Hot Best Seller

Music of the Heart

Availability: Ready to download

Gail Rostall was a young and ambitious singer, but all the same, when she got to know the famous composer Marc Bannister it was not with the kidea of furthering her career; in fact, her feelings for him were far from professional ones! But how could she convince him of that, when he was still recovering from having been let down in just that way by the last girl who had cla Gail Rostall was a young and ambitious singer, but all the same, when she got to know the famous composer Marc Bannister it was not with the kidea of furthering her career; in fact, her feelings for him were far from professional ones! But how could she convince him of that, when he was still recovering from having been let down in just that way by the last girl who had claimed to love him?


Compare

Gail Rostall was a young and ambitious singer, but all the same, when she got to know the famous composer Marc Bannister it was not with the kidea of furthering her career; in fact, her feelings for him were far from professional ones! But how could she convince him of that, when he was still recovering from having been let down in just that way by the last girl who had cla Gail Rostall was a young and ambitious singer, but all the same, when she got to know the famous composer Marc Bannister it was not with the kidea of furthering her career; in fact, her feelings for him were far from professional ones! But how could she convince him of that, when he was still recovering from having been let down in just that way by the last girl who had claimed to love him?

30 review for Music of the Heart

  1. 4 out of 5

    Leona

    So glad that these are being digitized and re-published!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Joan

    This is the sixth book in this series that I have read. Had I been a middle-aged (40 - 50?) woman in 1972, this might have been a very enjoyable read. It has all the required elements: a handsome and intelligent man with a wonderful singing voice; a pretty woman with some musical talent, a female antagonist with a cunning and malicious streak. It also had something I suspect a lot of women in the era were looking for - an air of 'magic' and an introduction to the mysterious world of opera and the This is the sixth book in this series that I have read. Had I been a middle-aged (40 - 50?) woman in 1972, this might have been a very enjoyable read. It has all the required elements: a handsome and intelligent man with a wonderful singing voice; a pretty woman with some musical talent, a female antagonist with a cunning and malicious streak. It also had something I suspect a lot of women in the era were looking for - an air of 'magic' and an introduction to the mysterious world of opera and theatre that was denied to any woman who wasn't wealthy (It's still denied to a lot of us now!) So, all in all I can see why these books were popular. Cheap, popular, appealing to middle-class women who were probably stuck at home. (and its worth remembering that a Mills and Boon book had a shelf life of 18 days) So. Given all that, are these books any good? Yes - if you want a quick clean read set in the 1970's and don't care very much about the way women were treated then, or about typos in your books! No, if you like your lead men to be caring and considerate, and your women to be more than meek and obedient and forgiving. After the first couple of novels I began to see a pattern - brilliant musical male - adored by all his thousands of (female) fans - treats quiet hard-working young woman either contemptuously, or patronisingly, or with complete and utter rudeness. Supposedly this is in her best interests! Said young woman meekly trusts the man and follows him slavishly, doing what he demands. (well, maybe thats an exaggeration, but by the time I had to got to book 6 I was getting pretty sick of the perfect, handsome tenor/conductor/musician riding roughshod over some poor woman who is simply trying her best to survive in the dog-eat-dog world of opera) The REAL problem though, with these books is that they all start of well - a nice slow introduction, some decent insight into the cut-throat world of musicians etc, the appearance of the evil stepmother other female and then, once the main event happens, it simply ends with the two characters madly in love and heading for a long life together. I know these books were written to a strict formula and word limit, but the writing lacked consistency. Too much 'setting the scene' and not enough development of the real reason for these books - the growth of a romance. There is no development of the relationship, no real depth to anything. They meet, she hates him, he ignores her, she (for some inexplicable reason) realises she is madly in love with him even though he has been utterly HORRID to her. And that's it. I would never forgive a man who had treated me the way some of these guys treat the woman. There is a LOT of emotional abuse and there are more than a few references to a man using physical violence on a woman - as in 'I would beat you.' There is absolutely NO justification for a man saying that to a woman. EVER. So. These novels are a rather sad reflection of a past era. A time when a lot of women were watching the younger generation have the things they could only dream of - fame and travel and an exciting life etc. Women who had careers and a future and money, instead of having to stay at home doing the housework. And yes, I know that middle-aged women did go out to work, but in 1972 a LOT of middle-class women didn't. They were stuck at home, day-dreaming of being whisked away to some wonderful destination by someone famous. Mills and Boon allowed them to 'live' that dream, however fleeting. As for the books themselves? They were probably written in less time than their shelf-life and if they were proof-read before being republished, then someone wasn't doing their job.

  3. 4 out of 5

    StMargarets

    This is the sixth book in the Warrender Saga and a re-read for me. The story opens when student singer heroine goes to the country manor home of one of her fellow music students. On the train she reads an article about a new opera being produced and realizes that her fellow music student friend and the composer of the opera (the hero) are brothers. In fact, he is from a very musical family with a genius conductor father as well. Music student is interested in less serious forms of music and is c This is the sixth book in the Warrender Saga and a re-read for me. The story opens when student singer heroine goes to the country manor home of one of her fellow music students. On the train she reads an article about a new opera being produced and realizes that her fellow music student friend and the composer of the opera (the hero) are brothers. In fact, he is from a very musical family with a genius conductor father as well. Music student is interested in less serious forms of music and is considered a lightweight. Heroine doesn't really know what kind of family drama she's wandered into, until she realizes the father wants to take over the production of the hero's opera and the hero isn't too happy about it. The father asks the heroine to sing and she acquits herself quite well. However, the hero is suspicious because he thinks she's using her connections with his brother to further her career. Heroine is divided. She wants to further her career and realizes the father can help her, but she also wants the hero's approval. She meets the neighbor girl who did use the hero to further her career and sees why he's so cynical. They meet again in London and go to a concert with Anthea Warrender singing. Hero is given a chance to pitch his opera at Warrender, so she backs out of going to supper with them. (Foreshadowing all the sacrifices she will do for hero and his opera) (view spoiler)[ The father goes behind the hero's back and begins coaching the heroine for her audition. He doesn't want the son to know his influence in fleshing out the character. The brother wants her to sing in a variety show-type production, but she only wants to do this opera. She auditions in front of the hero, the hero's father with Warrender as the third judge. They give her the part, but then another singer is brought in at the last minute and she is perfect for the part as the hero envisioned it. Heroine realizes she's going to have to refuse the part for the opera's own good and Warrender agrees. He sends her on a singing tour in Germany. Everyone is angry with the heroine. The father for wasting his time and for not getting his way with his vision of the opera, the hero because he feels she let him down like the last girl, and the brother because he wants her to sing in his variety show. Heroine goes on tour and learns a lot. When she sees in the newspaper that the opera is going to be performed that night, she calls the hero long distance and wishes him luck. He is surprised, but the line is cut off before they can say more. Opera is a huge success. Heroine comes home to London to find the brother in a flap. Seems his singer for the variety show broke her leg. Heroine jumps in takes the role - it's a huge success. Hero is in the audience but doesn't bother to speak to her. Father is still miffed, but the mother realizes why the heroine did what she did and invites her down to the country house for visit. Hero picks her up at the train and is still clueless as to why heroine sacrificed her big chance. They finally talk. HEA. (hide spoiler)] The heroine in this story was wonderful - self-sacrificing, but not in a self-pitying way. The hero is so single-minded that he can't see what the heroine has done for him until he's hit over the head with it. Only the mother seemed to realize everything the heroine had done for the two brothers. I would have liked more from him at the end.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Gerrie

    3.5 out of 5 stars

  5. 5 out of 5

    MB (What she read)

    3.5 stars. That was a wonderful reading experience. I forget how well written these old Harlequins are. Dear Author has been running a few reviews of these vintage and newly republished Mary Burchell "Warrender Saga" books that intrigued me enough to give this a try. (I've linked to the review if you're interested.) I'm glad I did and I promptly bought the other cheapie in the series. Maybe, eventually, I'll get around to all of them. This was less dated (considering it was set in the 60's? 50's 3.5 stars. That was a wonderful reading experience. I forget how well written these old Harlequins are. Dear Author has been running a few reviews of these vintage and newly republished Mary Burchell "Warrender Saga" books that intrigued me enough to give this a try. (I've linked to the review if you're interested.) I'm glad I did and I promptly bought the other cheapie in the series. Maybe, eventually, I'll get around to all of them. This was less dated (considering it was set in the 60's? 50's?) than I expected. I don't know how I missed reading Mary Burchell back in the day, but if this one is a good example, they are well worth finding more. In this, I really enjoyed the focus on the internal workings of the musical world. It is something I know little about. It felt glamorous to be 'inside' it, if temporarily; and I appreciated the fact that the main character came from a middle-class background and didn't take the glamor for granted. I liked the fact that she worked hard at her craft. I enjoy reading about women with careers. (Particularly if the author shows the work and effort involved and doesn't just 'hand wave' her special snowflake's marvelous special abilities into the plot. That's lazy and shallow writing, imo.)

  6. 4 out of 5

    Lizzie

    The best of a mediocre lot- I liked that Gail has opinions, agency, and attitude. Although per usual for Burchell the story was structured around a grand sacrifice from the heroine, at least Gail wasn't abject about it. This is also one of the few Burchells where the leads have a modicum of sexual chemistry. The best of a mediocre lot- I liked that Gail has opinions, agency, and attitude. Although per usual for Burchell the story was structured around a grand sacrifice from the heroine, at least Gail wasn't abject about it. This is also one of the few Burchells where the leads have a modicum of sexual chemistry.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Reading with Cats

    Martyr heroine + overly sensitive hero + way too much opera = my least favorite Burchell. Also, does no one care that Gail was dating Oliver seriously enough to spend a weekend meeting his family just *months* before Marc proposed? Nope, apparently not. Including Oliver.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Genie Kahn

    Absolutely Wonderful! I've read the first six books and this is the best by far. Great plot, characters and resolution. You will enjoy thisbook. Absolutely Wonderful! I've read the first six books and this is the best by far. Great plot, characters and resolution. You will enjoy thisbook.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Zeba Clarke

    Ok

  10. 5 out of 5

    Anna Wilson

    Sweet Sweet book with lots of heart. Only problem is this is the 3rd I’ve read and they’re basically all the same stories with different characters. But well written

  11. 4 out of 5

    Shelley

    Thank you to NetGalley, Endeavour Press and to the author Mary Burchell for allowing me to read this book in exchange for an honest review. I didn't enjoy this book, it's very old fashioned and not the sort of book i like to read. The female lead is now an empowering character and typifies 'doormat' if ever i saw one! You can tell this book was written in the 70's and it's where it should stay! Thank you to NetGalley, Endeavour Press and to the author Mary Burchell for allowing me to read this book in exchange for an honest review. I didn't enjoy this book, it's very old fashioned and not the sort of book i like to read. The female lead is now an empowering character and typifies 'doormat' if ever i saw one! You can tell this book was written in the 70's and it's where it should stay!

  12. 5 out of 5

    The Cobbler's Daughter

    One of the reasons I really loved this book was because the author, Ida Cook (pen name Mary Burchell) has an amazing story herself. It's funny that she chose to write romance novels but glad she did. The book was originally written in 1972 and reissued in 2017. The story remains the same. A struggling singer, Gail Rostall is invited to her friend, Oliver Bannister's home. There she finds out that Oliver isn't just a good friend, his family is the famous Bannisters. His brother Marcus is a world re One of the reasons I really loved this book was because the author, Ida Cook (pen name Mary Burchell) has an amazing story herself. It's funny that she chose to write romance novels but glad she did. The book was originally written in 1972 and reissued in 2017. The story remains the same. A struggling singer, Gail Rostall is invited to her friend, Oliver Bannister's home. There she finds out that Oliver isn't just a good friend, his family is the famous Bannisters. His brother Marcus is a world renown composer. Marcus isn't impressed by his brother's friend and believes all Gail wants is a chance to become famous. Gail doesn't even consider using her friend for that, but she finds herself attracted to Marcus. As family secrets are revealed, Gail is torn between keeping those secrets and finding her way to success. Will Gail find her own way to make it big or will she betray her friend? In addition to reading this book, I believe you all should check out the author's life, Ida Cook. She and her sister, Mary help rescue Jews from the Nazis. She had an amazing life!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Maria

  14. 5 out of 5

    Sindhu S

  15. 5 out of 5

    Rongbu

    So far, I enjoyed each book of the saga. The h was really charming and sweet.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Karen-Leigh

  17. 4 out of 5

    Usha

  18. 5 out of 5

    Elaine Holmes

  19. 5 out of 5

    Cordelia Fitzgerald

  20. 4 out of 5

    Fiona Marsden

  21. 4 out of 5

    Janga

  22. 4 out of 5

    Tricia

  23. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

  24. 4 out of 5

    Ms A Byrne

  25. 4 out of 5

    Lady_bercilak

  26. 4 out of 5

    Maureen

  27. 4 out of 5

    Julliana

  28. 4 out of 5

    Moira Mackinnon

  29. 5 out of 5

    Vonne

  30. 4 out of 5

    Marina Cooper

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...