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Nicky & Vera: A Quiet Hero of the Holocaust and the Children He Rescued

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In 1938, twenty-nine-year-old Nicholas Winton saved the lives of almost 700 children trapped in Nazi-occupied Czechoslovakia—a story he never told and that remained unknown until an unforgettable TV appearance in the 1980s reunited him with some of the children he saved. Czech-American artist, MacArthur Fellow, and Andersen Award winner Peter Sís dramatizes Winton’s story i In 1938, twenty-nine-year-old Nicholas Winton saved the lives of almost 700 children trapped in Nazi-occupied Czechoslovakia—a story he never told and that remained unknown until an unforgettable TV appearance in the 1980s reunited him with some of the children he saved. Czech-American artist, MacArthur Fellow, and Andersen Award winner Peter Sís dramatizes Winton’s story in this picture book. He intertwines Nicky’s efforts with the story of one of the children he saved—a young girl named Vera, whose family enlisted Nicky’s aid when the Germans occupied their country. As the war passes and Vera grows up, she must find balance in her dual identities—one her birthright, the other her choice.


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In 1938, twenty-nine-year-old Nicholas Winton saved the lives of almost 700 children trapped in Nazi-occupied Czechoslovakia—a story he never told and that remained unknown until an unforgettable TV appearance in the 1980s reunited him with some of the children he saved. Czech-American artist, MacArthur Fellow, and Andersen Award winner Peter Sís dramatizes Winton’s story i In 1938, twenty-nine-year-old Nicholas Winton saved the lives of almost 700 children trapped in Nazi-occupied Czechoslovakia—a story he never told and that remained unknown until an unforgettable TV appearance in the 1980s reunited him with some of the children he saved. Czech-American artist, MacArthur Fellow, and Andersen Award winner Peter Sís dramatizes Winton’s story in this picture book. He intertwines Nicky’s efforts with the story of one of the children he saved—a young girl named Vera, whose family enlisted Nicky’s aid when the Germans occupied their country. As the war passes and Vera grows up, she must find balance in her dual identities—one her birthright, the other her choice.

30 review for Nicky & Vera: A Quiet Hero of the Holocaust and the Children He Rescued

  1. 4 out of 5

    Rod Brown

    I really get choked up by the quiet, competent, and humble heroes like Nicholas Winton, those folks who just do a thing that needs doing. And that he persisted, saving one Jewish child after another from the Nazis, until his list grew to over six hundred names leaves me awestruck. Peter Sís tells the story well with his bizarre yet fascinating page layouts and meticulous linework and by intercutting Winton's story with that of one of the many young girls he managed to evacuate from Prague to Engl I really get choked up by the quiet, competent, and humble heroes like Nicholas Winton, those folks who just do a thing that needs doing. And that he persisted, saving one Jewish child after another from the Nazis, until his list grew to over six hundred names leaves me awestruck. Peter Sís tells the story well with his bizarre yet fascinating page layouts and meticulous linework and by intercutting Winton's story with that of one of the many young girls he managed to evacuate from Prague to England in 1939, just before the borders closed and the Holocaust began. This one's going to linger in my mind. Recommended. (Another project! I'm reading all the picture books and graphic novels from NPR's Books We Love 2021: Kids’ Books list.)

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    Beautiful, deceptively simple. Peter Sis's illustrations are perfect for this story, the true story of how one Englishman organized the trains that brought so many Jewish children to safety in England at the start of WWII. Includes a more direct biography of both Nicky and Vera (one of the children he saved) at the back. You may have seen the video that went viral a while back, where an elderly man is on a talk show and they ask everyone he helped during the war to stand up, and the rest of the Beautiful, deceptively simple. Peter Sis's illustrations are perfect for this story, the true story of how one Englishman organized the trains that brought so many Jewish children to safety in England at the start of WWII. Includes a more direct biography of both Nicky and Vera (one of the children he saved) at the back. You may have seen the video that went viral a while back, where an elderly man is on a talk show and they ask everyone he helped during the war to stand up, and the rest of the audience stands up around him. The thing that touches me most is how he insisted that he wasn't a hero, and told his wife to just toss the book he used to keep track of the kids, because "no one would care." Truly a humble man, and an angel.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Alex Baugh

    I remember reading about Nicholas "Nicky" Winton (1909-2015) while I was doing some dissertation research on Czechoslovakia. Nicholas is credited with saving 669 children in 1938, separate and apart from those children saved through the Kindertransport program. Now, Nicholas's act of heroism has been made accessible to today's young readers, thanks by the very talented Czech-born American artist Peter Sís. Sís begins Nicky's story with a brief biography of Nicky's early life. Then, in December 19 I remember reading about Nicholas "Nicky" Winton (1909-2015) while I was doing some dissertation research on Czechoslovakia. Nicholas is credited with saving 669 children in 1938, separate and apart from those children saved through the Kindertransport program. Now, Nicholas's act of heroism has been made accessible to today's young readers, thanks by the very talented Czech-born American artist Peter Sís. Sís begins Nicky's story with a brief biography of Nicky's early life. Then, in December 1938, a friend of Nicky's told him to come to Prague, Czechoslovakia. Earlier, in October 1938, Adolf Hitler's army had marched into the Sudetenland on the Czechoslovakian border. As soon as he arrived in Prague, Nicky realized that something had to be done. The world would soon be at war, but he knew that England would accept children under 17 if sponsors could be found for them and travel could be arranged, and so he set to work. In a town outside of Prague, 10-year-old Vera Diamantova's mother heard about an Englishman who was trying to get Jewish children out of harm's way, and her parents decided to see if Vera could be one of those children. Nicky spent most of 1939 in Prague and London preparing everything that was needed to get the children out of Czechoslovakia - making lists and getting photographs of the children, finding train connections, getting visas and advertising for families to take them in. Nicky paid for all of this himself. Meanwhile, in March, 1939, Germany invaded the rest of Czechoslovakia, and Vera's family were told they must give up their home to the occupying German army. Finally, though, the day came for Vera to leave, and her father gave her a diary to record memories so they could read them after the war. Three days later, Vera arrived safely in London, one of the 669 children Nicky rescued. After the war, Nicky lived a quiet life and no one would have learned about his act of heroism if his wife had not found his old records. Now, the world knows what this quiet, kind, unassuming man managed to accomplish against all odds. Sadly, when Vera returned to Czechoslovakia, she learned her parents and most of her family had perished in the Holocaust. Although I knew Nicky's story, there are lots of details I hadn't known before in this beautifully render picture book biography for older readers. And I loved the way Peter Sís intertwined Nicky's story with Vera's making it more personal and emotional, sensitive without being sentimental. Sís tells Nicky and Vera's stories using spare text and simple declarative sentences. Using stylized maps (see illustration above), cutaways, and color, the illustrations really moves the story along, providing a multitude of images to pour over and discuss. I'm sure you will notice immediately that blue is the dominant color for Vera, while a light green is used for Nicky, and gray for the Nazis. Two of my favorite illustrations show the readers the internal memories that are carried by Nicky after the war (above) and Vera arriving in London. I found this to be exceptionally moving and poignant. Nicky & Vera: A Quiet Hero of the Holocaust and the Children He Rescued in a compelling look at these to lives. If you read the Author's Note, you will learn how and what motivated Peter Sís to write Nicky and Vera's stories. This book is recommended for readers age 7+ This book was gratefully received from Edelweiss+

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ms. B

    Teens can make a differene! In this biography memoir from the World War II era, thirty year-old Nicholas Winston rescues 669 Jewish children from Czechoslovakia. Tween and teens will love finding put how in this inspiring story that would make a great read aloud in a history class or for a unit on the Holocaust or World War II. *I originally had Nicholas listed incorrectly as nineteen year-old; my math was a little off when figuring out his age.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Skip

    The remarkable story of Nicholas "Nicky" Winton. An English banker, Winton was asked to skip a ski vacation and come to Prague in 1938, where he was convinced to help save Jewish children, including Vera, who left her entire family in Czechoslovakia. Winton is widely credited with saving 669 children over the spring/summer of 1938, with support placing them all in foster homes. Perhaps more remarkably, he sought no credit for his selfless heroism, and his wife found the records while cleaning th The remarkable story of Nicholas "Nicky" Winton. An English banker, Winton was asked to skip a ski vacation and come to Prague in 1938, where he was convinced to help save Jewish children, including Vera, who left her entire family in Czechoslovakia. Winton is widely credited with saving 669 children over the spring/summer of 1938, with support placing them all in foster homes. Perhaps more remarkably, he sought no credit for his selfless heroism, and his wife found the records while cleaning the attic. There is a British TV program, where he received long overdue credit where about 100 of the saved children attended. A beautiful story written and illustrated by Czech-born artist, Peter Sís.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Cynthia Egbert

    I had read the news reports of the grown-up children meeting "Nicky" in a surprise meeting and I am glad to get a concise and clear version of just what a hero Nicholas Winton truly was for these children. How heartbreaking it is to read of that last trainload who were unable to get out before the border closed. But, we shall dwell on nearly 700 children who were saved through young Mr. Winton's efforts. The picture book is a great option for children and the three page follow up at the back of I had read the news reports of the grown-up children meeting "Nicky" in a surprise meeting and I am glad to get a concise and clear version of just what a hero Nicholas Winton truly was for these children. How heartbreaking it is to read of that last trainload who were unable to get out before the border closed. But, we shall dwell on nearly 700 children who were saved through young Mr. Winton's efforts. The picture book is a great option for children and the three page follow up at the back of the book that gives the adult reader the full story was perfect. Everyone really should know this story.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Morgan

    This was one of the last books Ann ever told me I just HAD to read and as always, she was right on the money. <3

  8. 4 out of 5

    Tracy Parvin

    This is a deceptively simply told story, illustrated with deceptively naïve images both exquisitely combined to tell the story of Nicky (Sir Nicholas Winton) and Vera, a young Jewish child from a village outside Prague. Nicky was an unassuming British born man of Jewish heritage who, while on a visit to Prague in 1938, quietly set about organising the removing of 669 Jewish children from Czechoslovakia to safety in Britain: the Kindertransport. A story of this magnitude, depth and complexity is This is a deceptively simply told story, illustrated with deceptively naïve images both exquisitely combined to tell the story of Nicky (Sir Nicholas Winton) and Vera, a young Jewish child from a village outside Prague. Nicky was an unassuming British born man of Jewish heritage who, while on a visit to Prague in 1938, quietly set about organising the removing of 669 Jewish children from Czechoslovakia to safety in Britain: the Kindertransport. A story of this magnitude, depth and complexity is one that would be difficult to convey to young children, but Sis does so with a lexical ease and simplicity of structure that can only be admired. It is a story simply told. The illustrations, although equally unsophisticated and portrayed with a child-like naivety lend an emotive depth to the story. The image of Vera standing small and alone in the vast and empty train station serves to enhance the enormity of the situation to which these children were exposed. They were saved, but their lives would never be the same. That Peter Sis himself was moved by the heroic actions of Nicholas Winton is evident in the pages beyond the story where we are given the historical back story and the potted biographies of both Nicky and Vera. As experienced readers, we can appreciate that this story just needs to be told, retold, and kept alive… to become a part of the fabric of our understanding of human courage. And Sis is the only author who could have presented it with such heart-felt beauty for our young readers.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Laura Harrison

    Most definitely a Caldecott 2022 contender. Caldecott award winner, Peter Sis clearly put a lot of time and effort in this title. The subject matter is beyond fascinating. Well written with astonishingly unique illustrations.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Edwina Callan

    A very simply written book about The Kindertransport during WW2. 2 stars for honoring Sir Nicholas Winton's memory in a book. A very simply written book about The Kindertransport during WW2. 2 stars for honoring Sir Nicholas Winton's memory in a book.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Deborah

    This book is as stunning, as is usual from Peter Sis. And if it doesn't move you to tears, I don't know what will. This book is as stunning, as is usual from Peter Sis. And if it doesn't move you to tears, I don't know what will.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Erin

    OPENLY WEEPING AT MY DESK

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ben Truong

    Nicky & Vera: A Quiet Hero of the Holocaust and the Children He Rescued is a children's picture book written and illustrated by Peter Sís. It centers on one man who made a difference as the full horror of the Holocaust began. Nicholas George Winton was a British banker and humanitarian who established an organization to rescue children at risk from Nazi Germany. Born to German-Jewish parents who had immigrated to Britain at the beginning of the 20th century, Winton supervised the rescue of 669 ch Nicky & Vera: A Quiet Hero of the Holocaust and the Children He Rescued is a children's picture book written and illustrated by Peter Sís. It centers on one man who made a difference as the full horror of the Holocaust began. Nicholas George Winton was a British banker and humanitarian who established an organization to rescue children at risk from Nazi Germany. Born to German-Jewish parents who had immigrated to Britain at the beginning of the 20th century, Winton supervised the rescue of 669 children, most of them Jewish, from Czechoslovakia on the eve of World War II. Winton found homes for the children and arranged for their safe passage to Britain. Sís' text is rather simplistic, straightforward, and informative. Sís weaves Winton's story together with that of Veruška "Vera" Diamantova, one of the children he saved, conveying the hard truths of the Holocaust in language that younger readers can take in. Backmatter includes an author's note, which further extends on Winton's life. Sís' brilliantly conceived paintings are an emotional anchor. With varying palettes – blue for Nicky, gold for Vera, and gray for the war scenes – the art flows easily from full-page vistas to miniature scenes that swirl and circle around the pages and even within the outlines of figures and buildings. The premise of the book is rather straightforward. After visiting Prague, Winston came to a realization that he could help children escape the Nazi occupation. The young stockbroker at the time works feverishly to arrange placements and train tickets. A parallel story has ten-year-old, Vera Diamantova, leaving home for England after her parents’ made the difficult decision to let her go. All in all, Nicky & Vera: A Quiet Hero of the Holocaust and the Children He Rescued is an extraordinary life memorably and evocatively presented.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    The story of Nicky & Vera squeezed my heart. I have always treasured the story of a quiet hero. One who is humble and great and does it just because it's what is right. There were so many incredibly moving moments in this book. I was especially touched on the page where everyone stood up (I don't want to spoil anything!) and those who stood had the child that they were inside of them visible too. I had never seen an image like that before and it about moved me to tears. The dates and events we The story of Nicky & Vera squeezed my heart. I have always treasured the story of a quiet hero. One who is humble and great and does it just because it's what is right. There were so many incredibly moving moments in this book. I was especially touched on the page where everyone stood up (I don't want to spoil anything!) and those who stood had the child that they were inside of them visible too. I had never seen an image like that before and it about moved me to tears. The dates and events were embedded in this book in an understandable way and the illustrations really struck me. The style of this book's presentation with both the words and pictures alike is unique and memorable. Really well done. I don't have to say how horrifying and appalling the Holocaust was for our world's history. What people experienced and lost was unimaginable and inhumane. It's important to me that it's not forgotten. It's also important to me that we never forget about hope and the quiet heroes who fought so hard for what they knew to be right. I really appreciated this book's capacity of storytelling and the conversations this could create. May we never forget our history and may we never stop fighting for children. And may we all find ourselves as the quiet heroes we read about in books.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Emily Quinn

    This book had me wiping the tears from my eyes. I knew the story would be a beautiful thing to experience after hearing it was based around the story of Nicholas Winton’s selfless acts in 1938, but I wasn’t quite prepared for how moving and how compelling it was, even as a children’s book. The history surrounding the Holocaust has always interested me, and this book places focus on both Nicky and one girl whose life was about to change in the most enthralling way. The book is written in simple t This book had me wiping the tears from my eyes. I knew the story would be a beautiful thing to experience after hearing it was based around the story of Nicholas Winton’s selfless acts in 1938, but I wasn’t quite prepared for how moving and how compelling it was, even as a children’s book. The history surrounding the Holocaust has always interested me, and this book places focus on both Nicky and one girl whose life was about to change in the most enthralling way. The book is written in simple terms for children to read and understand, but also well enough for adults to fully appreciate exactly what Nicholas did for those 669 children and just how he saved their lives. Reading this book combined with watching the actual video footage of Nicholas Winton being reunited with those whose lives he saved was incredibly powerful and beautifully memorable. Peter Sís has written an absolute masterpiece of a children’s story which should take pride of place on any bookshelf, child or adult, to remind us all what a wonderful person he was. Learning about Nicky and Vera’s lives in this book was as heartwarming as it was upsetting, but we can all take an awful lot of lessons away from his actions. A perfect story with a beautiful message that I’ll most certainly be passing down in generations. Read my full review over on my blog: https://aquintillionwords.com/2021/01...

  16. 5 out of 5

    Linda

    You may have read of the Kindertransport, but not of Nicholas Winton, called Nicky, who visited Prague in 1938 where he discovered Jewish refugees from the recent take-over of the Sudetenland and the recent tragic Kristallnacht. He did not hesitate but went to work organizing paperwork (legal and illegal) and eight trains to transport and rescue 669 children, sending them to Great Britain. Veruška “Vera” Diamantova was a 10-year-old Jewish girl whose parents made the wrenching decision to send You may have read of the Kindertransport, but not of Nicholas Winton, called Nicky, who visited Prague in 1938 where he discovered Jewish refugees from the recent take-over of the Sudetenland and the recent tragic Kristallnacht. He did not hesitate but went to work organizing paperwork (legal and illegal) and eight trains to transport and rescue 669 children, sending them to Great Britain. Veruška “Vera” Diamantova was a 10-year-old Jewish girl whose parents made the wrenching decision to send her away on one of those trains. After the war, Nicky never spoke of it and put the papers in his attic. His wife found those papers fifty years later and a TV show reunited Nicky and surviving children. Peter Sis is Czech-born, tells the story in his incredible dream-like illustrations accompanied by this story. He color-codes the pages: blue for Nicky, gold for Vera, and gray for the war scenes. Both the goodness of Nicky's quiet action and the tragedy that caused his acts can become a beginning of learning about this sad time in history. A new story from the terrible days of the Holocaust is one you don't want to miss.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kristen

    Picture book biographies can be a bit of a tough sell (at least in my library): since they are in the nonfiction section they don't often get picked up by picture book readers, and older kids aren't necessarily excited about reading one. But there's so much excellence in this category of book that I keep trying to get people to take them, anyway. And this is truly, truly excellent. If you want to sob through a picture book, definitely read it! I didn't actually know Nicholas Winton's story until Picture book biographies can be a bit of a tough sell (at least in my library): since they are in the nonfiction section they don't often get picked up by picture book readers, and older kids aren't necessarily excited about reading one. But there's so much excellence in this category of book that I keep trying to get people to take them, anyway. And this is truly, truly excellent. If you want to sob through a picture book, definitely read it! I didn't actually know Nicholas Winton's story until I heard of this book. Then I watched the BBC clip of him on that TV show, sobbed, and put this book on hold. I'm so glad I read it. The illustrations are lovely and while this story has lots of terribly sad elements, they are handled in an age appropriate way. And his story does carry hope and show that people can step up and help, even in the darkest times. Lovely and really beautifully done.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Crystal

    This was a wonderful short story with pictures telling the story of a hero (a real person named Nick) who, in 1939 changed his vacation plans to help rescue over 600 children out of Prague, saving them from the Nazi's and concentration camps. He never told anyone about what he had done until many years later, his wife found some paperwork he had hidden years before. Since then, he has been interviewed and honored by many, including one interview where many of the now adult children (one of them This was a wonderful short story with pictures telling the story of a hero (a real person named Nick) who, in 1939 changed his vacation plans to help rescue over 600 children out of Prague, saving them from the Nazi's and concentration camps. He never told anyone about what he had done until many years later, his wife found some paperwork he had hidden years before. Since then, he has been interviewed and honored by many, including one interview where many of the now adult children (one of them being Vera) came to see him. His comment about why he risked so much, he said I saw something that had to be done...and just did it. I highly recommend this one to everyone. While geared to children, everyone will have a different outlook about what means to do what is right no matter what.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ellon

    I love the stories of "quiet heroes," especially the ones from WWII. I think I remember seeing a clip of Nicky's TV appearance but I want to go look it up again now! This book tells the story of Nicky, who helped save nearly 700 children during WWII by arranging foster parents in England. It also tells of Vera, one of the children who Nicky saved. The illustrations are very detailed and different. There was clearly a lot of thought put into them. It's not a 5 star book for me because the layout of I love the stories of "quiet heroes," especially the ones from WWII. I think I remember seeing a clip of Nicky's TV appearance but I want to go look it up again now! This book tells the story of Nicky, who helped save nearly 700 children during WWII by arranging foster parents in England. It also tells of Vera, one of the children who Nicky saved. The illustrations are very detailed and different. There was clearly a lot of thought put into them. It's not a 5 star book for me because the layout of the text was odd and could be a bit confusing. I also think that the reader needs to have background information about WWII in order to understand much of the book (there are little picture inserts about certain important events like Kristallnacht but the events are not explained at all).

  20. 5 out of 5

    Eileen

    A beautiful picture book that made me cry, and it reminded me of this story that I had heard about in the news long ago but had forgotten about. Nicky was one of those quiet heroes who never saw himself as such, and that's why his story was never known until one of his grandchildren saw old papers talking about it and asked him what it was all about. The reunion between Nicky and some of his rescued children on tv was so filled with emotion and I don't know if he ever understood just how huge an A beautiful picture book that made me cry, and it reminded me of this story that I had heard about in the news long ago but had forgotten about. Nicky was one of those quiet heroes who never saw himself as such, and that's why his story was never known until one of his grandchildren saw old papers talking about it and asked him what it was all about. The reunion between Nicky and some of his rescued children on tv was so filled with emotion and I don't know if he ever understood just how huge an impact he had on them until that moment. I loved this picture book and I think it belongs in every elementary school classroom. It is a book that could be read by the child or read to the child. Highly recommended.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Nancy Brady

    In a few words and some amazing drawings by Peter Sis, the story of Nick Winston, who saved nearly 700 children in Czechoslovakia from death in the hands of the Nazis, is told. For Nick, it was a matter of doing what was right, and he never told anyone about his actions until his wife discovered his files. For Vera, she was one of these children, and the diary she wrote has been used as a source for a book of her life in England during the war. A perfect read for Holocaust Remembrance Day, and for In a few words and some amazing drawings by Peter Sis, the story of Nick Winston, who saved nearly 700 children in Czechoslovakia from death in the hands of the Nazis, is told. For Nick, it was a matter of doing what was right, and he never told anyone about his actions until his wife discovered his files. For Vera, she was one of these children, and the diary she wrote has been used as a source for a book of her life in England during the war. A perfect read for Holocaust Remembrance Day, and for anyone who doubts that the Holocaust happened. Yes, this is a children's book, but it well worth the read as well as for all the content in the drawings.

  22. 5 out of 5

    June

    Rounded up because it brought tears to my eyes. A hero who saw something wrong and did what he could to correct it. The life story of a man who canceled a ski vacation at the request of a friend and went to Prague. After Germany invaded the Sudetenland, England would allow refugees under the age of 17, so Nicky made a list of children and then returned to England to find foster families. Vera's is one of the 669 children he rescued. When she returned after the war, her family was gone. Rounded up because it brought tears to my eyes. A hero who saw something wrong and did what he could to correct it. The life story of a man who canceled a ski vacation at the request of a friend and went to Prague. After Germany invaded the Sudetenland, England would allow refugees under the age of 17, so Nicky made a list of children and then returned to England to find foster families. Vera's is one of the 669 children he rescued. When she returned after the war, her family was gone.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Adele

    Nicholas Winton is definitely an unsung hero, and I would like to know more about Vera's life, but neither of them are well-served by mashing their stories together in this picture book. The illustration style also did not work for me - vaguely interesting sometimes but a lot of the little details and pictures within pictures seemed random and not illuminating. Nicholas Winton is definitely an unsung hero, and I would like to know more about Vera's life, but neither of them are well-served by mashing their stories together in this picture book. The illustration style also did not work for me - vaguely interesting sometimes but a lot of the little details and pictures within pictures seemed random and not illuminating.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jolynne Dougherty

    Heroes, Refugees, World War II - Moving true story about Nicholas Winton who rescued 669 Czechoslovakian children at the beginning of WWII quietly. Introduces these subjects to children in an appropriate way.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Peacegal

    This is a the amazing and heartrending story of one determined man who saved hundreds of children from the clutches of the Nazis. I liked the unique, map-like illustration style, as well as the way it followed the parallel lives of Nicky, the man, and Vera, one of the children he saved. I loved the detail that Vera rescued and cared for stray cats in her small village, foreshadowing that one day she herself would be rescued.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Amazing story of a humble man who didn't want to be known as a hero. He did what had to be done to save hundreds of children, what any other human with the means to do so should have done. I'd heard of Nicholas Winton before, and his appearance on television when he was surprised by the many now-grown children who owed their lives to him. Powerful story! The symbolic illustrations added depth and meaning while helping to separate the two storylines featured in the book. Amazing story of a humble man who didn't want to be known as a hero. He did what had to be done to save hundreds of children, what any other human with the means to do so should have done. I'd heard of Nicholas Winton before, and his appearance on television when he was surprised by the many now-grown children who owed their lives to him. Powerful story! The symbolic illustrations added depth and meaning while helping to separate the two storylines featured in the book.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Eugene LeCouteur

    A good introduction for young readers to the Holocaust, its consequences, and the brave people who helped, the survivors and what it means to have courage.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jill Farr

    Wow, I’ve never heard the story of Nicholas Winston. The illustrations in the book are fascinating.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Rachel Stine

    Hard to know how to read the pages

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sam

    Rushed online to purchase copies for children of several friends (from an independent bookshop, of course). Brilliant illustrations give this true story interactive opportunities. Quite a challenge—WWII for kids? Impressive! Exceedingly highly recommended.

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