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Outlander Kitchen: To the New World and Back Again: The Second Official Outlander Companion Cookbook

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The author of the fan favorite Outlander Kitchen returns with more than 100 new easy-to-prepare recipes in this official cookbook inspired by Diane Gabaldon's beloved Outlander novels and the hit Starz original series. "If you thought Scottish cuisine was all porridge and haggis washed down with a good swally of whiskey, Outlander Kitchen's here to prove you wrong."-- En The author of the fan favorite Outlander Kitchen returns with more than 100 new easy-to-prepare recipes in this official cookbook inspired by Diane Gabaldon's beloved Outlander novels and the hit Starz original series. "If you thought Scottish cuisine was all porridge and haggis washed down with a good swally of whiskey, Outlander Kitchen's here to prove you wrong."-- Entertainment Weekly From Jenny Fraser's first delighted taste of light and fluffy flapjacks from Written in My Own Heart's Blood, to a mouthwatering ragout of beef with oysters at the Beefsteak in The Scottish Prisoner, or a batch of quick-fermented cabbage inspired by Minnie Rennie in "A Fugitive Green," this cookbook brings the world of Diana Gabaldon's beloved literary universe to life with more than 100 delicious, easy-to-follow recipes accompanied by full-color photos. Drawing inspiration from the latest novels in the Outlander series, which relocates the series to the American colonies, as well as the Lord John books and the stories in Seven Stones to Stand and Fall, Theresa Carle-Sanders delivers an entertaining and mouthwatering mix of authentic historical recipes, twenty-first century interpretations of traditional foods, and character-inspired dishes. Each recipe is preceded by the passage that first introduced or inspired it, including: Breakfast: Mrs. Figg's Flapjacks; Simon Fraser's Grits with Honey Soups: Leek and Potato Soup with Harry Quarry; Annie's Chicken Noodle Soup Appetizers: Cheesy Savouries; Sardines on Toast for Lady Joffrey Mains: Benedicta's Steak and Mushroom Pie; The Cheerful Chicken Tavern's Poulet au Miel; Roast Pork Tenderloin with Cider Sauce; Claire's Beans and Sass Sides: Tobias Quinn's Colcannon; Fried Plantains; Cornbread and Salt Pork Stuffing Breads: Lord John's Yorkshire Pudding; Cornbread; Scones with Preserved Lemon Sweets: Mistress Abernathy's Apple Pandowdy; Blancmange en Paris; Almond Biscuits


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The author of the fan favorite Outlander Kitchen returns with more than 100 new easy-to-prepare recipes in this official cookbook inspired by Diane Gabaldon's beloved Outlander novels and the hit Starz original series. "If you thought Scottish cuisine was all porridge and haggis washed down with a good swally of whiskey, Outlander Kitchen's here to prove you wrong."-- En The author of the fan favorite Outlander Kitchen returns with more than 100 new easy-to-prepare recipes in this official cookbook inspired by Diane Gabaldon's beloved Outlander novels and the hit Starz original series. "If you thought Scottish cuisine was all porridge and haggis washed down with a good swally of whiskey, Outlander Kitchen's here to prove you wrong."-- Entertainment Weekly From Jenny Fraser's first delighted taste of light and fluffy flapjacks from Written in My Own Heart's Blood, to a mouthwatering ragout of beef with oysters at the Beefsteak in The Scottish Prisoner, or a batch of quick-fermented cabbage inspired by Minnie Rennie in "A Fugitive Green," this cookbook brings the world of Diana Gabaldon's beloved literary universe to life with more than 100 delicious, easy-to-follow recipes accompanied by full-color photos. Drawing inspiration from the latest novels in the Outlander series, which relocates the series to the American colonies, as well as the Lord John books and the stories in Seven Stones to Stand and Fall, Theresa Carle-Sanders delivers an entertaining and mouthwatering mix of authentic historical recipes, twenty-first century interpretations of traditional foods, and character-inspired dishes. Each recipe is preceded by the passage that first introduced or inspired it, including: Breakfast: Mrs. Figg's Flapjacks; Simon Fraser's Grits with Honey Soups: Leek and Potato Soup with Harry Quarry; Annie's Chicken Noodle Soup Appetizers: Cheesy Savouries; Sardines on Toast for Lady Joffrey Mains: Benedicta's Steak and Mushroom Pie; The Cheerful Chicken Tavern's Poulet au Miel; Roast Pork Tenderloin with Cider Sauce; Claire's Beans and Sass Sides: Tobias Quinn's Colcannon; Fried Plantains; Cornbread and Salt Pork Stuffing Breads: Lord John's Yorkshire Pudding; Cornbread; Scones with Preserved Lemon Sweets: Mistress Abernathy's Apple Pandowdy; Blancmange en Paris; Almond Biscuits

30 review for Outlander Kitchen: To the New World and Back Again: The Second Official Outlander Companion Cookbook

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kay

    My kind of cookbook with not so many ingredients for each recipe. This cookbook must be really awesome for Outlander fans. I only read the first two books and very behind with the TV series. There are excerpt from the story before each adapted recipe which I thought was very cool. Too bad I don't know most of the characters. My kind of cookbook with not so many ingredients for each recipe. This cookbook must be really awesome for Outlander fans. I only read the first two books and very behind with the TV series. There are excerpt from the story before each adapted recipe which I thought was very cool. Too bad I don't know most of the characters.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Alisa (worldswithinpages)

    As a huge fan of Outlander, being able to dive into the world a little bit deeper through exploring recipes that may be made in the Fraser kitchen made my heart swell. So many of the included recipes are comfort foods, which is perfect for the quarantine blues. I have bookmarked quite a few of the recipes I want to try out and I am really looking forward to seeing how they turn out! I may even make a whole theme night of it with my fellow Outlander -loving friend! :)

  3. 5 out of 5

    Crystal

    An attractive, well-thought-out literary cookbook. While many of the recipes are not to my taste, and I haven't read the books this cookbook is inspired by, I wanted to commend the author for such flexible/ dietary restriction inclusive recipes. There's a dietary legend used to indicate whenever a recipe is gluten free, dairy free, vegetarian, or vegan, or adaptable to such. The notes for adapting recipes, where applicable, are thoughtful and detailed, not just tossed out there placatingly. The An attractive, well-thought-out literary cookbook. While many of the recipes are not to my taste, and I haven't read the books this cookbook is inspired by, I wanted to commend the author for such flexible/ dietary restriction inclusive recipes. There's a dietary legend used to indicate whenever a recipe is gluten free, dairy free, vegetarian, or vegan, or adaptable to such. The notes for adapting recipes, where applicable, are thoughtful and detailed, not just tossed out there placatingly. The photography is lovely, there's relevant quotations from Gabaldon's writing with each recipe, and the recipes themselves are really interesting. Worth picking up and looking through if you are a fan of literary cookbooks and/ or Gabaldon's Outlander books and/or creative historically inspired recipes.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Bridget Healy

    This cookbook is as much fun to read as it is a source of recipes. Will I make everything? No. Did I thoroughly enjoy reading every single recipe? Yes. She has a way of putting together flavors and explaining techniques that are really easy to follow. Absolutely recommend!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Marie L.

    I was given a copy of this book by the author for an honest review. First and foremost let me start by saying that this book is amazing. I loved the first Outlander Kitchen book and this one is just as good. If you don’t own the first book, what are you waiting for? Not only is Theresa a great chef, but she’s also a great writer. From Pender Island, British Columbia, Theresa brings us into her Outlander kitchen and makes us want to move in right next door. I’ll help with your herb garden Theresa I was given a copy of this book by the author for an honest review. First and foremost let me start by saying that this book is amazing. I loved the first Outlander Kitchen book and this one is just as good. If you don’t own the first book, what are you waiting for? Not only is Theresa a great chef, but she’s also a great writer. From Pender Island, British Columbia, Theresa brings us into her Outlander kitchen and makes us want to move in right next door. I’ll help with your herb garden Theresa and I’m really good at gardening. *wink* Have you ever wondered what the food you read about in a book tastes like? Wonder no longer, Theresa paints us a very vivid picture of the food from Outlander. How lucky are we? I loved reading the introduction to each recipe and how she described its origins. She manages to take recipes from the Outlander books and turns them into reality. If you're like me, you'll be salivating reading them. I foresee a Tarte Tantin and Young Ian's Grilled Succotash Salad in my very near future. In Outlander Kitchen: To The New World and Back Again, Theresa brings us even more recipes from the Outlander and Lord John world. From Benedicta's Steak and Mushroom pie, to Jenny's Breakfast Crumble and Savannah Clam Chowder, Theresa really does bring you on a trip to the New World and back again. In this book she has added gluten-free, dairy-free, vegetarian and vegan options. There are recipes for everyone!  Each fully detailed recipes brings you back in time to the Outlander world and the best part of it all is that you can bring the Outlander world into your own kitchen with this book. Whether you're good in the kitchen or not, Theresa does a terrific job of explaining how to recreate her recipes. So fear not, she guides you every step of the way. Each of her books has a great introduction which describes the ingredients she uses and how you can recreate the same in your own kitchen.  Don't skip out on reading her introduction, Diana's prologue and at the end of the book "The Diet and Cookery of Eighteen Century Highlanders". I thoroughly enjoyed reading this part as it was filled with historical details and information. I highly recommend this book and let's face it, even if you're not a cook, you need this book just to look at the information that comes along with each recipe, the pictures and all the historical details. 

  6. 5 out of 5

    Beth Robinson-Kinney

    This one doesn't quite have the spark of the first OK cookbook, but it has an excellent variety of recipes with lots of thought into vegetarian and gluten-free modifications. This one doesn't quite have the spark of the first OK cookbook, but it has an excellent variety of recipes with lots of thought into vegetarian and gluten-free modifications.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Kathryn

    I love that this cookbook has recipes and alternatives for vegan, gluten, diary and vegetarian!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Brindi Michele

    This one had me just as excited as the first one! Just wish every recipe included a photo.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Danielle Symington

    Adorable. Now I just need to put the words into action as I wait patiently for the last book of the series to be released!!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Out of the Bex

    A fantastic gift for fans of the Outlander series, this kitchen cookbook offers unique and interesting recipes. Most of which are accompanied by a historical annotation telling the background of a particular food as well as an excerpt from books within the franchise. Among the usual cookbook categories of Breakfast, Soups, Sweets, etc., Outlander Kitchen also includes novelty sections such as a particular passage for Game recipes. Not to miss are the thoughtfully composed Foreword, Introduction, A fantastic gift for fans of the Outlander series, this kitchen cookbook offers unique and interesting recipes. Most of which are accompanied by a historical annotation telling the background of a particular food as well as an excerpt from books within the franchise. Among the usual cookbook categories of Breakfast, Soups, Sweets, etc., Outlander Kitchen also includes novelty sections such as a particular passage for Game recipes. Not to miss are the thoughtfully composed Foreword, Introduction, and—my personal favorite—finale of an essay entitled, "The Diet and Cookery of Eighteenth-Century Highlanders." Of note, many entries include alternatives for vegan and gluten-free home chefs.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Alyssa Goebbert

    Cute book, but there were just not many recipes in this book that I would ever make or eat. Not too many unique recipes either. I also did not personally like the focus on gluten free, dairy free and vegan dishes, as that is not my eating preference (especially when I want to make Scottish food).

  12. 5 out of 5

    Richard Sommers

    This is the first time I've reviewed a book that I haven't actually read. I've only benefitted from the recipes my wife has cooked and heard her gush about the book. She was hooked on the Outlander series and my daughter spotted this book at the library, so we brought it home. We recently sold/donated several cook books, because my wife rarely uses any of them. However, not only did she use this book, but she became inspired by it. She's started making all kinds of good wholesome meals! As a veg This is the first time I've reviewed a book that I haven't actually read. I've only benefitted from the recipes my wife has cooked and heard her gush about the book. She was hooked on the Outlander series and my daughter spotted this book at the library, so we brought it home. We recently sold/donated several cook books, because my wife rarely uses any of them. However, not only did she use this book, but she became inspired by it. She's started making all kinds of good wholesome meals! As a vegetarian, my wife has been amazed at how this cook book goes out of the way to describe ways she can convert the original recipe into a vegetarian recipe. When I returned the book to the library, she was very disappointed, but I only returned it because I'd already bought her a copy and had it wrapped, waiting under the Christmas tree.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Beth

    Arranged by type of dish (appetizer, entree, salad, dessert, beverage), the second companion cookbook to the popular historical fiction series Outlander, each recipe opens with a quote from any of the popular books by Diana Gabaldon that referencing a meal, dish or ingredients, and then the chef's interpretation of the dish, with notes on how it was modernized and tips for accommodating gluten-free, dairy-free and meat-free preferences. The recipes begin and end with basic recipes you might inco Arranged by type of dish (appetizer, entree, salad, dessert, beverage), the second companion cookbook to the popular historical fiction series Outlander, each recipe opens with a quote from any of the popular books by Diana Gabaldon that referencing a meal, dish or ingredients, and then the chef's interpretation of the dish, with notes on how it was modernized and tips for accommodating gluten-free, dairy-free and meat-free preferences. The recipes begin and end with basic recipes you might incorporate into other dishes (Mayonnaise, Simple Syrup, Preserved Lemons) and closes with condiments and preserves (Rachel Murray's Dill Pickles, Prepared Horseradish, Brandied Peaches) for Origins of the dishes range from Native America (Young Ian's Grilled Succotash) to classic French (Coq au Vin, John Grey's Yorkshire Pudding) to Spain (Ropa Vieja) to Scotland (Scotch Broth), to England (Shirred Eggs in Butter), Cuba (Cuban Black Beans and Rice, Cassava Bread) to American (Cornbread, Johnnycake, Savannah Clam Chowder, Beans Baked with Bacon and Onion). The photos are mouth-watering, the ingredients easily accessible, and the dishes are all things I'd like to eat. I can't wait to try the mushroom Pate (which combines green lentils, walnuts and button mushrooms for a savory, umani, "meaty" spread); an easy GF Press in Crust of oat and rice flours with oil or melted butter; In many cases, the entries have some historical context, like an explanation of typical plants in the new world or the shift to a hog and hominy (pigs and corn diet), and suggested food pairings that reference other recipes in the book. The volume concludes with an essay about eighteenth century diet and cookery in the Highlands and the New World, that touches on locally grown and sourced versus imported delicacies; the rarity of sugar; the practice of keeping kitchen gardens; diet variations by class; the typical layout of a croft versus a castle kitchen; food security; and cooking equipment. The Pantry Notes at the beginning explain substitutions, conversions for international kitchens and a legend for defining the type of recipe, which might be GF (gluten-free) or VGN (vegan) as written; the notes for further adaption are at the end of recipe, giving a wonderful feeling of inclusion to each dish. I'm nominally kosher, so I skimmed the section on pork, but it's nice to see that I could make dishes that contain meat and dairy by substituting oil for butter or a cream made from nuts and seeds for sweet or savory cream. An introduction from Herself endorses the book and wishes bon appetit! (in Gaelic, of course) to the readers, while the author's introduction explains how her blog and cookbooks came to be. The index is mostly an alphabetical listing of dishes (not ingredients) but makes it easy to quickly find all the vegan or gluten-free recipes/adaptations. With recipes for Mushroom Catsup, Mocktapus with Tomatoes and Olives, and Vegan Sausage Rolls (no fake meat!), the book has appeal to foodies and hipsters, and also contains family dinner options (Chicken & Cornmeal Stew, Broccoli Sallet with Radishes and Vinegar, Herb Roasted Salmon). I can only assume that all the herring recipes were in Volume One, and my only disappointment is there is no whiskey in the Scotch broth, but that's my silly expectation, and not a reflection of how it's actually made. Great purchase for large libraries, cookbook collectors, or fans of all things Jamie and Claire.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Beth

    Another lovely and thoughtful compilation of recipes from Carle-Sanders! I didn't like this one *as* well as the first, I think because I wanted more of the history of each dish. However, there's a very large amount of recipes here, and they're varied (most are veg-rich and grain-free). As with the first Outlander Kitchen cookbook, each is accompanied by the passage (from the Outlander series and the spinoff short stories) that inspired it. Some of these recipes are more labor intensive, reserve Another lovely and thoughtful compilation of recipes from Carle-Sanders! I didn't like this one *as* well as the first, I think because I wanted more of the history of each dish. However, there's a very large amount of recipes here, and they're varied (most are veg-rich and grain-free). As with the first Outlander Kitchen cookbook, each is accompanied by the passage (from the Outlander series and the spinoff short stories) that inspired it. Some of these recipes are more labor intensive, reserved for entertaining and holidays, but most of them are straightforward and should be easy to make (and don't require niche ingredients). There's also an essay in the back about the evolution of Scottish cuisine during the 1700s, as waves emigrated to North America, which was fascinating. I bookmarked several to try, and expect I'll be referencing this cookbook again in the future.

  15. 5 out of 5

    April Newman

    Pretty great, the introduction on the Scottish diaspora was compelling and explained some of the recipe choices from around the world. I really liked that there was a gluten free and vegan amendment to each recipe that could be adapted. The pictures were attractive. My favorite parts were the sections at the end about what food might have been like during time periods in history, and getting us to think about food preservation, and how important, and how fickle, that made life in the past. That Pretty great, the introduction on the Scottish diaspora was compelling and explained some of the recipe choices from around the world. I really liked that there was a gluten free and vegan amendment to each recipe that could be adapted. The pictures were attractive. My favorite parts were the sections at the end about what food might have been like during time periods in history, and getting us to think about food preservation, and how important, and how fickle, that made life in the past. That part reminded me a little of the show, Victorian Farm, with the historical side of things. Full disclosure, I watched a little of this Outlander show, never read the books, so the excerpts from the stories and little asides about what character ate was lost on me, but didn't really matter if you are a reader interested in Scottish food and history.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Shannon

    I loved the first volume and anxiously waited for this one to come out. It did not disappoint. So many great recipes to try. The descriptions and Outlander (and beyond-love the addition of the Lord John books) are so fun to read. I don't sit and "read" many cookbooks but the day this arrived I found myself sitting for hours perusing recipes and reading the stories that went with them ... as I made my shopping list for items needed for the first recipes to try. If you are an Outlander fan who coo I loved the first volume and anxiously waited for this one to come out. It did not disappoint. So many great recipes to try. The descriptions and Outlander (and beyond-love the addition of the Lord John books) are so fun to read. I don't sit and "read" many cookbooks but the day this arrived I found myself sitting for hours perusing recipes and reading the stories that went with them ... as I made my shopping list for items needed for the first recipes to try. If you are an Outlander fan who cooks, you really need this book. (The first one too, if you don't already have that.)

  17. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    Such a lovely pictorial compliment and companion to the Outlander books. Gabaldon gives her stamp of approval to this collection of recipes inspired by texts in her books. The recipes, though inspired by old versions, are adapted to be created in a modern kitchen. The photos are beautiful, the historical antidotes informative, and the recipes themselves are doable and sound delicious. They are also adaptable for those that choose alternative diet restrictions. I am always looking for fun, new wa Such a lovely pictorial compliment and companion to the Outlander books. Gabaldon gives her stamp of approval to this collection of recipes inspired by texts in her books. The recipes, though inspired by old versions, are adapted to be created in a modern kitchen. The photos are beautiful, the historical antidotes informative, and the recipes themselves are doable and sound delicious. They are also adaptable for those that choose alternative diet restrictions. I am always looking for fun, new ways to play in the kitchen, and this delivers.

  18. 4 out of 5

    April

    Outlander Kitchen: To the New World and Back Again: The Second Official Outlander Companion Cookbook By Theresa Carle-Sanders While not as full of must-have recipes for me as the first book was, this one did a really good job of including vegen/vegetarian/gluten free recipes and substitutions and even has a recipe for Jackfruit hand pies - which I will have to make someday soon. It also taught me some awesome kitchen know-how (Note: the last book did too.) 3 stars.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Carrie

    I have the same issues with this cookbook as I did with the first one. Not enough pictures. Too many recipes didn't have a picture attached and I can't quite picture some of the more unusual recipes in my head enough to want to try them. Many of the recipes were things I would never want to try (rabbit stew). And the frog's leg recipe gave me pause until I saw it was really using chicken wings. I would only recommend these recipes to hardcore Outlander fans. I have the same issues with this cookbook as I did with the first one. Not enough pictures. Too many recipes didn't have a picture attached and I can't quite picture some of the more unusual recipes in my head enough to want to try them. Many of the recipes were things I would never want to try (rabbit stew). And the frog's leg recipe gave me pause until I saw it was really using chicken wings. I would only recommend these recipes to hardcore Outlander fans.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    I received this book for Christmas and have been reading through and cooking from it since then. The recipes are fantastic! So far my favorite the Leek and Potato soup and the Whiskey Cooler. My only complaint is the measures for ingredients, instead of asking for 4 cups of water it asks for 1 liter. Having to spend time converting upped the prep time. Still, the final product was worth the extra work.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jeannette Aquino

    Can you consider a "cookbook" as part of a reading challenge on Goodreads? Oh, yes! I enjoyed reading it from cover to cover. Being an Outlander junkie, I was pleased to find many of the recipes inspired by the Lord John books. Also, though I am not a vegan nor do I follow a gluten-free, dairy-free, or any popular diet, many of my friends do so I appreciated the adaptable recipes. This book, along with OK 1, the first cookbook, would make a wonderful addition to any cook's library. Can you consider a "cookbook" as part of a reading challenge on Goodreads? Oh, yes! I enjoyed reading it from cover to cover. Being an Outlander junkie, I was pleased to find many of the recipes inspired by the Lord John books. Also, though I am not a vegan nor do I follow a gluten-free, dairy-free, or any popular diet, many of my friends do so I appreciated the adaptable recipes. This book, along with OK 1, the first cookbook, would make a wonderful addition to any cook's library.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Haley

    Loved that there were so many adaptations for dairy-free & vegan recipes! As a lifelong lactose-intolerant person, I really appreciated this. We don’t always get the adaptations in cookbooks that gluten-free people tend to get (& they should! But throw a bone to those of us who can’t do cream & cheese too).

  23. 5 out of 5

    Anna Lapping

    I have this cookbook as well as the first one. Both excellent and fun to read. The day it arrived I made the “chicken Stew”, and have made it’s few times since. The author is a wizard when it comes to seasonings. If you have this book you have to try it. Page 113. If you haven’t yet added it to your collection, don’t wait! Buy it!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jaclyn

    Not what I was looking for, in the end. Too many modifications for different diets (which in general is great, just not for me) I don't have a lot of those specialty ingredients around, and was hoping for more of a basics, down home/slightly related to Scottish food or food they talk about in the books. Not quite what this is! Not what I was looking for, in the end. Too many modifications for different diets (which in general is great, just not for me) I don't have a lot of those specialty ingredients around, and was hoping for more of a basics, down home/slightly related to Scottish food or food they talk about in the books. Not quite what this is!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Nicole

    Mouthwatering reading at its best. I love the interjections of passages from the Outlander universe with the food and drink. It makes me feel more a part of the stories. I wish there were more pictures, though. I also felt there were quite a few passages repeated for multiple recipes, which felt dull to reread.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    Great recipes with easy to follow instructions. I enjoy trying these recipes and am working my way through the book. Loved Theresa’s fisrt book and am having fun with this one too. Several of her recipes have become family favorites.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    As an Outlander fan I had to look at this cookbook. It is beautiful. A must if you’re an Outlander fan and would make a great addition to any Outlsnder collection. Admittedly though some of the recipes do seem to have a higher level of difficulty then others but there are many that seem doable.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Myra Simmons

    didn't realize this was the 2nd edition. I need to read and look over the 1st edition. The 2nd edition has a wonderful array of recipes and worldly items to cook and bake. I have a few things on my to do list. didn't realize this was the 2nd edition. I need to read and look over the 1st edition. The 2nd edition has a wonderful array of recipes and worldly items to cook and bake. I have a few things on my to do list.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Ruth

    Fabulous new volume of Outlander Kitchen. I appreciate the gluten-free recipes as well as instructions on how to adapt non gf recipes. Beautifully photographed with Diana Gabaldon’s lovely book excerpts.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    I loved this as much as the first one! There were vegan and vegetarian options this time, and while so much looks labor intensive I would try everything in a heartbeat.

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