookidote.com/

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kerry

    This is hard for me to review, because I've read Dune more times than any other book, so it's difficult for me to imagine what it's like to read this not having read the book at all. Maybe only seen the movie(s) or whatever. So I'm mostly not going to do that and just review this for people who have read the novel and know it well. People who are me. Dune is super dense, there are a lot of words and he says the same shit over and over again -- which is part of the appeal! -- but there's no room f This is hard for me to review, because I've read Dune more times than any other book, so it's difficult for me to imagine what it's like to read this not having read the book at all. Maybe only seen the movie(s) or whatever. So I'm mostly not going to do that and just review this for people who have read the novel and know it well. People who are me. Dune is super dense, there are a lot of words and he says the same shit over and over again -- which is part of the appeal! -- but there's no room for that in here, so they're just mostly hitting the important beats of the story. And the introduction makes clear that they wanted to stick closely to the original text of the novel, no funny business. Which is admirable I guess, but makes it pretty boring for those of us who know the novel backwards and forwards. (They did make Duncan Idaho a Black dude, and there were a handful of women on the Duke's war council, so that was at least a little bit interesting.) I did like the design of the ornithopters -- I always have a hard time picturing those satisfactorily in my head, and these seemed like they would fly, and also looked like birds, so they were good. I didn't like Jessica's gowns, they were boring and not crazy enough. They looked like they were from the '80s -- not the '80s version of the future, just . . . the '80s. Yawn. Everything else was just . . . similar to the David Lynch movie, kinda? Oh and they didn't make the heighliner look massive enough. Technically if you pay attention you can tell that it's big, but it's SO BIG you guys, and they didn't really get that across. I'm always awed by how enormous that ship is described to be, but I guess the artists didn't find it as interesting. Near the beginning, the Reverend Mother says "for your father, nothing," which is incorrect, it's supposed to be "for the father, nothing." And then a few pages later, Paul recalls it correctly, even though that's not what was said to him! So that was messy, come on guys. Also at least twice there were speech bubbles that split a word over two lines that cannot be split like that. Like "HO" on one line and the next line started with "T." Messy, messy. Aside from that though, the book itself is gorgeous. I borrowed this from the library so it's a hardcover, and the pages are so thick, I kept thinking they were stuck together! The colors are nice and the art is fine but there's nothing very distinctive about it. I'll probably borrow the next two from the library if they get them and if I remember. (This one covers the first "book" of Dune, to where Jessica and Paul are in the stilltent.) But there's no way in hell I'd spend money on this. Oh, that reminds me of one more nit to pick: in this version, when they're in the stilltent and Paul is starting to freak out about seeing his future and whatnot (because he's been eating spicy food for all of two weeks, don't even get me started) he's like "they're going to call me Muad'Dib, the kangaroo mouse" but that's not how it happens in the novel. In the novel he sees that they are going to call him Muad'Dib, but he doesn't know why, and then a little later when they meet up with Fremen, the Fremen are like "okay you're cool, your secret name is Usul which means the base of the pillar, but you also need a non-secret name to use with people not in our seitch, what do you want it to be?" and he goes "oh I don't know, what's the name of that clever kangaroo mouse?" and they're like "we call that little guy Muad'Dib" and it's like DUN DUN DUNNNNN TERRIBLE PURPOSE etc etc which I think is more interesting than the way they did it here. But what do Frank Herbert and I know. One of us only wrote what is proclaimed in this volume to be "the most beloved novel in science fiction." P.S. I guess if you haven't read Dune, and you see this at your library, check it out? I think you will get the gist and the feeling of the novel? But honestly just go read Dune, it's flawed but fantastic. I think. It's honestly hard for me to tell anymore.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth A

    I'm slowly making my way through the original Dune trilogy - have read and loved the first two so far - and I figured I'd check out these graphic novel adaptations. Look at that cover! Well, color me disappointed. It's not that the art isn't good, it's that the adaptation simply doesn't convey what makes this story so wonderfully compelling. I'll not be continuing on with the graphic adaptations. Ah well. I'm slowly making my way through the original Dune trilogy - have read and loved the first two so far - and I figured I'd check out these graphic novel adaptations. Look at that cover! Well, color me disappointed. It's not that the art isn't good, it's that the adaptation simply doesn't convey what makes this story so wonderfully compelling. I'll not be continuing on with the graphic adaptations. Ah well.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kitty

    Why was this so ugly

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