Hot Best Seller

Strange Adventures

Availability: Ready to download

Bestselling writer Tom King is back with a new epic that reinvents one of DC's classic science-fiction adventurers, Adam Strange, examining whether his actions were heroic or disgraceful. This new science fiction epic written by bestselling author Tom King reinvents one of DC's classic adventure characters, Adam Strange. Born on Earth and hero of the distant planet Rann, Ad Bestselling writer Tom King is back with a new epic that reinvents one of DC's classic science-fiction adventurers, Adam Strange, examining whether his actions were heroic or disgraceful. This new science fiction epic written by bestselling author Tom King reinvents one of DC's classic adventure characters, Adam Strange. Born on Earth and hero of the distant planet Rann, Adam Strange is famous throughout the galaxy for his bravery and honor. After leading his adopted home to victory in a great planetary war, Adam and his wife, Alanna, retire to Earth, where they are greeted with cheers, awards, and parades. But not all is as it seems, as the decisions Adam made during battles on Rann come back to haunt his family. It will take an investigation by one of the most brilliant heroes in the DC Universe, Mr. Terrific, to uncover the truth and reveal whether Adam Strange is a hero or a disgrace. The Mister Miracle team of writer Tom King and artist Mitch Gerads are joined by fan-favorite artist Evan "Doc" Shaner to bring you an epic tale in the tradition of Watchmen, The Dark Knight Returns, and DC: The New Frontier--a story of blood, war, and love that readers will be talking about for years to come. Collects Strange Adventures #1-12.


Compare

Bestselling writer Tom King is back with a new epic that reinvents one of DC's classic science-fiction adventurers, Adam Strange, examining whether his actions were heroic or disgraceful. This new science fiction epic written by bestselling author Tom King reinvents one of DC's classic adventure characters, Adam Strange. Born on Earth and hero of the distant planet Rann, Ad Bestselling writer Tom King is back with a new epic that reinvents one of DC's classic science-fiction adventurers, Adam Strange, examining whether his actions were heroic or disgraceful. This new science fiction epic written by bestselling author Tom King reinvents one of DC's classic adventure characters, Adam Strange. Born on Earth and hero of the distant planet Rann, Adam Strange is famous throughout the galaxy for his bravery and honor. After leading his adopted home to victory in a great planetary war, Adam and his wife, Alanna, retire to Earth, where they are greeted with cheers, awards, and parades. But not all is as it seems, as the decisions Adam made during battles on Rann come back to haunt his family. It will take an investigation by one of the most brilliant heroes in the DC Universe, Mr. Terrific, to uncover the truth and reveal whether Adam Strange is a hero or a disgrace. The Mister Miracle team of writer Tom King and artist Mitch Gerads are joined by fan-favorite artist Evan "Doc" Shaner to bring you an epic tale in the tradition of Watchmen, The Dark Knight Returns, and DC: The New Frontier--a story of blood, war, and love that readers will be talking about for years to come. Collects Strange Adventures #1-12.

30 review for Strange Adventures

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    Adam Strange is the hero of two worlds: Earth and his adopted homeworld Rann, which he saved from alien invaders, the Pykkts. Following the publication of his memoir, allegations of war crimes surface about Adam’s actions during the Pykkt war and his squeaky-clean hero image is called into question. Adam’s life is strange… but is it fiction? Tom King, Mitch Gerads and Evan Shaner’s Strange Adventures is a mixed bag of good and bad stuff, but, like Mister Miracle, King’s managed to write a fairly Adam Strange is the hero of two worlds: Earth and his adopted homeworld Rann, which he saved from alien invaders, the Pykkts. Following the publication of his memoir, allegations of war crimes surface about Adam’s actions during the Pykkt war and his squeaky-clean hero image is called into question. Adam’s life is strange… but is it fiction? Tom King, Mitch Gerads and Evan Shaner’s Strange Adventures is a mixed bag of good and bad stuff, but, like Mister Miracle, King’s managed to write a fairly decent book about a relatively-unknown DC character. This is a book about duality - about the versions of ourselves we present to the world and the reality behind that image. Adam is the hero of two worlds. Gerads/Shaner split art duties with Gerads drawing the more realistic, gritty present and Shaner drawing the idealised, more cartoony, possibly fictional, past, presenting us with two sides of the same character’s life. And, as Mister Terrific discovers, there is much more to Adam’s story than he lets on. Mister Terrific/Michael Holt is the surprise addition to this story. He plays a large role here and he’s also by far the best part of this book. Given that there aren’t many books on this character out there (and I’ve only read the New 52 Mister Terrific book), it’s interesting to learn about him essentially from scratch. He’s got a sad past, he works his mind as rigorously as he does his body through constant quizzing from his T-Spheres (kinda like flying Alexas), and King writes the character very similarly to his Batman (who also cameos here and there). I like that he’s an unabashed iconoclast and his investigation into Adam is easily the most entertaining part of the story. Mitch Gerads and Evan Shaner’s art is fantastic throughout. I especially liked the way Gerads drew the Earth invasion scenes in the third act and Shaner’s art is a revelation - so many gorgeous splash pages on Rann, showing the landscape beauty and incredible battle scenes. Hats off to both artists for producing such a stunning comic. I’m gonna stop here for anyone who hasn’t read the book yet and say SPOILERS because I can’t talk about my criticisms without giving away huge plot points. For those of you who’re dipping out now, I’d say Strange Adventures is long-winded and tedious at times, but there are enough decent moments here to be worth the journey - but don’t expect a masterpiece. Alright - (Catherine) zeta-(Jones)beam in 3, 2, 1… By far the biggest flaw is how heavily Tom King leans on contrivance at major story beats, glossing over aspects and underwriting others to make his shaky story structure work. The Pykkts are THE stock bad guys from Central Casting. They’re invading Rann for no other reason than ‘cos, and then they’re invading Earth later on, again just ‘cos. That doesn’t make for compelling villains though, nor does it make their behaviour understandable in the least. Why Rann? And, if not Rann, why Earth - a planet 25 trillion miles away with who knows how many other planets in between?! The distance is relevant to note as this is a key reason for Adam’s motivation. So he’s only able to get to Rann for brief moments once a week thanks to the mysterious zeta-beam that teleports him there - I don’t know the character that well so I don’t know why this is, it’s just how it is. Then the Pykkts invade Rann and Adam’s stuck on Earth waiting for the beam to send him back so that he can help repel the invasion. First of all, Adam is just a dude with a jetpack and laser gun - how is he the saviour of an entire planet?! If it’s just the power of the jetpack and laser gun, why not give it to some dude on Rann who won’t get teleported away again every week? I never understood why Adam is considered such an amazing figure - he always seems so ordinary. So he approaches the Justice League for help in getting to Rann to join the fight rather than wait for the zeta-beam and they all shoot him down. Which is a very convenient excuse from characters who have many times previously dropped everything to go save some random aliens. But that gives him his motivation for selling out Earth to the Pykkts - because the superheroes didn’t help him in his hour of need so he’s bitter. Well, and also because the Pykkts are holding his daughter Aleea captive, so he’s ensuring she’s kept alive at the expense of EVERYONE ON EARTH! Hmm. Here’s what happened: Rann was losing the war against the Pykkts until Adam negotiated to give them Earth in exchange for sparing Rann. The Pykkts took Aleea to ensure Adam followed through. But why do the Pykkts want Earth more than Rann? And, if they were going to defeat Rann, whom Adam’s wife Alanna describes as being far more technologically advanced than Earth, why would they need any help from anyone - including Rocketeer Flash Gordon - in defeating Earth anyway? That’s what I mean by underwriting - we have no idea what these villains want or why, they’re just whatever the plot needs them to be in the moment. You might be asking yourself, how does Adam Strange make the difference in winning or losing in a war against Earth? So it’s implied that Adam would betray Earth by giving away secrets of Batman’s plans (he’s apparently the Supreme Commander against the Pykkt invasion), and, without Adam, the Pykkts lose. Which assumes that Batman would share every detail of every defence plan with Adam, a character he’s heavily suspicious of - that’s one helluva assumption to base a full scale invasion on! But Adam also wanted to be found out and stopped before that happened, hence why he asked to be investigated. But if that was the case, why not just come right out and ask Batman/Mister Terrific/anyone all about this - lay his cards out on the table? Because Alanna and Terrific have no trouble freeing Aleea once they know she’s being held captive! Speaking of Alanna, she’s the worst character here. She’s either a generic love interest in the Shaner sections or a complete idiot in the Gerads sections. It’s her moronic claim that the Pykkts are invincible when they’re clearly not - and easily manipulated to boot. And her “reasoning” in palming off her daughter onto Michael (which has a kind of poetry to it I suppose, given Michael’s own loss) is absurd, putting Adam’s death on Michael and criticising his choice to save Earth instead of letting the Pykkts win! She was awful and always managed to drag the story down. Adam and Alanna pushing back against Terrific’s investigation almost immediately, and after they insisted on it, made no sense. Rann keeping Pykkt records that held damning evidence against Adam made no sense, even if no-one could translate it - they obviously didn’t know about Terrific’s handy brilliance. Just destroy it - problem solved. Why Adam published a memoir in the first place is unclear. To be found out, maybe - except why get Alanna to write it then?! And, as beautifully illustrated as Shaner’s sections were, nearly all the flashbacks are utterly pointless. It’s just Adam and Alanna doing corny Edgar Rice Burroughs/Princess of Mars crap over and over. It added little and rarely entertained - they’re in love, I get it already! All it did was repeatedly underline the duality theme and beef up the page count unnecessarily. I did like how Tom King essentially trashes Adam’s character so badly that it makes me wonder that, despite death hardly mattering to superheroes, whether Adam’s death won’t stick because he does so many irredeemable things in this book - as if DC were like, sure, turn Adam Strange into a Nazi equivalent, we weren’t gonna use him anyway! It’s probably because Adam Strange is such a minor character in the DC Universe that they allowed King to portray him as such a loathsome person, but it’s still refreshingly different to see something this ballsy in a mainstream superhero comic. There’s the pseudo-mystery of the man at the book signing right in the opening chapter cussing out Adam and then shortly winding up dead with a laser gun blast to the head. Yup, Adam killed him. Because he thought he was a Pykkt in disguise! So King is saying that all the shit that Adam goes through has completely warped him and he’s suffering from PTSD, which is why he commits so many war crimes and betrays Earth. That aspect of the book was compelling but kinda one-note too - what are we meant to make of this? Is his behaviour excused? Is this a banal anti-war message? It doesn’t seem to be anything beyond what you see on the surface. Strange Adventures is not a particularly deep or entertaining book. It’s far too long, huge stretches of it are irrelevant or repetitive or both, and the plot is convoluted to say the least. It’s not wholly boring though with occasional sections here and there that are compelling, and the art and Mister Terrific parts are certainly standouts. As a Tom King fan, I’d say it’s not amongst his best books but it’s also worth checking out - head in with expectations lowered and a lotta patience and you’ll get something out of it.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Artemy

    Tom King's big thematic sequel to Mister Miracle and Sheriff of Babylon didn't disappoint. It's yet another book about war, war crimes, misinformation and deep dark secrets of supposed heroes. It's also about how Adam Strange is a piece of shit — and while it wasn't 100% clear that this is where the story was going in the early issues, it was a bit of a tough read, but thankfully everything clicked into place soon enough. Not only is this the best Tom King book since Mister Miracle, it's also th Tom King's big thematic sequel to Mister Miracle and Sheriff of Babylon didn't disappoint. It's yet another book about war, war crimes, misinformation and deep dark secrets of supposed heroes. It's also about how Adam Strange is a piece of shit — and while it wasn't 100% clear that this is where the story was going in the early issues, it was a bit of a tough read, but thankfully everything clicked into place soon enough. Not only is this the best Tom King book since Mister Miracle, it's also the best work by both Mitch Gerads and Doc Shaner to date, they did an absolutely outstanding job illustrating and intersecting the two 'worlds' where the story takes place. Doc's more cheery and iconic visual style is in a jarring contrast with the horrors he often has to draw, creating a dissonance that works so incredibly well for the story. Meanwhile, Mitch absolutely outdoes himself in the more 'realistic' half of the book with sublime facial expressions and acting, bringing so much raw emotion and vulnerability to the characters. I particularly loved the way he draws Mister Terrific, who, I might add, is the real star of the show here — now I really want a sequel all about him and that other character he ends up paired with at the end. Overall, Strange Adventures was a fantastic read, narratively complex and visually spectacular. And as always, I can't wait to see what's next in store for all of its creators, three of the most talented people working in comics today.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sean Gibson

    Much like other King tales, Strange Adventures features stellar art (kudos to Gerads and Shaner), highly refined storytelling chops, deep emotions, and an ending that, if a bit telegraphed, still punches you in the general vicinity of the solar plexus. I didn’t love it quite as much as I did Mister Miracle (I'm still baffled that this is not the name of a male libido enhancement supplement sold exclusively through the internet via Canada), but if you dug MM, I think you’ll like this too. Much like other King tales, Strange Adventures features stellar art (kudos to Gerads and Shaner), highly refined storytelling chops, deep emotions, and an ending that, if a bit telegraphed, still punches you in the general vicinity of the solar plexus. I didn’t love it quite as much as I did Mister Miracle (I'm still baffled that this is not the name of a male libido enhancement supplement sold exclusively through the internet via Canada), but if you dug MM, I think you’ll like this too.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Lyn

    I loved this all the way to the end, and then I didn’t. Pew! Pew! No doubt Tom King (he of the five year plus run on Batman) was inspired to write an exceptionally complex character study of the DC hero and King’s experience coming home from war translated well into Strange’s homecoming to earth; and his tongue in cheek humor was perfect for DC’s strange hero (anti-hero?). Truth be told, I’ve never really understood Adam Strange and where he fits into the DC universe. First introduced in 1958 by Ga I loved this all the way to the end, and then I didn’t. Pew! Pew! No doubt Tom King (he of the five year plus run on Batman) was inspired to write an exceptionally complex character study of the DC hero and King’s experience coming home from war translated well into Strange’s homecoming to earth; and his tongue in cheek humor was perfect for DC’s strange hero (anti-hero?). Truth be told, I’ve never really understood Adam Strange and where he fits into the DC universe. First introduced in 1958 by Gadrner Fox and Gil Kane, he’s been on the science fiction side of the house for most of his troubled history as his story was mainly told in the “Mystery in Space” title that ran in the 50s and 60s. For those that don’t know he his an Earth man who gets teleported light years away to the planet of Rann and then he kind of phases back and forth, having adventures with his dual citizenship. In this series, King describes how Rann’s enemies are threatening Earth and this can be seen as an anti-war allegory with lots of twists and turns and King examines the role of hero, society’s need for heroes both real and imagined. King also explores the complicated intricacies of war, where good guys are often compelled to do ugly things in defense of their country (planet). Finally this series describes Strange’s own family and his complex relationship with his wife Alanna, a princess from Rann. And then I just did not like the ending. It happens. Pew! Pew!

  5. 4 out of 5

    James DeSantis

    So this was...really good even if it had some flaws. This all starts with a mysterious death of a guy who screams at Adam Strange at a book signing event. After saying he's evil, a war criminal, and more a few hours later he's found dead in a alleyway. Strange decides to go to Batman and the rest of the Justice League and let them know it wasn't him, that they can even investigate him. This leads Batman to reach out to a old friend, Mister Terrific, and have him try to learn Adam's Strange's sec So this was...really good even if it had some flaws. This all starts with a mysterious death of a guy who screams at Adam Strange at a book signing event. After saying he's evil, a war criminal, and more a few hours later he's found dead in a alleyway. Strange decides to go to Batman and the rest of the Justice League and let them know it wasn't him, that they can even investigate him. This leads Batman to reach out to a old friend, Mister Terrific, and have him try to learn Adam's Strange's secrets he keeps hiding behind. Right off this team never fails to give some fantastic arc. The watch it's drawn is as good as mister miracle if not even better. I was loving the art direction, designs, and facial expressions in this book. Felt old and new all at once. Now the plot. It's intriguing. I wanted to learn about what Adam is hiding. Not only from the league, but also his wife Alanna. Once Mister Terrific gets closer to the truth everything starts unraveling. Through this investigations you get a lot of flashbacks with Adam and learn the truth about how he rose to be a "hero" of the people. Mister Terrific is easily the standout star in this book. Both interesting and a bit scary, yet very likeable, this character really helped me enjoy this story immensely. By the end every time he discovered something I was right there with him. And the very ending, while a bit too "with a bow and a nice ending" for me it still really worked as a whole thanks to him. I will say I think 10 issues instead of 12 would have helped the pacing of this some, it felt a bit stretched out in the middle. I feel like I have to re-read this one day to fully get every little hint of what is happening but for my first read I did enjoy it a lot. A 4 out of 5.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Rod Brown

    Tom King tries to do for Adam Strange what he did for Mister Miracle in his amazing 2019 graphic novel, but instead does the same sort of character assassination he ended up doing to Marvel's Vision back in 2015. Adam is tore up and down in this dreary look at heroes with feet of clay and oh-so-bloodied hands. I've never been an Adam Strange fan, but I get no joy out of seeing him treated so poorly. I can feel myself becoming the old crank who sits in the corner muttering how comics aren't as goo Tom King tries to do for Adam Strange what he did for Mister Miracle in his amazing 2019 graphic novel, but instead does the same sort of character assassination he ended up doing to Marvel's Vision back in 2015. Adam is tore up and down in this dreary look at heroes with feet of clay and oh-so-bloodied hands. I've never been an Adam Strange fan, but I get no joy out of seeing him treated so poorly. I can feel myself becoming the old crank who sits in the corner muttering how comics aren't as good as they used to be -- after all 1986 was the greatest year ever in superhero comics. And in 1987 comics god Alan Moore went ahead and did a dark retcon of Adam Strange and the people of the planet Rann, and it only took him two issues of his Swamp Thing run (#57-58). I love that Tom King admires Moore also, but it does feel that he and fellow DC writer Geoff Johns go back to re-plow Moore's fields a little too much. Having read King's Watchmen spin-off,Rorschach, earlier this week, it really feels like he and DC are as fixated with 1986 as I am. A final annoyance: Why in the #@$% does a DC Black Label book for mature audiences use @&!&% symbols like a [email protected] all-ages comic book instead of some real %#@ swear words? That's just [email protected]% stupid.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Dakota

    This was great and the only thjngbit had working against it was the fact that I read each issue as it came out over the course of over two years. This deserves another read through and when I do I'm fairly confident that my rating will bumb up to a 5 star. This was great and the only thjngbit had working against it was the fact that I read each issue as it came out over the course of over two years. This deserves another read through and when I do I'm fairly confident that my rating will bumb up to a 5 star.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Alberto González

    The art is awesome the general writing I like it, Mister Terrific was the best part of the series what it was really frustrating was Alanna it was a copy of Big Barda from Tom King's comic and the worst was the ending, everything from the last issue doesn't make sense. The art is awesome the general writing I like it, Mister Terrific was the best part of the series what it was really frustrating was Alanna it was a copy of Big Barda from Tom King's comic and the worst was the ending, everything from the last issue doesn't make sense.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Shaun Stanley

    Strange Adventures collects issues 1-12 of the DC Comics Black Label series written by Tom King with art Mitch Gerards and Doc Shaner. Adam Strange is the hero of two-worlds: Earth and Rann. On Earth, Adam was an archaeologist who was zeta-beamed (teleported) to Rann where he became a superhero equipped with a laser pistol and a jetpack. Adam fell in love with the princess of Rann (Think Princess of Mars/John Carter) and had a daughter and was living the perfect life until the Pyykt, a galaxy oc Strange Adventures collects issues 1-12 of the DC Comics Black Label series written by Tom King with art Mitch Gerards and Doc Shaner. Adam Strange is the hero of two-worlds: Earth and Rann. On Earth, Adam was an archaeologist who was zeta-beamed (teleported) to Rann where he became a superhero equipped with a laser pistol and a jetpack. Adam fell in love with the princess of Rann (Think Princess of Mars/John Carter) and had a daughter and was living the perfect life until the Pyykt, a galaxy occupying alien race, arrive to conquer Rann. Told in flashbacks, Adam and his wife have survived the war but their daughter was a casualty. Adam releases a tell all book on Earth and is welcomed home as a hero. That is, until he is accused of war crimes. Earth heroes decide to investigate Adam's past on Rann and put Mr. Terrific on the case... Until the Pyykt show up. Is Adam Strange's story fact or fiction? I thought the beginning 3 issues and the last 3 issues were extremely strong with the middle being either unnecessary or repetitive. The book is as much about Mr. Terrific as it is Adam Strange. I don't think I have read a Mr. Terrific book since Geoff John's run on JSA in the early 2000s so it was great revisiting this character. Gerard and Shaner's art is fantastic thought the book with Gerard taking in the present day on Earth and Shaner drawing the past on Rann. Tom King does another great job diving into an obscure DC Character, but I must say I was really surprised with what DC allowed him to do. If you like space operas and adventures (and don't mind Tom King), give this book a read.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Michael D’Annibale

    What a bitter disappointment. When I got into reading comics seriously in 2019, my favourite book for a long time was Mister Miracle. And so suffice to say, I was amped up for this book. Even though most of King’s books weren’t anything that made a top 10 list (except maybe Vision) he was still a talented writer who wrote about mature topics. Something I appreciated. So I was excited for this book for a long time. And I was let down. This book is a meandering mess. It takes 12 issues for 8 issues What a bitter disappointment. When I got into reading comics seriously in 2019, my favourite book for a long time was Mister Miracle. And so suffice to say, I was amped up for this book. Even though most of King’s books weren’t anything that made a top 10 list (except maybe Vision) he was still a talented writer who wrote about mature topics. Something I appreciated. So I was excited for this book for a long time. And I was let down. This book is a meandering mess. It takes 12 issues for 8 issues (at most) of storytelling. This damn book takes so long to cut to the chase that by the time the big mystery is revealed. I couldn’t care less. And the ending is somehow worse. This book reminds me a lot of the Lighthouse (2019). A very good looking film with an ending that I’m not even sure the director understands. Tom King keeps going back to the same well for all his stories. It’s always about war, politics, secrets and more war. It was great in Mister Miracle but that’s because it was new and it had more to it than “war is bad” the only redeeming thing about this book is the art. Evan Shaner does incredible work and Mitch Gerads deserves an Eisner for this book. But goddamn, this writing is unbearable. They say the sequel is never as good as the original. This is in many ways the spiritual successor to Mister Miracle. And sadly, what they say is true. I’m sorry I hate to be negative but I had such high hopes for this one. I wanted to love it so much. I wanted so bad to see what everyone else saw. But I was greeted with a sad, boring, meandering book, that has me questioning just how good an author Tom King is after the mixed bag of Heroes In Crisis, the nonsense of Superman: Up In The Sky and so many other books that left me saying “this isn’t as good as Mister Miracle” Don’t let what I have to say colour your view. Love it if you love it. And if you’ve not read it, give it a try. Every book is someone’s favourite book. At the end of the day, I give it one star. I probably will not read it again.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Chris Lemmerman

    Adam Strange is a war criminal. Adam Strange is a war hero. Both of these statements are true...aren't they? Or...is Adam Strange just a liar? Mister Terrific sets out to find the truth, no matter what it takes. Tom King strikes again. His latest twelve issue maxi-series drives the magnifying glass right over Adam Strange and the horror of war as we see just how far both he and his wife Alanna will go to save the worlds and the people that they love. Like Mister Miracle, it's hard to tell exactly Adam Strange is a war criminal. Adam Strange is a war hero. Both of these statements are true...aren't they? Or...is Adam Strange just a liar? Mister Terrific sets out to find the truth, no matter what it takes. Tom King strikes again. His latest twelve issue maxi-series drives the magnifying glass right over Adam Strange and the horror of war as we see just how far both he and his wife Alanna will go to save the worlds and the people that they love. Like Mister Miracle, it's hard to tell exactly what's true and what isn't, even right up until the final issue. It definitely keeps you guessing, and while the unreliable narrator trope can be irritating, here it really works since it's the same story being told from multiple perspectives. Like the rest of King's maxi-series, re-reading is a must to discover what you missed the first time around. The artwork's split between Evan Shaner and Mister Miracle artist Mitch Gerads, whose two styles couldn't be further apart. Shaner's bright and shiny visuals are beautiful, but hold darkness beneath, while Gerads' grittier lines and colours contrast brilliantly to tell the darker side of the story without trying to cover it up. Strange Adventures, like King's other work, will be divisive. But, also like King's other work, it's well worth reading it yourself to form your own opinion.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Bob

    I've deeply mixed feelings about this comic & Tom King in general. On the one hand, he's written some of the very best recent superhero comics (*Mr. Miracle*, *Omega Men*, *Vision*) & I really appreciate his attempts to normalize long yet limited series as a regular part of superhero comics. On the other, he's written some of the worst recent superhero comics too (*Heroes in Crisis* &, I assume, *Rorschach*, although I don't read or watch *Watchmen* sequels on principle), he's a former member of I've deeply mixed feelings about this comic & Tom King in general. On the one hand, he's written some of the very best recent superhero comics (*Mr. Miracle*, *Omega Men*, *Vision*) & I really appreciate his attempts to normalize long yet limited series as a regular part of superhero comics. On the other, he's written some of the worst recent superhero comics too (*Heroes in Crisis* &, I assume, *Rorschach*, although I don't read or watch *Watchmen* sequels on principle), he's a former member of one of the most evil & blood-soaked organizations in human history, the CIA, & he's a cringey liberal on Twitter. King also tends to be pretty repetitive in his themes: expect PTSD, war, sincere but strained marriages, & elliptic endings in every King comic; however, that repetitiveness isn't all bad: not enough superhero comics intelligently & effectively deal w/ marriage & parenting, which King mostly does, & his elliptical ends are probably much better than the other options for endings that the superhero comics companies might allow him. All that said, *Strange Adventures* seems to draw from both King's best & worst tendencies. Like *Mr. Miracle*, it does some great homages to prior comics: it reestablishes the greatness of Alanna from the Gardner Fox & Carmine Infantino Adam Strange stories, it's the best version of Mr. Terrific probably since John Ostrander & Tom Mandrake created this version of the character, & it does some fun callbacks to my favorite era of JL comics, the Bwhahahaha era. Like *Vision*, it says some smart but not too preachy things about race in the US. Like *Omega Men*, it overcomes the writer's liberalism to say some interesting things about war, although it's still too much in the shadow of the liberal imperialism that makes up the common sense of US intellectual life today. But, on the bad end, & like *Heroes in Crisis* did to Wally West, *Strange Adventures* casually assassinates the character of Adam Strange to make cheap & uninteresting points about trauma that all but guarantee this series will have to be ignored for any future adventures of the Stranges (Adam, Alanna, Aleea). On the more hilarious end, & like I understand to be the case in *Rorschach*, this comic gets really ridiculously meta & political. On the meta front, that the main inspiration of it, especially in issue #1, seems to be Tom King is upset at people yelling at him on Twitter for being a spook in Iraq, which he shouldn't've been, but, at some point, you can't let us haters live rent free in your head, even or especially when we're right. On the political front, the comic becomes something of an allegory about the Muller investigation, Russiagate, & contemporary political media's spin, which hilariously climaxes when Alanna cuts a deal w/ Trump. Although this aspect of the story seems to come from a deep place of liberal Russiagate hysteria, I must commend King for not letting that hysteria overwhelm the comic & still telling a pretty effective & non-preachy story w/ it. I feel bad that Tom King's persona & past work has so dominated my review of this book, so I'll just say that Mitch Gerads & Doc Shaner both do a hell of a job on the art, & the conceit of Gerads doing the cynical Earth scenes & Doc doing the poptimistic Rann scenes works well, although I must confess that I'd hoped & I'd've rathered this comic had just been a mod update on the great late 50s/early 60s Fox & Infantino planetary romance comics w/ Adam & Alanna all drawn by Doc.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Hugo Emanuel

    "Strange Adventures", by Tom King is a deconstructionist approach to the character of Adam Strange, and its a fantastic work. The plot is anything but simple or predictable for a comic book. Adam Strange is hailed as a hero for having stopped the invasion of Planet Rann by the Pykkts, a very violent and ruthless inter-planetary race of conquerors, but at the great cost of his daugthers life. . He even wrote a best-selling book about it. However, an implication of war crimes commited by the hero c "Strange Adventures", by Tom King is a deconstructionist approach to the character of Adam Strange, and its a fantastic work. The plot is anything but simple or predictable for a comic book. Adam Strange is hailed as a hero for having stopped the invasion of Planet Rann by the Pykkts, a very violent and ruthless inter-planetary race of conquerors, but at the great cost of his daugthers life. . He even wrote a best-selling book about it. However, an implication of war crimes commited by the hero come to light, swaying and dividing public opinion regarding Strange and his heroism. I will not say more about the plot to avoid spoiling it. But its a great meditation on morality, grief and loss. It's also a deep meditation on the cost, toll and compromise war demands of those who wage it. Despite its dark and heavy subject matter, its not an excessively depressing or gloom book. There is joy, humour and adventure occasionally as well, even if the overall mood is more often than not somber. A few self-referential and meta-fictional jokes are sprinkled thorughout, and they work very well. I imagine big fans of Adam Strange, or purists that accept only engrandazing mythlogy towards comic book heroes, might object to this book, as it puts some of its main characters in a somewhat unflattering light. But for people who like such engrandizing mythology occasionally challenged will probalby find much to love here. I do want to point out that this is not an escapist comic, and even the full scale planetary invasions that happen in the plot are barely seen from the perspective of the action in the battlegroungs, but from the more intimate and political aspects of it. And the ending is a total gut-punch. The artwork is entirely done by Mitch Gerards and Evan Doc Shaner. Despite both artists being very dissimilar, it works well, considering the themes and approach to storytelling the plot takes. They both excel at portraying imtimate moments, as well as grand-scale epic looking panels that often depict alien worlds. Highly recommended for Tom King fans, and for readers who enjoy a deconstructionist approach to heroes that do not resort to cheap shock factor to make its strong point.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jay

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This book is the perfect example of why some love Tom King, while others hate him, but read him anyways. I personally enjoy almost anything he puts out, even the more controversial titles like Heroes in Crisis. Even if he doesn't always stick the landing, he gets you feeling something. Whether it's something the reader wants to feel or not is dependent on the reader, and many use comics for escapism, not essays on the human condition. If you are a lifelong fan of Adam Strange, probably sit this This book is the perfect example of why some love Tom King, while others hate him, but read him anyways. I personally enjoy almost anything he puts out, even the more controversial titles like Heroes in Crisis. Even if he doesn't always stick the landing, he gets you feeling something. Whether it's something the reader wants to feel or not is dependent on the reader, and many use comics for escapism, not essays on the human condition. If you are a lifelong fan of Adam Strange, probably sit this one out. If you're like the rest of us and aren't emotionally invested in the character, this is an excellent examination of a powerful man made to feel powerless. One who is forced to make a very human decision, even if it appears inhumane. I get it, if King did this with Batman, or Supes, we'd probably all hate him (see: angry mob of Wally West fans, Heroes in Crisis). But with a guy like Adam Strange, you can get away with it. If it makes you uncomfortable, you might have to ask yourself - Am I empathetic to why Strange did it? Another thing King has going for him - god damn can that man pick his artists.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jake Nap

    Definitely a sequel of sorts to Sheriff of Babylon and Omega Men, both books dealing with war and the ethics of it all. I really love Tom King so I’m for sure biased, but this is one of my favorite of his works. Def his cleanest looking work. Mitch Gerads and Doc Shaner must’ve some sort of competitive spirit here because it seems like they’re trying to out do each other which makes for some compelling art. I love the looser panel structure of this one. More or less copies the New Frontier 3 pan Definitely a sequel of sorts to Sheriff of Babylon and Omega Men, both books dealing with war and the ethics of it all. I really love Tom King so I’m for sure biased, but this is one of my favorite of his works. Def his cleanest looking work. Mitch Gerads and Doc Shaner must’ve some sort of competitive spirit here because it seems like they’re trying to out do each other which makes for some compelling art. I love the looser panel structure of this one. More or less copies the New Frontier 3 panel structure with occasional divides in the wide screen panels. Of course, you’ve gotta have the 9 panel grids. Not a really a fan of the last issue honestly, but I loved issues 1-11. 9/10

  16. 4 out of 5

    Adam Williams

    Another great character series from Tom King. I love the way he makes stories about superheroes into deeper stories about families, flaws, and morality. The art by Mitch Gerads and Doc Shaner is wonderful, and the way the artists alternate creates really interesting and effective tonal shifts. They fit well together. Strange Adventures is a worthy successor to Mister Miracle and The Vision with similar DNA to both.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jacob

    One person’s victory against evil is another person’s violent atrocity. When you remove the binary terms of good and evil, what is left but wannabe heroes unable to accept that the devastation they have left behind them has far outdone anything good they ever did? Another victory in “Tom King’s Universe of Traumatised Superheroes”, but since it’s basically about how meaningless that word is in a world destroyed by hate and war, it seemed like I needed to add a bit more commentary then how I thin One person’s victory against evil is another person’s violent atrocity. When you remove the binary terms of good and evil, what is left but wannabe heroes unable to accept that the devastation they have left behind them has far outdone anything good they ever did? Another victory in “Tom King’s Universe of Traumatised Superheroes”, but since it’s basically about how meaningless that word is in a world destroyed by hate and war, it seemed like I needed to add a bit more commentary then how I think the art of people flying in space with guns that literally go “pew pew” is really good, and that this definitely reads like it was written by someone who is still rightfully furious about a certain country’s tendency to glamourise and reward its war criminals.

  18. 4 out of 5

    AJ Kallas

    Best Tom King mini yet. Wow!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Terry Mcginnis

    Another 5-star read from Tom King. Leave it to him to make an irrelevant character relevant, tell an amazing story, and keep you excited until the last page. Very highly recommended.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    Collects Strange Adventures issues #1-12 I currently read anything that Tom King writes, and I read this issue by issue, rather than in a collection. As with most of King's writing, I'm guessing that this would read better straight through in a collection, rather than waiting for one chapter a month. With that being said, I was able to remember things pretty well in this story, compared to some other experiences I've had reading one issue a month, and then forgetting what happened last time. Prio Collects Strange Adventures issues #1-12 I currently read anything that Tom King writes, and I read this issue by issue, rather than in a collection. As with most of King's writing, I'm guessing that this would read better straight through in a collection, rather than waiting for one chapter a month. With that being said, I was able to remember things pretty well in this story, compared to some other experiences I've had reading one issue a month, and then forgetting what happened last time. Prior to this reading, I don't think I knew a thing about Adam Strange. Now, I'm very interested in his world. Final rating = 4.5 stars

  21. 4 out of 5

    Eskana

    Well, I knew what I was getting into. At the point, I've read Tom King's Mister Miracle, Heroes in Crisis, and his Batman series featuring Booster Gold. I know that he tends to take characters and use them as vehicles to make his points about depression, trauma, emotional suffering and general despondency, corruption, and PTSD. I know his books are almost always paired with absolutely beautiful art. I know his books feature a lot of conversation, or characters giving a (usually uninvited) solil Well, I knew what I was getting into. At the point, I've read Tom King's Mister Miracle, Heroes in Crisis, and his Batman series featuring Booster Gold. I know that he tends to take characters and use them as vehicles to make his points about depression, trauma, emotional suffering and general despondency, corruption, and PTSD. I know his books are almost always paired with absolutely beautiful art. I know his books feature a lot of conversation, or characters giving a (usually uninvited) soliliquy on life or why they did what they did, given existential points that sorta-kinda make sense, but not when you really look at it. This book was all those things. He got me again. *sigh* and he's still getting me... after all, I'm reading the "Human Target" series right now. I'm a sucker for the JLI. (not the Supergirl one, though) We'll see how THAT turns out. ANYWAY.... Plot: This book stars Adam Strange, the "Hero of Rann," a space superhero from DC Comics. Adam Strange is originally from Earth, but through a series of adventures found a home on the planet Rann, where he lives most of the time with his wife Alanna and daughter Aleea. Although originally an archeologist on Earth, on Rann, Adam became a jet-pack-wearing, laser-gun-toting hero. In this book, after having won a desperate war for Rann (in which he also lost his daughter) against the alien race known as the Pykkts, Adam returns to Earth and writes a book about his exploits. But not everyone is welcoming to the hero. When a critic of his is found dead, and Adam is investigated as a murderer, and when Mr. Terrific (Michael Holt) takes the case, secrets about Adam's war on Rann begin to unravel, just as the Pykkts begin making a move to take over Earth. Review: Well, if this weren't about Adam Strange, it would be really good. I think that about a lot of King's writings. He is pretty good at telling a story (although there are plenty of plot holes, let me assure you,) and the main problem is he always tends to tell it using characters who already have an established personality and backstory. King doesn't care about that. He just wants to tell his story. So he does, and as a result the characters suffer. Thank goodness that this (I believe) is not canon. Unlike Heroes in Crisis,/i>... You see, King does that same thing. What I read here does not do Adam or Alanna any favors. I don't think it hurts Terrific too much, but honestly, he's just a tool in the author's hands, a way for him to slowly reveal his story. Like so many things by King, this story is really about something else. This is about the trauma of fighting through a war, and about the things that will do to a person. It is about what your enemy can do to you, and what you will do because of it, and how you deal with the guilt, shame, and pain of it all. That's a very good and introspective topic. But it doesn't need to be told through Adam Strange, the laser spaceman who fights dinosaurs. Despite this, I am able to read this and keep it separate from the Adam Strange I know, so I can still enjoy the story for what it is. However, even on that level, there are some things in the plot, as the secrets are being revealed, that just don't make sense. Click the spoiler tag to see some examples. (view spoiler)[ Firstly, the plot ends up being that Adam, after being captured and tortured by the Pykkts, makes a deal with them: he will help them get Earth if they let him save Rann. so, they let him go and give him license to do whatever he wants with the Pykkt armies, making it look like he's winning through luck and ingenuity. Meanwhile, he lets the Pykkts take his daughter as collateral, faking her death even to Alanna. Then, when the Pykkts attack Earth, he helps them wreak havoc, including destroying large cities such as Phoenix. That makes no sense. When the Pykkts have an enemy commander at their mercy, why make a deal? They obviously could've taken over Rann, and then attacked Earth if they wanted to on their own. They obviously didn't want to attack Earth initially.... because they weren't. They were attacking Rann. Why would they then go for Earth, which is obviously much better defended (as is well known in the DC universe? Why would they LET ADAM MURDER their troops? Why didn't they just, I don't know, kill Adam? He's the enemy commander, after all. And Rann was losing. Also, how could Michael figure all this out, simply because Adam quoted a Bible verse that refers to guilt, as well as many other things? How could Adam Strange, a hero, do all this? How could Alanna kill him? It makes no sense. (hide spoiler)] Luckily for this book, the art is fantastic. The art vacillates between the stylized, romanticized art that is used to depict the past on Rann, and even during the war, it's beautiful. It emphasizes the "Golden Age," classic adventure feel of the character, while also including the somewhat flat dialogue of those times. < img src="https://cdn.comixwire.com/i/cw/firstl..." / > < img src="https://m.media-amazon.com/images/I/5..." / > < img src="https://th.bing.com/th/id/OIP.5rgtj4t..." / > The present is a sort of blurry watercolor style, which is also very nice. < img src="https://www.comiccrusaders.com/wp-con..." / > < img src="https://i.pinimg.com/originals/07/2a/..." / > So no complaints there. And it makes it all very pretty to look at. But overall, since this series does a terrible disservice to the hero that is Adam Strange through a sometimes nonsensical story in such a way that it is obviously just a vehicle for the author's expression instead of an authentic character-based story, I can't give it any more than three stars. That art, though. Here's a bit of classic Adam Strange, for old times' sake. < img src="https://i.pinimg.com/originals/ab/e6/..." / >

  22. 4 out of 5

    Billy Jepma

    "Our lives are stories. Little fictions we tell our friends and our lovers and ourselves. And we spend every moment we have praying to every god we can find…that no one ever discovers that we made all that shit up." On paper, everything about Strange Adventures makes it seem like a comic tailor-made for me. Some of my favorite creators teaming up for a sci-fi story that marries old-school pulp adventure with a modern, political edge? That's just about everything I look for these days. In executio "Our lives are stories. Little fictions we tell our friends and our lovers and ourselves. And we spend every moment we have praying to every god we can find…that no one ever discovers that we made all that shit up." On paper, everything about Strange Adventures makes it seem like a comic tailor-made for me. Some of my favorite creators teaming up for a sci-fi story that marries old-school pulp adventure with a modern, political edge? That's just about everything I look for these days. In execution, the result is a little messier. Granted, the first half of the series had me firmly and contentedly curled around its fingers—I read this as monthly issues until the final installment, where I waited to get my hands on the hardcover collection and read it all over again in a sitting or two. As the series continues, though, it starts to unravel at the seams, as the ambitions of King's story begin to stretch it too far. There's some genuinely terrific, genre-defying work in these pages, but it's far less consistent than it needed to be to land its punches. It's always refreshing to see a mainstream comic like this unapologetically wrestle with politics, and King is undoubtedly well equipped to take on that challenge. The modern-day comparisons to Strange Adventures are as obvious and telegraphed as they come, but I appreciated them anyway. Using a colorful comic book superhero to interrogate themes of American exceptionalism, violence, and eagerness for both war and figureheads to help it shirk responsibility for that war is an inspired idea that seems nearly too obvious to be real. That said, King's execution of that idea is mixed. His dialogue is reliably excellent, but as the central mystery begins to unfold, King's script starts to buckle amidst its many moving pieces. Like most maxiseries these days, I think Strange Adventures would've benefited from a tighter runtime that scaled back on some of the (admittedly exceptional) spectacles. The spectacle is outstanding, though, with Gerards and Shaner pulling out all the stops in significant, meaningful ways. Gerards heavier, grimier style works so well for the moral murkiness of the present-day storyline. At the same time, Shaner's vibrant colors and cinematic compositions make the flashbacks/revisionist histories feel every bit as epic as you'd want them to be. There's stuff about the art I don't love—Gerard's version of Alanna looking exactly like Olivia Munn, something he says is intentional, is more distracting than anything—but it's still pretty damn impressive. Shaner has always been a star, and I hope his work on this book catapults him into the renown he deserves. The ending feels rushed and far too clean, which was probably inevitable, considering how much the book was trying to pull off. Despite the shortcomings, I still admire this comic a lot. King is still one of my favorite writers to read because he takes on big projects like this and isn't afraid to push them in risky directions. I don't think he's quite figured out how to pull them all off yet—with the obvious exception of Mister Miracle, which is as close to perfect as a comic can get, in my mind. I'm giving this 3.75 stars, which easily rounds up to 4. It's a mixed bag thematically and narratively, but its successes will stick with me far longer and more meaningfully than its missteps.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Mickey

    pretty bleak... First of all, I'm unqualified to review this because Adam Strange is the ONE pop culture character in whom I'm actually, genuinely invested. My earliest memories of literature are of my dad reading me the stories from the 1960s. I've read and reread every single story featuring Adam Strange at least five times. This is the second major attempt to redefine the character as a scumbag who lives in a cruel world. (I'm referring to the 1990 miniseries as the first.) That's fine...I'm tr pretty bleak... First of all, I'm unqualified to review this because Adam Strange is the ONE pop culture character in whom I'm actually, genuinely invested. My earliest memories of literature are of my dad reading me the stories from the 1960s. I've read and reread every single story featuring Adam Strange at least five times. This is the second major attempt to redefine the character as a scumbag who lives in a cruel world. (I'm referring to the 1990 miniseries as the first.) That's fine...I'm trying to be cool about new versions and new stories... But it's actually kinda hard to watch this creative team understand what makes Adam Strange so special and then decide to flip it on its head. But it's their creative decision and I respect that. They give us a decent story. A mystery about war crimes, which is not fun. The manner in which the story unfolds is deeply irritating, bouncing around different time periods. It pays off at the end, with all things revealed and resolved in a masterful, sudden completion of the tapestry. But the road to the climax is confusing and frustrating. I'm really trying to separate my expectations from what the creators accomplished here. It's not fair play to say, "Make this character nice because that's how I remember him." Anyway, I'm really bummed. BUT I don't think it's just my personal investment in the character. I think this was a bizarrely depressing comic book. Like...I literally just do not understand imposing such a bleak moral imagination onto 2D comic characters. This book seems to pretend to be morally complex. It's not. It's just bleak. It's like a bully in an ethics class concocting the most absurd scenarios to get people to admit that they might, in that one bizarre, unrealistic situation choose personal advancement over the moral action. Remember the good guys from the stories you read as a child? The ones that inspired you to tell the truth and to be courageous? They're actually assholes, just like your heroes who actually lived in the real world, like Thomas Jefferson and Bill Cosby. The problem with having heroes is not "having heroes will always let you down," like King suggests in this book. The problem with having heroes is that these specific people do bad things. It is such a squeamish, skeletal moral imagination that projects that failure onto the kid who's admiring their hero. This book pulls the curtain back and says, "Hey reader, you're an idiot if you thought it was possible to be good in this world." Bleak, miserable, hateful book.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Zac

    Another great Tom King series. Adam Strange returns to Earth from a brutal war on Rann. He is celebrated as a hero and his memoir becomes a bestseller, until he is accused of war crimes. Mr. Terrific investigates and soon realises that parts of Strange’s story don’t add up. The surface structure of ‘Strange Adventures’ is again a bit of a detective story, told with the use of flashbacks. But Adam Strange’s journey is morally disturbing and complex. Strange has done basically what the character ( Another great Tom King series. Adam Strange returns to Earth from a brutal war on Rann. He is celebrated as a hero and his memoir becomes a bestseller, until he is accused of war crimes. Mr. Terrific investigates and soon realises that parts of Strange’s story don’t add up. The surface structure of ‘Strange Adventures’ is again a bit of a detective story, told with the use of flashbacks. But Adam Strange’s journey is morally disturbing and complex. Strange has done basically what the character (and other superheroes) have always done - waged war and killed off swathes of outsiders in defence of his adopted homeland. Is this heroic, and are such bloodthirsty tales worthy of a memoir? (This is without even taking into consideration Strange’s more ‘dishonorable’ actions throughout the war). I didn’t quite understand what the quotes by comic creators were about at the end of each chapter, but I guess it’s an attempt to pull the reader out of the comic and make us ask, “are these bloodthirsty tales worthy of a comic book?” and also question to what extent the industry is complicit in promoting war and violence. (I don’t know if it needs mentioning that Tom King was a CIA agent in Iraq and is probably more complicit in war and war crimes than your average comic book writer, or average person for that matter). Art duties are split between Mitch Gerards and Doc Shaner, who are responsible for present-day vs. flashbacks. Shaner is great but Gerards’ art is stunning and the best work I’ve seen him do.

  25. 4 out of 5

    David

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This was pretty good. I wasn't sure what to expect as I am not a huge Adam Strange fan, nor have I ever read anything by Tom King before. I can't help but notice how similar the character of Adam Strange is to Edgar Rice Burroughs' John Carter of Mars. I'm sure the original DC writers and creators were influenced by those stories. I really liked the artwork of Mitch Gerads and Evan Shaner, and the contrast in style between the flashbacks and main storyline. I was absolutely not expecting King to This was pretty good. I wasn't sure what to expect as I am not a huge Adam Strange fan, nor have I ever read anything by Tom King before. I can't help but notice how similar the character of Adam Strange is to Edgar Rice Burroughs' John Carter of Mars. I'm sure the original DC writers and creators were influenced by those stories. I really liked the artwork of Mitch Gerads and Evan Shaner, and the contrast in style between the flashbacks and main storyline. I was absolutely not expecting King to make a classic character like Strange out to be the opposite of a hero. As a reader, you get pulled into the story thinking you're reading a fun sci-fi and that the hero will pull through in the end and overcome the trials set before him. Instead you slowly find out that the protagonist is a liar, a murderer, and a lost hero who abuses his legacy to manipulate those who trust him. He makes bad, desperate decisions, and keeps making more to cover up the last. Not what I was expecting, and wasn't thrilled about it after I finished, but the more I thought about it, it worked. The story can be hard to follow with the constant interruptions of flashbacks bouncing you back and forth, but I feel it is worth the read if you like sci-fi with a touch of super-hero stuff (appearances from the JLA). A kind of dark twist on a classic.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Greg Trosclair

    Tom King is DC Comics current best writer. Everything that I have read from him has been stellar. In this case he takes a turn at Adam Strange. King seldom tells a typical superhero story. Adam Strange has returned to Earth and finally brought along his wife Alanna. He writes a best selling tell all about his last adventure on Rann versus the world conquering Pykkts. During the war it appears that something happens to his daughter and she is killed. Sadly whatever really occurred the Pykkts have Tom King is DC Comics current best writer. Everything that I have read from him has been stellar. In this case he takes a turn at Adam Strange. King seldom tells a typical superhero story. Adam Strange has returned to Earth and finally brought along his wife Alanna. He writes a best selling tell all about his last adventure on Rann versus the world conquering Pykkts. During the war it appears that something happens to his daughter and she is killed. Sadly whatever really occurred the Pykkts have followed Adam to Earth and are now trying to conquor Earth. Mr. Terrific is investigating Adam's story which seems fishy. This is a well told story. King does a great job bringing Adam and Alanna to life. He does a great job with Mr. Terrific too. The art which is split between Evan Shaner and MItch Gerads is fantastic. This is a solid Sci-Fi story with the lightest of super hero trappings. It is a great read.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Linda

    A compelling war allegory with a sci-fi twist but the themes within this comic are timeless. If you don't know who Adam Strange is, that shouldn't deter you from to picking up this series up. This is a self-contained narrative that doesn't really require any precursory reading. It's a story that pulls you in and keeps you guessing at each turn. This is a tale about the truth and the complexities that come from searching and uncovering it. Narrative and subjectivity are also two central tenets wi A compelling war allegory with a sci-fi twist but the themes within this comic are timeless. If you don't know who Adam Strange is, that shouldn't deter you from to picking up this series up. This is a self-contained narrative that doesn't really require any precursory reading. It's a story that pulls you in and keeps you guessing at each turn. This is a tale about the truth and the complexities that come from searching and uncovering it. Narrative and subjectivity are also two central tenets within Strange Adventures, and I would go as far as saying this is as much a mystery as it is a "sci-fi epic". And while the plot is standout, it was the depth within the characters and the political structures in this narrative that made this a five-star read for me. It also needs to be said that the artwork is standout, Mitch Gerads and Doc Shaner are to be commended.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Ferguson

    I admit I have not read any Adam Strange- I was introduced to Rann and Adam Strange thanks to season 2 of Young Justice. I chalked the Strange Adventures up to one of the Golden Era comics that didn’t really translate into the modern era. And I was very wrong. Strange Adventures borrows from a number of great DC Comics from the past two decades - Identity Crisis and Mister Miracle most notably- and uses the themes to even greater effect. The book deconstructed the nature of heroes by showing the I admit I have not read any Adam Strange- I was introduced to Rann and Adam Strange thanks to season 2 of Young Justice. I chalked the Strange Adventures up to one of the Golden Era comics that didn’t really translate into the modern era. And I was very wrong. Strange Adventures borrows from a number of great DC Comics from the past two decades - Identity Crisis and Mister Miracle most notably- and uses the themes to even greater effect. The book deconstructed the nature of heroes by showing the duality of heroism- both the great successes and often the great horror from the other side. The contrasting artwork by Gerads and Shaner- showing the gritty reality of earth and the idealized clean Rann- drives this point home in amazing detail.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Peter Drummond

    I liked it well enough. The dialogue was tight. The art was stunning, with Doc Shaner as the standout storyteller. The craft of it was solid on every level, but it feels a little too familiar. It's as if Tom King is stuck in a recursive loop of telling the same kinda’ story where the reality of events isn't exactly as it seems because the moral compass of lesser men isn't as stern as we like to think it is. Especially among those who wear a hero's mantle professionally. As if their shortcomings w I liked it well enough. The dialogue was tight. The art was stunning, with Doc Shaner as the standout storyteller. The craft of it was solid on every level, but it feels a little too familiar. It's as if Tom King is stuck in a recursive loop of telling the same kinda’ story where the reality of events isn't exactly as it seems because the moral compass of lesser men isn't as stern as we like to think it is. Especially among those who wear a hero's mantle professionally. As if their shortcomings will always get them dirty enough to betray any ideal in time. Especially when the proper leverage is applied... Once is thought-provoking. Hell, I liked it twice, but three times, then four in rapid succession; it starts to feel a little one-note and loses its luster.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Billy Russell

    A lot of good stuff in here. The art direction is fantastic, the juxtaposition of the artists, and what the subjects they are drawing, is really though provoking. A lot of ground is covered in this: in many ways it’s a commentary of the idealism of silver age comic books, or just general fiction itself; there’s a clear white saviour narrative being challenged; it addresses misinformation; war abroad, and how that is perceived and used for political gain. The narrative itself can be seen coming f A lot of good stuff in here. The art direction is fantastic, the juxtaposition of the artists, and what the subjects they are drawing, is really though provoking. A lot of ground is covered in this: in many ways it’s a commentary of the idealism of silver age comic books, or just general fiction itself; there’s a clear white saviour narrative being challenged; it addresses misinformation; war abroad, and how that is perceived and used for political gain. The narrative itself can be seen coming from a mile away, but it makes up for it in being a solid plot. It’s a really brilliant read. Another fantastic piece of work by King!

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...