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The Best American Poetry 2005

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This eagerly awaited volume in the celebrated Best American Poetry series reflects the latest developments and represents the state of the art today. Paul Muldoon, the distinguished poet and international literary eminence, has selected -- from a pool of several thousand published candidates -- the top seventy-five poems of the year. With insightful comments from the poet This eagerly awaited volume in the celebrated Best American Poetry series reflects the latest developments and represents the state of the art today. Paul Muldoon, the distinguished poet and international literary eminence, has selected -- from a pool of several thousand published candidates -- the top seventy-five poems of the year. With insightful comments from the poets illuminating their work, and series editor David Lehman's perspicacious foreword, The Best American Poetry 2005 is indispensable for every poetry enthusiast.


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This eagerly awaited volume in the celebrated Best American Poetry series reflects the latest developments and represents the state of the art today. Paul Muldoon, the distinguished poet and international literary eminence, has selected -- from a pool of several thousand published candidates -- the top seventy-five poems of the year. With insightful comments from the poet This eagerly awaited volume in the celebrated Best American Poetry series reflects the latest developments and represents the state of the art today. Paul Muldoon, the distinguished poet and international literary eminence, has selected -- from a pool of several thousand published candidates -- the top seventy-five poems of the year. With insightful comments from the poets illuminating their work, and series editor David Lehman's perspicacious foreword, The Best American Poetry 2005 is indispensable for every poetry enthusiast.

30 review for The Best American Poetry 2005

  1. 5 out of 5

    Chris - Quarter Press Editor

    I quite enjoyed many of the poems here. I picked this up in hopes that it would expose me to some new poets that I might enjoy, and it did exactly that. For a collection, I also enjoyed the range of work here. There were some poems that definitely weren't for me--albeit well-written--those types of poems that make me feel like I'm dumb for not "getting it." There are some playful poems, wordplay and entertainment at their hearts. There are more scene / story-oriented poems, which I love. And ther I quite enjoyed many of the poems here. I picked this up in hopes that it would expose me to some new poets that I might enjoy, and it did exactly that. For a collection, I also enjoyed the range of work here. There were some poems that definitely weren't for me--albeit well-written--those types of poems that make me feel like I'm dumb for not "getting it." There are some playful poems, wordplay and entertainment at their hearts. There are more scene / story-oriented poems, which I love. And there are traditional forms, too. So, in all, it gives a solid variety of styles and poem types so that it should--in fact--cater to all audiences in some capacity. Did every poem blow my mind? No, but a few did. Did the whole collection scream "Best" to me? No, but many deserved that merit. Did it introduce me to some amazing writers? Yes! Two of which I have already purchased a collection from them. So, in the end, if you want a solid variety of poems by some talented poets, this is good book to place a bet on for finding things you'll enjoy.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ace Boggess

    Probably my second favorite volume in the series, if for no other than Julie Sheehan's "Hate Poem," which is one of the best poems of the past twenty years. Probably my second favorite volume in the series, if for no other than Julie Sheehan's "Hate Poem," which is one of the best poems of the past twenty years.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Joshua

    Underwhelming for the most part - apparently, Paul Muldoon and I don't share similar tastes in poetry. I'll need to who else has edited BAP in the past. Kay Ryan's "Home to Roost" stood out, especially given how close to 9/11 it was written. Reading this collection amid the COVID-19 pandemic may have affected my experience of it, also. I just didn't feel the urgency that I expect from art right now or at least the sense of complete dislocation. Underwhelming for the most part - apparently, Paul Muldoon and I don't share similar tastes in poetry. I'll need to who else has edited BAP in the past. Kay Ryan's "Home to Roost" stood out, especially given how close to 9/11 it was written. Reading this collection amid the COVID-19 pandemic may have affected my experience of it, also. I just didn't feel the urgency that I expect from art right now or at least the sense of complete dislocation.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Samuel Gee

    liked most of it! one poet at the end says that spinoza’s project “fails” because “non-Euclidean geometry has relativized the axiom.” Lmao. Dumbass

  5. 5 out of 5

    Amory Blaine

    Took this to jury duty because the last poem starts, "I showed up for jury duty..." It got me through the whole day and gave me interesting topics to think about while waiting in crowded rooms. Took this to jury duty because the last poem starts, "I showed up for jury duty..." It got me through the whole day and gave me interesting topics to think about while waiting in crowded rooms.

  6. 5 out of 5

    David

    Seemed fewer great poems in this issue.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Brendan

    Rating: Soft 4. I had some doubts going into this, due to being unimpressed by Muldoon's Quoof. As the Guest Editor, he chose the poems represented here. There are several gems though. In Series Editor David Lehman's Foreword, he addresses the debate over populism vs. elitism in poetry. Not much stands out from Muldoon's Introduction, though both men let their leftist political leanings show. Anyway, these are the more notable pieces: "The Beats" - Charles Bukowski: A bit harsh. Unfairly, methink Rating: Soft 4. I had some doubts going into this, due to being unimpressed by Muldoon's Quoof. As the Guest Editor, he chose the poems represented here. There are several gems though. In Series Editor David Lehman's Foreword, he addresses the debate over populism vs. elitism in poetry. Not much stands out from Muldoon's Introduction, though both men let their leftist political leanings show. Anyway, these are the more notable pieces: "The Beats" - Charles Bukowski: A bit harsh. Unfairly, methinks. "Five Roses in the Morning" - Stephen Dunn: A bit romantic, without being too sappy. "For Kateb Yacine" - Marilyn Hacker: Longish poem about an Algerian writer / activist. "Media Effects" - Jerome Sala: A funny piece comparing poetry, film, advertising, and TV. "Moscow" - Jason Schneiderman: A shortish piece about his past relationships. "Some Words Inside of Words" - Richard Wilbur: A funny, rhyming poem. and she was more beautiful because she believed she was - Stephen Dunn, "Five Roses in the Morning" The drink we drank was cordial. In a spoon, the ceiling fan whirled. - Matthea Harvey, "I May After Leaving You Walk Quickly or Even Run" A closed window is both a closed window and an obvious symbol of how I hate you. - Julie Sheehan, "Hate Poem"

  8. 4 out of 5

    SmarterLilac

    This is a great one, which I will always remember for its most striking piece--Stephen Dunn's "Five Roses in the Morning": March 16, 2003 On tv, the showbiz of war, so I turn it off wishing I could turn it off, and glance at the five white roses in front of the mirror on the mantel, looking like ten. That they were purchased out of love and are not bloody red won't change a goddamned thing-- goddamned things, it seems, multiplying every day. Last night, the roses numbered six, but she chose to wear one in he This is a great one, which I will always remember for its most striking piece--Stephen Dunn's "Five Roses in the Morning": March 16, 2003 On tv, the showbiz of war, so I turn it off wishing I could turn it off, and glance at the five white roses in front of the mirror on the mantel, looking like ten. That they were purchased out of love and are not bloody red won't change a goddamned thing-- goddamned things, it seems, multiplying every day. Last night, the roses numbered six, but she chose to wear one in her hair, and she was more beautiful because she believed she was. It changed the night a little. For us, I mean.

  9. 4 out of 5

    martha

    Only a few poems really jumped out at me, but I still really enjoy how this series includes notes from the authors on their anthologized poem, which are often really funny or really illuminating.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Marc Kohlman

    Erotic, humorous and brilliant collection of poems! One of the best editions of the BAP series. I am glad to have received my copy from my cousin last Christmas.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Diane

    Favorites: A Blessing from My Sixteen Years' Son by Mary Karr, Favorites: A Blessing from My Sixteen Years' Son by Mary Karr,

  12. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    This book is full of short poems that will bring up all kinds of emotions. A few boring...but we cannot all connect with everything, right? I checked it out at the library.

  13. 5 out of 5

    John

  14. 5 out of 5

    Eva Madrah

  15. 5 out of 5

    Emily

  16. 5 out of 5

    Acolyte

  17. 5 out of 5

    Adam Collins

  18. 4 out of 5

    Brian

  19. 5 out of 5

    Anthony Scarzafava

  20. 5 out of 5

    Loren Smith

  21. 4 out of 5

    T

  22. 4 out of 5

    Kim Welliver

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Bang

  24. 4 out of 5

    Tim Hawkins

  25. 4 out of 5

    Raymond

  26. 4 out of 5

    Michelle Hoogterp

    I enjoyed this collection thoroughly

  27. 4 out of 5

    Louise Leonard

  28. 5 out of 5

    Loyal

  29. 4 out of 5

    Marcus

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sara Kearns

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