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Chinese Theories of Fiction: A Non-Western Narrative System

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In this innovative work, Ming Dong Gu examines Chinese literature and traditional Chinese criticism to construct a distinctly Chinese theory of fiction and places it within the context of international fiction theory. He argues that because Chinese fiction, or xiaoshuo, was produced in a tradition very different from that of the West, it has formed a system of fiction theo In this innovative work, Ming Dong Gu examines Chinese literature and traditional Chinese criticism to construct a distinctly Chinese theory of fiction and places it within the context of international fiction theory. He argues that because Chinese fiction, or xiaoshuo, was produced in a tradition very different from that of the West, it has formed a system of fiction theory that cannot be adequately accounted for by Western fiction theory grounded in mimesis and realism. Through an inquiry into the macrocosm of Chinese fiction, the art of formative works, and theoretical data in fiction commentaries and intellectual thought, Gu explores the conceptual and historical conditions of Chinese fiction in relation to European and world fiction. In the process, Gu critiques and challenges some accepted views of Chinese fiction and provides a theoretical basis for fresh approaches to fiction study in general and Chinese fiction in particular. Such masterpieces as the Jin Ping Mei (The Plum in the Golden Vase) and the Hongloumeng (The Story of the Stone) are discussed at length to advance his notion of fiction and fiction theory.


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In this innovative work, Ming Dong Gu examines Chinese literature and traditional Chinese criticism to construct a distinctly Chinese theory of fiction and places it within the context of international fiction theory. He argues that because Chinese fiction, or xiaoshuo, was produced in a tradition very different from that of the West, it has formed a system of fiction theo In this innovative work, Ming Dong Gu examines Chinese literature and traditional Chinese criticism to construct a distinctly Chinese theory of fiction and places it within the context of international fiction theory. He argues that because Chinese fiction, or xiaoshuo, was produced in a tradition very different from that of the West, it has formed a system of fiction theory that cannot be adequately accounted for by Western fiction theory grounded in mimesis and realism. Through an inquiry into the macrocosm of Chinese fiction, the art of formative works, and theoretical data in fiction commentaries and intellectual thought, Gu explores the conceptual and historical conditions of Chinese fiction in relation to European and world fiction. In the process, Gu critiques and challenges some accepted views of Chinese fiction and provides a theoretical basis for fresh approaches to fiction study in general and Chinese fiction in particular. Such masterpieces as the Jin Ping Mei (The Plum in the Golden Vase) and the Hongloumeng (The Story of the Stone) are discussed at length to advance his notion of fiction and fiction theory.

32 review for Chinese Theories of Fiction: A Non-Western Narrative System

  1. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    150510: this is more fun than actually reading some very very long works of Classical Chinese fiction: possibly that is merely a reflection of not having read the relevant works, though it is fascinating to learn of this entire different metaphysics of narrative systems... i should read more Chinese fiction... i have 231018 read some more, not necessarily classical but admired, such as ‘red sorghum’, ‘republic of wine’, ‘frog’ by Mo Yan, some not well written but interesting satire in ‘the fat y 150510: this is more fun than actually reading some very very long works of Classical Chinese fiction: possibly that is merely a reflection of not having read the relevant works, though it is fascinating to learn of this entire different metaphysics of narrative systems... i should read more Chinese fiction... i have 231018 read some more, not necessarily classical but admired, such as ‘red sorghum’, ‘republic of wine’, ‘frog’ by Mo Yan, some not well written but interesting satire in ‘the fat years’ by Chan Koonyoung, some classic like ‘the true story of ah Q’ by Lu Yun, some recent like ‘boy in the twilight’, ‘to live’ by Yu Hua, and just finished ‘the three body problem’ trilogy by Lu Cixin and was ultimately disappointed) though i liked the classic horror in ‘strange stories from a Chinese studio’, all of these are not necessarily classic but seem to draw from an entirely different world, the Chinese world, and are thus interesting perspectives on all our worlds...

  2. 4 out of 5

    Wuxia Wanderings

  3. 4 out of 5

    Tom Carter

  4. 4 out of 5

    Mike

  5. 4 out of 5

    Brandon Toh

  6. 5 out of 5

    abcdefg

  7. 4 out of 5

    Emily

  8. 4 out of 5

    Zaffiro

  9. 4 out of 5

    David Kong

  10. 4 out of 5

    Eärcaraxë

  11. 5 out of 5

    LP

  12. 5 out of 5

    Szymon

  13. 5 out of 5

    Marselia

  14. 4 out of 5

    Pedro

  15. 5 out of 5

    James

  16. 5 out of 5

    Patrick Murphy

  17. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kody

  19. 4 out of 5

    Michael

  20. 4 out of 5

    Adriana

  21. 4 out of 5

    Igrowastreesgrow

  22. 5 out of 5

    Magicat42

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jakub

  24. 5 out of 5

    Katt Hansen

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kristen

  26. 5 out of 5

    Maciej Borowik

  27. 4 out of 5

    Michael Joseph Schumann

  28. 4 out of 5

    Anna

  29. 4 out of 5

    Robobobo

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ryan

  31. 5 out of 5

    Taif Ahmed

  32. 4 out of 5

    Dieso

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