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Another Gospel?: A Lifelong Christian Seeks Truth in Response to Progressive Christianity

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A Movement Seeks to Redefine Christianity. Some Think that It Is a Much-Needed Progressive Reformation. Others Believe that It Is an Attack on Historic Christianity. Alisa Childers never thought she would question her Christian faith. She was raised in a Christian home, where she had seen her mom and dad feed the hungry, clothe the homeless, and love the outcast. She had wi A Movement Seeks to Redefine Christianity. Some Think that It Is a Much-Needed Progressive Reformation. Others Believe that It Is an Attack on Historic Christianity. Alisa Childers never thought she would question her Christian faith. She was raised in a Christian home, where she had seen her mom and dad feed the hungry, clothe the homeless, and love the outcast. She had witnessed God at work and then had dedicated her own life to leading worship, as part of the popular Christian band ZOEgirl. All that was deeply challenged when she met a progressive pastor, who called himself a hopeful agnostic. Another Gospel? describes the intellectual journey Alisa took over several years as she wrestled with a series of questions that struck at the core of the Christian faith. After everything she had ever believed about God, Jesus, and the Bible had been picked apart, she found herself at the brink of despair . . . until God rescued her, helping her to rebuild her faith, one solid brick at a time. In a culture of endless questions, you need solid answers. If you or someone you love has encountered the ideas of progressive Christianity and aren't sure how to respond, Alisa's journey will show you how to determine--and rest in--what's unmistakably true.


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A Movement Seeks to Redefine Christianity. Some Think that It Is a Much-Needed Progressive Reformation. Others Believe that It Is an Attack on Historic Christianity. Alisa Childers never thought she would question her Christian faith. She was raised in a Christian home, where she had seen her mom and dad feed the hungry, clothe the homeless, and love the outcast. She had wi A Movement Seeks to Redefine Christianity. Some Think that It Is a Much-Needed Progressive Reformation. Others Believe that It Is an Attack on Historic Christianity. Alisa Childers never thought she would question her Christian faith. She was raised in a Christian home, where she had seen her mom and dad feed the hungry, clothe the homeless, and love the outcast. She had witnessed God at work and then had dedicated her own life to leading worship, as part of the popular Christian band ZOEgirl. All that was deeply challenged when she met a progressive pastor, who called himself a hopeful agnostic. Another Gospel? describes the intellectual journey Alisa took over several years as she wrestled with a series of questions that struck at the core of the Christian faith. After everything she had ever believed about God, Jesus, and the Bible had been picked apart, she found herself at the brink of despair . . . until God rescued her, helping her to rebuild her faith, one solid brick at a time. In a culture of endless questions, you need solid answers. If you or someone you love has encountered the ideas of progressive Christianity and aren't sure how to respond, Alisa's journey will show you how to determine--and rest in--what's unmistakably true.

30 review for Another Gospel?: A Lifelong Christian Seeks Truth in Response to Progressive Christianity

  1. 4 out of 5

    Justin

    If you're struggling with questions because you've been confronted by progressive Christianity in some way, shape or form then I'd highly suggest you pick up this book. It's a great starting point, a solid rebuttal to wayward progressive teaching, and the content is reader friendly. I think most believers go through a period of questioning their faith. It's often a turbulent and lonely journey that needs to be taken. I remember reading the late Rachel Held Evans book "Searching for Sunday" about If you're struggling with questions because you've been confronted by progressive Christianity in some way, shape or form then I'd highly suggest you pick up this book. It's a great starting point, a solid rebuttal to wayward progressive teaching, and the content is reader friendly. I think most believers go through a period of questioning their faith. It's often a turbulent and lonely journey that needs to be taken. I remember reading the late Rachel Held Evans book "Searching for Sunday" about her journey out of an orthodox or evangelical faith into the progressive church. I kept asking, where did she go to get answers? If she keeps disagreeing with the Bible at every turn, why in the world does she still call herself a Christian? After the dust settled from her journey, the Bible (for her) had more holes in it than swiss cheese. Then we come to Alisa Childers, confronted with modern progressive teachings, which was shocking to her, she goes about it a completely different way. What do scholars all agree on about Jesus? Are the progressives correct about church history, the early church fathers? She goes to the primary sources. What did the early fathers understand about scripture and the disciples etc.? What does scripture actually say? Can it be twisted to mean something different or do we have to be honest about what it says, commands, reveals and teaches? She comes to the end of her journey.....and is a stronger, more devout believer in Jesus Christ than when she began. I'd encourage the reader, the doubter, and the believer that Christianity, the historic, biblical, orthodox faith can withstand questions. It can absorb personal doubts. The bible can endure hostile skepticism and honest inquiry. That to "progress" away from from the historic faith isn’t really progress, but an intellectually dishonest walk into an invented philosophy which will not submit to revelation. The Bible at best becomes an evolving document which has to surrender to progressive whims or be deemed irrelevant. Birthing a faith that cost nothing, is in step with the world, and where Jesus is only partially Lord or no Lord at all. Pick this book up, it’s worth your time.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Josh Olds

    I went into Alisa Childers’ Another Gospel not knowing how I’d feel about it. In many ways, here journey mirrors mine. Grew up deeply entrenched in conservative evangelicalism. Lived in a conservative, white bubble. And slowly but surely had my perspectives stretched by people I would have called “liberal.” Basically, our only differences are that while Childers retreated toward the center, I’ve found myself firmly identifying with a lot of “Progressive Christianity” and that I was never a membe I went into Alisa Childers’ Another Gospel not knowing how I’d feel about it. In many ways, here journey mirrors mine. Grew up deeply entrenched in conservative evangelicalism. Lived in a conservative, white bubble. And slowly but surely had my perspectives stretched by people I would have called “liberal.” Basically, our only differences are that while Childers retreated toward the center, I’ve found myself firmly identifying with a lot of “Progressive Christianity” and that I was never a member of an award-winning CCM band. Given that the subtitle was A lifelong Christian seeks truth in response to Progressive Christianity, I went into the book a bit defensive. I would define myself as a progressive Christian. I’m a firm believer in social justice. But there was just something about Another Gospel that made me want to pick it up. I soon found that I pretty much agreed with Childers on almost everything—except maybe the definition of Progressive Christianity. Her own personal experiences surround growing up with a pastor who was a self-proclaimed agnostic who had jettisoned much of the historical Jesus. The beginning chapters focus on her story and growth in the faith and how it was challenged by a pastor who had left orthodoxy. In the chapter “Fixing What Isn’t Broken,” Childers attempts to make the claim that progressive Christianity softens the moral demands of historic Christianity. To make this case, she uses the topic of same-sex sexual behavior. Historic Christianity says that it is wrong; progressive Christianity says that it is allowable. Progressive Christianity softens the moral demands of historic Christianity. Except no work is done to prove that historic Christianity generally frowned upon same-sex sexual behavior. Not even the stereotypical “clobber texts” are trotted out. There’s just an assumption of what the Bible says without even a perfunctory attempt to look at the text, let alone how progressive Christians understand those texts. Further, the assumption then becomes—since the book’s title is Another Gospel—that one’s position on same-sex sexual behavior is a matter of theological orthodoxy. This elevation of a moral command to the level of determining salvation is very dangerous. Placing it on such a high pedestal without even attempting to work through the various interpretations of the passage shows that Childers is catering to an audience that already has made up their minds on the issue. A second example comes in the chapter “Cosmic Child Abuse,” which is a takedown of progressive Christianity’s distancing from penal substitution as the primary metaphor of the atonement. What many progressives try to do is widen the viewpoint of the atonement to show that Christ’s death was not simply an intra-Trinitarian transaction. (And yes, some do go too far in decrying it). But while the reality of the Atonement is a matter of orthodoxy, the nature of the metaphor of the Atonement is not. That’s what we have to focus on. The various theories of atonement are all based on Scripture’s description of the indescribable. And each of them hold value—even if we see penal substitution as being the primary metaphor. But again, because the book is entitled Another Gospel, the assumption becomes if you don’t believe in this particular type of atonement, you don’t just have an interpretive difference, you’ve committed heresy. And by this metric many of the Church Fathers would be considered heretics, from Origin to Augustine to C.S. Lewis. This is a good book when it focuses on the majors, when it accurately attacks actual orthodoxy. Unfortunately, it sometimes seems that Childers doesn’t know how to identify the difference between first-order and second-order doctrines. It focuses on the social differences between conservative Christianity and progressive Christianity rather than the theological differences, and ultimately offers mediocre social critiques instead of substantive theological ones. And progressive Christianity needs hit with substantive theological critiques. I stand as someone who leans progressive in my actions and conservative (historic?) in my beliefs. I don’t agree with those who try to redefine the historical Jesus or deny the Resurrection or downplay the validity of Scripture. That’s what this book needed to focus on: that you can love the other and seek social justice while yet remaining theologically faithful to historic Christianity. Instead, Another Gospel gets sidetracked on social issues. So here’s what I’d like to tell Childers: There’s a part of Progressive Christianity that’s much different than what you’ve painted here. Sure, we’ll disagree on some ancillary matters of faith, but we’re not questioning orthodoxy. Or, when we do, it’s to be sure we have a better understanding of what it is. I won’t be the apologist for everyone you quote here—least of all your agnostic pastor—but many of the people you dismiss as heretics who proclaim another gospel love Jesus and hold to all the foundations of the faith. I would encourage you to use your position to reach out to these individuals and do the work of engaging with them—not just their books—and seeing their love for Jesus. Another Gospel is obviously sincere, it’s conversationally written, it’s a good primer to introductory apologetics, but it overstates any perceived errors of most of progressive Christianity as heresy.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jenna Hill

    Another Gospel by Alisa Childers is much needed literature in a time such as this when so much of the world of Christian influencers today is saturated with either a watered down or completely different gospel altogether. Beautifully written, she tells about her personal experience with progressive Christianity, her deconstruction story and reconstruction of her faith going back to historic Christian roots. This book is so eloquent in the way apologetics is seamlessly strung in with her testimon Another Gospel by Alisa Childers is much needed literature in a time such as this when so much of the world of Christian influencers today is saturated with either a watered down or completely different gospel altogether. Beautifully written, she tells about her personal experience with progressive Christianity, her deconstruction story and reconstruction of her faith going back to historic Christian roots. This book is so eloquent in the way apologetics is seamlessly strung in with her testimony. You literally laugh and cry with her as she walks you through her journey, and it’s not something that is only for those who have gone through seminary and know the “lingo”. This is such an easy read! If you have friends or loved ones in your life who are knee deep in or just dipping their toes into progressive Christianity, this book is for you. If you are just coming out of progressive Christianity or think your church may be leaning that way, this book is for you. If you feel like something is off at your church and you just can’t put your finger on it, this book might just be for you. If you have no idea what progressive Christianity is and want to know more, this book is for you. I genuinely believe that anyone, proclaiming Christian or not, can get something out of Alisa’s testimony and the research she has done into the deteriorating affects that progressive church’s worldview has on the Christian church today. I had no idea what progressive Christianity was and the real depth of deceit until finding Alisa’s apologetics ministry and reading this book. Highly recommend.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Susy *MotherLambReads*

    Alarming and thought provoking. Alarming by how sneaky the devil can be entering into our churches and coloring truth. The author goes through her faith struggle and how her journey to truth caused her to question and eventually get answers to so many truths. This book is a deeper look into Apologetics. Mama Bear Apologetics was a great start and this takes it deeper. This is a warning to Christians- Progressivism is rampant and growing. Our basic tenant of truth are being questioned. I slowed dow Alarming and thought provoking. Alarming by how sneaky the devil can be entering into our churches and coloring truth. The author goes through her faith struggle and how her journey to truth caused her to question and eventually get answers to so many truths. This book is a deeper look into Apologetics. Mama Bear Apologetics was a great start and this takes it deeper. This is a warning to Christians- Progressivism is rampant and growing. Our basic tenant of truth are being questioned. I slowed down and took breaks on the deeper parts The Textual Criticism part I had my hubby listen w me and answer some questions. Of course he gave me more books to read. Why do I believe what I believe? The main essential tenants to the Christian faith: inerrancy and soul authority of the Bible, the resurrection, salvation through Christ’s alone, the virgin birth and so much more. I appreciated the author’s approach to hyper fundamentalism as well and explanation of legalism in the church. Definitely recommend to those wanting to delve in and study what the Fathers of Christianity set forth years before. Many reference books at the end for other resources.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kristin Murray

    I would give this 6 stars if I could. I listened to it on audio (it is read by the author), but then decided to purchase a physical copy. By the time I received the book in the mail, I finished reading the last few chapters and immediately started rereading it to highlight her main points in each chapter. I found this book extremely helpful to me both times that I've read it. Several of my close family members have been persuaded by progressive Christian leaders in their thinking. Alisa Childers I would give this 6 stars if I could. I listened to it on audio (it is read by the author), but then decided to purchase a physical copy. By the time I received the book in the mail, I finished reading the last few chapters and immediately started rereading it to highlight her main points in each chapter. I found this book extremely helpful to me both times that I've read it. Several of my close family members have been persuaded by progressive Christian leaders in their thinking. Alisa Childers quotes those very leaders in her book, and I felt like a sponge soaking up all she had to say about her fight for faith amidst her doubts. She has a list of further resources and references in the back of her book that I really appreciate.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sherri

    I’ve read a lot of apologetics in the course of my life, much of it excellent and clear. But this book is, outside C.S. Lewis’ Mere Christianity, the most accessible I’ve encountered. That’s actually a big deal. I have some favorite texts that are more academic or challenging, but apologetics aren’t helpful if they’re not easily read and apprehended by regular folks. This is well researched, well argued, and so well articulated. I would recommend it to anyone.

  7. 4 out of 5

    David

    There are generally two kinds of apologetics books: those that list arguments and facts, and those that present arguments and facts through a story, usually a memoir or biography. Of the former, “I Don’t Have Enough Faith To Be An Atheist” (Turek, Geisler) and “Evidence That Demands a Verdict” (McDowell) might be the most famous. Of the latter, “The Case for Christ” (Strobel) and “Seeking Allah, Finding Jesus” (Qureshi). The former are excellent books for classes, for studying, for referencing. T There are generally two kinds of apologetics books: those that list arguments and facts, and those that present arguments and facts through a story, usually a memoir or biography. Of the former, “I Don’t Have Enough Faith To Be An Atheist” (Turek, Geisler) and “Evidence That Demands a Verdict” (McDowell) might be the most famous. Of the latter, “The Case for Christ” (Strobel) and “Seeking Allah, Finding Jesus” (Qureshi). The former are excellent books for classes, for studying, for referencing. The latter are excellent for growing, for learning, for understanding. Rote facts are often less memorable than a good and solid lesson in which such facts can be presented in context. Together, along with the few books like Tactics (Koukl) and Conversational Evangelism (Geisler), they make up a whole that every Christian should learn from. Alisa Childers is adding a new book to the latter group, to the stories. While most such books talk about things outside the faith, usually someone coming to Christ, Alisa talks about nearly leaving the church because of threats from within. This is a lesson sorely needed today in the church as people, young and old, are leaving the church by the hundreds and thousands. The particular threat that Alisa addresses is that of Progressive Christianity. For those who may not be familiar with it, Alisa has made a list of 9 denials that mark and define Progressive Christianity: 1) Denial of the atonement 2) Denial of the authority and inspiration of the Bible 3) Denial of the sin nature of man 4) Denial of the reality of sin that separates us from God 5) Denial of the deity of Jesus 6) Denial of the physical resurrection of Jesus 7) Denial of the virgin birth of Jesus 8) Denial of the Trinity 9) Denial of the sinlessness of Jesus These are doctrines that have been held by the church virtually since inception, even if they weren’t articulated clearly for some time. To deny them is to reject original and historic Christianity, which together embody the biblical faith. As former singer of ZoeGirl, and current recording artist on her own, Alisa knows how to entertain an audience. As a popular blogger, she knows how to write clearly and effectively. And as a student of apologetics and speaker with STR and various Christian worldview conferences, she understands sound doctrine and how to present such doctrine to the world. This trifecta, plus her own history with Progressive Christianity, leaves her as the perfect person to address this challenge. Another Gospel is an engaging book that is at once thoroughly theological and deeply personal, at once rigorous and merciful. Alisa isn’t a discernment blogger out to throw punches, but she also doesn’t mince words where truth is on the line. This is not an academic text that will bore you, but neither is it a feel-good anecdote. This book will challenge you to take your beliefs seriously. But please, don’t take my word for it, and definitely don’t take her word for it: instead, be like the Bereans, and test what she says. Test it by logic and sound reason, test it with history, but most importantly: test it against Scripture, the Word of God itself. Originally posted at: https://www.bravedaily.com/2020/09/30...

  8. 5 out of 5

    Tom Pasmore

    This is not a serious engagement with what progressive Christians believe. This is denouncement of what the author doesn’t believe. She chooses to define Christians as created in her image and dismisses those who do not. She was right about one thing. She is a fundamentalist. The most troubling part of the book for me is that I don’t think I ever saw the word grace. I think grace is a non-negotiable part of the faith.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Clayton Keenon

    Solid, clear presentation of standard apologetic arguments. This book seems like it would be most effective with people who are committed to historic Christian teaching, but are concerned about trends away from orthodoxy. It serves as a good warning against false teaching. It would probably solidify the faith of someone who believes orthodox Christianity, but doesn’t know why those views are true. Unfortunately, I’m not convinced this book will be effective for someone who is actually going thro Solid, clear presentation of standard apologetic arguments. This book seems like it would be most effective with people who are committed to historic Christian teaching, but are concerned about trends away from orthodoxy. It serves as a good warning against false teaching. It would probably solidify the faith of someone who believes orthodox Christianity, but doesn’t know why those views are true. Unfortunately, I’m not convinced this book will be effective for someone who is actually going through a deconstruction of their faith. The main problem with the book is book a rhetorical one. Childers initially presents her experience with the class at the progressive church as something that rattled her faith and raised questions she couldn’t shake. It sounded initially like she was genuinely drawn toward the progressive ideas she was hearing and had to wrestle her way back to the truth. But as the book continued, the story of the class sounded more and more like Childers was always a traditional believer who heard things she disagreed with and what troubled her was finding out that people thought these things and that she didn’t know the answers to refute them. She never came across as if she felt the draw of progressive Christianity, more the discomfort of being among people who believed these ideas. Childers doesn’t need to have been seduced by false teaching to write a book responding to these bad ideas, but, in terms of classical rhetoric, it undermined her ethos to picture her as the one traditional believer sitting in a class week after week shocked and trying to rebut the teacher. That is not the kind of person my friends who have gone through a deconstruction of their faith would listen to, because it didn’t feel like she wrestled with honest doubt personally, even though that’s how it was framed at the beginning of the book and in the promotional blurbs. So, while I’d recommend this to a solid Christian who wants to think through some of the false ideas coming from the progressive side of Christianity, or maybe bolster the faith of a young person prior to them being drawn into these ideas, I wouldn’t find this useful in addressing people already convinced by the views the book aims to refute.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Scott Carter

    Childers, Alisa. Another Gospel?. Carol Stream, IL: Tyndale Momentum, 2020. $16.99 Alisa Childers writes Another Gospel? with the average Christian in mind. This book is not meant only for Christians. Those who have left Christianity because of doubts and questions under the influence of the various forms of Progressive Christianity would benefit from Another Gospel. Childers also seeks to build up the Christian to be able to stand up against mounting pressure and questions. Many Christians are n Childers, Alisa. Another Gospel?. Carol Stream, IL: Tyndale Momentum, 2020. $16.99 Alisa Childers writes Another Gospel? with the average Christian in mind. This book is not meant only for Christians. Those who have left Christianity because of doubts and questions under the influence of the various forms of Progressive Christianity would benefit from Another Gospel. Childers also seeks to build up the Christian to be able to stand up against mounting pressure and questions. Many Christians are not prepared to respond to questions related to the authority of Scripture, Scripture’s historical accuracy and trustworthiness, and how to understand the God who both ordered the killing of people in the Old Testament. Childers provides an approachable defense of orthodox Christianity. She provides references to more academic works (many of which I wholeheartedly recommend) and Church Fathers. Yet, the tone is welcoming and sets an example of how to create a defense on a popular level. It is also encouraging to see God using attempts at deconstructing a believer’s faith to drive them back to his Word. Childers engages with the popular arguments leveled against historical Christianity by the likes of McLaren, Enns, Bell, and Ehrman. I would be glad to put this book in the hands of the average Christian to begin engaging with the arguments of Progressive Christianity. I received a complimentary digital copy of this book from the publisher through Netgalley for review purposes. My comments are independent and my own.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Courtney | Lasting Joy Reads

    This is one of my most anticipated reads for this year. And the most important too. Christian, has your faith been rocked by progressive views of the gospel? I know mine has. Some of the views are obvious and you know they are false. But some are sneaky and subtle and play on your feelings. I encourage you to read this book. Alisa lays it all out here. This book talks about her journey through doubt after being introduced to these new ideas in a church bible class. This book was so graciously wri This is one of my most anticipated reads for this year. And the most important too. Christian, has your faith been rocked by progressive views of the gospel? I know mine has. Some of the views are obvious and you know they are false. But some are sneaky and subtle and play on your feelings. I encourage you to read this book. Alisa lays it all out here. This book talks about her journey through doubt after being introduced to these new ideas in a church bible class. This book was so graciously written. Throughout the book she has a quote from a progressive leader. Some of those quotes sounds so off base and others sound almost right. Alisa goes through several different topics that many progressive Christians hold. It was fascinating and also alarming because I too was almost swayed by some of these ideas. And it breaks my heart that people close to me are adopting these ideas. Alisa Childers book is so important and I encourage you to please read this book! And I highly recommend her podcast too. Her blog and podcast were life boats to me in a season of doubt after I was seeing so many things shared on social media and wondered if I had it all wrong. Thank you so much Alisa for writing this book!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Traci Rhoades

    If I'm honest, this book left me a little sad. I felt like it brought a tight group of Christians even tighter. The term progressive was never clearly defined, and I know a number of people who are progressive and still hold a historic view of the gospel. The group she was a part of should have been called something else. Emergent? Deconstructers? Not sure but I had trouble getting past it. She briefly touched on atonement and canon but I felt like the answers offered were too easy. I've learned If I'm honest, this book left me a little sad. I felt like it brought a tight group of Christians even tighter. The term progressive was never clearly defined, and I know a number of people who are progressive and still hold a historic view of the gospel. The group she was a part of should have been called something else. Emergent? Deconstructers? Not sure but I had trouble getting past it. She briefly touched on atonement and canon but I felt like the answers offered were too easy. I've learned some about varying understandings of atonement and the deuterocanonical books, and both are worthy of discussion based on her target audience. I liked the way she presented her own experience with the apologetics work she did. I just wish it had left a little more space for the complexities of the non-salvific theology Christians have. In a polarized world where we desperately need to have good conversations, I felt like this book shut many conversations down.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Brent Leung

    Fantastic introduction into the dangers of progressive (or liberal) theology: a form of buffet Christianity, if you will, that’s based on false doctrine and allows us to essentially custom tailor Christianity to what we want as individuals or society.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Cherie Miller

    I’d give 5 stars for the subject matter of this book—it’s so incredibly needed, and reading it was like a breath of fresh air in the temperature of today’s Christian culture. I read it as an ebook, so maybe that’s why it often seemed a little fragmented to me, and the writing style wasn’t my taste necessarily, but the more I read this book, the more I loved it. I especially appreciated chapters 11 and 12, and I’ll be on the lookout for a hard copy to come back to over and over and make notes nex I’d give 5 stars for the subject matter of this book—it’s so incredibly needed, and reading it was like a breath of fresh air in the temperature of today’s Christian culture. I read it as an ebook, so maybe that’s why it often seemed a little fragmented to me, and the writing style wasn’t my taste necessarily, but the more I read this book, the more I loved it. I especially appreciated chapters 11 and 12, and I’ll be on the lookout for a hard copy to come back to over and over and make notes next to what I read, in order to get as much out of it as I can. I can err on the side of not asking enough questions about my faith and thus fail to know *why* I believe what I believe, so this book was a must for me, and I think for any Christian…whether they’ve dealt with significant doubts or not.

  15. 5 out of 5

    John

    I felt it was true to her experience but didn't quite follow through on addressing some of the key points of the traditional vs progressive elements. I felt it was true to her experience but didn't quite follow through on addressing some of the key points of the traditional vs progressive elements.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Felicia Bunch

    Alisa Childers has written an engaging and powerful book about Progressive Christianity and the dangers it has imposed upon the true Gospel. She effortlessly blends personal experiences with incredibly detailed and documented research (with footnotes that would make all my college professors proud). The result is an intelligent, persuasive, but very readable work that exposes the truth about the false gospel and its insidious threat to Christianity. This a fantastic work of apologetics that I gi Alisa Childers has written an engaging and powerful book about Progressive Christianity and the dangers it has imposed upon the true Gospel. She effortlessly blends personal experiences with incredibly detailed and documented research (with footnotes that would make all my college professors proud). The result is an intelligent, persuasive, but very readable work that exposes the truth about the false gospel and its insidious threat to Christianity. This a fantastic work of apologetics that I give my highest recommendation, and will henceforth purchase copies for friends and loved ones.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Katie Ramsey

    I’m very thankful for this book. I feel like I am just scratching the surface of learning apologetics! I’m thankful she includes resources for further study in the end! I really enjoyed the whole book but the last chapter was my favorite and such an encouragement!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Alaina

    What a great read. I was so thankful for the explanation on where progressive 'Christianity' veers from the foundation of Biblical Christianity. I liked how Alisa explained their viewpoints in detail and her struggle through finding truth. I walk away thankful that I own this book- and will come back to it time and time again for advice and logical truth. Each person who has ever had doubts about how we can trust the Bible and its teachings will want to pick this book up. What a great read. I was so thankful for the explanation on where progressive 'Christianity' veers from the foundation of Biblical Christianity. I liked how Alisa explained their viewpoints in detail and her struggle through finding truth. I walk away thankful that I own this book- and will come back to it time and time again for advice and logical truth. Each person who has ever had doubts about how we can trust the Bible and its teachings will want to pick this book up.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    When author Alisa Childers unknowingly finds herself in a bible class being led by a pastor who labels himself as a “hopeful agnostic,” what he teaches and questions rocks the foundation of her own Christian faith. For four months she sits in the class. With each session, she finds her faith deconstructed and the validity of Christianity in question. Over her time in the class, she is exposed to the redefining of scripture through a Progressive Christianity lens. She becomes incredibly uncomfort When author Alisa Childers unknowingly finds herself in a bible class being led by a pastor who labels himself as a “hopeful agnostic,” what he teaches and questions rocks the foundation of her own Christian faith. For four months she sits in the class. With each session, she finds her faith deconstructed and the validity of Christianity in question. Over her time in the class, she is exposed to the redefining of scripture through a Progressive Christianity lens. She becomes incredibly uncomfortable with what she is hearing and learning. After calling it quits with the class and the church itself, she is left with picking up the pieces of her own walk with Christ and reconstructing what she knows to be the inerrant truth of the Bible. This is no easy task. It’s painful at times and grueling. But the reader of her book benefits greatly from her reconstruction process. With transparency, honesty, and Truth, Alisa’s book is an easy-to-understand explanation of what to look out for in regards to the dangers of the “doctrines” of Progressive Christianity and help define the non-negotiables of Historic Christianity. There is also a comprehensive documentary on the subject entitled “American Gospel: Christ Crucified” that is very worth watching as well. (Side note: I cringe at the fact that I have willingly read some progressive Christian authors early on in my journey with Christ and didn’t have the knowledge or understanding to know otherwise.)

  20. 4 out of 5

    The Book Distiller

    An absolutely excellent book!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Caleb Simmons

    Incredible. I enjoyed how she broke down key points of progressive christianity and then played out how they're incorrect. I read it as an audio book and I will be buying the physical copy and rereading it. Highly recommend. Incredible. I enjoyed how she broke down key points of progressive christianity and then played out how they're incorrect. I read it as an audio book and I will be buying the physical copy and rereading it. Highly recommend.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Josh

    Super helpful and clear answer to the progressive/deconstruction hopelessness. Very thankful this book is out there.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jesvin Jose

    Lee Strobel said that this book “may be the most influential book you will read this year.” After reading it, I find it hard to disagree with him. In “Another Gospel?”, Alisa Childers takes us on a fascinating intellectual journey, where her initially thoughtless faith was challenged by a progressive pastor asking provocative questions of the Bible’s authority and inspiration. Along the way, she gives enough evidence to the truths of historic Christianity, thereby deconstructing progressive Chri Lee Strobel said that this book “may be the most influential book you will read this year.” After reading it, I find it hard to disagree with him. In “Another Gospel?”, Alisa Childers takes us on a fascinating intellectual journey, where her initially thoughtless faith was challenged by a progressive pastor asking provocative questions of the Bible’s authority and inspiration. Along the way, she gives enough evidence to the truths of historic Christianity, thereby deconstructing progressive Christianity with both wit and wisdom. It’s a brilliant book, a book that I hope is read by many. The best thing for me about the book is the author’s easy conversational style of writing. Through the book, she writes about how her progressive pastor challenged her initially unreflective conservative Christian faith. The attempt by the pastor was an attempt at “deconstruction”, which eventually pushed her to examine the foundations of historic Christianity. The doctrine of original sin, the virgin birth of Christ, the atonement, the resurrection, the doctrine of hell and even the very inspiration and authority of the Bible were all challenged. Initially, she did not have the answers, but she was determined to find them out. This book is the story of how she “reconstructs” her faith by God’s grace and solid historical research. The author doesn’t simply present us truth; she does meticulous research in challenging the claims of people like Rob Bell, Nadia Bolz Weber, Rachel Held Evans and Brian McLaren. She turns to the early church fathers to show us that progressive Christianity is “nothing new under the sun”. It is different candy, but the same wrapper. In chapter 6, she shows us how progressive Christianity gains much of its heretical theology from the past - for example, the circumcision party (Jesus plus social justice), the Gnostics (Jesus plus new knowledge), and the Marcionites (Jesus minus judgment). She writes, “Like the unorthodox movements that came before them, progressive Christians are not teaching anything new. They are simply giving old ideas a new voice, a distinct spin, and an updated image.” I heartily agree with her conclusions! Alisa then shows us that the Bible we hold in our hands is the same Scripture that was originally written and so can be trusted. Further, she demonstrates with solid evidence that the writers of Scripture spoke the truth. Then she gives evidence for the authority and inspiration of Scripture from Jesus’ teachings, thus establishing that the Bible is indeed the Word of God. If the Bible is the Word of God, we cannot then pick and choose which parts to accept and which to ignore, something which the progressives conveniently do, thus showing their denial of Biblical authority. Alisa writes, “To inform our view of the Bible, we can choose to follow the whims of a godless culture or we can choose to follow Jesus. I choose Jesus.” What a much-needed book this is! It’s such a bold book, challenging the foundations of an entire movement. Each chapter overflows with rich insight. Since this book is told through personal narrative, I was intrigued from page one. It reads much like a novel, but it is packed with solid research and evidence. One thing will be clear as you finish this book: Progressive Christianity preaches another gospel! Their Jesus is not the Jesus of historic Christianity! Alisa Childers through her beautifully narrated story, successfully points us back to the true gospel and the true Jesus of the Bible. I am glad that I read this book. It receives my highest recommendation. 5/5 stars. *I received a complimentary copy from NetGalley and Tyndale House Publishers, but was not required to write a positive review.*

  24. 4 out of 5

    Chad Armond

    False teachers have been around since the beginning of Christianity. As the author points out, 22 of the 27 New Testament books have warnings about false teachers. So why is this book so needed when Christians have been warned about false teaching for the past 2000 years? Because we live in the (mis)information age. Never has it been so easy for anyone to reach the masses with their false doctrine. Combine that with a post-modern society where everyone believes they are their own arbiter of trut False teachers have been around since the beginning of Christianity. As the author points out, 22 of the 27 New Testament books have warnings about false teachers. So why is this book so needed when Christians have been warned about false teaching for the past 2000 years? Because we live in the (mis)information age. Never has it been so easy for anyone to reach the masses with their false doctrine. Combine that with a post-modern society where everyone believes they are their own arbiter of truth and it is no wonder so many Christians are led astray, confused, or walking away from their faith completely. This book seeks to help the Christian navigate through these uncertainties. My own Christian story shares some similarities with the author's. We both grew up about the same time in Christian homes. We never really questioned our faith nor had it questioned by others until our adulthood. It was then that we had to start taking a hard look at what we believed and why. This book does an excellent job of walking systematically through various topics and addresses those with reason, research, and compassion. However, it's not written like a text book but as a personal journey. You can feel her emotions she felt as she worked through her doubts and the rebuilding of her Christian faith. I highly recommend this book to all my Christian brothers and sisters and to anyone seeking to understand Christianity. I especially enjoyed the audio book as the author reads the book herself. In it you can hear her gentle and caring tone and know that she is attacking false doctrine out of love and humility and not out of pride or conceit.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Janessa Miller

    Essentially, the author is guided to deconstruct her faith by her pastor, so she reconstructs it on her own instead. (FYI I see this book as a helpful tool for believers within the traditional church more than out.)

  26. 5 out of 5

    David

    I've been listening to Alisa's podcasts for some time now, and have been eagerly awaiting her book. I wasn't disappointed. Progressive Christianity (a departure from the historical truths of the Christian faith) isn't a new phenomenon. Departures from the Christian faith have been occurring for centuries. Each generation, however, has to grapple with them since the language and manifestations vary with the passing of time. Alisa here responds to this generation's struggle, identifying the proble I've been listening to Alisa's podcasts for some time now, and have been eagerly awaiting her book. I wasn't disappointed. Progressive Christianity (a departure from the historical truths of the Christian faith) isn't a new phenomenon. Departures from the Christian faith have been occurring for centuries. Each generation, however, has to grapple with them since the language and manifestations vary with the passing of time. Alisa here responds to this generation's struggle, identifying the problem areas, and distinguishing them from the positions of the historical Christian faith. She spends quite a bit of time affirming the authority of Scripture since an undermining of it is so common in Progressive Christianity. She presents her own testimony in that regard and adds to it an impressive amount of research. She also addresses the rebellion against Biblical, sexual morality, the existence and nature of Hell, and the concept of penal substitutionary atonement. Throughout this work, she refers to many books and articles she has consulted in reaching her conclusions. Because she gathers together such a broad range of resources, this book could also serve as a reference volume. There are few titles on the market today addressing Progressive Christianity. This one is the best I've read so far. I recommend it highly. The author does a superb job of contending "for the faith that was once for all delivered to the saints" (Jude 3).

  27. 5 out of 5

    Michael LeDuc

    Alisa Childers is a sharp and clear communicator as she humbly critiques the progressive Christianity movement. She deals with the doubts and questions with extensive study, thorough research, and deep examination. This book is a nice little antidote to the deconstruction movement led by thinkers like Rob Bell, Richard Rohr, and Brian Zahnd. While she exposes how shallow and arbitrary many of the claims of these deconstructionists are, she also sympathizes with them and meets them in their frust Alisa Childers is a sharp and clear communicator as she humbly critiques the progressive Christianity movement. She deals with the doubts and questions with extensive study, thorough research, and deep examination. This book is a nice little antidote to the deconstruction movement led by thinkers like Rob Bell, Richard Rohr, and Brian Zahnd. While she exposes how shallow and arbitrary many of the claims of these deconstructionists are, she also sympathizes with them and meets them in their frustrations with historic Christianity.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Elsa K

    I think this book is a "must read" for Christians out there. I listened to the audiobook and it was a fairly quick read. I only recently became aware of the term "Progressive Christianity. Alisa Childers does an excellent job describing the basic aspects of it. She then applies apologetics and research to show the falsehoods. It is a great primer for those new to apologetics arguments or a great reminder for those who find it hard for all these arguments to stick in their brains (me). The book i I think this book is a "must read" for Christians out there. I listened to the audiobook and it was a fairly quick read. I only recently became aware of the term "Progressive Christianity. Alisa Childers does an excellent job describing the basic aspects of it. She then applies apologetics and research to show the falsehoods. It is a great primer for those new to apologetics arguments or a great reminder for those who find it hard for all these arguments to stick in their brains (me). The book is also narrative driven, so it is easy to listen to. She shares her personal story and also good analogies/metaphors throughout. I have seen a lot of people I loved seem to fall away from classical Christianity, but couldn't connect the dots until I heard the author on a podcast recently. She has a great blog and podcast that further explores this topic and great resources listed at the end of the book. I highly recommend.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jeanie

    Crisis of faith - you never know how much you really believe anything until its truth or falsehood becomes a matter of life and death to you. CS Lewis I have listened to Alisa Childers' podcast for several years now. She tackles controversy of Progressive Christianity but she remains true to the gospel. The importance of creation, the fall, redemption and restoration. Progressive Christianity and their teachers put a different spin on these issues. What became a crisis of faith for Alisa was her Crisis of faith - you never know how much you really believe anything until its truth or falsehood becomes a matter of life and death to you. CS Lewis I have listened to Alisa Childers' podcast for several years now. She tackles controversy of Progressive Christianity but she remains true to the gospel. The importance of creation, the fall, redemption and restoration. Progressive Christianity and their teachers put a different spin on these issues. What became a crisis of faith for Alisa was her invitation to a bible study led by progressive teacher. Asking her questions that she struggled with but always believed. The Progressive camp foundation is not necessarily on solid theology and the only way to God is Jesus but community, friendship, justice and unity (unity without truth). All good things but digging deeper do they deal with the individual relation to God. Meaning do I struggle with who God is. His holiness, the blood that covers sin, sacrifice, and heaven and hell. Childer's crisis led her to dig deeper into faith and to how historical Christianity can lead to the answers she seeks. I liked how her book was always moving forward. How she grew up in a Christian home, her family served the community and the church and then when she was challenged with what she really believed. The bible makes plain that truth will be hard to digest in the end times. I believe we are there. I encourage Christians to read Alisa's account, listen to her blog, and be reminded the importance of good theology. A Special thank you to Tyndale House Publishing and Netgalley for the ARC and the opportunity to post an honest review.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Vianey Sanchez

    3.5 This book is a good start for anyone wanting to understand the basic claims of progressive Christianity. It offers a helpful snapshot response to the main tenets of their gospel. I appreciate that the author addresses a variety of claims, but one of my criticisms is that because there are many, she does not delve deeply into each one. I did find her chapters about the atonement and judgment helpful, and I really liked her emphasis on the early Christian writers. She definitely inspired me to 3.5 This book is a good start for anyone wanting to understand the basic claims of progressive Christianity. It offers a helpful snapshot response to the main tenets of their gospel. I appreciate that the author addresses a variety of claims, but one of my criticisms is that because there are many, she does not delve deeply into each one. I did find her chapters about the atonement and judgment helpful, and I really liked her emphasis on the early Christian writers. She definitely inspired me to read them for myself. I liked that she connected many of the "new" progressive claims to old, historic herecies. It's the same old claims recycled and reframed. I do wish she could have given more detail about what her season of "deconstruction" and doubt was like. Her descriptions of that time seemed simplistic to me and do not do justice to the heart-wrenching and spiritual angst many who have walked that path endure. I also did not appreciate her writing style; it was conversational and too informal for my liking, considering some of the weighty topics being discussed. Overall, this book serves as a good springboard for further research and reading and offers a good start for anyone contending for the faith as they encounter this other gospel.

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