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You've Got Something Coming

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You've Got Something Coming is a breakthrough debut novel about a down-and-outer and his small daughter and his attempt to give them a better life. Trucks, an aging boxer with only thirty dollars, breaks his deaf daughter, Claudia, out of a children's home in Wisconsin one night during the dead of winter. He gives her used hearing aids to help with her deafness, and they b You've Got Something Coming is a breakthrough debut novel about a down-and-outer and his small daughter and his attempt to give them a better life. Trucks, an aging boxer with only thirty dollars, breaks his deaf daughter, Claudia, out of a children's home in Wisconsin one night during the dead of winter. He gives her used hearing aids to help with her deafness, and they begin hitchhiking to Nevada. Claudia is a winsome, feisty little girl who tries to hold her father to account, and Trucks loves her unconditionally. Claudia's mother, an addict, has disappeared and is likely dead. Their first ride takes them to Sioux Falls, South Dakota, where Trucks teaches Claudia about "need borrowing," or shoplifting. They meet a number of people on their journey, including June, a woman about Trucks' age who was abandoned by her husband, and Gerald, an older rancher in Montana who offers them a place to stay, an offer Trucks refuses. While he does all he can to provide for Claudia and offer as normal of a life as possible, Trucks can't let go of boxing, knowing no other way to live. Soon they're utterly broke and living in a gazebo in a park. Trucks, unable to find work, returns to boxing, trapped in a vocation for which he's no longer suited. The damage to his mind and body worsens, fight after fight, and it changes Claudia seeing her father so broken. His mind no longer reliable, Trucks steals a car. Delusional and drifting in and out of consciousness, Trucks drives Claudia east with the final hope of reconnecting with June.


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You've Got Something Coming is a breakthrough debut novel about a down-and-outer and his small daughter and his attempt to give them a better life. Trucks, an aging boxer with only thirty dollars, breaks his deaf daughter, Claudia, out of a children's home in Wisconsin one night during the dead of winter. He gives her used hearing aids to help with her deafness, and they b You've Got Something Coming is a breakthrough debut novel about a down-and-outer and his small daughter and his attempt to give them a better life. Trucks, an aging boxer with only thirty dollars, breaks his deaf daughter, Claudia, out of a children's home in Wisconsin one night during the dead of winter. He gives her used hearing aids to help with her deafness, and they begin hitchhiking to Nevada. Claudia is a winsome, feisty little girl who tries to hold her father to account, and Trucks loves her unconditionally. Claudia's mother, an addict, has disappeared and is likely dead. Their first ride takes them to Sioux Falls, South Dakota, where Trucks teaches Claudia about "need borrowing," or shoplifting. They meet a number of people on their journey, including June, a woman about Trucks' age who was abandoned by her husband, and Gerald, an older rancher in Montana who offers them a place to stay, an offer Trucks refuses. While he does all he can to provide for Claudia and offer as normal of a life as possible, Trucks can't let go of boxing, knowing no other way to live. Soon they're utterly broke and living in a gazebo in a park. Trucks, unable to find work, returns to boxing, trapped in a vocation for which he's no longer suited. The damage to his mind and body worsens, fight after fight, and it changes Claudia seeing her father so broken. His mind no longer reliable, Trucks steals a car. Delusional and drifting in and out of consciousness, Trucks drives Claudia east with the final hope of reconnecting with June.

30 review for You've Got Something Coming

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jerome M

    I really enjoyed the author's strong writing style. The story is intense and deep, and I enjoyed the father-daughter dynamic and the boxing elements. Definitely worth a read! I really enjoyed the author's strong writing style. The story is intense and deep, and I enjoyed the father-daughter dynamic and the boxing elements. Definitely worth a read!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Carla

    What a tragic story. Truck is the father of Claudia, his six year old deaf child that he breaks out of the State home in Wisconsin to get. They travel west. Hitchhiking, connecting, fortunately with good people. A father wanting to get to Vegas (he's a boxer), a daughter who's missing her mother, a journey. Both love each other, but Truck can't give his daughter what she needs or wants, or what he thinks she needs or wants. Each chapter has you traveling with them, hoping against hope for some s What a tragic story. Truck is the father of Claudia, his six year old deaf child that he breaks out of the State home in Wisconsin to get. They travel west. Hitchhiking, connecting, fortunately with good people. A father wanting to get to Vegas (he's a boxer), a daughter who's missing her mother, a journey. Both love each other, but Truck can't give his daughter what she needs or wants, or what he thinks she needs or wants. Each chapter has you traveling with them, hoping against hope for some stability. Broke my heart.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Michele

    If I could give this book zero * I would. This is one of the worst books I have ever read. And it is so poorly written I can't believe anybody published it. In all my voracious reading life, I've only thrown three books across the room. Unfortunately, I'm reading this on my iPad since I can't get books from the library. I'm not about to throw my iPad across the room but I am sorely tempted. There's an hour I can't get back. Worthless father, unfortunate, annoying child. Stupid plot. Next up, new If I could give this book zero * I would. This is one of the worst books I have ever read. And it is so poorly written I can't believe anybody published it. In all my voracious reading life, I've only thrown three books across the room. Unfortunately, I'm reading this on my iPad since I can't get books from the library. I'm not about to throw my iPad across the room but I am sorely tempted. There's an hour I can't get back. Worthless father, unfortunate, annoying child. Stupid plot. Next up, new Stephen King, thank god

  4. 4 out of 5

    Judy

    A wonderful story of a father's love for his daughter. Trucks does all he can to care and provide for Claudia, but his resources are limited. Boxing gives him an income and the identity he needs to survive. However, survival is hard and often Trucks' choices are not the best. Trucks lives life as if he is in the ring boxing. He punches, ducks, and blocks. Jonathan Starke takes you into that world. A wonderful story of a father's love for his daughter. Trucks does all he can to care and provide for Claudia, but his resources are limited. Boxing gives him an income and the identity he needs to survive. However, survival is hard and often Trucks' choices are not the best. Trucks lives life as if he is in the ring boxing. He punches, ducks, and blocks. Jonathan Starke takes you into that world.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Nils

    Starke's first novel is a sustained meditation on love stretched to its limits. Trucks, a middling boxer in search of other means, attempts to eke out a life for his young daughter Claudia. The result is hardship, brush ups with human kindness that are too good to last, and a desire for better that never tapers in the face of brutish realities. Starke is a writer in complete control of his words. The prose is terse, sharp, and powerful. The sentences read like whispers but land like full-throate Starke's first novel is a sustained meditation on love stretched to its limits. Trucks, a middling boxer in search of other means, attempts to eke out a life for his young daughter Claudia. The result is hardship, brush ups with human kindness that are too good to last, and a desire for better that never tapers in the face of brutish realities. Starke is a writer in complete control of his words. The prose is terse, sharp, and powerful. The sentences read like whispers but land like full-throated screams. "You've Got Something Coming" is an analysis of hope, redemption, and single fatherhood explored with a deep tenderness. From the pet names - "Pepper Flake" - to Claudia's misnomers - hearing aids are "hearing phones" - these character, these words, and these places stay with you. A beautiful debut novel. "You've Got Something Coming" is as honest as it comes.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Mickey

    A desperate man takes desperate measures. Trucks so wants to give his 6-year-old daughter a better life that he helps her escape the state home she's been assigned to due to his inadequate care. In the middle of a winter night, the two set off on a difficult journey to find some good luck elsewhere. Poverty, shelter life, hunger and homelessness are explored in this disturbing tale of love and daily struggle. There are no bad guys on their road to survival, just bad luck and increasingly bad dec A desperate man takes desperate measures. Trucks so wants to give his 6-year-old daughter a better life that he helps her escape the state home she's been assigned to due to his inadequate care. In the middle of a winter night, the two set off on a difficult journey to find some good luck elsewhere. Poverty, shelter life, hunger and homelessness are explored in this disturbing tale of love and daily struggle. There are no bad guys on their road to survival, just bad luck and increasingly bad decisions. The author's simple, crisp prose allows readers to experience the Badlands, the Montana cold, the boxing ring, and the kind of profound love for a child that allows hope to outlast rationality.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Todd Mitchell

    Two things are clear. Jonathan Starke knows a great deal about boxing. And he knows how to pack a sharp, stunning punch into a sentence. You've Got Something Coming swept me up in the first chapter and kept going with relentless intensity. The writing is taught, raw, brilliantly crafted, and at times astonishingly poetic ("like a goddamn space clam.") This is a timeless, blunt story about Trucks, a down-and-out middle-aged boxer on the road, doing his best to be a father to Claudia, his young daug Two things are clear. Jonathan Starke knows a great deal about boxing. And he knows how to pack a sharp, stunning punch into a sentence. You've Got Something Coming swept me up in the first chapter and kept going with relentless intensity. The writing is taught, raw, brilliantly crafted, and at times astonishingly poetic ("like a goddamn space clam.") This is a timeless, blunt story about Trucks, a down-and-out middle-aged boxer on the road, doing his best to be a father to Claudia, his young daughter. The compact novel unfolds with precise attention to the details of a journey deep into the back country of the heart. Parts are achingly beautiful. Parts hit like a swift right hook. If you're a fan of classic American writers like Hemingway ("The Battler"), Raymond Carver, or Cormac McCarthy (The Road), or if you enjoy movies like Warrior, The Wrestler, or Million Dollar Baby, this book is for you. And if you just want to read some damn fine writing that doesn't need to dress itself up to stand out, You've Got Something Coming is not to be missed.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Glenn L. Obster

    This is the best book I've read in a long time, it's awesome! I was moved by this portrait of a father and daughter on the fringes, doing their best to survive in a society that doesn't want them. The novel is packed with boxing knowledge, philosophy, hitching, love, endurance, and hope. The pacing is wonderful and makes you hungry for each next chapter. The references to Hemingway, Carver, and McCarthy are apropos, though this writer has a voice and style all his own. Highly recommended read, a This is the best book I've read in a long time, it's awesome! I was moved by this portrait of a father and daughter on the fringes, doing their best to survive in a society that doesn't want them. The novel is packed with boxing knowledge, philosophy, hitching, love, endurance, and hope. The pacing is wonderful and makes you hungry for each next chapter. The references to Hemingway, Carver, and McCarthy are apropos, though this writer has a voice and style all his own. Highly recommended read, and I'll be following this author from now on.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Clayton

    The premise of this book had me from the start. A boxer/father rescues his little girl from a foster children's home and promises to never leave her again. The child doesn't believe him but wants to and they set off on the road. They have no resources and hitch their way west in hopes of a better life. Each chapter pulls the reader along with them. Trucks' suffers from CTE which leads to some poor decision making. There is some repetition but kind of feels like dancing around the canvas. The pac The premise of this book had me from the start. A boxer/father rescues his little girl from a foster children's home and promises to never leave her again. The child doesn't believe him but wants to and they set off on the road. They have no resources and hitch their way west in hopes of a better life. Each chapter pulls the reader along with them. Trucks' suffers from CTE which leads to some poor decision making. There is some repetition but kind of feels like dancing around the canvas. The pacing is great and characters, Trucks and Claudia, are well drawn. Reading is fast paced and visceral.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Chad

    I highly recommend reading this book. Quick read, I couldn’t put it down. Finished in two days. Great writing!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Gina

    You’ll never forget this book. The title of Jonathan Starke’s debut novel, “You’ve Got Something Coming,” says it all. Buckle in and hold on tight for a heart-pounding and emotional ride. The novel tells the story of Trucks, a boxer who breaks his young daughter Claudia out of a children’s home and hits the road in search of better days, vowing to his little girl to stay out of the ring. As they make their way hitching across the country, their story of struggle, survival, and grit works its way You’ll never forget this book. The title of Jonathan Starke’s debut novel, “You’ve Got Something Coming,” says it all. Buckle in and hold on tight for a heart-pounding and emotional ride. The novel tells the story of Trucks, a boxer who breaks his young daughter Claudia out of a children’s home and hits the road in search of better days, vowing to his little girl to stay out of the ring. As they make their way hitching across the country, their story of struggle, survival, and grit works its way into the reader’s mind and psyche. I’ve long been a fan of Starke’s essays, short stories, and poetry. In this novel, he succeeds in sustaining the lightning storm of storytelling energy he’s known for throughout the book. Every chapter packs a punch, the jabs softened between bouts by tenderness, humanity, and humor. It’s tempting to compare this novel to other memorable books by authors like Tim O’Brien, Ernest Hemingway, and Raymond Carver, but that’s not fair because Starke’s unique style of writing and the power he wields puts this novel in a class of its own. “You’ve Got Something Coming” left me breathless and haunted—and grateful for an unforgettable read.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Naomi Eagleson

    I have a soft spot for father-daughter stories. "You've Got Something Coming" is an intimate portrait of a father and his young daughter as they embark on a journey in search of a home and a better future. What Starke does so well is show us how difficult it is to be a good father when you're dealing with crushing poverty and your only recourse is to box, a violent job that takes a cumulative toll on the mind and body. What elevates this novel is the depth of feeling and the quality of the writi I have a soft spot for father-daughter stories. "You've Got Something Coming" is an intimate portrait of a father and his young daughter as they embark on a journey in search of a home and a better future. What Starke does so well is show us how difficult it is to be a good father when you're dealing with crushing poverty and your only recourse is to box, a violent job that takes a cumulative toll on the mind and body. What elevates this novel is the depth of feeling and the quality of the writing. The love Trucks feels for his daughter is palpable and poignant and desperate. The writing is spare, stunning, and quietly powerful. "You've Got Something Coming" is a good novel to curl up with when the world outside has gone dark.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Mimi Lee

    The story begins with a dad (Trucks) breaking his daughter (Claudia) out of a children's home. The journey that follows is full of twists and turns that will yank your heart but also fill it up. Trucks (a sort of streetsmart survivor ex-boxer) and his precocious emotionally open daughter, Claudia, are characters that might make you think and rethink what's most important in your own relationships. It made me think about mine. Despite the grit and claw of their day to day struggle to survive and The story begins with a dad (Trucks) breaking his daughter (Claudia) out of a children's home. The journey that follows is full of twists and turns that will yank your heart but also fill it up. Trucks (a sort of streetsmart survivor ex-boxer) and his precocious emotionally open daughter, Claudia, are characters that might make you think and rethink what's most important in your own relationships. It made me think about mine. Despite the grit and claw of their day to day struggle to survive and find a better life, there is a closeness to their relationship that any parent would admire. Their trip to a better place to start over introduces them to an array of very interesting strangers that sometimes give generously and sometimes take away brutally - maybe without even realizing the impacts of their actions. There are moments to this tale that feel like Upton Sinclair's "The Jungle" to me -- not in style of prose, Starke is a more fluid writer, but in the way this story reveals so many angles about homelessness and the current system in place (or lack thereof) that seems to keep the homeless stuck at the bottom rung with no way to climb out or up. This story made me wonder a lot about the real-world Trucks and Claudias -- Who is there to help them? What options do they really have? What stereotypes do they have to prove wrong? Despite the darkness around Trucks and Claudia, there are also some surprising moments of undeniable beauty and magic you would never see coming, and some truly great thought provoking sentiments really stand out in the dialogue. There is a line partway through the book that says, "maybe we don't have to look at our struggles as good or bad...just experiences...just things we've done..." I don't want to list more (don't want to spoil or give away too much) but there are many moments from the boxer, Trucks, that land just as you'd expect, like punches. This is a book you'll be glad you read for what it gives you, in the long run.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Katherine

    This book is hauntingly beautiful. His words and sentences leave such an impression, I was constantly underlining my favorites and reading them again and again. Like, “some people are born with a wild wind inside them that carries them to distant places,” and “she was no part of my blood but every part of my being.” His characters won’t leave your thoughts for days. Trucks, the father who thinks trying is all that matters. Who gives perceptive pieces of advice to his daughter before saying he doe This book is hauntingly beautiful. His words and sentences leave such an impression, I was constantly underlining my favorites and reading them again and again. Like, “some people are born with a wild wind inside them that carries them to distant places,” and “she was no part of my blood but every part of my being.” His characters won’t leave your thoughts for days. Trucks, the father who thinks trying is all that matters. Who gives perceptive pieces of advice to his daughter before saying he doesn’t really know anything at all. Claudia, the daughter who wants more than her father can give. Who hangs on to a stranger’s perfume because it was one moment of happiness in her dismal life. Trucks’ love for his girl and his absolute dedication until the end is what makes this book so poignant. How realistic is it to have strangers speak so openly and confide each other? I’m not sure, but maybe some people evoke that kind of response out of strangers. How realistic is it to have strangers as nice as June and Gerald pick you up off the side of the road? I’m not sure, but maybe I’ve just never met any nice people. I normally don’t like sad endings, but this ended just like it should have. Like it needed to end. I’m glad Jonathan Starke writes. The world must be better because of it.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Emma

    Starke's well-written, well-paced, vivid, and emotionally raw book will stay in your mind long after you've finished it. The book's protagonist, Trucks, is a father whose love for his daughter is both reckless and intense. He constantly self-sacrifices and attempts to do what he perceives as what's best for his daughter, but oftentimes his perception of what's "best" is misguided. As Trucks and his daughter Claudia must tough it through their "hard times", the reader is repeatedly shown how a li Starke's well-written, well-paced, vivid, and emotionally raw book will stay in your mind long after you've finished it. The book's protagonist, Trucks, is a father whose love for his daughter is both reckless and intense. He constantly self-sacrifices and attempts to do what he perceives as what's best for his daughter, but oftentimes his perception of what's "best" is misguided. As Trucks and his daughter Claudia must tough it through their "hard times", the reader is repeatedly shown how a little bit of compassion from the people the pair encounter goes a long way, and how the lack of such compassion is potentially fatal. The book challenges concepts about morality that are presupposed by society, and highlights the moral elitism in society that makes the average person more likely to simply pass by those in desperate need. It is a heart-breaking but beautifully impactful read. In certain aspects, it reminded me of Studio Ghibli's award-winning 1988 film, Grave of the Fireflies. Starke's novel is absolutely worth a read.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Christina

    A haunting beautifully written novel about a man who never had a chance in life who desperately wants to give his young daughter that chance but he simply doesn’t know how. At times it was a painful, heart-wrenching read. I was really hoping that he would pull through for Claudia, and at the end he’s on the path to doing so but we don’t seethe happy ending I was yearning for. (it’s one of those literary open ended endings.) I can definitely see this as a independent movie, albeit with a more def A haunting beautifully written novel about a man who never had a chance in life who desperately wants to give his young daughter that chance but he simply doesn’t know how. At times it was a painful, heart-wrenching read. I was really hoping that he would pull through for Claudia, and at the end he’s on the path to doing so but we don’t seethe happy ending I was yearning for. (it’s one of those literary open ended endings.) I can definitely see this as a independent movie, albeit with a more definitive ending. The author made some brilliant choices, such as giving Claudia a hearing impairment. Highly recommended.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Sally Reid

    I loved the pacing of this novel and found the sparse, sharp prose mesmerizing. I couldn't put this book down! I read it in a couple days, which is fast for me. I cared for the father-daughter relationship and loved getting to know the two main characters. Though Trucks' downward slide is difficult to watch there's also something beautiful in how it progresses and his attempts to protect and care for his daughter. I can't wait to read more of Mr. Starke's writing! I loved the pacing of this novel and found the sparse, sharp prose mesmerizing. I couldn't put this book down! I read it in a couple days, which is fast for me. I cared for the father-daughter relationship and loved getting to know the two main characters. Though Trucks' downward slide is difficult to watch there's also something beautiful in how it progresses and his attempts to protect and care for his daughter. I can't wait to read more of Mr. Starke's writing!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    This is an incredibly powerful novel. It has been a few months since I finished it, and I still carry the characters with me. I see Trucks and Claudia in unexpected places: when I see people down on their luck, living homeless, or with a thumb out for a ride. There are some books where you can measure your life in before you read the book, and then after. This is one of them. It will leave you changed - in the best way.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Mike Carlozzi

    The book is exceptionally well written and keeps you engaged throughout. Starke does a wonderful job changing the flow and keeping you guessing. Each time I thought I knew what the next chapter would bring, I was proven wrong. The book also keeps you emotionally involved. Starke does a great job changing the emotional feelings of the reader, at least in my case. I found myself relating to Trucks on occassion, then wanting to slap him during the next chapter.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Maggie Woolers

    I read this book off a suggestion from a friend. I didn't know what to expect with the boxing, but the telling of it reads almost like poetry. The relationship between the father and daughter is loving and beautiful, even if misguided at times by head injuries. There is beautiful writing here and a thoughtful dynamic. Had a hard time putting this one down! I read this book off a suggestion from a friend. I didn't know what to expect with the boxing, but the telling of it reads almost like poetry. The relationship between the father and daughter is loving and beautiful, even if misguided at times by head injuries. There is beautiful writing here and a thoughtful dynamic. Had a hard time putting this one down!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Joe

    A deep, heartfelt read about a father and daughter fallen on tough times struggling to survive on the road. The characters are so real and true to life i will be thinking of them for years to come. A truly American condition, I was rooting for them the entire time in all their compassion and contradiction.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Mateo

    This is one of the best books I've read in the past decade. Philosophical dialogue, lovely father-daughter relationship, and love the boxing scenes and introspective thoughts on life. Precise and beautiful language. This is one of the best books I've read in the past decade. Philosophical dialogue, lovely father-daughter relationship, and love the boxing scenes and introspective thoughts on life. Precise and beautiful language.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kelly Tarr

    Trucks, a father and fighter goes on a mission to find his daughter (she is in a children’s home). He wants to care for her but is homeless and only knows fighting as a living. I didn’t love the end and it didn’t end the way I wanted but a good story that kept me interested.

  24. 5 out of 5

    K B

    A beautiful but concise page-turner. The writing style and story made it really hard to put down. Especially as a parent. And now that I've finished it, I can't stop thinking about it. Highly recommended. A beautiful but concise page-turner. The writing style and story made it really hard to put down. Especially as a parent. And now that I've finished it, I can't stop thinking about it. Highly recommended.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Lynn

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. **Spoilers***I really wanted to like this book. What a great premise. Truck, the dad, takes his daughter out of an orphanage type home after he loses custody of her. Claudia , the daughter is a sassy young lady. Truck does his best to take care of Claudia when he's got nothing. No home, not much money, noone to help them. He gets her used hearing aids and teaches her how to "borrow" food for their dinner. I felt bad for Truck. This part of the book was good. Easy to read for the most part. I was **Spoilers***I really wanted to like this book. What a great premise. Truck, the dad, takes his daughter out of an orphanage type home after he loses custody of her. Claudia , the daughter is a sassy young lady. Truck does his best to take care of Claudia when he's got nothing. No home, not much money, noone to help them. He gets her used hearing aids and teaches her how to "borrow" food for their dinner. I felt bad for Truck. This part of the book was good. Easy to read for the most part. I was hooked. Then they met June a nice lady who gave them a ride and bought them food even let them take a bath. Around this time Claudia became a brat. She wanted to stay with June, so she starts telling her dad that she doesn't want him to box for money anymore. She doesn't want to "borrow" food or sleeping bags. She doesn't want to hitchhike. And I get it, the poor kid has had a crap life for sure. But she left Truck with no options. The only job he'd ever had was boxing for money. He was boxed out though, it was making him goofy. So Truck has these never-ending conversations with himself about how all he knows is boxing and without it what can he do. On and on over and over. He's the adult if he needs to box to get bus fare then do it for Pete's sake. At this point I was getting aggrevated with the cycle of Truck failing Claudia because of all the rules she's set up for them. There's a scene towards the end of the book that made me roll my eyes so bad I had to take Tylenol for my headache. He's trying to show Claudia a (?) shooting star--I think I don't remember because honestly it was horrible the first time I read it and I was going to look it up to make sure my review was factual but I just couldn't. Sorry if he wasn't looking at a shooting star. In my mind this little scene went on for 40 minutes. In actual time I'm sure it was less than a minute and a half. All these things I could've overlooked and still given at least a 3.5 star rating rounded up to a 4. **major spoilers****But then Truck drugged Claudia with cough syrup so he could steal a car so that he could go find June and leave Claudia with this stranger June. What the hell!! I was rooting for them. And he was just going to drop her off and leave her. He didn't get to though because he crashes the car he stole and is just carrying Claudia who is drugged and now hurt down the road and boom the book ends.....???? Ok I've never left such a low rating, but in my opinion it's earned here. I rounded my 1 star up to 2 because I enjoyed the first part of the book.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Steven Smith

    Jonathan Starke’s You’ve Got Something Coming is a knockout! Trucks hitchhikes westward from Wisconsin with his young daughter Claudia to make a fresh start boxing in Nevada. Trucks lacks a strategic plan of attack, but you will admire and respect his stubborn motivation and extraordinary sacrifices. The boxing ring is a metaphor for survival and perseverance. The borders of each state new ropes and canvas. You will find yourself out of breath at times after reading a flurry of chapters. At times Jonathan Starke’s You’ve Got Something Coming is a knockout! Trucks hitchhikes westward from Wisconsin with his young daughter Claudia to make a fresh start boxing in Nevada. Trucks lacks a strategic plan of attack, but you will admire and respect his stubborn motivation and extraordinary sacrifices. The boxing ring is a metaphor for survival and perseverance. The borders of each state new ropes and canvas. You will find yourself out of breath at times after reading a flurry of chapters. At times, at the end of each chapter’s bell, you will be laced up in Trucks’s shoes, so go to your corner—catch your breath. And be patient because you will have a hard time remaining on your stool as you anticipate the next chapter’s bell. At times, you will find yourself in Trucks’s corner trying to fix his cuts, wipe the sweat and blood from his face, providing advice that will likely just fall on deaf ears. At times, you will be a ref—giving Trucks the mandatory eight count, silently admiring his pugilistic instinct to get back on his feet and keep moving. At times, you will be June and Gerald—providing Trucks and Claudia with sustenance and genuine companionship during their journey. At times, you will be Claudia—foraging a dilemma: Stay put in a safe and warm place with caring people or keep moving through the howling winter with little resources to survive? Throughout the entire novel you will want to find Trucks and Claudia hitching a ride, pull over, pick them up, and talk to Trucks about a hard upbringing and the ongoing challenges of parenthood and the difficulties of finding work and how to handle certain situations with brains instead of brawn. You’ve Got Something Coming is one of a handful of novels that will leave you contemplating and speechless—groping for the ropes as if you walked right into a barrage of unexpected head and body shots.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Cornett Allen

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jane Krier

  29. 4 out of 5

    Liz

  30. 4 out of 5

    Madeline Houge

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