Hot Best Seller

Music for Tigers

Availability: Ready to download

Shipped halfway around the world to spend the summer with her mom’s eccentric Australian relatives, middle schooler and passionate violinist Louisa is prepared to be resentful. But life at the family’s remote camp in the Tasmanian rainforest is intriguing, to say the least. There are pig-footed bandicoots, scary spiders, weird noises and odors in the night, and a quirky bo Shipped halfway around the world to spend the summer with her mom’s eccentric Australian relatives, middle schooler and passionate violinist Louisa is prepared to be resentful. But life at the family’s remote camp in the Tasmanian rainforest is intriguing, to say the least. There are pig-footed bandicoots, scary spiders, weird noises and odors in the night, and a quirky boy named Colin who cooks the most amazing meals. Not the least strange is her Uncle Ruff, with his unusual pet and veiled hints about something named Convict Rock. Finally, Louisa learns the truth: Convict Rock is a sanctuary established by her great-grandmother Eleanor—a sanctuary for Tasmanian tigers, Australia’s huge marsupials that were famously hunted into extinction almost a hundred years ago. Or so the world believes. Hidden in the rainforest at Convict Rock, one tiger remains. But now the sanctuary is threatened by a mining operation, and the last Tasmanian tiger must be lured deeper into the forest. The problem is, not since her great-grandmother has a member of the family been able to earn the shy tigers’ trust. As the summer progresses, Louisa forges unexpected connections with Colin, with the forest, and—through Eleanor’s journal—with her great-grandmother. She begins to suspect the key to saving the tiger is her very own music. But will her plan work? Or will the enigmatic Tasmanian tiger disappear once again, this time forever? A moving coming-of-age story wrapped up in the moss, leaves, and blue gums of the Tasmanian rainforest where, hidden under giant ferns, crouches its most beloved, and lost, creature.


Compare

Shipped halfway around the world to spend the summer with her mom’s eccentric Australian relatives, middle schooler and passionate violinist Louisa is prepared to be resentful. But life at the family’s remote camp in the Tasmanian rainforest is intriguing, to say the least. There are pig-footed bandicoots, scary spiders, weird noises and odors in the night, and a quirky bo Shipped halfway around the world to spend the summer with her mom’s eccentric Australian relatives, middle schooler and passionate violinist Louisa is prepared to be resentful. But life at the family’s remote camp in the Tasmanian rainforest is intriguing, to say the least. There are pig-footed bandicoots, scary spiders, weird noises and odors in the night, and a quirky boy named Colin who cooks the most amazing meals. Not the least strange is her Uncle Ruff, with his unusual pet and veiled hints about something named Convict Rock. Finally, Louisa learns the truth: Convict Rock is a sanctuary established by her great-grandmother Eleanor—a sanctuary for Tasmanian tigers, Australia’s huge marsupials that were famously hunted into extinction almost a hundred years ago. Or so the world believes. Hidden in the rainforest at Convict Rock, one tiger remains. But now the sanctuary is threatened by a mining operation, and the last Tasmanian tiger must be lured deeper into the forest. The problem is, not since her great-grandmother has a member of the family been able to earn the shy tigers’ trust. As the summer progresses, Louisa forges unexpected connections with Colin, with the forest, and—through Eleanor’s journal—with her great-grandmother. She begins to suspect the key to saving the tiger is her very own music. But will her plan work? Or will the enigmatic Tasmanian tiger disappear once again, this time forever? A moving coming-of-age story wrapped up in the moss, leaves, and blue gums of the Tasmanian rainforest where, hidden under giant ferns, crouches its most beloved, and lost, creature.

30 review for Music for Tigers

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jeanette (Ms. Feisty)

    This is a lovely story for middle-grade readers with an interest in threatened and endangered species, or just nature in general. The tigers in the title are not really tigers at all. They are technically thylacines, doglike marsupials with stripes on their backs, hence the common name "Tasmanian tigers." If you harbor fantasies of someday spotting an animal that is believed to be extinct, this book may fuel your hopes. It does happen occasionally that someone finds a living member of a species This is a lovely story for middle-grade readers with an interest in threatened and endangered species, or just nature in general. The tigers in the title are not really tigers at all. They are technically thylacines, doglike marsupials with stripes on their backs, hence the common name "Tasmanian tigers." If you harbor fantasies of someday spotting an animal that is believed to be extinct, this book may fuel your hopes. It does happen occasionally that someone finds a living member of a species thought to have been wiped out many decades ago. The Tasmanian rain forest setting is appealing, and there are some useful lessons for youngsters. Louisa discovers that there are delightful adventures to be had if you step out of your comfort zone and open yourself up to new experiences and people. She makes a friend named Colin who is on the autism spectrum. Some of the narrative gets a bit didactic at times, but it might help kids understand that people who seem "weird" just have a different way of interacting with the world.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Christine

    Disclaimer: ARC via Netgalley When I was in middle school, I helped out as a library aide. You got to take out as many books as you wanted, and you got to play as much Oregon Trail as you wanted. I lost count of how many times I took out the Guinness’s Book of World Animal Records. It was that book that first introduced me to the thylacine (or Tasmanian Tiger). Kadarusman’s young adult novel is about Louisa who much rather be practicing for an audition yet finds herself visiting her mother’s fam Disclaimer: ARC via Netgalley When I was in middle school, I helped out as a library aide. You got to take out as many books as you wanted, and you got to play as much Oregon Trail as you wanted. I lost count of how many times I took out the Guinness’s Book of World Animal Records. It was that book that first introduced me to the thylacine (or Tasmanian Tiger). Kadarusman’s young adult novel is about Louisa who much rather be practicing for an audition yet finds herself visiting her mother’s family, whose lands is about to be taken and repurposed. The problem is that the land has been a refugee for certain animals that may be consider extinct by the larger population. Of course, the action takes place on Tasmania. It was wonderful to read a young adult novel, with a character who is in her late teens, that does not have a love triangle at its center. Well, unless you count Louisa’s love for music. Louisa is the right amount of slightly resentful teen (the rest of her family are scientists) but also a good girl who you can identify with. She also learns and adapts as the story goes on. The supporting characters are well drawn as well. At times, the book does feel a bit too much like a science lecture. This is in part because of the conversations about the tigers as well as neurotypicals. It should be noted that it does not read like a speech or a “very important lesson”. The passages are closer to info dumps, but they don’t quite read like them. The conversations between characters, especially between Louisa and other young people, feel very nature and organic. This is particularly true of the conversations between Colin and Louisa. I love the use of Colin as a character. The use of the old diary is interesting and is blended in quite well with the rest of the book. There is a sure change of voice in these sections. Recommended.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kim

    Amazing!!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Christina

    You’ll be transported to the lush Tasmanian rainforest of Australia where curiosity and wonder abound underneath giant ferns and eucalyptus. At first, Louisa, a talented violinist, was hesitant to spend the summer with an uncle that she has never met so far away from her Toronto home. Very quickly though, she becomes entranced by her surroundings, the animals, and a journal that belonged to her great-grandmother that reveals a rich-family history of steadfast conservation efforts for Tasmanian t You’ll be transported to the lush Tasmanian rainforest of Australia where curiosity and wonder abound underneath giant ferns and eucalyptus. At first, Louisa, a talented violinist, was hesitant to spend the summer with an uncle that she has never met so far away from her Toronto home. Very quickly though, she becomes entranced by her surroundings, the animals, and a journal that belonged to her great-grandmother that reveals a rich-family history of steadfast conservation efforts for Tasmanian tigers. When her family’s legacy is threatened, Louisa and a cast full of lovable characters jump into action to see to it that the family’s incredible work lives on. This captivating story is full of heart, hope, music, and science. Louisa’s many new relationships evolve so beautifully and I especially adored her interactions with Colin, who has autism spectrum disorder. Kirkus starred reviewed, MUSIC FOR TIGERS is a special coming-of-age story that pays homage to Tasmanian aboriginal people, nature, and the magnificent beings with whom we share the earth.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Aaron

    Thanks very much to Pajama Press and my friends at my ARC sharing group, Book Portage for a copy of this new book from Michelle Kadarusman, whose Girl of the Southern Sea I really enjoyed (It was also nominated for the Governor General award in Canada). This story takes place in Tasmania. Louisa is a Canadian but is sent to Tasmania to stay with relatives and discovers what appears to be an animal who is thought to be extinct. Her explorations of the wild and discoveries of things inside nature Thanks very much to Pajama Press and my friends at my ARC sharing group, Book Portage for a copy of this new book from Michelle Kadarusman, whose Girl of the Southern Sea I really enjoyed (It was also nominated for the Governor General award in Canada). This story takes place in Tasmania. Louisa is a Canadian but is sent to Tasmania to stay with relatives and discovers what appears to be an animal who is thought to be extinct. Her explorations of the wild and discoveries of things inside nature and inside herself made this a thought provoking book. Her relatives run a wildlife preserve that is threatened by development but this is not a book about saving the wildlife. It is really a book about great characters. Louisa has goals in life and plenty that gets in her way. She meets a friend, Colin, who is neuro diverse and also a very interesting, realistic character. I would love to purchase this book as I know several kids who would read it (next year for me) and it comes out on April 28. 

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kriss

    Music for Tigers is a beautifully written middle grade novel that will warm the hearts of young readers. Lou grows by leaps and bounds when she is sent to spend the summer in Tasmania instead of practicing her violin. Readers will find themselves drawn into this beautiful story as Lou connects with her family roots and the Australian back country.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Laurie Hnatiuk

    Thank you to the publisher for an ARC of this book for #bookportage. I loved spending time and getting to know not only Louisa but her extended family in Tasmania Canadian author @michellekadarusman’s upcoming novel Music for Tigers will be a wonderful addition to classrooms and librarians and will be of interest to a wide range of readers which is one of its many strengths. Louisa lives in Toronto but is being sent to Tasmania to spend the summer with her mother’s brother. Louisa does not want to Thank you to the publisher for an ARC of this book for #bookportage. I loved spending time and getting to know not only Louisa but her extended family in Tasmania Canadian author @michellekadarusman’s upcoming novel Music for Tigers will be a wonderful addition to classrooms and librarians and will be of interest to a wide range of readers which is one of its many strengths. Louisa lives in Toronto but is being sent to Tasmania to spend the summer with her mother’s brother. Louisa does not want to go. She is a violinist and has an upcoming audition and going to an off the beaten path residence is not appealing at all. Upon her arrival Louisa has to make adjustments. Her uncle is focused on a dying pig-footed bandicoot rather than her, she is isolated in the middle of the Tasmanian jungle surrounded by all kinds of creatures, noises and unwanted smells and her nearest neighbour is a mother and her son Colin, who is autistic and is a jeep ride away. Despite all the sudden changes, it is her own family’s history of her great grandmother Eleanor and her tie to the animals ,in particular the Tasmanian Tiger that allows her to open her eyes and her heart to the rainforest. Colin also comes to stay with her uncle and takes Louisa on hikes and shares his knowledge of the animals and plants that live there and the two become friends. Louisa learns that her great grandmother too was a musician and it was her music that played a role with the Tasmanian Tiger and helped repopulate them. Louisa learns and begins to understand the deep rooted connection her uncle and family has with the animals and the land. In the same way, her grandmother’s music helped the Tasmanian Tiger, she too has the chance to use her music to possibly save a Tasmanian Tiger thought to be extinct. Themes of animals, protecting the environment, music or playing an instrument, wonder how to make friends, autism, anxiety, fitting in, family relationships are all covered in this moving story - there is something for everyone to identify and connect with in this story. I loved how the friendship Colin and Louisa developed and how they both supported one another (especially the camera scene). As an animal lover I enjoyed learning more about unfamiliar animals and appreciated the presence of the Aboriginals and the important role they had in the story. Preorder or look for it April 28.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kathie

    Thank you to the publisher for an ARC of this book for #bookportage. I'm a big fan of the author's writing so this book was one of my most anticipated reads of 2020, and I thoroughly enjoyed it! Louisa lives in Canada, but is sent to Tasmania to spend the summer with her mom's brother at their family bush camp while her parents are busy doing field research. Louisa's passion lies with music, particularly her violin, and she'd rather be at home practicing for an upcoming audition than in the middle Thank you to the publisher for an ARC of this book for #bookportage. I'm a big fan of the author's writing so this book was one of my most anticipated reads of 2020, and I thoroughly enjoyed it! Louisa lives in Canada, but is sent to Tasmania to spend the summer with her mom's brother at their family bush camp while her parents are busy doing field research. Louisa's passion lies with music, particularly her violin, and she'd rather be at home practicing for an upcoming audition than in the middle of the rainforest with an uncle she's never met. It doesn't take long until she discovers a family secret; her family has protected a species that is considered extinct, but the impending destruction of their camp to make way for logging in the area puts the animals in jeopardy. Louisa must help her uncle and his friends trap and relocate a Tasmanian tiger out of harms way, but can they do it before it's too late? There are so many things I like about this story. I loved that it took place in a location that was new to me, and how it made me question what we really know about species considered extinct (this could lead to some fascinating classroom discussion). I appreciated how the author presented Louisa's friend, Colin. who is autistic. He and Louisa formed a special friendship, and I loved that Louisa accepts him from the start of the novel, and the positive influence they both have on each other. I also enjoyed the journals of Louisa's Great Granny Eleanor, and how the family history is tied into the story. I was very happy to see the author acknowledge the Tasmanian Aboriginal community, and that Elders were mentioned as playing a role in the relocation. I would definitely recommend adding this book to your middle grade collection when it is released on April 28/20.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Lianne (The Towering Pile) Lavoie

    A third great MYRCA nominee from Michelle Kadarusman! I greatly enjoyed The Theory of Hummingbirds and Girl of the Southern Seas, and Music for Tigers did not disappoint. As an autistic reader it's hard for me to talk about this book without focusing on Colin. (I'm gonna say some negative things [in fact I might rant], but I promise I did like the book. I just can't help but focus on this specific aspect of it.) I liked Colin a lot. Does he fall into some of the stereotypes of autistic characters A third great MYRCA nominee from Michelle Kadarusman! I greatly enjoyed The Theory of Hummingbirds and Girl of the Southern Seas, and Music for Tigers did not disappoint. As an autistic reader it's hard for me to talk about this book without focusing on Colin. (I'm gonna say some negative things [in fact I might rant], but I promise I did like the book. I just can't help but focus on this specific aspect of it.) I liked Colin a lot. Does he fall into some of the stereotypes of autistic characters written by neurotypicals? Yes. But he was lovable and I'm starved for representation lol so I still got very attached to him. But it's hard to call this book good representation because of one thing: Colin's mom, who won't stop talking about Colin being "ASD". I like her as a character otherwise, but did not love the way she talked at length about his disability behind his back to a potential friend. I definitely would have preferred if Colin had been the one to talk about this with Louisa. In the acknowledgements, a "support education specialist" is listed as the sensitivity reader. This didn't surprise me at all. But it did annoy me. I'm gonna take a small leap and say that sensitivity reader probably isn't autistic. So why is she the sensitivity reader for an autistic character?? Answer: because autistic people still aren't seen as capable of advocating for ourselves, and people who are around us are considered to be better experts.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jill Jemmett

    Louisa is sent to Tasmania to stay with her uncle for the summer when her parents go on a research trip. Her Uncle Ruff lives in a remote camp where he looks after a variety of wild animals. He gives Louisa a journal belonging to her great-grandmother, who rescued Tasmanian tigers. Even though Tasmanian tigers were thought to be extinct for centuries, Louisa’s family knows that they are secretly around the island. Now, Louisa is the only one who holds the secret to rescuing the remaining tiger. I Louisa is sent to Tasmania to stay with her uncle for the summer when her parents go on a research trip. Her Uncle Ruff lives in a remote camp where he looks after a variety of wild animals. He gives Louisa a journal belonging to her great-grandmother, who rescued Tasmanian tigers. Even though Tasmanian tigers were thought to be extinct for centuries, Louisa’s family knows that they are secretly around the island. Now, Louisa is the only one who holds the secret to rescuing the remaining tiger. I learned so much while reading this book. I realized recently that I have read books by Australian authors, but none that are set in Australia. I was so glad to discover that this one was set there. I loved learning about the different animals in Tasmania that I didn’t know before. The fictional mystery around the extinction of Tasmanian tigers was so great. It makes me wonder how many creatures that are thought to be extinct could be hiding out somewhere in the world. This book was less than 200 pages, yet there was so much to the story. The important topic of animal extinction was discussed a lot. Louisa also had anxiety surrounding her performing music on her violin. She met a boy named Colin, who was autistic. Louisa was eager to learn about Colin and how to help him navigate the world of social interaction. These were relevant topics to be in a middle grade novel. I loved this book! Thank you Pajama Press for providing a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Karen McKenna

    I loved this story! It immediately inspired me to learn more about Tasmania, the Tarkine forest, and the wildlife there. I loved learning about bandicoots, Tasmanian tigers, and devils. I admit that I knew next to nothing about this beautiful part of the world. I was inspired to learn more, and realized this would be a great read aloud for students in my 3rd grade class next year before beginning our information unit and animal reports because the story inspires you to learn about animals you ne I loved this story! It immediately inspired me to learn more about Tasmania, the Tarkine forest, and the wildlife there. I loved learning about bandicoots, Tasmanian tigers, and devils. I admit that I knew next to nothing about this beautiful part of the world. I was inspired to learn more, and realized this would be a great read aloud for students in my 3rd grade class next year before beginning our information unit and animal reports because the story inspires you to learn about animals you never even knew existed and to look at animals and their connection to their habitat in deeper ways. The story is condensed (the ARC comes in at around 150 pages of text) yet has a maturity and importance that is worth every page. The relationships are complex and I especially loved the friendship between Louisa and Colin as it developed. This book introduces readers to ideas of how to not only accept but be a good friend to someone who is neurodiverse, which I also love for my students. The story also addressed anxiety, which many of our students are grappling with, and I thought it does an excellent job with this topic as well. In the story, a beloved animal dies, but unlike the dog dying books that are so popular in school, I thought this did a thoughtful job of handling the topic and also moving on. The story inspired us to be more aware of our impact on the world around us, both the people and the animals in addition to the habitat they need for survival. The actions are small, and in some ways the conservation efforts of Louisa and her family end without any knowledge of if they will work or have an impact on the future, yet it teaches us that it is important to do the right thing even if it is a small act. The look at colonization is honest and does not follow the narrative of only being heroic which can be so dangerous and prevalent in children's literature. I also appreciate that there are multiple formats of text within the book, from the overall narrative to informational text in written and speech form, an old diary filled with entries, and even a newspaper article at the end. I am really excited to share this book with my students next year! #LitReviewCrew

  12. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

    Louisa wants nothing more than to practice playing the violin back home in Canada, but her mother has shipped her off to Tasmania to stay with her uncle. She's not impressed by him or by the large spiders that fill the cabin where she is to stay. Eventually, as she reads the remains of a journal kept by her great-grandmother, Eleanor, Louisa realizes why her uncle behaves as he does and the special charge that her family has taken on to preserve the Tasmanian tigers, a species long thought to be Louisa wants nothing more than to practice playing the violin back home in Canada, but her mother has shipped her off to Tasmania to stay with her uncle. She's not impressed by him or by the large spiders that fill the cabin where she is to stay. Eventually, as she reads the remains of a journal kept by her great-grandmother, Eleanor, Louisa realizes why her uncle behaves as he does and the special charge that her family has taken on to preserve the Tasmanian tigers, a species long thought to be extinct. As Louisa continues to practice her music, she admits her fears about performing in public, and befriends Colin, whose classmates make fun of him for his differences and social awkwardness. As mining efforts threaten the sanctuary and the last of those special tigers, Colin, Uncle Ruff, and Louisa join forces to find the tiger and have it moved to a safe place. This gentle story about how one season changed the life of a girl reluctant to move out of her comfort zone will touch readers' hearts with its descriptive language, appealing characters, and unexpected heroism. After all, heroic acts come in small and large forms and in the most unlikely ways. The story started a little slowly for me, but after the first few pages, my interest was captured, and I wondered about the possibilities of what's out there in the natural world and what we really don't know about it.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kate

    In a single word: brilliant. From start to finish, Music for Tigers is absolutely brilliant. The power of Kadarusman's story telling of Louisa discovering truths of her family, world, and self, is intricately interwoven with discussions of deforestation, species extinction, effects of mining, neurodiversity and the difficulties that arise from being neurally diverse, childhood anxiety, normalizing cognitve behavioral therapy, the strength of family, friends, and nature. Music for Tigers is a book In a single word: brilliant. From start to finish, Music for Tigers is absolutely brilliant. The power of Kadarusman's story telling of Louisa discovering truths of her family, world, and self, is intricately interwoven with discussions of deforestation, species extinction, effects of mining, neurodiversity and the difficulties that arise from being neurally diverse, childhood anxiety, normalizing cognitve behavioral therapy, the strength of family, friends, and nature. Music for Tigers is a book for all ages, we are blessed to have Michelle Kadarusman's voice speaking to our next generation of readers. By far one of my favorite reads of the year. Buy this as a gift for every young or young at heart person you know, and pick up a copy for yourself while you're at it.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Storytime With Stephanie

    There are books that grip you from page one and transport you right into the story. The author takes you on a journey and drops you right in the middle of their story, Michelle Kadarusman has this particular magic in her writing. Never have I read one of her beautiful books and not been completely captivated, almost always reading them in one sitting. Music for Tigers is her incredible new story, set in the Tasmanian rainforest, about family, legacy, friendship, and environmentalism. Michelle Kad There are books that grip you from page one and transport you right into the story. The author takes you on a journey and drops you right in the middle of their story, Michelle Kadarusman has this particular magic in her writing. Never have I read one of her beautiful books and not been completely captivated, almost always reading them in one sitting. Music for Tigers is her incredible new story, set in the Tasmanian rainforest, about family, legacy, friendship, and environmentalism. Michelle Kadarusman explores so many different themes with the time and attention they need to grow. In the story we meet Louisa who is sent to spend some time at her Uncle Ruff’s bush camp in Tasmania, much to her chagrin. She should be spending the summer practicing her violin for her big audition. While at the camp she meets her great-grandmother, through her journals, a new friend in Colin, and a once thought extinct Tasmanian tiger named Ellie. Music is found in many different places. There is the music created by musicians to entertain us but there is also the music of the everyday. The music in the birds singing in the trees, the frogs croaking in the ponds, the chattering of children as they play. While in the rainforest Louisa makes many discoveries. She discovers the music in sitting and listening to the wildlife around her. She discovers she is not quite so different from her family after all and she discovers how she can be a good friend. There are times when we just don;t recognize how we fit into our family dynamic. We feel so different from those around us that it’s hard to know how we belong. In Louisa’s case her passion for music is so different from the passion for biology her mom, dad, and older sister share. While staying in her ancestral home she discovers she wasn’t the only person in her family with a passion for music, her great-grandmother Eleanor was not only an environmentalist and an ecological protectionist, she was also an accomplished pianist. When she meets Colin, the son of her Uncle Ruff’s neighbour and an accomplished rainforest tour guide, she meets a neurodiverse friend who she helps to navigate the challenging world of body language and social interaction. Colin helps Louisa recognize and name what has been keeping her from earning a place in the youth orchestra, performance anxiety. His blunt recognition of her challenge helps her find comfort and also allows her the confidence to confide in her parents and get the help and resources she needs to succeed. Together they help to save a long thought extinct species. Michelle Kadarusman always writes from the heart. She writes about places she has lived that have a piece of her spirit. She lovingly addresses topics that at one time were thought taboo in children’s literature. It is incredible to have authors forthrightly tackling topics such as mental health, neurodiversity, and environmentalism. These are topics that are so relevant to youth today and will strike a chord with many young readers. It’s a book that would make an incredible read aloud in a classroom or as a bedtime read and it’s also a story that will inspire action well after you are finished with the story. There are so many elements you could dive down into further to really get to the heart of the characters. Consider enjoying Vivaldi’s The Four Seasons before, during, and after reading. You will gain a new perspective for the genius behind the work.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Tara Elliott

    This book was magical in the way it transported me to a part of the world I will never likely get to but through these pages. The characters felt like I really knew them and loved them all for their unique personalities, both human and animal. I loved this book and would give it more stars if I could. Thank you Michelle Kadarusman for this amazing book.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Carisa

    Beautifully written and covers important topics like conservation, history, ASD, and anxiety. It was a great fictional story, but also very educational. The descriptions the author used really transported the reader. The book accomplishes so much from character development to an interesting plot in a relatively short book.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Michelle Kadarusman

    The Advance Reading Copy of my story Music for Tigers is out! I am so excited to share this story with you, set in my homeland of Australia. It is a coming of age story, but also a love letter to nature the importance of taking care of our environment and all its creatures. I hope you enjoy spending time in the Tasmanian rainforest with me.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Julia

    Thoroughly enjoyable read!! Great setting and interesting story line. Makes me want to visitTasmania!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Shella

    Thank you to Netgalley and Myrick Marketing and Media, LLC Pajama Press for an ARC of Music for Tigers. I am giving an honest opinion in exchange for a copy of the book. As a sixth grade reading teacher, I am thrilled to highly recommend this story. Very rarely do we find a book that fits so many niches for a vast amount of middle school readers. For reluctant readers, the unique setting and mystery will draw them into the story. The reader immediately feels at home and enthralled with Tasmania. Thank you to Netgalley and Myrick Marketing and Media, LLC Pajama Press for an ARC of Music for Tigers. I am giving an honest opinion in exchange for a copy of the book. As a sixth grade reading teacher, I am thrilled to highly recommend this story. Very rarely do we find a book that fits so many niches for a vast amount of middle school readers. For reluctant readers, the unique setting and mystery will draw them into the story. The reader immediately feels at home and enthralled with Tasmania. Even though this is not a fantasy book, the writing is magical in its ability to transport you half way around the word in two time periods. The setting becomes like a character. Inquisitive minds will want to research the vast array of unique animals presented in the story. This book is unique in its ability to be interesting to on grade level/ higher readers while at the same time draw in the lower or reluctant readers without frustrating them. The words choices are fantastic but not overdone or confusing. The friendship developed between the protagonist and a neurodiverse character is presented in a memorable and caring way. The dynamic characters are interesting and as the mystery unfolds through her great grandmother's journals- keeps the pages turning. The relationships that are built through the story provide springboards for meaningful classroom and home conversations. This is a perfect book club book. It is a fast read with an interesting cover and unique setting. The themes of finding confidence, acceptance of others, and the balance between economics and environment is executed masterfully- not preaching and political. I cannot express my gratitude enough to the author for finding that balance. In recent years- political driving agendas plowing through adolescent literature has been infuriating. Topics are dropped into story lines just to get a politically correct box checked off to bolster sales rather than presenting the complexity of controversial issues. This author provides authenticity for her themes that should be a model for other middle school authors. I encourage all middle school and upper elementary teachers to put this book on your radar. If I can, I am going to try to get my school to get a set of books to add to my book club choices.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Angela Blount

    Originally reviewed for YA Books Central: https://www.yabookscentral.com/yafict... 3.5 Stars A vividly descriptive Middle-Grade work with an ecological focus--enriched by elements of music, friendship, and atypical neurology. When her parents get busy with work, Canadian-born Louisa is shipped off to spend the summer with an uncle she's never met--in the Tarkine forests of Tasmania. Initially, Louisa is agonizingly disinterested in everything outside of her drive to practice her violin. Her uncle Originally reviewed for YA Books Central: https://www.yabookscentral.com/yafict... 3.5 Stars A vividly descriptive Middle-Grade work with an ecological focus--enriched by elements of music, friendship, and atypical neurology. When her parents get busy with work, Canadian-born Louisa is shipped off to spend the summer with an uncle she's never met--in the Tarkine forests of Tasmania. Initially, Louisa is agonizingly disinterested in everything outside of her drive to practice her violin. Her uncle is a recluse who lives in an abandoned logging camp turned makeshift animal preserve--and is focused on a dying bandicoot, which has apparently been his sole companion for many years. The only person her age nearby turns out to be an autistic boy named Colin, whose savant expertise for the forest is a counter to his uncertainty over social cues. And there is a family mystery of sorts, revolving around the grandmother that Louisa never knew... I was drawn to this book because I recognized the hindquarters of a Tasmanian Tiger on the cover. (It was in middle school that I learned of these so recently extinct creatures, and became intensely fascinated with them.) And while it turned out to be far lighter on the "Tigers" than I would have liked, it was still good to see them referenced and given a bit of life. The pacing is a bit slow, the tension only rising a couple of times. The mystery angle in this story is a bit thin, as well--since no one is actually trying to keep any of the family "secrets" from the MC (Louisa was simply too obsessed with her violin to pay attention to what her mother had tried to explain to her about her great-grandmother, the camp, and the animals their family has long tried to protect.) The bits of her great-grand's diary she's able to read are a delight--written with a strong voice and a sense of historical authenticity. But just as Louisa is starting to connect with her, we find the rest of her personal entries were lost in a fire. And the great-grandmother's voice is, sadly, not revisited. Louisa herself is a bit difficult to connect with for much of the book. Her fixation on her violin dominates her self-identity, which makes more sense when we eventually learn she's had problems with performance anxiety and failed her previous children's orchestra auditions... Although it's revealed so late into the story, and hinted at so little, it struck this reader as oddly surprising. On the plus side, Louisa and Colin's friendship is both a prominent element and a highlight--leading to noteworthy character growth for each. Louisa is largely adaptive to Colin's quirks from the get-go (thanks in part to his mother's explanation of his behaviors and difficulties), and at one point even assists him in interpreting the facial expressions and intentions of some of his more snide classmates. And while Colin's savantism stands as a commonly known possible aspect of being on the autism spectrum, his movement coping for agitation/overstimulation is less so. I would readily recommend this for young contemporary fiction and nature lovers. There's some great potential here for building empathy, educating on species extinction, and expanding familiarity with neurological diversity--all while steeping readers in the atmosphere of an incredibly unique biome.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Katelyn Spedden

    *I received a free ARC of this novel from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review* Music for Tigers is a fantastic coming of age story. There are many different things dealt with In the novel and they all flow together so well. It’s crazy knowing that there were animals that were abundant at one time and people deciding they were pests killed them off. And yes you know that there aren’t really tigers running around Tasmania and that no one has noticed them yet but it is a wonderful thought thi *I received a free ARC of this novel from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review* Music for Tigers is a fantastic coming of age story. There are many different things dealt with In the novel and they all flow together so well. It’s crazy knowing that there were animals that were abundant at one time and people deciding they were pests killed them off. And yes you know that there aren’t really tigers running around Tasmania and that no one has noticed them yet but it is a wonderful thought thinking they could be out there somewhere. That people cared enough about the animals to protect them. It also handles autism and anxiety very well. There are some stories that slap that label on people and don’t do much other then write a character as ‘socially awkward; or something like that but Coli is so well rounded. He’s someone that knows his limits and has moments where he’s overwhelmed and has ways to self calm just like someone does in real life. It’s such a realistic portrayal that I think it’s perfect for a middle grade book when kids are starting to really see things and there are always the problems with bullying. It shows that he’s not ‘odd’ or ‘weird’ (words used in the book to say what he isn’t) but a child that’s different just like everyone else. I would fully recommend this book both for it’s characters and it’s story. I really enjoyed it.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Misty Miller

    Music for Tigers gracefully unlocks adventure while expressing an underlying mystery. Louisa or Lou is sent to spend the summer in Australia – in a remote part of Tasmanian to be exact. For this music loving, violin playing, middle schooler, nothing could be further from where she would like to be. The fact it is to spend the summer with an uncle she has never met only makes matters worse. At the beginning of the story Lou has a one-track mind – practicing the violin. Can she see past her own de Music for Tigers gracefully unlocks adventure while expressing an underlying mystery. Louisa or Lou is sent to spend the summer in Australia – in a remote part of Tasmanian to be exact. For this music loving, violin playing, middle schooler, nothing could be further from where she would like to be. The fact it is to spend the summer with an uncle she has never met only makes matters worse. At the beginning of the story Lou has a one-track mind – practicing the violin. Can she see past her own desires and fears to embrace the adventure and mystery that is right in front of her? Kardarusman weaves a fantastic coming of age story with a unique background. Her introduction of a character on the autism spectrum is done with such class that his personality and character outshine his “label”. The friendship that grows between the two main characters reminds us that we are not that different when we choose to look for our similarities and not our differences. Music for Tigers will leave you with an almost uncontrollable desire to travel to the “Land Down Under” to see firsthand the beautiful landscapes that are described with perfection. This story will leave you guessing and hoping for things to be as we hope and imagine them to be and not what is widely believed to be true.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Dean Italiano

    Music for Tigers is a Silver Birch Fiction Award Nominee. I don't always get a chance to read the Forest of Reading books every year, but this isn't a year like most others. Violin-playing teen Louisa travels from Toronto to stay with her Uncle in the Australian bush in the Tasmanian rainforest. Although it's a work of fiction, there are a number of factual lessons to be learned about the natural wildlife and environment there. As interesting as it was, to me, it read like a number of info dumps. Music for Tigers is a Silver Birch Fiction Award Nominee. I don't always get a chance to read the Forest of Reading books every year, but this isn't a year like most others. Violin-playing teen Louisa travels from Toronto to stay with her Uncle in the Australian bush in the Tasmanian rainforest. Although it's a work of fiction, there are a number of factual lessons to be learned about the natural wildlife and environment there. As interesting as it was, to me, it read like a number of info dumps. Dropping the facts in situations such as a walk with a tour guide, felt more like school and less like enjoyable fiction. That was my biggest beef with this book. And now, what I liked about it... Louisa shows tremendous growth while still remaining true to herself, that was balanced nicely. The scenery/location is impeccable, of course. It makes me want to go. It also made me want to save the environment, so it's got that going for it, too. I especially appreciate Colin, the neurodivergent friend Louisa meets while staying at her Uncle's. The two work together to maneuver the challenges that come with one of them being on the Spectrum, written in a respectable and well done manner. The tiger was intriguing, enough that I looked up more information, and watched the old videos they mention in the story. The history of their family and these Tasmanian Tigers together made for an interesting peek into the past. I did enjoy most of this novel, it was a quick read, and I think many of the students at my school will enjoy it. I didn't love it, but it gets one solid thumb up from me.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Shari

    What an intriguing and fantastic book! I have enjoyed Michelle Kadarusman's writing before, and loved this title as well. I read Music for Tigers in one sitting, punctuated only by pausing to google images of the various creatures mentioned in the book. I was fascinated with the idea of a family legacy of caring for endangered creatures, and it brought to mind often the Endling books by Katherine Applegate - a completely different genre of books, to be sure, but also stories that deal with extin What an intriguing and fantastic book! I have enjoyed Michelle Kadarusman's writing before, and loved this title as well. I read Music for Tigers in one sitting, punctuated only by pausing to google images of the various creatures mentioned in the book. I was fascinated with the idea of a family legacy of caring for endangered creatures, and it brought to mind often the Endling books by Katherine Applegate - a completely different genre of books, to be sure, but also stories that deal with extinction and endangerment of species. The way that music is intertwined through the story was beautiful, connecting Louisa to both the tiger and her great-grandmother. There are powerful themes of family, friendship, and making the right choices, as well as neurodiversity, anxiety, and grief. I love finding books that include a nuanced, multi-layered story and tell it in under 200 pages, and Music for Tigers definitely fits that bill. Finding that in a book set in a beautiful, far-off land that few of my students will ever see - that is priceless! I cannot wait to share this book with students, teachers, and anyone else who loves a good story!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Tanya #TeacherReader

    This was a beautifully written almost lyrical (musical) story. There are so many themes that will appeal to middle grade readers--Australia, conservation, extinct/endangered animals, friendship, music, neurodiversity, and more. This is actually my first summer reading book of 2020 and I can’t wait to have some students read it for feedback, but now I have to wait until the fall. When Louisa arrives to stay with her Uncle Ruf in Tasmania at the family’s wilderness sanctuary, she is suffering anxie This was a beautifully written almost lyrical (musical) story. There are so many themes that will appeal to middle grade readers--Australia, conservation, extinct/endangered animals, friendship, music, neurodiversity, and more. This is actually my first summer reading book of 2020 and I can’t wait to have some students read it for feedback, but now I have to wait until the fall. When Louisa arrives to stay with her Uncle Ruf in Tasmania at the family’s wilderness sanctuary, she is suffering anxiety because of her upcoming violin audition. As she learns more about the sanctuary’s purpose, she blends her musical talents into their mission. Her relationship with Colin leads her to understand neurodiversity and copes with her own issues. I really enjoyed the conservation and hopeful messages in this one. I will definitely be checking out other books by Kadarusman!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    I absolutely loved this and can't wait to include it in my middle grades book recommendation newsletter and tell all of my students about it in the fall! Louisa's time in Tasmania captured my attention right from the beginning and left me wanting to learn about the Tasmanian Aboriginal community, and more about animals that seem to return from extinction. Such a beautiful story. Quotes I want to remember... "When people don't understand something, they tend to generalize and use labels, like 'weir I absolutely loved this and can't wait to include it in my middle grades book recommendation newsletter and tell all of my students about it in the fall! Louisa's time in Tasmania captured my attention right from the beginning and left me wanting to learn about the Tasmanian Aboriginal community, and more about animals that seem to return from extinction. Such a beautiful story. Quotes I want to remember... "When people don't understand something, they tend to generalize and use labels, like 'weird.' I aim to change that. There is a need to educate about the acceptance of neurodiversity." "Doing something despite being afraid is the definition of bravery."

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kristin Crouch

    Music for Tigers is the story of a reluctant visitor to the Tasmanian rainforest. Not wanting to abandon her music, she brings her violin along to meet a whole new cast of characters in her life. When her uncle hands her the journals of her great-grandmother, Lou realizes she has more in common with this woman than she could have imagined. A story of family, conservation, and kindness, Music for Tigers captured my attention and then my heart. Highly recommend! I think it may even be the first re Music for Tigers is the story of a reluctant visitor to the Tasmanian rainforest. Not wanting to abandon her music, she brings her violin along to meet a whole new cast of characters in her life. When her uncle hands her the journals of her great-grandmother, Lou realizes she has more in common with this woman than she could have imagined. A story of family, conservation, and kindness, Music for Tigers captured my attention and then my heart. Highly recommend! I think it may even be the first read aloud in my science class this year.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jeanette

    Forest of Reading, Silver Birch Fiction Nominee. Read aloud and recorded, cover to cover, for my students, since access to paper copies is tough this year with quarantine protocols. Will they appreciate my efforts? Who knows. I appreciate the publisher and author for granting me permission to create these recordings! The book itself was fantastic. The setting was gorgeous. the plot had just enough in it to propel the reader forward. I thought the theme of neurodiversity and friendship was well ha Forest of Reading, Silver Birch Fiction Nominee. Read aloud and recorded, cover to cover, for my students, since access to paper copies is tough this year with quarantine protocols. Will they appreciate my efforts? Who knows. I appreciate the publisher and author for granting me permission to create these recordings! The book itself was fantastic. The setting was gorgeous. the plot had just enough in it to propel the reader forward. I thought the theme of neurodiversity and friendship was well handled, though I am not an expert and will need to read a few reviews to confirm that.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Vicki

    4 1/2 stars Young aspiring musician Louisa isn’t sure about the phrase “fair dinkum” when she visits from Canada and hears her Australian uncle use it in the early days of her visit with him at a camp in the wilds of Tasmania. The phrase signifies not only approval but a warm vote of confidence. It can be applied to many aspects of Governor General’s award nominated author Michelle Kadarusman’s third middle grade novel, Music For Tigers. Read my full review here: http://bookgagabooks.ca/2020/03/12 4 1/2 stars Young aspiring musician Louisa isn’t sure about the phrase “fair dinkum” when she visits from Canada and hears her Australian uncle use it in the early days of her visit with him at a camp in the wilds of Tasmania. The phrase signifies not only approval but a warm vote of confidence. It can be applied to many aspects of Governor General’s award nominated author Michelle Kadarusman’s third middle grade novel, Music For Tigers. Read my full review here: http://bookgagabooks.ca/2020/03/12/mu...

  30. 5 out of 5

    Ann

    I really loved the setting in Tasmania, the endangered species theme and the characters. It was a quickly moving story where I learned a lot about the Tasmania tiger. Louisa a young violinist from Canada is sent to spend the summer with her Uncle Ruff in Tasmania where is he a caretaker of a remote camp that protects endangered species of bandicoots and possibly (?) tasmanian tigers. Louisa is reluctant to go but this summer adventure changes Louisa in many ways. She learns of her family history I really loved the setting in Tasmania, the endangered species theme and the characters. It was a quickly moving story where I learned a lot about the Tasmania tiger. Louisa a young violinist from Canada is sent to spend the summer with her Uncle Ruff in Tasmania where is he a caretaker of a remote camp that protects endangered species of bandicoots and possibly (?) tasmanian tigers. Louisa is reluctant to go but this summer adventure changes Louisa in many ways. She learns of her family history in Tasmania, befriends Colin ( a boy on the autistic spectrum) and discovers a whole other side of herself. This book won an environmental children's book award and was excellent! I loved it as an adult and will definitely be recommending to my younger library patrons.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...