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Surrounded by Idiots: The Four Types of Human Behavior and How to Effectively Communicate with Each in Business (and in Life)

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Do you ever think you’re the only one making any sense? Or tried to reason with your partner with disastrous results? Do long, rambling answers drive you crazy? Or does your colleague’s abrasive manner rub you the wrong way? You are not alone. After a disastrous meeting with a highly successful entrepreneur, who was genuinely convinced he was ‘surrounded by idiots’, communi Do you ever think you’re the only one making any sense? Or tried to reason with your partner with disastrous results? Do long, rambling answers drive you crazy? Or does your colleague’s abrasive manner rub you the wrong way? You are not alone. After a disastrous meeting with a highly successful entrepreneur, who was genuinely convinced he was ‘surrounded by idiots’, communication expert and bestselling author, Thomas Erikson dedicated himself to understanding how people function and why we often struggle to connect with certain types of people. Surrounded by Idiots is an international phenomenon, selling over 1.5 million copies worldwide. It offers a simple, yet ground-breaking method for assessing the personalities of people we communicate with – in and out of the office – based on four personality types (Red, Blue, Green and Yellow), and provides insights into how we can adjust the way we speak and share information. Erikson will help you understand yourself better, hone communication and social skills, handle conflict with confidence, improve dynamics with your boss and team, and get the best out of the people you deal with and manage. He also shares simple tricks on body language, improving written communication, advice on when to back away or when to push on, and when to speak up or shut up. Packed with ‘aha!’ and ‘oh no!’ moments, Surrounded by Idiots will help you understand and communicate with those around you, even people you currently think are beyond all comprehension. And with a bit of luck you can also be confident that the idiot out there isn’t you!


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Do you ever think you’re the only one making any sense? Or tried to reason with your partner with disastrous results? Do long, rambling answers drive you crazy? Or does your colleague’s abrasive manner rub you the wrong way? You are not alone. After a disastrous meeting with a highly successful entrepreneur, who was genuinely convinced he was ‘surrounded by idiots’, communi Do you ever think you’re the only one making any sense? Or tried to reason with your partner with disastrous results? Do long, rambling answers drive you crazy? Or does your colleague’s abrasive manner rub you the wrong way? You are not alone. After a disastrous meeting with a highly successful entrepreneur, who was genuinely convinced he was ‘surrounded by idiots’, communication expert and bestselling author, Thomas Erikson dedicated himself to understanding how people function and why we often struggle to connect with certain types of people. Surrounded by Idiots is an international phenomenon, selling over 1.5 million copies worldwide. It offers a simple, yet ground-breaking method for assessing the personalities of people we communicate with – in and out of the office – based on four personality types (Red, Blue, Green and Yellow), and provides insights into how we can adjust the way we speak and share information. Erikson will help you understand yourself better, hone communication and social skills, handle conflict with confidence, improve dynamics with your boss and team, and get the best out of the people you deal with and manage. He also shares simple tricks on body language, improving written communication, advice on when to back away or when to push on, and when to speak up or shut up. Packed with ‘aha!’ and ‘oh no!’ moments, Surrounded by Idiots will help you understand and communicate with those around you, even people you currently think are beyond all comprehension. And with a bit of luck you can also be confident that the idiot out there isn’t you!

30 review for Surrounded by Idiots: The Four Types of Human Behavior and How to Effectively Communicate with Each in Business (and in Life)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Charlie

    I received this book as a christmas present, otherwise I would never have accepted it into my home. At first, I thought that even if it didn't present anything new, at least it could end up being an interesting read. It was not. Judging by the tone of the writing, the author genuinely believes that he has revolutionized workplace psychology by rehashing four-temperament ensemble theories of human behavior into an unappetizing slurry of self-aggrandizing word casserole. Every little paragraph is f I received this book as a christmas present, otherwise I would never have accepted it into my home. At first, I thought that even if it didn't present anything new, at least it could end up being an interesting read. It was not. Judging by the tone of the writing, the author genuinely believes that he has revolutionized workplace psychology by rehashing four-temperament ensemble theories of human behavior into an unappetizing slurry of self-aggrandizing word casserole. Every little paragraph is frustratingly presented as some sort of divine insight into how humans truly work, peppered with various anecdotes very obviously constructed to strengthen the point the author is presenting. That point being, "there are four types of humans at any given workplace, and this is how you handle them". There is no room given for, you know, actual human nature or the complexities of personality and relationships. The author would have the reader believe that we are all just, on a basic level, different configurations of traits that can be handled easily by following certain steps... and most importantly, that you will be a successful human being if you take this all to heart and master it. The author promises that the reader will have learned something new by the time they have finished reading. All I picked up was that these days, it's really easy to hawk an idea and have a book published if you're a skilled salesperson who loves the sound of your own voice. Don't mistake this author for an authority. He is a salesperson selling you a repackaged idea. If you are in need of ways to improve workplace relationships, I would suggest you speak with someone actually qualified on the topic.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Katarzyna

    First of all I would like to address some issues other reviewers had mentioned: "This author thinks he discovered some brand new theory, when it's only choleric, melancholic, sanguine and phlegmatic once again" - this is VERY not true. Author actually mentions Hippocrates and his theory multiple times. And yes, this book is all about four temperaments theory, just portrayed as colors, which in my opinion was more apealing to reader's imagination in author's mind. "Book describes 4 types of First of all I would like to address some issues other reviewers had mentioned: "This author thinks he discovered some brand new theory, when it's only choleric, melancholic, sanguine and phlegmatic once again" - this is VERY not true. Author actually mentions Hippocrates and his theory multiple times. And yes, this book is all about four temperaments theory, just portrayed as colors, which in my opinion was more apealing to reader's imagination in author's mind. "Book describes 4 types of people as only possibilities that exist, a person cannot be simply put in any of these groups! - this opinion could only be written by someone who did not actually read the book itself. Author gives multiple examples of people being dual-colors, or having different elements of multiple colors in their personalities. 4 types are more about groups of features that every person is "made of", and they can be mixed in many different ways. Now, having that out of the way, I can say that: - I had a few good laughs seeing different people that I know in colors' descriptions - Stories from real life that author puts here and there are indeed very made up, but they are only serving certain points, so I guess they can be taken as metaphors... - There is nothing very new to the characteristics of 4 colors, since it's based entirely on Hippocrates. Author mentiones multiple ways to DEAL WITH them though, which I've never read anywhere before. - Author has his own way of mentioning "I am a proffesional", "I've worked in this field for 20 years now", "I give lectures and speeches on that topic" and other show-offy bits almost every chapter, which might become irritating for some readers. I would not recommend this book to anyone who had already read a lot of books on personalities types topic. It won't bring you anything new. To everybody else - give it a go. It has some useful and funny bits.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Timo Kataja

    Childishly written, as if speaking to toddlers. Based on no science but the writer's own opinions. So in brief: Utter garbage. Childishly written, as if speaking to toddlers. Based on no science but the writer's own opinions. So in brief: Utter garbage.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Miikka Häyrinen

    Wow, do not waste your time with this book. If you want to learn something fact-based about human behaviour, look someplace else. From the very first page I was sceptical. Nothing in the book seemed to make sense when assessed through my previous knowledge of psychology, persuasion or what affects decision making. Or what makes a team work. The categorization in to four groups seemed to cut too many corners, even though the different colours Erikson uses can mix in one person. I set out do some r Wow, do not waste your time with this book. If you want to learn something fact-based about human behaviour, look someplace else. From the very first page I was sceptical. Nothing in the book seemed to make sense when assessed through my previous knowledge of psychology, persuasion or what affects decision making. Or what makes a team work. The categorization in to four groups seemed to cut too many corners, even though the different colours Erikson uses can mix in one person. I set out do some research and well, surprise surprise, there is really very little basis for this kind of an assessment in the first place. As Magnus Lindwall, a professor of psychology at the University of Gothenburg has commented, the book is “no more scientific than a horoscope”. As it turns out, the book is based on a DISC assessment system, which was invented in the 1920s. To provide perspective, back then Freud was still around and those who have studied psychology know what today's psychology thinks about his theories. What is that then? Well, it has been proven that he was wrong about most everything. His research and methods have become outdated after scientific development. The same thing has happened with the DISC assessment that Erikson bases this book on. As the Swedish psychologist Jonas Hjalmar blom has commented: “the theories behind this book have been outdated for a long time and it should not be used by professionals” We are talking about psychology preceding WWII for crying out loud. Even the author himself has commented to the criticism on his blog: “…there are no facts in my book.” Still the book undisputedly mixes behavioural science with pseudo-science and therefore misleads the reader. So, HR people, if you thought you have found the next best thing, you have not. Most likely by applying the thinking and methods of this book, you will miss opportunities. As said, the psychology side of the book is a swindle, and unfortunately, the book is not saved by good narration. The description of the different colours, representing different kinds of individuals, ranges e.g. from their values, decision making and conflict management to things like “blue people are quality-conscious, like the Japanese engineers working at Toyota”. I mean, this is so far from how decision making actually works, I don’t have enough time to even address everything that is wrong with it. The text itself bounces from one thing to another, because the skeleton for which this book is constructed on is crooked and fragile like it would have had osteoporosis its entire life. This is for the simple fact, that because it is not based on any actual research, it has no distinguishable red line which a conscious and critically thinking reader could follow. Finally, if you want to learn about the subjects of which this tragicomic presentation claims to be a true authority of, I urge you to consider some of the following titles and save yourself from a good 8-10 hours of lost lifetime. Philosophy: 5 Major Pieces to the Life Puzzle The Slight Edge 12 Rules for Life: An Antidote to Chaos Practical psychology: Thinking, Fast and Slow (This tells how decision making actually works) How to Win Friends and Influence People Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion Teamwork: The Five Dysfunctions of a Team: a Leadership Fable The 17 Indisputable Laws of Teamwork: Embrace Them

  5. 5 out of 5

    Thomas Stroemquist

    Obviously, the 4-type personality profiling or assessment has been quite popular for a very long time. Hippocrates apparently kicked it off with his original 4 'temperaments'; Melancholic, Sanguine, Phlegmatic, and Choleric. It has subsequently been modernized, e.g. into the (oddly S&M associative) DISC (Dominance, Inducement, Submission, and Compliance) model. The one described in this book goes with colors instead, and I very much prefer that to the more Tarot-sounding "Winning from Within"-no Obviously, the 4-type personality profiling or assessment has been quite popular for a very long time. Hippocrates apparently kicked it off with his original 4 'temperaments'; Melancholic, Sanguine, Phlegmatic, and Choleric. It has subsequently been modernized, e.g. into the (oddly S&M associative) DISC (Dominance, Inducement, Submission, and Compliance) model. The one described in this book goes with colors instead, and I very much prefer that to the more Tarot-sounding "Winning from Within"-nomenclature; The Thinker, The Dreamer, The Warrior & The Lover :-S   Regardless of what you name them, one underlying problem with dividing people into 4 different personality types is of course that no-one is a pure 'type'. This is readily acknowledged, but oddly little discussed, in the literature I've been in contact with (including this book). Another mistake, in my opinion, is the exclusion of group dynamics. Very much is focused on teaching us how to "handle" a single person by determining his personality type and use the theories and 'methods' taught. While I certainly admit that being made aware of someone else's view point is often an eye-opener, I don't always agree that the way to cope is to 'play along'. If I happen upon a Red (Choleric, Dominant, Warrior...) that disrupts the work in a team by screaming and intimidating, my initial reflex is not to look in the book and find out how I can stroke his ego - more likely I'll strike him on top of his head with the book and tell him to behave like a decent person and not a spoiled kid. I can imagine that tells you all you need to know to place me in my 'type' if you've read this book. The personality type theory also has the drawback of colliding with many others (which are happily and uncritically used). As an example; early in this book, the author speaks about learning and presents a model by Edgar Dale which can be summarized by saying that the more active you are, the more you remember about what you were supposed to learn. The passive end is reading and listening (10 & 20 %, respectively) - the other end of the scale is "dramatic presentation" (90 %). Now, could this really be independent of one's personality type? I have troubles picturing something I would dread more than dramatic presentation and I dare bet that the only thing about that ordeal I would remember is exactly how painful I thought it was. Rest would probably be somewhere in a total blackout...   One part I appreciated was the discussion about how all the different types are needed and that the diversity actually works for the best; if everyone's a energetic entertainer, who are they going to entertain? Or if all are driven leaders, who is there to lead? Which I particularly liked, since leadership is such a buzzword right now and I have actually gotten the response "well everyone is responsible for leading themselves" to that question.   What I liked less was the informal, 'spoken language' type of narrative, giving a somewhat flippant impression. It doesn't help either with the many, not all convincing, examples of the types through anecdotes that contain people with suspiciously "pure" personality types. Add to this some sloppy editing (admittedly not a lot, but still) and the overall result feels shaky. Even when the result sometimes are unintentionally funny: "Blue behavior: Some basics to remember. Blue persons: 1) Keeps their distance. 2) Either stands or sits."

  6. 5 out of 5

    Moonkiszt

    Yep. I'm a yellow. And I have a story about it. . . . jk. This book reminded me of all the ones that were thrown at us in the 80's, and the tests we were given to make sure our personality types were properly distributed throughout the office, and no one was allowed to shriek about moved cheese, because that was going to happen. I did enjoy the mental process of putting all my co-workers, friends and families in their proper boxes. It was harder to recognize combos, and then hilarious to realize Yep. I'm a yellow. And I have a story about it. . . . jk. This book reminded me of all the ones that were thrown at us in the 80's, and the tests we were given to make sure our personality types were properly distributed throughout the office, and no one was allowed to shriek about moved cheese, because that was going to happen. I did enjoy the mental process of putting all my co-workers, friends and families in their proper boxes. It was harder to recognize combos, and then hilarious to realize how spot on the author is in his observations (he did have help from an old Greek. . . .). I imagined what might happen if we put this concept into our educational system, starting with kindergarteners. . . .that was a hilarious day dream! Give a kid a lego and see who he/she is! Worth the read, understanding it is not science, but anything that gets us all to a less hostile work / home / community environment is a benefit. 3 stars from me . . . *bam*!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Vivian

    Easy to approach overview of human interrelations. So if you've been exposed to Myers-Briggs or basic psychology then the breakdown into four types is not going to be difficult to grasp, at all. The value in this book is rather than it merely being a categorical reference it explains how to approach, give feedback, criticism, workflow, etc. for the different types. Generally, people grok those that are similar to themselves, but others who approach activity differently may be perplexing at times Easy to approach overview of human interrelations. So if you've been exposed to Myers-Briggs or basic psychology then the breakdown into four types is not going to be difficult to grasp, at all. The value in this book is rather than it merely being a categorical reference it explains how to approach, give feedback, criticism, workflow, etc. for the different types. Generally, people grok those that are similar to themselves, but others who approach activity differently may be perplexing at times. Erikson provides a plethora of anecdotal examples to illustrate each instance. Of course, being what I am personality wise I found this to be a bit too much chitchat in style, but that also made me laugh since the book kinda was pointing out different strategies. I found this a useful refresher course.

  8. 5 out of 5

    A Need to Read

    An excellent insight into the people in your life, this book will scream at you about who you are as a person and who those closest to you are.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Oskar

    The most useful takeaway from the book is that there are different types of people. You need to adapt to that and treat people differently. The framework that the book uses to classify people is perhaps best thought of as an example of how you could group different people. It is in no way the only or best way to classify people. The book has zero references to scientific studies and instead focuses on the personal experiences of one individual. That doesn't mean that the book and the ideas aren' The most useful takeaway from the book is that there are different types of people. You need to adapt to that and treat people differently. The framework that the book uses to classify people is perhaps best thought of as an example of how you could group different people. It is in no way the only or best way to classify people. The book has zero references to scientific studies and instead focuses on the personal experiences of one individual. That doesn't mean that the book and the ideas aren't useful, but they are definitely not undisputed facts. All in all, if you value examples and an easy and useful mental framework then this is for you. If you want facts, look elsewhere.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Iain

    Absolute drivel from start to finish. Categorising people in over-simplified ways in order to manipulate them. The author provides examples, all of which come across as completely made up, and he himself comes across as the most abhorrent person. Perhaps society is in turmoil because too many people are reading nonsense like this and actually taking it seriously. You don't need this to understand people, you just need a bit of common sense and compassion. Avoid. Absolute drivel from start to finish. Categorising people in over-simplified ways in order to manipulate them. The author provides examples, all of which come across as completely made up, and he himself comes across as the most abhorrent person. Perhaps society is in turmoil because too many people are reading nonsense like this and actually taking it seriously. You don't need this to understand people, you just need a bit of common sense and compassion. Avoid.

  11. 4 out of 5

    BookAholic12

    It was a very interesting read. I enjoyed the fact that I could see myself in the different colors. I definitely recommend this one!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Linda

    Have you wondered why you sometimes need to be alone for a while with your thoughts? Or why you always have to be the center of attention? Why certain people are so careless and sloppy? Or why you are surrounded by idiots? Thomas Erikson is explaining all this. He uses a known method to sort differences in communication and categorize people into four different groups, or personality types. Red people are impatient and focused on results, yellow people are positive and need to be the center of a Have you wondered why you sometimes need to be alone for a while with your thoughts? Or why you always have to be the center of attention? Why certain people are so careless and sloppy? Or why you are surrounded by idiots? Thomas Erikson is explaining all this. He uses a known method to sort differences in communication and categorize people into four different groups, or personality types. Red people are impatient and focused on results, yellow people are positive and need to be the center of attention, green people, which are the most common, are calm and good listeners, and blue people are well organized and pay attention to detail. Everyone is needed and the best group is consisting of all colors. People critical to this would certainly claim that it’s difficult to categorize people, but, of course, this method includes numerous variations, and most people have more than one color. Another critical comment might be that dividing people into groups is something that should be prevented, but Thomas Erikson doesn't value one quality more than another, he just states that we are all different. This is just a way to understand each other. We get to know the cause of conflicts and how best to treat them. Of course, this is not a totally waterproof method. People are unpredictable and complicated. The reality is always more complex. The book, a new edition, is entertaining and useful, both at work and in private life. Everyone benefits from this because everyone we all use communication.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Alice-Elizabeth (Prolific Reader Alice)

    This psychology/self-help book is claimed to prove better communications and understanding of different kinds of human behaviour. It's a huge bestseller in the author's home country of Sweden and now, it's making waves here in the UK too. To be honest, right now, the title seems quite appropriate for the current situations. However, this was a straight-up read filled with real-life examples and traits examined under four different colours. At first, this did read well. However, I started to feel This psychology/self-help book is claimed to prove better communications and understanding of different kinds of human behaviour. It's a huge bestseller in the author's home country of Sweden and now, it's making waves here in the UK too. To be honest, right now, the title seems quite appropriate for the current situations. However, this was a straight-up read filled with real-life examples and traits examined under four different colours. At first, this did read well. However, I started to feel quite disconnected and a little bored after about 150 pages or so. It's good if you are studying psychology for any courses. Not so if you are looking for a general read!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Simona Puidokaite

    Not worth the time! The book is based on DISC method that lacks scientific basis and this lack is clearly seen on every page. Each of four profiles are presented as somewhat divine truths though actually sound more like astrology just for the office. Author makes bold statements throughout the book but does not provide a single reference to any research where these statements are coming from… (So am I Blue now as I asked for more details?). It can be an entertaining read in the same way when you Not worth the time! The book is based on DISC method that lacks scientific basis and this lack is clearly seen on every page. Each of four profiles are presented as somewhat divine truths though actually sound more like astrology just for the office. Author makes bold statements throughout the book but does not provide a single reference to any research where these statements are coming from… (So am I Blue now as I asked for more details?). It can be an entertaining read in the same way when you read horoscopes or tarot cards, but something to take seriously? No, if you have your critical thinking switched on.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Thomas Edmund

    I'm not usually into personality classifications, they always seem little more than astrology type Barnum descriptions, but what is good about Erikson's book is that he doesn't overdo trying to classify people so much as provide useful advice for dealing with each behaviour pattern. So even if you don't buy into ideas of people being any particular type you can still use each piece of advice to address a particular situation, e.g. if someone is acting like a 'red' you can still use Erikson's advi I'm not usually into personality classifications, they always seem little more than astrology type Barnum descriptions, but what is good about Erikson's book is that he doesn't overdo trying to classify people so much as provide useful advice for dealing with each behaviour pattern. So even if you don't buy into ideas of people being any particular type you can still use each piece of advice to address a particular situation, e.g. if someone is acting like a 'red' you can still use Erikson's advice on giving feedback or managing that situation.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sol

    It seems a intresting book that will guide you to different -color- presonalities however this author is full of himself! I lost intrest half way. Lack of objective approach and seriously dont bother!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jana|جنى

    No wonder my favorite color is red I love psychology. Shut up.

  18. 5 out of 5

    آبگینه

    This book was written by an idiot.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jay

    First of all, human behaviour is extremely complex (and the result of so many internal/external factors) that no one will every be able to accurately categorise it all. Having said that, I personally love personality tests and shoving myself into little boxes: from Myers-Briggs (INFP here) to Buzzfeed quizzes (if I were a baked potato I'd just have a plain cheese topping apparently) to Hogwarts Houses (Gryffindor) I find it entertaining to see where I fit. But that is the magic word here: entert First of all, human behaviour is extremely complex (and the result of so many internal/external factors) that no one will every be able to accurately categorise it all. Having said that, I personally love personality tests and shoving myself into little boxes: from Myers-Briggs (INFP here) to Buzzfeed quizzes (if I were a baked potato I'd just have a plain cheese topping apparently) to Hogwarts Houses (Gryffindor) I find it entertaining to see where I fit. But that is the magic word here: entertaining, because none of these should ever be taken seriously. I'm never going to hire anyone based on the result of such tests, I'm never going to pick my partner or friendship group based on such tests. And if someone attempted to do it to me, I'd suggest professional help. Surrounded by Idiots is another subjective take on categorising people with a lot of anecdotes and the author's own opinions, but without concrete research or citations. Based on Erikson's system I'm a strong Green with hints of Blue. My dad is a super Red. My mum and sister would also be Greens. One of my coworkers is a definite Yellow. As long as I looked at it as "entertainment" and gently pondered about what colour my other loved ones would fit under, it was fun. Just fun, nothing more. Unfortunately this is where the book let me down - the author disagreed with my lighthearted opinion on the matter. He came across as someone who believed this all to be cold hard facts with very little wiggle room, you HAD to fit into one or two of these and it was even a helpful way to predict what kind of person you would be in the workplace or in your personal life. I very strongly disagree and I got a little tired wrestling with him on that, it really affected my enjoyment by the end. Also, some of the examples he's used as proof for different traits also seemed to be a smidge too convenient and I'm sure he's made a few of them up. Still an interesting read and I definitely see why people keep buying it in my shop. Thank you loads to NetGalley and Random House for the ARC!!

  20. 4 out of 5

    John de' Medici

    The first thing that draws you (at least that drew me) to this book is the title itself. Gotta give an A to whoever came up with it. The book however has much to do with the subtitle than with the title - "The Four Types of Human behaviour". The author uses the DISC behavioral assessment tool to categorize human behaviour or personality traits, DISC standing for: Dominance (D), Influence (I), Steadiness (S) and Conscientiousness (C). The tool is based on theories from the psychologist William Mar The first thing that draws you (at least that drew me) to this book is the title itself. Gotta give an A to whoever came up with it. The book however has much to do with the subtitle than with the title - "The Four Types of Human behaviour". The author uses the DISC behavioral assessment tool to categorize human behaviour or personality traits, DISC standing for: Dominance (D), Influence (I), Steadiness (S) and Conscientiousness (C). The tool is based on theories from the psychologist William Marston. First though, let's address the elephant in the room, human behaviour and humans are unbelievably complex and any attempt to form a categorization is apt to raise a few eyebrows. The author though does acknowledge this, and offers in my opinion a reasonable account of the DISC model. To make the learning process easier, the author uses colors for the four types of human behaviour: Red, Yellow, Green and Blue. The traits are roughly based on Hippocrates famous personality traits: Choleric, Sanguine, Phlegmatic and Melancholic. He spends a good amount on each color, highlighting their perceived strengths, observed weaknesses and what stresses them. More importantly he goes into detail on the interaction between each color and the other, how the actions of one color can be perceived by the other, but also how to handle the challenges that come with these differences in a group. The book brought me a great deal amount of audible laughter in the moments I was reading about a particular color, and suddenly recognition hit as I recalled a person in my life. My memory was taken to instances where I had challenges dealing with a particular person, but now I deeply understood what was at play. More importantly however it opened my awareness to how my behavior can be perceived by others, leaving room for improvement in my interactions. I can't recommend enough this wonderful book. A Must-Read!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Andy

    People are different! Not everyone sees the world the way you do! If this is a new idea to you, then the four-colors personality type system is as good as another I guess for discovering that concept. The author gets points for admitting that this idea is ancient, going back to the 4 humors of the Hippocratic tradition. He also gets bonus points for interviewing people who just read his book and revealing how the experience apparently accomplished next to nothing in getting the readers to apprec People are different! Not everyone sees the world the way you do! If this is a new idea to you, then the four-colors personality type system is as good as another I guess for discovering that concept. The author gets points for admitting that this idea is ancient, going back to the 4 humors of the Hippocratic tradition. He also gets bonus points for interviewing people who just read his book and revealing how the experience apparently accomplished next to nothing in getting the readers to appreciate different personality types!!! It's sad though that if this system has been around for decades and used on millions of people, that there's not some kind of evaluation data on how this training has any impact on productivity or workplace satisfaction or something.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Marilyn Mansilla

    Not worth the hype at all!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Juuso

    Somewhat entertaining, but relies on overly simplistic stereotypes. Also, the theory behind the categorisation is not exactly on the bleeding edge of modern behavioral sciences.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jamie

    Absolute drivel. Unfinishable.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Wissam Raji

    A great book about the different kinds of personalities and how can one kind be misunderstood by another. The four kinds starting with the dominant positive red personality, to the cheerful positive enthusiastic yellow one, to the silent routine blue analytic personality ending with the selfless green personality. The author give examples of these personalities and which personalities go along while others clash. Highly recommended read.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Cassandra Kay Silva

    A very very basic personality profiling book. There are definitely better resources for this type of information and this lacks the vigorous research and depth that I would expect from a work on this topic. Its really a "book for the masses" which isn't necessarily a bad thing. But it was weird that the author said that most people were two to three of the colours but never went through what these combinations would look like or how this might play out. It was all just focused on the main four b A very very basic personality profiling book. There are definitely better resources for this type of information and this lacks the vigorous research and depth that I would expect from a work on this topic. Its really a "book for the masses" which isn't necessarily a bad thing. But it was weird that the author said that most people were two to three of the colours but never went through what these combinations would look like or how this might play out. It was all just focused on the main four but with no appropriations for what was accepted as "the majority of the population". It was all just too simplified to be useful in my opinion.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Autumn

    I only read this because it was my work's book club pick - would never have picked it up otherwise. My essential takeaway is that this is a man's book. Written by a man, with men in mind. It was rigid and categorical, even though the author repeatedly claimed that that's not how this book was meant to come across. The vibes are undeniable. I mean, chapter 4 is literally called "Red Behavior: How to Recognize a Real Alpha and Avoid Getting in His Way" 😒 The author also chose to exclusively use theo I only read this because it was my work's book club pick - would never have picked it up otherwise. My essential takeaway is that this is a man's book. Written by a man, with men in mind. It was rigid and categorical, even though the author repeatedly claimed that that's not how this book was meant to come across. The vibes are undeniable. I mean, chapter 4 is literally called "Red Behavior: How to Recognize a Real Alpha and Avoid Getting in His Way" 😒 The author also chose to exclusively use theoretical he/him pronouns. I found this alienating and entirely unnecessary for a book written in 2019. His explanation in the introduction was "I know that you have enough imagination to insert a 'her' or a 'she' in your thoughts where this may be appropriate." Couldn't he have enough imagination to just use they/them pronouns and be inclusive from the start? My biggest beef with this book, though, is that it is undeniably pseudoscientific. All the author has done is recycled a philosophical concept from Hippocrates and passed it off as a foundational insight into social science and human psychology. He quoted next to no scientific sources in this work, and places himself in a position of expertise on human communication when he has no real accreditations or experience to make him so. The world doesn't need this book, it never needed to be published. It makes no difference that it exists because it contributes nothing that is new nor that can be relied upon.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Evelina | AvalinahsBooks

    Definitely very interesting and very easy to read, although I feel like this book was more of an intro into the types rather than how to proceed to communicate better with everyone. I think the author has written more books on this though, so that's probably why. Either way, worth a read. Definitely very interesting and very easy to read, although I feel like this book was more of an intro into the types rather than how to proceed to communicate better with everyone. I think the author has written more books on this though, so that's probably why. Either way, worth a read.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Shaneka Knight

    Great for anyone who leads or manages other. But where do we find a test for these personality types, on reflection seems as though you choose your personality type haha. Not sure about that actually! I listened to audiobook FREE here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZXq7l... Great for anyone who leads or manages other. But where do we find a test for these personality types, on reflection seems as though you choose your personality type haha. Not sure about that actually! I listened to audiobook FREE here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZXq7l...

  30. 5 out of 5

    Bassant Amir

    One of the best reads! And not the kind of nonfiction to be read and put on a shelf, you’ll probably need to go back to it! I have to admit that I misinterpreted many people and that this book helped me alot in understanding them more. And honestly I can’t stop trying to sort people out now!!!!!

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