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The Prison Doctor: Women Inside: Stories from my time inside Britain’s biggest women’s prison.

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From the Sunday Times bestselling author Dr Amanda Brown. Insights into the world of a Prison Doctor, this time taking us deeper into the walls of Bronzefield, the UK’s biggest women’s prison.From the drug addicts who call Amanda ‘the mother I never had’ to the women who’ve pushed back at domestic abuse, to women close to release in their 70s, who just want to stay in t From the Sunday Times bestselling author Dr Amanda Brown. Insights into the world of a Prison Doctor, this time taking us deeper into the walls of Bronzefield, the UK’s biggest women’s prison.From the drug addicts who call Amanda ‘the mother I never had’ to the women who’ve pushed back at domestic abuse, to women close to release in their 70s, who just want to stay in the place that they’ve always known, these are stories that are heartbreaking, harrowing and heart-warming. Amanda listens, prescribes, and does what she can. After all, she’s their doctor.


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From the Sunday Times bestselling author Dr Amanda Brown. Insights into the world of a Prison Doctor, this time taking us deeper into the walls of Bronzefield, the UK’s biggest women’s prison.From the drug addicts who call Amanda ‘the mother I never had’ to the women who’ve pushed back at domestic abuse, to women close to release in their 70s, who just want to stay in t From the Sunday Times bestselling author Dr Amanda Brown. Insights into the world of a Prison Doctor, this time taking us deeper into the walls of Bronzefield, the UK’s biggest women’s prison.From the drug addicts who call Amanda ‘the mother I never had’ to the women who’ve pushed back at domestic abuse, to women close to release in their 70s, who just want to stay in the place that they’ve always known, these are stories that are heartbreaking, harrowing and heart-warming. Amanda listens, prescribes, and does what she can. After all, she’s their doctor.

30 review for The Prison Doctor: Women Inside: Stories from my time inside Britain’s biggest women’s prison.

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    I liked this, but on finishing a part of me was left wondering if it was really necessary? Having read The Prison Doctor and enjoying it, I thought this would explore more of what it's really like to be incarcerated in a women's prison. Although we do see some of the social reasons behind the majority of women's imprisonment, from drug abuse, sexual exploitation and domestic abuse, I felt a lot of the time that this just skimmed the surface and felt a little contrived. Amanda is a doctor. She's I liked this, but on finishing a part of me was left wondering if it was really necessary? Having read The Prison Doctor and enjoying it, I thought this would explore more of what it's really like to be incarcerated in a women's prison. Although we do see some of the social reasons behind the majority of women's imprisonment, from drug abuse, sexual exploitation and domestic abuse, I felt a lot of the time that this just skimmed the surface and felt a little contrived. Amanda is a doctor. She's clearly extremely empathetic to the women she treats, but she's a privileged white woman who has grown up with opportunities these women never had. I don't think she can ever clearly express what a lot of these women have gone through, and continue to go through. These aren't Amanda's stories to tell. I also find that she's very biased towards the prison staff and praising what they do. She doesn't delve into the terrible things that happen and seems to view Bronzefield a bit through rose tinted glasses. A better example of life in Bronzefield would be Breakfast at Bronzefield, which is actually written by a previous inmate. The two books offer quite the apposing views to help make your own mind up. And if anyone has anymore recommends about prison life in the UK written by women who have actually experienced time behind bars, let me know.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Natalie Vellacott

    Not enough detail about the cases I usually enjoy this type of biographical account especially relating to crime, police, prisons etc. However, this book lacked detail. There were some interesting cases and some shocking stories, but it was frustrating not knowing any outcomes. I also found the parts of the book where the author talked about her own life or detailed procedures and practices within the prison boring. I also wonder whether creative licence has been taken as the novel opens with a s Not enough detail about the cases I usually enjoy this type of biographical account especially relating to crime, police, prisons etc. However, this book lacked detail. There were some interesting cases and some shocking stories, but it was frustrating not knowing any outcomes. I also found the parts of the book where the author talked about her own life or detailed procedures and practices within the prison boring. I also wonder whether creative licence has been taken as the novel opens with a story about a woman who had just been arrested for murdering her partner. The author states that the lady had been brought to prison straight from the crime scene by police and was therefore still covered in blood. This seems highly unlikely as she would initially have been to police custody for interview and charge and her clothing would have been seized especially if it had blood on it. I sensed the helplessness of the author as she prescribed methadone for more and more prisoners and increased the dosages in order to stop people overdosing on heroin once they return to the street. She remarks that most women have three week or less sentences which isn't enough time to detox, so they are just maintaining the women and trying to keep them alive. In the past, they didn't do prescribe drugs to the women and would just supervise their withdrawal.... The plight of these women is truly terrible and the hopelessness comes across. The author mentions the role of chaplains and several prisoners who find faith which helps them to get clean. However, she seems to see this as a crutch that works for some rather than a life transforming solution. Jesus and His power to forgive sins and change lives isn't mentioned. This was readable and I might read another by the author purely because I'm interested in the subject matter rather than because the author is a terrific writer. There is bad language, some minimal sexual content and violence.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    The authors second book; this was a probing look at life inside a modern British women’s prison. Touching and moving in places, however the author pays particular attention to the real issues and challenges inside women’s prisons and what changes must be made. Women’s prisons are inherently different from men’s; and the residents need a different level of support and care. This is a fascinating book, and ideal for those interested in the criminal justice system at large.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

    I feel that this book could have done so much more to raise awareness for the issues surrounding women in prison and then on their release. I feel like the stories were completely glossed over and the most detail was provided of the Dr herself? Good premise, poorly executed.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Nicole

    Another fantastic book from DR Amanda Brown. I absolutely loved the prison doctor and although I didn't love this one as much as her first book, I did really enjoy it still I find these books so interesting and insightful. I always learn so much about life in prison from reading these books. I didn't find this book to be as fast paced as her previous book which is why it didn't get a full five stars from me but I still really enjoyed her easy to read writing style. The stories and case studies d Another fantastic book from DR Amanda Brown. I absolutely loved the prison doctor and although I didn't love this one as much as her first book, I did really enjoy it still I find these books so interesting and insightful. I always learn so much about life in prison from reading these books. I didn't find this book to be as fast paced as her previous book which is why it didn't get a full five stars from me but I still really enjoyed her easy to read writing style. The stories and case studies discussed in this book are so fascinating. It really does open your eyes to the struggles and abuse women go through which often leads them to prison. This book also gives a really detailed insight into what it's like to work in a prison and the everyday ins and outs of how prisons are run which is really fascinating Overall, I loved this book and I highly recommend! TW: suicide, violence, murder, self harm, domestic abuse, child abuse, rape, sexual assault and prostitution

  6. 5 out of 5

    KF

    An interesting read but there were a few things that just felt a bit off. Firstly, it was very repetitive and so, at times, a little boring. Secondly, there's something about the way the women talk to Dr Brown that just seems unrealistic. I'm sure there are lots of women who are deeply grateful towards Dr Brown but it seemed a little unbelievable that these women just revealed their entire life stories to her at their first appointment. The way that the conversations were written as if quoting t An interesting read but there were a few things that just felt a bit off. Firstly, it was very repetitive and so, at times, a little boring. Secondly, there's something about the way the women talk to Dr Brown that just seems unrealistic. I'm sure there are lots of women who are deeply grateful towards Dr Brown but it seemed a little unbelievable that these women just revealed their entire life stories to her at their first appointment. The way that the conversations were written as if quoting the women was odd, because most of the wording was obviously Dr Brown's. It just seemed a bit jarring to read what these women had to say about their lives in the exact same tone and style every time. Overall, fairly interesting but just a bit repetitive.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Lucy

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. In the acknowledgements of this book the author writes she was reluctant to write this book, a follow up to her similar debut of prison tales, as she felt she had used all her good stories for that novella. I can only say that I quite agree with her first thought and wish this one hadn’t been written! It starts slow, has no real interest, all of the women have the same story of abuse, and it builds to an ending that attempts to teach a moral but comes across rather cliche (especially with the Ch In the acknowledgements of this book the author writes she was reluctant to write this book, a follow up to her similar debut of prison tales, as she felt she had used all her good stories for that novella. I can only say that I quite agree with her first thought and wish this one hadn’t been written! It starts slow, has no real interest, all of the women have the same story of abuse, and it builds to an ending that attempts to teach a moral but comes across rather cliche (especially with the Christmas carols and biblical references!) Avoid this novella unless you enjoy being preached to and read the first one. It’s far more interesting.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Gemma Cheetham

    I picked this up recently in a charity shop as it caught my eye instantly. I haven’t yet read the other book but it’s on my kindle ready to go, I’m not sure it matters but maybe I should have read that one first. Maybe not 🤪 Anyway, I was totally shocked how much this book was about homelessness, I really believe it has taught me so much about people desperate to go back to prison for a roof over their head. I also couldn’t believe the amount of domestic abuse, I think I’m quite naive to what goi I picked this up recently in a charity shop as it caught my eye instantly. I haven’t yet read the other book but it’s on my kindle ready to go, I’m not sure it matters but maybe I should have read that one first. Maybe not 🤪 Anyway, I was totally shocked how much this book was about homelessness, I really believe it has taught me so much about people desperate to go back to prison for a roof over their head. I also couldn’t believe the amount of domestic abuse, I think I’m quite naive to what going on. This was a real eye opener for me and I would highly recommend. I’m also going to prioritise the first one now.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Eleanor Fowler

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This was a good but very predictable! You could guess what was going to be said next! Although I loved hearing about prison life and everyone’s struggles, it felt the stories were nearly all the same 😑 I finally felt like I was enjoying it right at the end of the last story being told by the Prison doctor. still enjoyed it to finish it

  10. 5 out of 5

    Alice-Elizabeth

    This is the follow-up to Amanda’s first book called The Prison Doctor, which I read last year during the various lockdowns. Even though Women Inside was a good read and at times, very confronting and realistic, I preferred the first book more!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Summer Lambert

    I really enjoyed Amanda’s first book, I was left feeling a little disappointed with this one. I don’t know I just found it a bit dull. Blurgh.

  12. 5 out of 5

    my bookworm life

    Review soon

  13. 4 out of 5

    beth ☁️

    This was a good read. I haven’t read the first one but will do at some point I’m sure. The perspective this takes is that of someone there to look after people. Being a trusted person in that position allows for accounts to be shared on the struggles and issues women face. Although there are books from prisoners perspectives which gives more detail to their lives. This book gives a snapshot view of the issues and stories as well as what it is like to work as a doctor in a women’s prison.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Rach

    I really enjoyed The Prison Doctor so I was super excited when I heard that she had written another book. I wasn’t disappointed! I found the experiences of women in prison shared within this book to be powerful, insightful and, at times, heart-breaking to read. I love Brown’s non-judgemental and compassionate approach and her passion for change/reform is evident throughout. ⁣ ⁣ This read highlighted several key issues with our current prison system which I feel needs further discussion: the use of I really enjoyed The Prison Doctor so I was super excited when I heard that she had written another book. I wasn’t disappointed! I found the experiences of women in prison shared within this book to be powerful, insightful and, at times, heart-breaking to read. I love Brown’s non-judgemental and compassionate approach and her passion for change/reform is evident throughout. ⁣ ⁣ This read highlighted several key issues with our current prison system which I feel needs further discussion: the use of drugs, the fact that the majority of women are released from prison with no stable living and/or working arrangements resulting in homelessness and the fact that so many prisoners are on IPP sentences with no idea of when they will be released. With Brown quoting that it costs around £65000 to house a prisoner each year, surely these issues should be addressed and money invested in appropriate community support/housing upon release. ⁣ ⁣ An insightful and eye-opening read that I would highly recommend! ⁣

  15. 5 out of 5

    Margaret

    Rounded up to 2 stars because I wanted to like this. I found it really stilted and repetitive - and it's not a long book by any means. All the characters speak with the same voice and none of them sounds authentic to the characters or the stories as she presents them. Despite working in the prison system for many years she seems astounded to learn that most of the people in prison have addictions, chaotic lives, a history of trauma etc and that many of the women end up there because of the men in Rounded up to 2 stars because I wanted to like this. I found it really stilted and repetitive - and it's not a long book by any means. All the characters speak with the same voice and none of them sounds authentic to the characters or the stories as she presents them. Despite working in the prison system for many years she seems astounded to learn that most of the people in prison have addictions, chaotic lives, a history of trauma etc and that many of the women end up there because of the men in their lives - at least that's the level of 'insight' she provides. The interesting point for me was that apparently most women in prison are serving very short sentences and that this has its own problems - a 3 or 4 week sentence is not long enough to get any constructive help for addiction or other mental health conditions but it is long enough to lose your social housing and - since you did something to commit the crime of which you were convicted - you are judged to have made yourself deliberately homeless so you lose your eligibility for rehousing when you come out.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jodie (whatjodiereads)

    Although I did enjoy this book, I enjoyed the first one more. Some parts of this one felt very repetitive, and I’m sure some parts of it were also written about in book one. However, it was still very interesting. I really enjoyed reading this book as it’s a subject that I’m interested in. I really liked the writing and it was very easy to read. But I definitely wasn’t as hooked as I was when reading book one. I would still recommend this book to people who are interested in this type of book. I Although I did enjoy this book, I enjoyed the first one more. Some parts of this one felt very repetitive, and I’m sure some parts of it were also written about in book one. However, it was still very interesting. I really enjoyed reading this book as it’s a subject that I’m interested in. I really liked the writing and it was very easy to read. But I definitely wasn’t as hooked as I was when reading book one. I would still recommend this book to people who are interested in this type of book. I’m only going to write a short review for this one, as there’s not much I can say about it. There’s no storyline to comment on and there’s no characters. All I can say is that I enjoyed reading about Dr Amanda Brown and her time as a prison doctor.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Francisca Rockey

    Good read but so many missed opportunities to dive deeper into individual stories hence the low rating

  18. 4 out of 5

    Paul

    Lately, I seem to be on a bit of a run of nonfiction books. For me, I feel it is important to keep educating myself about the world I inhabit. There is so much about it that I don't know or understand and whilst I appreciate one can never know everything, and to be honest it would be no fun to. I think I can always keep expanding and fill in a few more of my blank spots. Throughout my life, I have managed to avoid spending any time in a working prison more through luck the judgment at times. Th Lately, I seem to be on a bit of a run of nonfiction books. For me, I feel it is important to keep educating myself about the world I inhabit. There is so much about it that I don't know or understand and whilst I appreciate one can never know everything, and to be honest it would be no fun to. I think I can always keep expanding and fill in a few more of my blank spots. Throughout my life, I have managed to avoid spending any time in a working prison more through luck the judgment at times. This leads to the fact that most of my ideas of what prison is like come from film and T.V. It as all of us are aware is not always the best of educators. Violence and crime rain supreme in an attempted to keep views glued to the screen. This also raises another question, As most fictional media focuses on what it is like to be banged up. What is it like for those who spend there nine to five there? It strikes me that most go into medicine in the hopes of trying to make life easier for others. I would imagine having a great deal of empathy would come in handy. So the question is how do you cope in an environment that is geared to showing a harder front than most would usually project. Throughout the course of Women Inside we follow Dr. Brown through the ins and outs of her job. Along the way meeting a large cross-section of the types of women who are currently serving time. I think the problem is we have this predetermined view of the type of people who end up here. It is our own pre-judgment that can be a treacherous thing. At the end of the day, it really seems to matter which station in life you hold one false step and we could all end up being sent away. It is the stark reality that you come to understand as she tells us her story. For me, it feels like through the course of this book we get to better understand the Doctor by way of the stories of the inmates she comes into contact with. It is how she works to try and give them all the best possible care despite what crimes they may have committed. It is something I fear I would personally struggle with. How do you still find the compassion to give due care to someone who has committed some of the most horrific crimes? But I also feel it would be greatly dismissive to center all this around those women. For the most part, the inmates she comes into contact with have hard stories to tell. and yes it would be far too easy to judge them for their actions. But it strikes me that far too often and offensive is taken at face value without context for how they came to be. Many of the stories I read here are so heartbreaking it beggars belief as to who these women could end up where they did. When surely alternatives in the modern age could be offered. Whilst it would seem most men end up in prison because of things they have down to feed their own needs for lust or greed. A great many of these women ended up here because of actions they did for others or in fact because of others. And whilst you may argue they all had a choice sometimes the alternatives are all too unpalatable to bear thinking about. At two hundred and eighty-eight pages long, this book seems both short and long at the same time. Her style means that the book seems very accessible to anyone who picks it up. It is rather in the subject matter that slows you down. At times you end up feeling mental drain by what you read and feel the need to escape into something lighter. But for me, it also shines a light on the thing we don't talk about fascists of life we try and push to the sidelines. It also strikes me that so many of these women would probably not be where they were if not for the actions of the men in their lives that inflicted such pain and suffering on them in one form or another. It is very easy to sink into the glume and claustrophobic nature of this world in the course of the book. But I think that would be unfair to all concerned. Brown has clearly given a great deal of thought into which story to add to this tale and whilst some are heartbreaking others offer real hope and at times laughter. We get to see the families they form inside those walls and how for many they are trying to make the best out of a bad situation. And for others still, despite how we might see it they offer respite. A step away from there abusers. And a chance to gain shelter and warm meals guaranteed every day. It's funny how one person's idea of hell is another place of refuge. This is one of those books that will give you a great deal to think about. I came out questioning how much of our criminal justice system is truly fair. Or are we in fact still stuck in this notion that all musted be punish rather than looking at the root cause of such situations. My only real downside here is that there is no real follow-up on the women she talks about. I was left wanting to know how they are coping and if for some life did in fact get better. But I suppose like the good Doc her self we only see them briefly and then they are gone from our lives forever.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Katy Chessum-Rice

    Dr Amanda Brown is the Prison Doctor at HMP Bronzefield, the UK's only purpose-built women's prison. The patients that she treats come from across the social spectrum and what becomes clear from her book is that Amanda really cares for them. She bonds with her patients, learns from them and does what she can to help. The women sent to prison are usually on short sentences for low-level crimes, e.g. shoplifting and they tend to be repeat offenders. Amanda explains that the women are often caught i Dr Amanda Brown is the Prison Doctor at HMP Bronzefield, the UK's only purpose-built women's prison. The patients that she treats come from across the social spectrum and what becomes clear from her book is that Amanda really cares for them. She bonds with her patients, learns from them and does what she can to help. The women sent to prison are usually on short sentences for low-level crimes, e.g. shoplifting and they tend to be repeat offenders. Amanda explains that the women are often caught in a terrible cycle of abusive relationships, drug addiction, poor education, mental health problems, loss of benefits, children being taken into care and a loss of their sense of self-worth, which leads to them reoffending to get away. There are stories of women who have overcome the odds to get clean and get back on their feet, taking education and training courses in prison to be able to re-join the workforce 'on the outside'. I enjoyed reading this book, my first go at the 'medical memoir' genre. It provides a brilliant insight into how we need to approach women's prisons and rehabilitation differently to men's incarceration. As a society, we need to recognise the impact of putting women in prison on their families (they are often the only parent) and their life chances. For example, did you know Wales has NO female prisons? That means women are sent hundreds of miles away from their families to be imprisoned - how are they supposed to keep a bond with their families, who might not be able to afford to travel so far? Thought provoking stuff.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Lucy Hodgson

    I have not read Amanda's previous book 'The Prison Doctor', however I am definetly adding it to the list after reading this one. There are so many tragic stories of women in prison but also heartwarming ones who are trying to turn their lives around. The women who are trapped in the endless circle of addiction, homelessness and prison as for many the prison is their 'home' and family after having trouble childhoods. It really echoes the importance of support and help during the formative years t I have not read Amanda's previous book 'The Prison Doctor', however I am definetly adding it to the list after reading this one. There are so many tragic stories of women in prison but also heartwarming ones who are trying to turn their lives around. The women who are trapped in the endless circle of addiction, homelessness and prison as for many the prison is their 'home' and family after having trouble childhoods. It really echoes the importance of support and help during the formative years to give self worth to women. As without the abuse from the young age make them susceptible to abusive relationships in the future with partners, drugs and alcohol. There are still the women who just make a mistake or spiral in their adult years which is shocking. As there are so many reoffenders it does question what the point of our prisons need to be, surely we need to focus on rehabilitation especially for the minor crimes and help with drug additictions. Reading this book opened my eyes and the relationship between Dr Amanda and the women is valuable, as she treats them as human and listens to their stories.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Nick Davies

    Disappointing. For all that I appreciate the important work that the author and other medical professionals do, and as much as I understand the nature of the justice system is a very complex and difficult one, trying to address societal issues which are beyond my ability to solve, I wasn’t left feeling particularly sympathetic or convinced by this. Dr. Brown writes about her work as a prison GP and makes some very intelligent points. However I found the style both too gossipy and too cloying, th Disappointing. For all that I appreciate the important work that the author and other medical professionals do, and as much as I understand the nature of the justice system is a very complex and difficult one, trying to address societal issues which are beyond my ability to solve, I wasn’t left feeling particularly sympathetic or convinced by this. Dr. Brown writes about her work as a prison GP and makes some very intelligent points. However I found the style both too gossipy and too cloying, the focus on sad story after story of female criminal forced into committing a crime due to factors supposedly out with their control, and how heartwarming it was to make a difference, all a bit too much for my tastes. I’m sure there are many female prisoners who have had difficult lives and been victims of abuse. I’m sure there are many female prisoners who have been benefited by the professional help they have received in prison. I’m however also sure that there are many others who do not fit these categories and who the author hasn’t mentioned. Consequently this comes over as a biased sort of book, and I also thought the author probably had already used up many of her best stories in the first book in the series.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Tilly

    2.5 Stars I read Dr Amanda Brown's first "The Prison Doctor" book last year and gave it 5 stars. However unfortunately I didn't really see the point in this book as it basically felt the same as the first book. I was hoping there would be different themes etc but is was just so similar to the first book. The writing was decent although for a published book there were too many typos and grammatical errors. A few of the stories were shocking and had be emotionally connected but unfortunately it jus 2.5 Stars I read Dr Amanda Brown's first "The Prison Doctor" book last year and gave it 5 stars. However unfortunately I didn't really see the point in this book as it basically felt the same as the first book. I was hoping there would be different themes etc but is was just so similar to the first book. The writing was decent although for a published book there were too many typos and grammatical errors. A few of the stories were shocking and had be emotionally connected but unfortunately it just wasn't as good as the first book and sadly in my opinion not necessary.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Emma

    An enjoyable and enlightening read. Brown does a great job of balancing the bleak, gritty truth of life inside prison with stories of hope from relatable women she meets. It was well written, although a little loose in structure. It was a little more like a collection of interviews than a chronological overview of Brown’s time as a prison doctor. I think I preferred her first book in that respect as it felt more personal. If you enjoyed the first book then this is definitely worth a read.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Leah

    What a book! Gripping from the first chapter. There is a stigma around those who are imprisoned and a narrative that they are "bad" people, but DR Brown helps you uncover the mask and to understand their lived experiences. Maybe we don't understand it, but sometimes crime is a mode of survival... What a book! Gripping from the first chapter. There is a stigma around those who are imprisoned and a narrative that they are "bad" people, but DR Brown helps you uncover the mask and to understand their lived experiences. Maybe we don't understand it, but sometimes crime is a mode of survival...

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jo

    Brown is a doctor in a women's prison in England. Here she recounts the patients she's treated and the life of a prison. There are times when you feel for the women, especially as some are in there having been failed by the system. It's an interesting read and short enough to get through quickly. Brown is a doctor in a women's prison in England. Here she recounts the patients she's treated and the life of a prison. There are times when you feel for the women, especially as some are in there having been failed by the system. It's an interesting read and short enough to get through quickly.

  26. 5 out of 5

    RuthyMB

    A great second book by Dr Amanda Brown, full of stories heartbreaking, sad and funny about life in women’s prison Bronzefield. Would recommend to those who have read the first book!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie Ng

    Such a good book! I hope she ends up writing more as I've really enjoyed the two she has written. Such a good book! I hope she ends up writing more as I've really enjoyed the two she has written.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jess Sealey

    I'm glad I read this one as I read the first. Both times buddy reads. I enjoyed this one and found it an eye opener. If you haven't read either of these I recommend them I'm glad I read this one as I read the first. Both times buddy reads. I enjoyed this one and found it an eye opener. If you haven't read either of these I recommend them

  29. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth Best

    Could have been interesting but it was poorly written. All of the people she spoke to sounded exactly the same.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Billy-Ray McEvoy

    This book is really interesting. I learnt a lot about prison and empathised with the patients written about in this book. I hope they all find some happiness.

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