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Essential Manners for Men: What to Do, When to Do It, and Why

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Essential Manners for Men helps men make the right decisions about what to do and say in every situation that counts. Peter Post, great-grandson of Emily Post, distills the essential information men need for all the important roles they play in life. Organized into three parts -- "Daily Life," "Social Life," and "On the Job" -- Essential Manners for Men resolves situations Essential Manners for Men helps men make the right decisions about what to do and say in every situation that counts. Peter Post, great-grandson of Emily Post, distills the essential information men need for all the important roles they play in life. Organized into three parts -- "Daily Life," "Social Life," and "On the Job" -- Essential Manners for Men resolves situations that can stump even the savviest. Peter Post's advice is sharp-witted and sensible, with tips, boxes, and candid anecdotes about his own etiquette blunders. Topics include: The most important behaviors to avoid and emulate at the gym, at work, on the golf course, at home, out with friends, at a business social event, and a child's ball game Tipping, driver's "ed-iquette," introductions, sportsmanship, and parenting Successfully sharing living spaces with a roommate, significant other, or spouse -- from the toilet seat to the remote control to the kitchen sink How to throw a great party or be the perfect guest How to successfully navigate the business dinner Things men do wrong that make women wince, and things men do right that women love The five-step process to resolve any situation where there is no etiquette "rule" Short and shoot-from-the-hip honest, Essential Manners for Men is a book no man can afford to be without.


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Essential Manners for Men helps men make the right decisions about what to do and say in every situation that counts. Peter Post, great-grandson of Emily Post, distills the essential information men need for all the important roles they play in life. Organized into three parts -- "Daily Life," "Social Life," and "On the Job" -- Essential Manners for Men resolves situations Essential Manners for Men helps men make the right decisions about what to do and say in every situation that counts. Peter Post, great-grandson of Emily Post, distills the essential information men need for all the important roles they play in life. Organized into three parts -- "Daily Life," "Social Life," and "On the Job" -- Essential Manners for Men resolves situations that can stump even the savviest. Peter Post's advice is sharp-witted and sensible, with tips, boxes, and candid anecdotes about his own etiquette blunders. Topics include: The most important behaviors to avoid and emulate at the gym, at work, on the golf course, at home, out with friends, at a business social event, and a child's ball game Tipping, driver's "ed-iquette," introductions, sportsmanship, and parenting Successfully sharing living spaces with a roommate, significant other, or spouse -- from the toilet seat to the remote control to the kitchen sink How to throw a great party or be the perfect guest How to successfully navigate the business dinner Things men do wrong that make women wince, and things men do right that women love The five-step process to resolve any situation where there is no etiquette "rule" Short and shoot-from-the-hip honest, Essential Manners for Men is a book no man can afford to be without.

30 review for Essential Manners for Men: What to Do, When to Do It, and Why

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

    There's a strange dynamic at play in Peter Post's Essential Manners for Men. On the one hand, Post regularly calls on his readers to follow the essential manners. However, in this postmodern, globalized age, is anything "essential?" Perhaps not, but Post maintains that we should be considerate by remaining aware of social guidelines for behavior. Still, I found it problematic that Post calls on us to be considerate, not because it's right, but rather because it can cost us if we are not. Isn't it There's a strange dynamic at play in Peter Post's Essential Manners for Men. On the one hand, Post regularly calls on his readers to follow the essential manners. However, in this postmodern, globalized age, is anything "essential?" Perhaps not, but Post maintains that we should be considerate by remaining aware of social guidelines for behavior. Still, I found it problematic that Post calls on us to be considerate, not because it's right, but rather because it can cost us if we are not. Isn't it crass to apply the logic of the marketplace to manners? Post points out that if we break the rules in front of our clients, they are free to "take their business elsewhere, for whatever reason" -- including bad manners. I imagine this argument is stated at greater length in Post's other book, The Etiquette Advantage in Business. This argument becomes more troublesome when Post begins to discuss male-female relationships. Though not directly stated, Post regularly organizes his call to action around the notion that women are free to "take their business elsewhere, for whatever reason." And you can bet that includes bad manners. It seems like bad manners to outline relationships using business analogies, though I'll admit that I'm not an expert. Crass or not, I wonder how important -- and how uniform -- etiquette really is to women. For one thing, it's clear that the majority of the complaints Post shares come from women that live with their partner. I think it's fair to say that "business," to use the parlance of Post's book, is being transacted. At best, what Post's complaints reveal is the way that we tend to focus on the negative. We tend to nitpick our partners for their faults rather than commending them for their achievements. Is that impolite? Post regularly relies on the notion that men have poor etiquette and women tend to be better, and more traditionally, mannered. I'm not saying this isn't true. It may well be true. Still, the pictures at the start of every chapter hearken back to the Jazz Age, suggesting that those were the days when men were "men," which also implies that those were the days when women were "women." I found myself wondering whether women are today generally better mannered than their male counterparts. Perhaps it is the gentleman's responsibility to argue that women are better mannered. To make his arguments, Post relies on a poll conducted by the Emily Post Institute, and he often shares his "shocking" results. However, I couldn't help recalling Homer Simpson's famous claim that "statistics can be used to prove anything. 14% of people know that," particularly when I came across Post's argument that we (men) should modify our behavior because "one in seven women" disapprove of X and Y. Is one in seven really a persuasive statistic, or does it just sound like it should be? At other times, Post is on firmer ground, citing an 88% disapproval rating on this or that, but few of these results come as surprises. Don't we already read enough articles about putting down the toilet seat (and other mundane pet peeves) in the "Life" section of the newspaper? Finally, Post's comments on public displays of affection had me laughing out loud. In a world of "sexting," Post worries about people kissing in public -- anything beyond a public peck is too much. Of course, "more than a peck" might be acceptable in Europe, Post suggests, where apparently "anything" goes -- especially in Italy and France. So why bother reading Essential Manners for Men? After all, aren't the people most in need of a book on etiquette the ones that are least likely to read it? We are human beings and we make mistakes everyday. Certainly I do. So I'm always happy to return to the rule book, even if Essential Manners for Men wasn't the most impressive set of rules I've encountered. Nevertheless, I wish I'd read this book, or perhaps a book like this but that doesn't ground its principles in cost/ benefits analysis, when I was 13, rather than in my late 20s.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Mohammad Ali Abedi

    “Essential Manners for Men” is written for sitcom husbands. That guy who is in his underwear drinking beer and won’t switch the channel because he loves football so much! *audience in the studio piss themselves LAUGHING* The subtitle of this book is “What to Do, When to Do It, and Why”. I was especially interested in the why, because it sounds interesting. Why should we do some of the things we are expected to do? As it turns out, the answer to the why is basically, because its respectable or be “Essential Manners for Men” is written for sitcom husbands. That guy who is in his underwear drinking beer and won’t switch the channel because he loves football so much! *audience in the studio piss themselves LAUGHING* The subtitle of this book is “What to Do, When to Do It, and Why”. I was especially interested in the why, because it sounds interesting. Why should we do some of the things we are expected to do? As it turns out, the answer to the why is basically, because its respectable or because women love it. That’s basically it. I was hoping for some real, logical reason. For example, we are expected to hold doors for women, but maybe the why for it was that women had the tendency to smash right into doors due to their biologically proven weak visions. That would have been interesting. But no. You have to hold doors because its expected. The author is somehow stuck in the 50s and yet tries to be ultra-modern by telling us to listen to women and his 70 year old man’s hip advice on video games and SMS. The book is supposed to be based on hard research, which is basically their institute’s shitty surveys on what women want. The thing is, women don’t know what they want. I’m not saying that men do, but women specially do not. We’re all idiots really, not much changed from our six year old self who’s wish is to eat all the candy they can get their hands on and then after our stomach hurts, realizing it wasn’t such a neat idea after all. I’ll try to explain this by something from the book. The book has full of quotes from their survey to back up their shitty advice, but look at this great quote, “Many workplaces may still be a ‘man’s domain’ but that doesn’t excuse you to treat women like second-class citizens. Whether you’re the CEO or the janitor, you’ll get a dazzling smile if you hold the door as you walk through or offer any other professional courtesy you’d offer to a man in the workplace. Not asking for more-just the same.” Everything that is wrong with man-woman relationship in our generation is in that quote! If you are a woman and are reading that sentence and are thinking, “Huh? I don’t get it, that’s a perfectly fine sentiment” then you are part of the problem! You BITCH! How can you ask us to hold the door for you as you walk through and then talk about not wanting more, just the same? Are you holding the doors for us? Are you incapable of opening the fucking door and you need a strong Tarzan to do it for you? If door handling is such an important thing for you, fine, I’ll open every door so none of you ever have to come in conduct with a door handle again, but please don’t ask me to treat you like my male buddies, who are perfectly capable of interacting with doors without the need for a third-party person to do it for them. The female gender needs to figure out what the fuck they want. You want special treatment or similar treatment. Similar treatment is how men treat each other and that means not holding chairs for each other and not going into a mental breakdown due to toilet seat status.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Dave

    This is written for every man who will not read it. It's for the obtuse public nut scratcher / adjuster that irritates all of the women in the world who are perfectly mannered. I was hoping for a more timely set of topics like smartphone use, outdated practices (door holding, etc). This is written for every man who will not read it. It's for the obtuse public nut scratcher / adjuster that irritates all of the women in the world who are perfectly mannered. I was hoping for a more timely set of topics like smartphone use, outdated practices (door holding, etc).

  4. 5 out of 5

    Saydde

    I really, thoroughly enjoyed reading this book! Although I am a woman, I still gained quite a bit of insight as to how to act towards people from reading this "Men's" book. I'm incredibly interested in going back and reading more from the Emily Post Institute, and I even look forward to it! This book is insightful for anyone who is interested in human behaviors, any age. The writing style was not as text-book style as one would assume from the title. The author's personal tales and views of how p I really, thoroughly enjoyed reading this book! Although I am a woman, I still gained quite a bit of insight as to how to act towards people from reading this "Men's" book. I'm incredibly interested in going back and reading more from the Emily Post Institute, and I even look forward to it! This book is insightful for anyone who is interested in human behaviors, any age. The writing style was not as text-book style as one would assume from the title. The author's personal tales and views of how people interact made the book feel more like I was having a conversation with Mr. Post right then and there! -Sara Piant

  5. 4 out of 5

    Patrick Quinn

    Does exactly what it intends to do, with an emphasis on old prep (read: the New England approach). If you're curious about what the old guard consider modern manners to be, this book is both more accessible and more readable than the traditional books. Like any self-improvement book, it's tenets should be taken as guidelines, and it's up to the reader to pick and choose which ideas to apply in their life, as well as how they intend to do so. Does exactly what it intends to do, with an emphasis on old prep (read: the New England approach). If you're curious about what the old guard consider modern manners to be, this book is both more accessible and more readable than the traditional books. Like any self-improvement book, it's tenets should be taken as guidelines, and it's up to the reader to pick and choose which ideas to apply in their life, as well as how they intend to do so.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Affad Shaikh

    I have never gone to an "American, read White, Christian" wedding before. I would assume its the same as any other wedding, and therefore, I would cautiously attend, though I would feel awkward and out of place not knowing what exactly is going on and what expectations there might be of me. Watching TV you can pick up on so much of whats acceptable, however, given that there are so many variations its hard to find a safe norm. I am sure if White Christians tried to apply these normal standards o I have never gone to an "American, read White, Christian" wedding before. I would assume its the same as any other wedding, and therefore, I would cautiously attend, though I would feel awkward and out of place not knowing what exactly is going on and what expectations there might be of me. Watching TV you can pick up on so much of whats acceptable, however, given that there are so many variations its hard to find a safe norm. I am sure if White Christians tried to apply these normal standards of behavior to say a South Indian Jain wedding, they would create problems for themselves. Its safer to have some standard norms to go with, and for me, Mr. Post helps provide a reference point for those daily interactions and special occasions. The book, I expected, was going to be a very long bullet list. However, it was not the case. The organization of the book kept the reading easy and quick and makes it easy for me to reference in the future quickly when the need arises. Its not an all together complicated book, after I read things I felt that they were common sense sort of ideas. However, I think thats where the genius of the book lies. What I would consider as being common sense in a wedding situation, is in fact not. Being an immigrant that was raised in the US, I had the unique opportunity to exist in two separate cultures and create my own unique culture from the best of both of the cultures I came in contact with. That does not mean that I apply my own considerations to every point of contact I might make, to the contrary, I understood that I needed to know the "rules" in order to function properly in whatever environment I might be in. Thats why this book was a great read, it gives me some clear cut answers to things that I might be muddled about. Finally, I am not sure that I liked the structure of the book being based around this survey that is referenced throughout. While the survey forms the outline for the contents of the book, I fear with each subsequent survey the focus of the book will have to change, therefore, my copy is not as "timeless" as I would hope it to be. But then again we live in a "post-modern" society, where everything is deconstructed, so what is the use of this book anyway? It goes back to my personal experience of having to navigate cultures. Being capable of successfully navigating cultures, or having a cultural IQ, is critical to a man's future given the pace of globalization. in any cultural exchange the concepts of consideration, honesty and respect that are the underpinning of manners and etiquette apply. Here Post does a wonderful job in conveying the "why" of certain manners through anecdotes and through the survey.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan

    This was not a surprising book in its contents, but it was quick and interesting. Some reiterations that I think everyone can bear to be reminded of: * Etiquette is no more than Consideration, Respect, and Honesty for the other person. It is a social pattern that developed over centuries because it works to help people get along. When you act with etiquette, it gives the other person more trust in you, and in you more confidence. * When you interrupt someone, you are cutting that person off at the This was not a surprising book in its contents, but it was quick and interesting. Some reiterations that I think everyone can bear to be reminded of: * Etiquette is no more than Consideration, Respect, and Honesty for the other person. It is a social pattern that developed over centuries because it works to help people get along. When you act with etiquette, it gives the other person more trust in you, and in you more confidence. * When you interrupt someone, you are cutting that person off at the knees. Don't ever do it. Apologize if you do. * Be on time (in America and some other countries). * Talk slowly and use eye contact. * Introduce others in the most important to least important order. * Remember names. * Stand when meeting someone else, or if your dinner companion stands up at the table. * Stand up for the other guy and refuse to make deprecating conversations. Defend the honor of their significant other, date, or friend. Refuse to engage with men being juvenile. Show respect for different viewpoints. * Refuse to fight or argue. Let an intense debate be for one on one, not subjecting others to listen to it where they may disagree. * Be appreciative and attentive. Hold coats, elevators, doors and chairs for women. Carry packages and things. * Take pride in your appearance. * Foul language is not necessary. * Smile. When walking around have a pleasant look on your face, even if stressed out inside. * Do etiquette for all, not just to impress certain people.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Sleepless Dreamer

    Ok fine. I read this book in order to make fun of it. The thought that this book exists, that someone thought it necessary to create a book for manners, makes me laugh. See, I feel like theres a fine line between actual kindness and manners. Having manners doesn't equal being a kind and considerate person. I'm also annoyed by how the reason to do stuff for women was to pick them up. You do stuff to impress women. That seems a bit sexist. The whole theories about women in the work force as well a Ok fine. I read this book in order to make fun of it. The thought that this book exists, that someone thought it necessary to create a book for manners, makes me laugh. See, I feel like theres a fine line between actual kindness and manners. Having manners doesn't equal being a kind and considerate person. I'm also annoyed by how the reason to do stuff for women was to pick them up. You do stuff to impress women. That seems a bit sexist. The whole theories about women in the work force as well as Facebook/ mail seemed a bit outdated. I can't think of anyone sending mail nowadays. I am a woman and I open doors for men. It's a matter of comfort. Of course i know everyone can open doors by themselves, its just a nice thing to do. Women are capable of lifting heavy stuff and open doors and paying bills and what not. There's also the whole stereotypical view of men and women. My brother probably has better manners than me. I tend to be more blunt and rude than him. Not all girls like the same things (dont buy me flowers). Boys aren't all overly aggressive and smelly and what not. People are not their stereotypes, especially in the world of gender. But this book i suppose is important. It does attempt to teach something important. It's written nicely. It's very readable. I liked the tidbits that were humorous.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sunny Yoo

    A must read for any man who wants to improve in his daily, social, and work life. The three principles of etiquette are consideration, respect and honesty. He teaches me that: "We don't do these things to get anything in return - we do them because we believe in their inherent value." Through our manners there is "A terrific opportunity to do things right, thus pleasing and impressing those you're with." "These gestures are the mark of a man who is aware and respectful of the people around him." I h A must read for any man who wants to improve in his daily, social, and work life. The three principles of etiquette are consideration, respect and honesty. He teaches me that: "We don't do these things to get anything in return - we do them because we believe in their inherent value." Through our manners there is "A terrific opportunity to do things right, thus pleasing and impressing those you're with." "These gestures are the mark of a man who is aware and respectful of the people around him." I hope to exercise these practices daily in order to show the ones I love that I appreciate them and value them. To be caring and aware of how my actions affect all the people around me including strangers and impressionable children. It is our responsibility to improve the world we live in and the first start is essential manner.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Phillip.c.lacey

    An etiquette book for guys? C'mon. Right off the bat, Peter Post, great-grandson of etiquette guru Emily Post, lets his readers know that the book explains how to be considerate and that etiquette need not be something that guys automatically dismiss. Post offers both the rules of etiquette and the all important why the rules exist. Guys, this will save you many unnecessary arguments and lectures, and will improve the way you are perceived by your partners. Ladies, this will help your partners be An etiquette book for guys? C'mon. Right off the bat, Peter Post, great-grandson of etiquette guru Emily Post, lets his readers know that the book explains how to be considerate and that etiquette need not be something that guys automatically dismiss. Post offers both the rules of etiquette and the all important why the rules exist. Guys, this will save you many unnecessary arguments and lectures, and will improve the way you are perceived by your partners. Ladies, this will help your partners be more mindful and appreciative of you and all that you do. Beyond that, it's a great book for social rules, table manners, business lunches, interviews, etc.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Don Incognito

    This book is helpful enough that you should buy a copy and expect to refer to it occasionally. Where it helped me the most is the etiquette of tipping. On one of my last dates, I was annoyed at the waiter's insufficiently attentive service, so I wanted to withhold any tip. My date insisted I tip him just because of servers' negligible pay. I did what she wanted, and eventually learned from this book that I was wrong and she was right; waiters and other people giving service should be tipped some This book is helpful enough that you should buy a copy and expect to refer to it occasionally. Where it helped me the most is the etiquette of tipping. On one of my last dates, I was annoyed at the waiter's insufficiently attentive service, so I wanted to withhold any tip. My date insisted I tip him just because of servers' negligible pay. I did what she wanted, and eventually learned from this book that I was wrong and she was right; waiters and other people giving service should be tipped something whether they give good service or not, and the well-mannered response to poor service is to give a smaller tip.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Darrell

    This book is NOT suppose to entertain, and yet I found it very entertaining. Post delves into situations and things that I would never this of. The bottom line is to be the one to make everyone at ease - - but we sometimes do not know how to go about that. This was a very nice book.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Gary Parker

    The main point of the book, that we should try, within reason, to accommodate those with whom we interact, and try not to intentionally offend, is solid. But there is zero acknowledgement that a habit of deference to others enables bad behavior in abusers and users. Worse, there is not even a nod to the idea that we should insist on our own place in this world and not allow ourselves to be walked on. Rather, this book is filled with an insistence that one should lose all sense of self in deferenc The main point of the book, that we should try, within reason, to accommodate those with whom we interact, and try not to intentionally offend, is solid. But there is zero acknowledgement that a habit of deference to others enables bad behavior in abusers and users. Worse, there is not even a nod to the idea that we should insist on our own place in this world and not allow ourselves to be walked on. Rather, this book is filled with an insistence that one should lose all sense of self in deference for the sensitivities of the lowest common denominator, which weakens a soul, undermines a sense of identity, and dissolves the spine, resulting in weak men afraid of even the shadow of offense. Further, the content feels largely outdated and in need of refurbishment, even though it was only written 18 years ago. Finally, I would strongly recommend that men who are in an actively abusive relationship, or who have been abused and are still struggling to rebuild their sense of self and personal identity, put this book on the shelf until you have reclaimed your individuality and power and can approach this advice in a healthy way, and not view it as simply one more insistence that you subject yourself to the abusive whims of the users in this world. Within a healthy community of respectful people, this advice is mostly excellent. Sadly, too much of the world we have to negotiate every day in 2021 is hostile and fractured and uncooperative, and this advice may merely turn the reader into an unnecessary victim.

  14. 5 out of 5

    David Evans

    I went back and forth as to whether I should rate this book two or three stars. I opted for two mainly because I took offense at how the book perpetuates the perception that all men are Neanderthals and are completely clueless. For example, there is way too much emphasis on not peeing on the floor, discrete nose blowing, not farting, not burping, and making sure you put the toilet seat down. Got it. Thanks. Once the author got all of that out of the way, I focused on some of the finer points - g I went back and forth as to whether I should rate this book two or three stars. I opted for two mainly because I took offense at how the book perpetuates the perception that all men are Neanderthals and are completely clueless. For example, there is way too much emphasis on not peeing on the floor, discrete nose blowing, not farting, not burping, and making sure you put the toilet seat down. Got it. Thanks. Once the author got all of that out of the way, I focused on some of the finer points - good ways to introduce people - how to write sharp thank you notes - and some other tidbits. If I had a list of all the ideas this book conveyed, I would say probably 2% of them are somewhat insightful. Most of the rest are obvious and in some cases obnoxious. PS - many of these ideas apply to women just as much as they apply to men.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Douglas Kim

    A useful book on etiquette, but some of the recommendations seem outdated I think that being well-mannered is essential for both men and women, and, as such, I decided to buy this book. For the most part, this book satisfied my desire to learn about etiquette. However, some of the recommendations seemed to be a little outdated. In any case, though, I would still suggest reading this book in order to think about etiquette and the principles behind it.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Sean

    Well intentioned, but pointless. Men who don't know by now that they should be holding doors for others and should refrain from belching in public aren't the type of men who typically read for pleasure. Much of the advice comes off as outdated at best, and misogynistic at worst. I finished it because it was quick and easy, but didn't gain anything from it and wish I hadn't wasted my time. Well intentioned, but pointless. Men who don't know by now that they should be holding doors for others and should refrain from belching in public aren't the type of men who typically read for pleasure. Much of the advice comes off as outdated at best, and misogynistic at worst. I finished it because it was quick and easy, but didn't gain anything from it and wish I hadn't wasted my time.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Rahul Gupta

    Nothing new, just basic common sense marketed.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Deante Partee

    Very helpful! It is a good resource to either learn proper manners or remind yourself of them. I recommend the read.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Evellard

    Informative. Well written book. I recommend using this book as a reference guide and a quick read before the specific occasion.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Giuliano Zuan

    I wasn’t too sure what to expect when I cracked open my hardcover copy of Essential Manners for Men. I knew it was about manners (for men), but I didn’t know how it would be written and presented. Anyone can write a bulleted list of manners and rules of etiquette, but in order for the message in a book to be correctly delivered, it must be interesting and well organized. The author, Peter Post, did a very good job at laying out and organizing how the book would flow. In order to write his nation I wasn’t too sure what to expect when I cracked open my hardcover copy of Essential Manners for Men. I knew it was about manners (for men), but I didn’t know how it would be written and presented. Anyone can write a bulleted list of manners and rules of etiquette, but in order for the message in a book to be correctly delivered, it must be interesting and well organized. The author, Peter Post, did a very good job at laying out and organizing how the book would flow. In order to write his national bestseller, Mr. Post used research and statistics gathered by The Emily Post Institute. The book covers topics ranging from handshakes to tipping to job interviews. It is a well-rounded and interesting read that should be read by every man who’s willing to make positive changes in his life. Essential Manners for Men was a relatively quick and simple read. This was thanks to Mr. Post’s clear and concise style of writing. The book was well written and touched upon many etiquette issues and things that men need to work on. Throughout the book, Mr. Post uses stories from his own life as examples of what to do and what not to do. These stories make the book more interesting and relatable. Mr. Post did a good job at making something that is often taught in long boring classes into something interesting and educational. Essential Manners for Men is a well written, interesting, and informative piece on men's behavior and proper manners and etiquette. Essential Manners for Men covers a lot of different topics and areas in which men have flaws. The book asks men to reflect on what they do, and to consider how their actions affect those around them. As the book brought to light, there are a lot of little things than can really affect your relationships with people. Thoroughly cleaning up after you shave, staring at people, and attitudes in the workplace all really affect how you can interact with people. Although many lessons are taught in the book, Mr. Post’s main point was to remember the main three principles of etiquette.Those principles include consideration, respect, and honesty. Mr. Post made clear that proper etiquette is very simple. It is just being thoughtful towards others and thinking about the effects that your actions will have. Essential Manners for Men had a lot of common knowledge information. That being said, there were many parts that I found interesting and informative. I would recommend this book to anyone who just wants to learn a little more about manners and etiquette or to anyone wanting advice on how to act in certain situations.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Mason Frierson

    In this triumph of principles over dogma, the great-grandson of Emily Post provides a practical, no-nonsense, research-based guide for any man wishing to improving his relations with others at home, work, or elsewhere. This aptly-titled book first boils all of etiquette down to one timeless principle from Emily Post, and the rest of the book couches the most common situations ("common" according to survey) in terms of this principle. I had several epiphanies because this book explains WHY. Now I In this triumph of principles over dogma, the great-grandson of Emily Post provides a practical, no-nonsense, research-based guide for any man wishing to improving his relations with others at home, work, or elsewhere. This aptly-titled book first boils all of etiquette down to one timeless principle from Emily Post, and the rest of the book couches the most common situations ("common" according to survey) in terms of this principle. I had several epiphanies because this book explains WHY. Now I understand the *reason* for putting the toilet seat down, not using profanity, etc. These eye-openers were not what I expected and make the manners obvious so that there's nothing to remember. There is a simple discussion of staring (ogling) and how to avoid it, and it works! The author acknowledges that etiquette does not apply everywhere. The two other books on men's manners I looked at were somewhat dogmatic and arbitrary, and this was the jewel. Contrary to another review, the only mention of a vacation house and cricket is on pages 120-121 as a hypothetical example of something that the invited guest is UN-familiar with. For the record, I find Peter Post to be remarkably accessible and down-to-earth. He writes openly about passing gas, spitting, and other "small grossnesses." (The message is HOW to do these things if you must, rather than just "don't do it.") I did not find any paragraph to be the least bit pretentious, condescending, snooty, or hoity-toity. A man is more attractive when confident. This book triggered long-overdue changes in how others respond to me, and raised my dignity.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Paul Percival

    As another reviewer has mentioned, this book was written for every man who will never read it. In it you will discover that it is inappropriate to blatantly adjust your tackle in front of women but that it is polite to hold doors for those following you through. There are a few interesting snippets but most people that will take the time to read this are likely to already be following the majority of these ideas. Most of the manners or polite actions discussed in this book are supported by their As another reviewer has mentioned, this book was written for every man who will never read it. In it you will discover that it is inappropriate to blatantly adjust your tackle in front of women but that it is polite to hold doors for those following you through. There are a few interesting snippets but most people that will take the time to read this are likely to already be following the majority of these ideas. Most of the manners or polite actions discussed in this book are supported by their 2011 survey results that identified that this is how most women want us to behave. I was hoping that there would be more discussion of the 'Why' part of etiquette but this is essentially boiled down to 'because she might reward you with a dazzling smile'. Also bear in mind that this is written from an American perspective. The chapter on tipping in particular was therefore largely irrelevant to me as it is very different in the UK. Taking social media advice in this context seemed unusual but of course it is worth considering how you manage your online presence. ***Spoiler*** Manners; be considerate, respectful and honest towards others and you will do just fine.

  23. 4 out of 5

    John Williams

    More investigation into the (d)evolution of manners, this one by Peter Post (the great-grandson of Emily Post) is geared toward the modern man. It is equal parts etiquette for dummies (e.g., proper introductions made easy) and self help (e.g., anger management). It does not give you the nuts and bolts of classic 20th century manners, but it does argue convincingly that good manners still matter. Would be a good wade-in for guys who want or need to know the basics.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Raleighhunter

    I actually bought this for my 18 year old boy, because we all know kids don't always listen to their dad, but I figured I'd run through it too. Most of the stuff in these books, I've taught to him already but looking for reinforcement. It is all common sense & dictated from a woman's point of view because they represented 86% of the survey respondents. Maybe other parts of the country is different but growing up in Texas, well, I knew all this already. I actually bought this for my 18 year old boy, because we all know kids don't always listen to their dad, but I figured I'd run through it too. Most of the stuff in these books, I've taught to him already but looking for reinforcement. It is all common sense & dictated from a woman's point of view because they represented 86% of the survey respondents. Maybe other parts of the country is different but growing up in Texas, well, I knew all this already.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    In this book are a handful of practical ideas to help both men and women show consideration toward each other—and page after page about why men are the problem. The man isn't really engaged in the conversation? There's only one possible explanation: men just don't listen. Same goes for toilet seats, etc. Every source of friction in a relationship is due to these rough men who have no manners and don't care. Peter Post is emblematic of everything that's wrong with men today. In this book are a handful of practical ideas to help both men and women show consideration toward each other—and page after page about why men are the problem. The man isn't really engaged in the conversation? There's only one possible explanation: men just don't listen. Same goes for toilet seats, etc. Every source of friction in a relationship is due to these rough men who have no manners and don't care. Peter Post is emblematic of everything that's wrong with men today.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Baqerjeryo

    Peter post came from a long chain of Posts great minds. This 2nd edition gives all answers in any situation for a fine man to be in good image in front family, friends, and even strangers. It gives a clean and clear instructions on to deal with many social barrier. It takes you to start the first step to be a gentleman

  27. 5 out of 5

    Adriana

    A cool book that explains to the modern man how certain manners are out of style and why some never go out of style. There are many examples and good explanations to consider. Also, it helped me understand some of the anxieties men feel when they don't know how to behave with women. A cool book that explains to the modern man how certain manners are out of style and why some never go out of style. There are many examples and good explanations to consider. Also, it helped me understand some of the anxieties men feel when they don't know how to behave with women.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Sergio

    I enjoyed this book. Although I found a lot of it common sense, I thought the chapter on tipping was well worth the read. I would recommend this book to either the clueless friend, or someone who wants to take a look and maybe refine their manners. It was definitely an easy read.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Garrett Cash

    It's a good book that does what it intends to do, which is list the most important manners for men. The problem is that 80% of the content is very common sense stuff for the civilized man. There isn't too much to learn here if you already have socially adequate manners. It's a good book that does what it intends to do, which is list the most important manners for men. The problem is that 80% of the content is very common sense stuff for the civilized man. There isn't too much to learn here if you already have socially adequate manners.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Glenn Banks

    very simple things, probably best for the teen boy or someone that need a little help. it would be a good gift if you wanted to let that person know there are things he needs to work on. for me i read as a refresher.

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