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FoodSutra: A Memoir of the Foods of India

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A comprehensive and entertaining exploration of the foods of India, told through a foodie's experiences, with delightfully quirky facts and stories. Indian food is the aggregate of many regional cuisines. This wide-ranging account describes these regional cuisines and their main dishes, connected by the author's travels, experiences, and memories over many decades. Over 40 A comprehensive and entertaining exploration of the foods of India, told through a foodie's experiences, with delightfully quirky facts and stories. Indian food is the aggregate of many regional cuisines. This wide-ranging account describes these regional cuisines and their main dishes, connected by the author's travels, experiences, and memories over many decades. Over 400 dishes are covered, including not only ingredients and methods of cooking, but also associated interesting facts and anecdotes. For example: why a fish dish is called Bombay Duck; the misconception that Vindaloo means vinegar and potatoes; the special kabab created for an ageing and toothless nawab; how multiple elements in Chaat, the Indian street foods, combine to create a symphony of tastes; and many more. With beautiful photographs, FoodSutra is an essential, easy-to-read reference on Indian food. It gives a comprehensive overview of the foods of this vast and complex country and will appeal to anyone who wants to know more about Indian food and its association with Indian culture.


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A comprehensive and entertaining exploration of the foods of India, told through a foodie's experiences, with delightfully quirky facts and stories. Indian food is the aggregate of many regional cuisines. This wide-ranging account describes these regional cuisines and their main dishes, connected by the author's travels, experiences, and memories over many decades. Over 40 A comprehensive and entertaining exploration of the foods of India, told through a foodie's experiences, with delightfully quirky facts and stories. Indian food is the aggregate of many regional cuisines. This wide-ranging account describes these regional cuisines and their main dishes, connected by the author's travels, experiences, and memories over many decades. Over 400 dishes are covered, including not only ingredients and methods of cooking, but also associated interesting facts and anecdotes. For example: why a fish dish is called Bombay Duck; the misconception that Vindaloo means vinegar and potatoes; the special kabab created for an ageing and toothless nawab; how multiple elements in Chaat, the Indian street foods, combine to create a symphony of tastes; and many more. With beautiful photographs, FoodSutra is an essential, easy-to-read reference on Indian food. It gives a comprehensive overview of the foods of this vast and complex country and will appeal to anyone who wants to know more about Indian food and its association with Indian culture.

38 review for FoodSutra: A Memoir of the Foods of India

  1. 5 out of 5

    Pamela N.

    First I read the Kama Sutra, now this sutra: a collection of aphorisms ( fitting observations of simple truths) in the form of a manual. This writer takes you on a gentle, fragrant trip around India, highlighting the characteristic food of the multiple regions/states of India. In the same way culture gets stereotyped, which represents approximately 10% of any culture, so can the food of a region. (Think of Chinese, Mexican, Italian restaurant menus.) In this well written memoir, we are exposed t First I read the Kama Sutra, now this sutra: a collection of aphorisms ( fitting observations of simple truths) in the form of a manual. This writer takes you on a gentle, fragrant trip around India, highlighting the characteristic food of the multiple regions/states of India. In the same way culture gets stereotyped, which represents approximately 10% of any culture, so can the food of a region. (Think of Chinese, Mexican, Italian restaurant menus.) In this well written memoir, we are exposed to the multiple ingredients, preparations, emotional responses, and general usage of a dish. I was fascinated that despite the lack of recipes, that this memoir created many of the same effects on me as does a good cook book. Some of the descriptions were so detailed I felt I might recreate the dish today. Being a typical American - that is, my knowledge of geography is weak - I was astounded to discover the vast number of regions in India. With this vast number is an even greater number of the variations of the dishes described. He describes an incredible variety of ingredients and spices, many of which I've heard of, but some are mysterious. And then there are the variations of different preparations, from roasting, toasting, soaking, frying, baking, grinding, and so forth. I appreciated the sequence of the "story," and the personal anecdotes included. I thought this book made such interesting reading, since I couldn't put it down from the opening page until I finished reading it. I was glad to recognize some of my favorite dishes and learn from which region they originated, and eager to learn more about others. This book is professionally written and presented, with excellent photographs. One can almost smell the tantalizing aromas. There is a table of contents, and the always valuable Index. This to me is the hallmark of a genuine book, versus a vanity publication. In addition, there are pages of references to enhance the experience. In the same way the Kama Sutra opened my mind to certain possibilities, so does the FoodSutra to others. I'm open to a whole new world of dishes from India I'm eager to try, and to attempt creating in my own kitchen.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Kimmie

    Interesting book...however I was expecting more of a cookbook with memoir.

  3. 5 out of 5

    oohlalabooks

    This was interesting and entertaining to read! I love Indian food and I now have a better understanding of the spices and ingredients used. I enjoy both South and North regional cooking styles, though one is more spicy. Thank you to the author for a gifted copy. This is my honest review.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    Wonderful book

  5. 4 out of 5

    Mike He

    For anyone who likes Indian food, this is a must read.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Edward

    Very interesting, have not tried any recipes yet, but sure want to.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Angela

  8. 5 out of 5

    Susan

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Berry-O'Cain

  10. 4 out of 5

    Suzanne Eastman

  11. 4 out of 5

    Dianne Robbins

  12. 4 out of 5

    Astrid Galactic

  13. 5 out of 5

    Gabby

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kim Ellis

  15. 4 out of 5

    Lizette

  16. 5 out of 5

    Mark

  17. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca Oman

  18. 5 out of 5

    Yueyee Vue

  19. 5 out of 5

    Carmen

  20. 4 out of 5

    Christa Bengtsson

  21. 4 out of 5

    Zach Yancey

  22. 5 out of 5

    John

  23. 4 out of 5

    Lori Piscicelli

  24. 4 out of 5

    Cassandra

  25. 5 out of 5

    Dana

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jill

  27. 5 out of 5

    Michele

  28. 5 out of 5

    lou brown

  29. 5 out of 5

    Cynthia Fry

  30. 5 out of 5

    Deborah Hughes

  31. 5 out of 5

    Traci

  32. 5 out of 5

    Brenda Hojonski

  33. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Moore

  34. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Masci

  35. 4 out of 5

    Tricia Rossbach

  36. 5 out of 5

    Kelsey

  37. 4 out of 5

    Laura

  38. 4 out of 5

    Bethany

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