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Right-Brained Children in a Left-Brained World: Unlocking the Potential of Your ADD Child

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Jeffrey Freed and Laurie Parsons provide an effective method for helping children with Attention Deficit Disorder excel in a classroom setting. In straightforward language, this book explains how to use the innovative "Learning Styles Inventory" to test for a right-brained learning style; help an ADD child master spelling—and build confidence—by committing complicated words Jeffrey Freed and Laurie Parsons provide an effective method for helping children with Attention Deficit Disorder excel in a classroom setting. In straightforward language, this book explains how to use the innovative "Learning Styles Inventory" to test for a right-brained learning style; help an ADD child master spelling—and build confidence—by committing complicated words to visual memory; tap an ADD kid's amazing speed-reading abilities by stressing sight recognition and scanning rather than phonics; access the child's capacity to solve math problems of increasing, often astonishing complexity—without pen or paper; capitalize on the "writing and weaning" technique to help the child turn mental images into written words; and win over teachers and principals to the right-brained approach the ADD child thrives on. For parents who have longed to help their ADD child quickly and directly, Freed and Parsons's approach is nothing short of revolutionary. This is the first book to offer them reason for hope and a clear strategy for enabling their child to blossom.


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Jeffrey Freed and Laurie Parsons provide an effective method for helping children with Attention Deficit Disorder excel in a classroom setting. In straightforward language, this book explains how to use the innovative "Learning Styles Inventory" to test for a right-brained learning style; help an ADD child master spelling—and build confidence—by committing complicated words Jeffrey Freed and Laurie Parsons provide an effective method for helping children with Attention Deficit Disorder excel in a classroom setting. In straightforward language, this book explains how to use the innovative "Learning Styles Inventory" to test for a right-brained learning style; help an ADD child master spelling—and build confidence—by committing complicated words to visual memory; tap an ADD kid's amazing speed-reading abilities by stressing sight recognition and scanning rather than phonics; access the child's capacity to solve math problems of increasing, often astonishing complexity—without pen or paper; capitalize on the "writing and weaning" technique to help the child turn mental images into written words; and win over teachers and principals to the right-brained approach the ADD child thrives on. For parents who have longed to help their ADD child quickly and directly, Freed and Parsons's approach is nothing short of revolutionary. This is the first book to offer them reason for hope and a clear strategy for enabling their child to blossom.

30 review for Right-Brained Children in a Left-Brained World: Unlocking the Potential of Your ADD Child

  1. 4 out of 5

    Katherine

    If you are looking for a researched based, scientific approach to ADD, keep on looking and if you are really annoyed by oversimplifications like the summing up of a person as either right or left brained, then you will find yourself getting irritated as you read this book. But, if you have a child, or teach a child, who has a diagnosis of ADD or whom you suspect could get such a diagnosis, or who is simply struggling in school for no apparent reason, I recommend you put your irritation in check If you are looking for a researched based, scientific approach to ADD, keep on looking and if you are really annoyed by oversimplifications like the summing up of a person as either right or left brained, then you will find yourself getting irritated as you read this book. But, if you have a child, or teach a child, who has a diagnosis of ADD or whom you suspect could get such a diagnosis, or who is simply struggling in school for no apparent reason, I recommend you put your irritation in check and read it anyway. This book focuses on people who possess many of the characteristics and behaviours associated with ADD. The authors fully accept that ADD is real and that in some cases drugs are absolutely necessary, but they also maintain that there are many, many, more kids who are diagnosed with ADD who are actually just visual spatial learners. These kids just need to be taught in a different way. The chapter outlining exactly what these different methods are was quite brief. What is there is definitely helpful but I was quite disappointed that there wasn’t more detail in this area. If you have a child that fits this profile or you work with children then this book will serve as a starting point only, but don’t take that as criticism. Sometimes a starting point can be an absolute gift and for many concerned parents I’m sure this book has been exactly that.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Steph

    I agree with previous reviewers that some of the information in this book is getting a little dated. A new edition is overdue. That being said, this book opened my eyes about how human brains function. As a parent of an ADHD child, this was a great read as it brought to light the vast differences between how my daughter's brain processes information versus my own. Having a better understanding of how she functions and why she reacts in certain ways has created a closer bond for us. The authors al I agree with previous reviewers that some of the information in this book is getting a little dated. A new edition is overdue. That being said, this book opened my eyes about how human brains function. As a parent of an ADHD child, this was a great read as it brought to light the vast differences between how my daughter's brain processes information versus my own. Having a better understanding of how she functions and why she reacts in certain ways has created a closer bond for us. The authors also provided insight about teaching methods will work best with her learning style. I will absolutely be recommending this book to her teachers.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Mindy

    I don't have an ADD child, but I do have a very right-brained child. This book has been good for me to try and get into her head a bit more, as thinking in pictures is foreign to me. i've checked this book out a couple of times and haven't made it all the way through. Not because it isn't worth reading, but rather because it isn't all currently relevant to me, and I also tend to check out too many books at a time. I have gotten some good ideas and insights from it, though, and will probably pick I don't have an ADD child, but I do have a very right-brained child. This book has been good for me to try and get into her head a bit more, as thinking in pictures is foreign to me. i've checked this book out a couple of times and haven't made it all the way through. Not because it isn't worth reading, but rather because it isn't all currently relevant to me, and I also tend to check out too many books at a time. I have gotten some good ideas and insights from it, though, and will probably pick it up again.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Mandy Jennings

    This book is a little dated, 1997, but it does give you insight of the left and right-brained child. This is something that has become big talk with our school piloting the Single Gender program. How does the boy and girl brain work differently? Just because Johnny moves around and has a short attention span doesn't mean he is ADD. I would also recommend checking out David Chadwell's research and Dr. Leonard Sax. Both of these Single Gender education experts have spoke at our school and in the c This book is a little dated, 1997, but it does give you insight of the left and right-brained child. This is something that has become big talk with our school piloting the Single Gender program. How does the boy and girl brain work differently? Just because Johnny moves around and has a short attention span doesn't mean he is ADD. I would also recommend checking out David Chadwell's research and Dr. Leonard Sax. Both of these Single Gender education experts have spoke at our school and in the county.This clearly is a teacher resource and would not be used by the students, only to help them.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Feliks

    A solid overview of this fascinating field of study. Good place to start learning more; or fine, 'as is' to familiarize yourself in the basics. Brain functionality is where its all at. Dispense with all the other 'pop-psych fads' out there. We have to know whats really going on with us and why we behave the way we do. This is important knowledge to keep on top of, as we go through our day. Every time you struggle with following a set of instructions or absorbing information; keep these principle A solid overview of this fascinating field of study. Good place to start learning more; or fine, 'as is' to familiarize yourself in the basics. Brain functionality is where its all at. Dispense with all the other 'pop-psych fads' out there. We have to know whats really going on with us and why we behave the way we do. This is important knowledge to keep on top of, as we go through our day. Every time you struggle with following a set of instructions or absorbing information; keep these principles in mind and let's stop blaming ourselves as 'poor students' or 'not applying ourselves'. Ack!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Beth

    I think the author provides good, practical advice for parents with right-brained children. After reading this, I'm think that my child is actually more whole-brained than right brained, but regardless, it's interesting and informative. But I HATED the author's attitude towards teachers. It was condescending and downright rude. That definitely detracted from the overall message of the book. Still, I'm glad I read it and would recommend to parents who think they have a right-brained child. I think the author provides good, practical advice for parents with right-brained children. After reading this, I'm think that my child is actually more whole-brained than right brained, but regardless, it's interesting and informative. But I HATED the author's attitude towards teachers. It was condescending and downright rude. That definitely detracted from the overall message of the book. Still, I'm glad I read it and would recommend to parents who think they have a right-brained child.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Gigi

    This book changed the way I see and homeschool one of my sons. It explained how he thinks and then offered ways to help me teach to his strengths and support him in areas he struggles. Each time I read this book I find more helpful ideas and gain a better understanding of my son and his needs.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    It put's a lot of pressure on teachers to be entertainers, when the current push is standardized testing. It puts us in the quandary of who do we work for - the students or the policy makers? It put's a lot of pressure on teachers to be entertainers, when the current push is standardized testing. It puts us in the quandary of who do we work for - the students or the policy makers?

  9. 5 out of 5

    Abby

    This is worth reading if you think you might have a predominantly right-brained child or student. It’s more anecdotal than research-based, as Freed shares the wisdom he’s accumulated from years of working with visual-spatial thinkers, so take it for what it is. I know research doesn’t support learning styles theory, and particularly not the strict right-brained/left-brained dichotomy that’s become part of pop psychology, but my personal experiences indicate that these kinds of learners DO exist. This is worth reading if you think you might have a predominantly right-brained child or student. It’s more anecdotal than research-based, as Freed shares the wisdom he’s accumulated from years of working with visual-spatial thinkers, so take it for what it is. I know research doesn’t support learning styles theory, and particularly not the strict right-brained/left-brained dichotomy that’s become part of pop psychology, but my personal experiences indicate that these kinds of learners DO exist. Freed argues that the learning styles of most gifted, right-brained, and ADHD kids tend to overlap. These learners tend to be “highly visual, nonsequential processors who learn by remembering the way things look and by taking words and turning them into mental pictures.” They tend to be slow processors and inconsistent performers academically. They are highly intuitive, “big picture” thinkers with powerful memories, and Freed alleges that they are generally more sensitive and perfectionistic than other children. He points out, as have other authors, that our school system tends to favor more sequential learners and is becoming out of touch with the needs of students that are becoming increasingly visual and “random” in their processing (thanks to the ubiquity of visual media and the rapid pace of life in general). Finally, he discusses some ways that parents and teachers can support right-brained learners. Freed’s biases: He deplores IQ testing (I disagree) and advocates school choice (I reluctantly agree). He romanticizes the past, when children were born to mothers who were married, didn’t work outside the home, and “most likely had healthy, relatively stress-free pregnancies” (??????) And then he comes off with some just plain weird stuff, like how kids won’t need to study grammar and punctuation in the future because computers will “replace” the need for them (sure, we’re moving in that direction, but... no), and how kids are so stressed out that they’re relying on "a quick rush of adrenaline” from sugar, caffeine, and “foods to which [they’re] slightly allergic.” (I think he needs to look up what an “allergy” is.) Useful, though. For a more technical discussion of this “visual-spatial” learning style, which indeed seems to manifest itself in gifted learners as well as learners who show ADHD symptoms, see Upside-Down Brilliance: The Visual-Spatial Learner.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Rachel Anderson

    To know that this book was written over 20 years ago is mind blowing. The author talks about the fast paced world affecting children’s brains and the need for education to change in order to keep up with changing technology (MTV, Walkman w earphones, picture in picture, skipping commercials by switching back and forth on the tv). W.O.W. Can you imagine what he thinks now?! Netflix with no commercials, iPads with YouTube where the child watches 3 seconds of one video, 20 seconds of another, etc, To know that this book was written over 20 years ago is mind blowing. The author talks about the fast paced world affecting children’s brains and the need for education to change in order to keep up with changing technology (MTV, Walkman w earphones, picture in picture, skipping commercials by switching back and forth on the tv). W.O.W. Can you imagine what he thinks now?! Netflix with no commercials, iPads with YouTube where the child watches 3 seconds of one video, 20 seconds of another, etc, AirPods constantly in our kids’ ears. Yet, for the most part, education has not changed from where we were when this book was written. Our children are still being given papers with 50 math problems to complete in 4 minutes. 8 hour class days with 1 recess break and 1 PE break...the rest of the day sitting in desks working quietly or listening to the teacher. As a Speech-Language Pathologist in the schools, I see how children are changing. I would agree that our normal child today was the ADD child of 30-40 years ago. Education must change its delivery to keep up with the changing brain of our students. This book was very insightful on ways to engage students and simple changes to make. I would LOVE an updated version, but, even without one, the idea in the book remain the same. Continue to engage the right hemisphere of your childrens’ brains! Make learning engaging and fun.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    Turned off by the black and whiteness of left and right brain. No one I know fits so neatly into the compartments. There is an attention to dyslexia here, but I don't sense the authors have a true understanding of it as it relates to left-right. The book just didn't work for me. Others may get more out of it. Turned off by the black and whiteness of left and right brain. No one I know fits so neatly into the compartments. There is an attention to dyslexia here, but I don't sense the authors have a true understanding of it as it relates to left-right. The book just didn't work for me. Others may get more out of it.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jill

    This book helped me to understand my son. It changed my perspective of ADD from being a problem to potential. I highly recommend this book. It also gives parents help as to how to practically help their child to learn. It is written by someone who tutors ADD/ADHD students.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Leo

    One of the best books I've read in understanding myself and my 2 boys. Anyone with a child that doesn't "fit the mold" needs to read it. I read the original printing, I'm hoping they either have an updated version or are working on one because it is needed! One of the best books I've read in understanding myself and my 2 boys. Anyone with a child that doesn't "fit the mold" needs to read it. I read the original printing, I'm hoping they either have an updated version or are working on one because it is needed!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Elaine

    I didn't know much about ADD, but I found this resource after looking for reasons why T is so easily distracted. Some people pointed me to the possibility he may be 'right-brained' or ADD (or both). This book is both about teaching right-brained kids, as well as about ADD. The premise is that ADD kids (and pseudo-ADD/mislabeled ADD) are right-brained (but not all right-brained kids have ADD), and that being right-brained means they have different strengths and learning styles; namely, they are v I didn't know much about ADD, but I found this resource after looking for reasons why T is so easily distracted. Some people pointed me to the possibility he may be 'right-brained' or ADD (or both). This book is both about teaching right-brained kids, as well as about ADD. The premise is that ADD kids (and pseudo-ADD/mislabeled ADD) are right-brained (but not all right-brained kids have ADD), and that being right-brained means they have different strengths and learning styles; namely, they are visual-spatial thinkers. I thought it was fascinating that with the rise of visual stimuli (TV, Movies, Computer), there's been a rise in ADD, and more kids being labelled with some kind of label. The author's hypothesis is that the increased visual stimulation in the formative years has caused the visual neural pathways to be strengthened, while the traditional auditory/sequential learning style has declined because of the switch from verbal storytelling to visual images during childhood (in the past 50 years) causes the auditory connections in the brain to weaken, thus leaving more brains wired for visual input than in the past. This book covers alot of ground-from characteristics of right-brained people, to teaching tips, to medication/treatment options (for ADD), to options for handling the school environment, to potential solutions to our education system so that right-brained kids don't lose out. I really like that the author doesn't treat ADD as something that will doom kids to a life of being unable to learn, but sees the different strengths that a right-brained person has and uses those differences to reach these kids. The right-brained characteristics mentioned in the book certainly fit with my observation of T - creative, imaginative, loves building, easily distracted, sensitive (both physically and emotionally), internally perfectionist, bad at arithmetic facts but good at math concepts, poor speller, overlooks grammar/punctuation, late reader. Knowing this, I think will help me understand him better, rather than getting annoyed at him for 'not focusing' or 'not trying hard'. The techniques used (I've already tried the spelling one), seem like they are worth a try, and hopefully we will have a much smoother learning process. Personally, I've learned that I shouldn't make him show his work for math, not to teach him to spell phonetically but to teach him to visualize the word (which is actually how I spell too), not to nag and berate or yell, put on some white noise and remove all distractions, incorporate physical exercise daily, let him fidget while learning, and keep the lessons challenging yet short.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    I read this for the right-brained reading parts of this book, but of course they had to go slapping a label on it and make something wrong with the child for being right brained...This book is outdated, I mostly skimmed over it, as it wasn't "new", etc. I did find the chapters on reading, spelling, & writing interesting & useful. It is wise to focus on spelling first w/ right brained children. Right brained children do not learn best w/ phonics, in fact they typically lack the ability to fine tu I read this for the right-brained reading parts of this book, but of course they had to go slapping a label on it and make something wrong with the child for being right brained...This book is outdated, I mostly skimmed over it, as it wasn't "new", etc. I did find the chapters on reading, spelling, & writing interesting & useful. It is wise to focus on spelling first w/ right brained children. Right brained children do not learn best w/ phonics, in fact they typically lack the ability to fine tune their hearing enough to differentiate between subtle vowel sounds. There is a strong correlation between how a child responds to phonics & how well he/she does in visualizing whole words. A right brained child is not only seeing the word on the page, but is also seeing an image of what it represents. Therefore oral reading is challenging and slow. Insisting a child concentrate and take it slow, sounding out words, will actually trip him up. Silent & speed reading is often easier so picking up the pace is often more helpful to them. Trigger words which have no corresponding visual image add distress. Tell your child when he comes to a word that he has a chance of missing, he should allow you to read it for him. This takes the fear & anxiety out of having to guess at hard words; it keeps your child from blurting out the wrong word, which imprints on his brain & is more difficult to undo later; and it helps your child commit more difficult words to visual memory as you read them to him. Right brained children are more spatial in their processing which makes them more prone to inversions. Dyslexia was also discussed, and it was mentioned that if your child can write forwards & backwards perfectly, they can picture the word in all its dimensions and are right brained.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    This book might deserve a higher rating, but I basically just skimmed it. The information is getting dated (published in '97), so I had the sense that I had heard most of it before, but the author's insights into the left - right brain spectrum are interesting. He spends a lot of time talking about how his theories relate to schools, which obviously wasn't as helpful to me, but that is my own issue. Obviously he would need to include that info for most folks. In the middle section of the book, t This book might deserve a higher rating, but I basically just skimmed it. The information is getting dated (published in '97), so I had the sense that I had heard most of it before, but the author's insights into the left - right brain spectrum are interesting. He spends a lot of time talking about how his theories relate to schools, which obviously wasn't as helpful to me, but that is my own issue. Obviously he would need to include that info for most folks. In the middle section of the book, there are some helpful tips about working with your right-brainer - focusing on mental math, use of color and other visual stimuli, etc., but again, nothing groundbreaking. Still worth a read if you find this subject interesting.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Brigid

    As a quintessential left-brainer, I was amazed to read about right-brained folks, even though I live with 2 of them. Of course, I wanted to try all the exercises out immediately:( This book seems to focus on how to help younger kids, even though the authors work with all ages. Maybe my son's not right-brained as much as I think, or maybe school (even Montessori) has already squelched his natural methods of learning (not totally because we used a great book in 4th grade "Times Tables the Fun Way" As a quintessential left-brainer, I was amazed to read about right-brained folks, even though I live with 2 of them. Of course, I wanted to try all the exercises out immediately:( This book seems to focus on how to help younger kids, even though the authors work with all ages. Maybe my son's not right-brained as much as I think, or maybe school (even Montessori) has already squelched his natural methods of learning (not totally because we used a great book in 4th grade "Times Tables the Fun Way" so he could learn math facts using stories). We're going to try some of this out and keep on researching.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    This book definitely exhibits an anti-teacher bias. Freed spends a lot of time explaining why right-brained children struggle in traditional schools. An entire chapter is devoted to reforms that should be made in public schools. As a parent, this information isn't helpful to me; perhaps it would be more useful to an administrator. There is some time in the middle devoted to techniques parents can use to help their children at home (and I'm very eager to try some of them on my daughter, especiall This book definitely exhibits an anti-teacher bias. Freed spends a lot of time explaining why right-brained children struggle in traditional schools. An entire chapter is devoted to reforms that should be made in public schools. As a parent, this information isn't helpful to me; perhaps it would be more useful to an administrator. There is some time in the middle devoted to techniques parents can use to help their children at home (and I'm very eager to try some of them on my daughter, especially to teach her spelling), but I'm not sure how effective it will be if it isn't reinforced in the classroom.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Andrea Garfield

    Crazy. This book reads like a story of my life. Very interesting... Many interesting ideas about learning styles, how our digital cultures is changing those styles, and how traditional education is very resistant to those changes- as those who are drawn to the field have found success in the old style. Eye-opening book. Everyone could benefit from reading it, especially those who are or who work with right-brained types. Now I want to read one about left-brained types to learn more about them, b Crazy. This book reads like a story of my life. Very interesting... Many interesting ideas about learning styles, how our digital cultures is changing those styles, and how traditional education is very resistant to those changes- as those who are drawn to the field have found success in the old style. Eye-opening book. Everyone could benefit from reading it, especially those who are or who work with right-brained types. Now I want to read one about left-brained types to learn more about them, beyond the comparisons drawn in this book.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kelli

    This book teaches a parent how to help keep his child focused on a task. One point in the book is the importance of immediate correction of mistakes so that the "wrong way" isn't coded into their brain. Another suggestion is to reward effort, not results. There is a series of questions for you to answer about your child to determine whether he is right or left brained (and it's good to use to find out what you are as well). For those of us with children who have learning challenges, this is a go This book teaches a parent how to help keep his child focused on a task. One point in the book is the importance of immediate correction of mistakes so that the "wrong way" isn't coded into their brain. Another suggestion is to reward effort, not results. There is a series of questions for you to answer about your child to determine whether he is right or left brained (and it's good to use to find out what you are as well). For those of us with children who have learning challenges, this is a good general resource.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Linda Pifer

    A terrific intro to the world of the ADD individual. Since this was a first read on the subject of right and left brained thinking and the differences in learning methods, I found it fascinating. The authors constructed it logically enough for the layperson to get a grip on the various methods for visualization of material for reading, math, and writing. Also included are some proven techniques for the teacher. This is not the all inclusive volume for teachers but if you're looking for an introd A terrific intro to the world of the ADD individual. Since this was a first read on the subject of right and left brained thinking and the differences in learning methods, I found it fascinating. The authors constructed it logically enough for the layperson to get a grip on the various methods for visualization of material for reading, math, and writing. Also included are some proven techniques for the teacher. This is not the all inclusive volume for teachers but if you're looking for an introduction to understanding an individual with ADD, I found this book very informative.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Alissa

    Wow. This is an amazing guy with amazing insight. I want to have coffee with this man. I think it important that everyone read this to get not only a better glimpse into possibly their children but of the future. Because like I have thought (I wrote an essay in college about this) of today's technologies and fast movie images is producing ADD and ADHD children. Reprogramming their minds. So this is our future. Reading this book and others like this Is strongly encouraged. "Read something to lear Wow. This is an amazing guy with amazing insight. I want to have coffee with this man. I think it important that everyone read this to get not only a better glimpse into possibly their children but of the future. Because like I have thought (I wrote an essay in college about this) of today's technologies and fast movie images is producing ADD and ADHD children. Reprogramming their minds. So this is our future. Reading this book and others like this Is strongly encouraged. "Read something to learn something", that's what I always say!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kristina Seleshanko

    My kids don't have ADD, but they are right brained learners, I'm beginning to understand. This book offers lots of insights into the right brained kid, explains why they don't do well with traditional teaching methods, and offers plenty of tips for teaching them in ways that make sense to them. There's also lots of stuff about ADD and how kids diagnosed with it are right brained learners. I didn't agree with the author on all points, but when it comes to his teaching methods, his record is stell My kids don't have ADD, but they are right brained learners, I'm beginning to understand. This book offers lots of insights into the right brained kid, explains why they don't do well with traditional teaching methods, and offers plenty of tips for teaching them in ways that make sense to them. There's also lots of stuff about ADD and how kids diagnosed with it are right brained learners. I didn't agree with the author on all points, but when it comes to his teaching methods, his record is stellar.

  24. 5 out of 5

    DeBora Rachelle

    There are so many great tips in this book. I especially liked how it explains how a right-brained perfectionist would rather sit on the sidelines until he's certain he can master a skill than risk failing. They had such an incredible desire to succeed it can sometime lead to paralysis. And how they have very powerful memories and can visualize things in 3D (up down left right) even though they have to visualize in order to learn. Which is not how teacher teach in school. I highly recommend this There are so many great tips in this book. I especially liked how it explains how a right-brained perfectionist would rather sit on the sidelines until he's certain he can master a skill than risk failing. They had such an incredible desire to succeed it can sometime lead to paralysis. And how they have very powerful memories and can visualize things in 3D (up down left right) even though they have to visualize in order to learn. Which is not how teacher teach in school. I highly recommend this book!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Deb

    An encouraging and practical tool for both parents and educators alike... recognizing that we are seeing more and more children labeled as ADD, when in fact many kids simply have a different learning style than "the norm". It's time for teachers to recognize the gifts of different learning styles! Parents who are frustrated and feel that they are fighting an uphilll battle will gain great comfort and hands-on exercises to help their children. A great resource! An encouraging and practical tool for both parents and educators alike... recognizing that we are seeing more and more children labeled as ADD, when in fact many kids simply have a different learning style than "the norm". It's time for teachers to recognize the gifts of different learning styles! Parents who are frustrated and feel that they are fighting an uphilll battle will gain great comfort and hands-on exercises to help their children. A great resource!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Dave Manning

    Glad that my son's principal pointed this book out to me. It certainly has some great insights into visual learning and how our education systems need to be pushed towards the inclusion of broader forms of teaching. Some great examples were given of spelling backwards, coloring syllables, and giving other visual angles for understanding alternative approaches to reaching children's capabilities. The voucher focus towards the end of the book is probably somewhat dated. Glad that my son's principal pointed this book out to me. It certainly has some great insights into visual learning and how our education systems need to be pushed towards the inclusion of broader forms of teaching. Some great examples were given of spelling backwards, coloring syllables, and giving other visual angles for understanding alternative approaches to reaching children's capabilities. The voucher focus towards the end of the book is probably somewhat dated.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    This book is from 1997, so I felt like some of his ranting about the use of ritalin and the poor quality of public schools was slightly out of date. I did get some very specific ideas about how to help my child with the dreaded spelling list and multiplication table, so I'm thankful for that. If I had it to do over again, I would read only the middle section about working with kids and skip the beginning and end about whether ADHD is real and how to fix schools. This book is from 1997, so I felt like some of his ranting about the use of ritalin and the poor quality of public schools was slightly out of date. I did get some very specific ideas about how to help my child with the dreaded spelling list and multiplication table, so I'm thankful for that. If I had it to do over again, I would read only the middle section about working with kids and skip the beginning and end about whether ADHD is real and how to fix schools.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Liz

    I found the simple questionnaire to be incredibly valuable from this book (my child is not ADD, but is a right-brain learner). The set of questions can help you to determine if your child favors right-hemispheric learning or is somewhere in the middle. The author has a set of questions for adults too since most right-brained children have at least one parent who favors that type of learning as well.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Wajid

    This is an excellent book to aid in understanding visual-spatial learners, ADHD kids and their daily struggles. However most of those books in that category deal with the child I only wish they would have a book geared towards adults. The reason is because we adults have a lot of bad habits accumulated through the years it would be great to have a book to help us tackle these habits and difficulty in our daily lives.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Heather Woods

    This gave marvelous suggestions for how to help your child learn according to their strengths, gifts, and abilities rather than fighting against their weaknesses. No wonder so many kids feel they're failures and "bad at school." These kids (and adults) simply take in the world differently and we can learn so much from them. I love the checklist at the front helping to determine whether your child is right-brained or not. And some of the questions are truly surprising. This gave marvelous suggestions for how to help your child learn according to their strengths, gifts, and abilities rather than fighting against their weaknesses. No wonder so many kids feel they're failures and "bad at school." These kids (and adults) simply take in the world differently and we can learn so much from them. I love the checklist at the front helping to determine whether your child is right-brained or not. And some of the questions are truly surprising.

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