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Death at Greenway

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From the award-winning author of The Day I Died and The Lucky One, a captivating suspense novel about nurses during World War II who come to Agatha Christie’s holiday estate to care for evacuated children, but when a body is discovered nearby, the idyllic setting becomes host to a deadly mystery. Bridey Kelly has come to Greenway House—the beloved holiday home of Agatha Chr From the award-winning author of The Day I Died and The Lucky One, a captivating suspense novel about nurses during World War II who come to Agatha Christie’s holiday estate to care for evacuated children, but when a body is discovered nearby, the idyllic setting becomes host to a deadly mystery. Bridey Kelly has come to Greenway House—the beloved holiday home of Agatha Christie—in disgrace. A terrible mistake at St. Prisca’s Hospital in London has led to her dismissal as a nurse trainee, and her only chance for redemption is a position in the countryside caring for children evacuated to safety from the Blitz. Greenway is a beautiful home full of riddles: wondrous curios not to be touched, restrictions on rooms not to be entered, and a generous library, filled with books about murder. The biggest mystery might be the other nurse, Gigi, who is like no one Bridey has ever met. Chasing ten young children through the winding paths of the estate grounds might have soothed Bridey’s anxieties and grief—if Greenway were not situated so near the English Channel and the rising aggressions of the war. When a body washes ashore near the estate, Bridey is horrified to realize this is not a victim of war, but of a brutal killing. As the local villagers look among themselves, Bridey and Gigi discover they each harbor dangerous secrets about what has led them to Greenway. With a mystery writer’s home as their unsettling backdrop, the young women must unravel the truth before their safe haven becomes a place of death . . .


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From the award-winning author of The Day I Died and The Lucky One, a captivating suspense novel about nurses during World War II who come to Agatha Christie’s holiday estate to care for evacuated children, but when a body is discovered nearby, the idyllic setting becomes host to a deadly mystery. Bridey Kelly has come to Greenway House—the beloved holiday home of Agatha Chr From the award-winning author of The Day I Died and The Lucky One, a captivating suspense novel about nurses during World War II who come to Agatha Christie’s holiday estate to care for evacuated children, but when a body is discovered nearby, the idyllic setting becomes host to a deadly mystery. Bridey Kelly has come to Greenway House—the beloved holiday home of Agatha Christie—in disgrace. A terrible mistake at St. Prisca’s Hospital in London has led to her dismissal as a nurse trainee, and her only chance for redemption is a position in the countryside caring for children evacuated to safety from the Blitz. Greenway is a beautiful home full of riddles: wondrous curios not to be touched, restrictions on rooms not to be entered, and a generous library, filled with books about murder. The biggest mystery might be the other nurse, Gigi, who is like no one Bridey has ever met. Chasing ten young children through the winding paths of the estate grounds might have soothed Bridey’s anxieties and grief—if Greenway were not situated so near the English Channel and the rising aggressions of the war. When a body washes ashore near the estate, Bridey is horrified to realize this is not a victim of war, but of a brutal killing. As the local villagers look among themselves, Bridey and Gigi discover they each harbor dangerous secrets about what has led them to Greenway. With a mystery writer’s home as their unsettling backdrop, the young women must unravel the truth before their safe haven becomes a place of death . . .

30 review for Death at Greenway

  1. 5 out of 5

    Lori Rader-Day

    There's a short time when I'm the only person who can say they have read a book—my book—and it gets a five-star rating. No shame. I worked HARD on this book. Hope you like it, too! There's a short time when I'm the only person who can say they have read a book—my book—and it gets a five-star rating. No shame. I worked HARD on this book. Hope you like it, too!

  2. 4 out of 5

    DeAnn

    3.5 Agatha stars This one is more historical fiction than mystery/suspense but I enjoyed reading it and learning a bit more about Agatha Christie. Most of the story is told from Bridey’s perspective. She’s a nurse-in-training during the early days of WWII in London. A mishap at the hospital occurs and Bridey is sent to Greenway House with ten children (all under 5!) being evacuated from London. She’s joined by another nurse and the two women try to figure out the best way to care for the children. 3.5 Agatha stars This one is more historical fiction than mystery/suspense but I enjoyed reading it and learning a bit more about Agatha Christie. Most of the story is told from Bridey’s perspective. She’s a nurse-in-training during the early days of WWII in London. A mishap at the hospital occurs and Bridey is sent to Greenway House with ten children (all under 5!) being evacuated from London. She’s joined by another nurse and the two women try to figure out the best way to care for the children. Agatha Christie owns the house with her husband, and they have agreed to take in the evacuees to do their part in the war effort. I was a bit disappointed that there was only one cameo performance. It probably makes sense though as Agatha was frequently in London during this time. The house itself is almost a character, a big white structure up on a hill with surrounding woods and very near the English Channel. It turns out the house is safer than London, but there are still bombings and close calls. The other nurse has some secrets of her own and soon there’s a dead body that has turned up. This could almost be called a coming-of-age story as Bridey really comes into her own and becomes a strong character. There are definitely secrets and mistrust among the villagers, but I never felt a strong sense of tension and danger. There were a few times when I worried for Bridey’s sanity. The author notes at the end are fascinating and talk about the research that went into this one. Thank you to Scene of the Crime/William Morrow/Custom House and NetGalley for the opportunity to read this one and share my honest review.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jenny Lawson

    A lovely little historical thriller/murder mystery. (It's set in Agatha Christie's estate but she's not really much in the book.) A lovely little historical thriller/murder mystery. (It's set in Agatha Christie's estate but she's not really much in the book.)

  4. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    Damn it. This started out so well. But damn it crashed and burned I didnt find this to be a mystery but historical fiction/literay. It focused much more on the war and the characters' lives in it than the murders. Yes, characters had mysterious backgrounds and mysterious secrets. But they were mostly political and/or more human flaws rather than anything that revolves around creating suspense the murder. Even within the genre of historical fiction/literary (and to be fair I'm not a reader of these Damn it. This started out so well. But damn it crashed and burned I didnt find this to be a mystery but historical fiction/literay. It focused much more on the war and the characters' lives in it than the murders. Yes, characters had mysterious backgrounds and mysterious secrets. But they were mostly political and/or more human flaws rather than anything that revolves around creating suspense the murder. Even within the genre of historical fiction/literary (and to be fair I'm not a reader of these genres) it meandered like a scenic dream through the mountains. And while I love a scenic drive through the mountains, I don't need it in a book that is supposed to be suspenseful. The time jumps were jarring and often at times where suspense could have been built. It was like the time jump caused more meandering, somehow. The narrator wasn't bad. She was good. The problem was that there are so many characters that she couldn't modulate enough for them. The book did change POVs each chapter (though most were from Brighty's point of view). But either you need a cast or a narrator that could've handled more modulation for thr different characters

  5. 5 out of 5

    Mara

    3.5 stars - Hmm, I'm at somewhat of a loss as to how to rate this book. On the one hand, I think it does not deliver as a mystery novel really at all. Based on the title and description, I was certainly expecting a mystery novel set at Agatha Christie's country home during WWII. That's not really the vibe here. On the other hand, I think as a historical fiction novel with strong mystery and romance elements in it, it's quite successful. The writing is really nice, the characters are pretty inter 3.5 stars - Hmm, I'm at somewhat of a loss as to how to rate this book. On the one hand, I think it does not deliver as a mystery novel really at all. Based on the title and description, I was certainly expecting a mystery novel set at Agatha Christie's country home during WWII. That's not really the vibe here. On the other hand, I think as a historical fiction novel with strong mystery and romance elements in it, it's quite successful. The writing is really nice, the characters are pretty interesting, and I liked the setting. So I guess just make sure you know what kind of book you're reading getting into it and go from there

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sarah-Hope

    The publisher's promo materials describe Death at Greenway as "a captivating suspense novel about nurses during World War II who come to Agatha Christie’s holiday estate to care for evacuated children, but when a body is discovered nearby, the idyllic setting becomes host to a deadly mystery.... Bridey and Gigi [the nurses] discover they each harbor dangerous secrets about what has led them to Greenway. With a mystery writer’s home as their unsettling backdrop, the young women must unravel the t The publisher's promo materials describe Death at Greenway as "a captivating suspense novel about nurses during World War II who come to Agatha Christie’s holiday estate to care for evacuated children, but when a body is discovered nearby, the idyllic setting becomes host to a deadly mystery.... Bridey and Gigi [the nurses] discover they each harbor dangerous secrets about what has led them to Greenway. With a mystery writer’s home as their unsettling backdrop, the young women must unravel the truth before their safe haven becomes a place of death." Well... yes and no. Death at Greenway isn't your standard suspense novel. It's much more the story of Bridey's coming into her own: as a nurse and as an individual. Gigi plays a significant role, but it's really Bridey's book. Bridey and Gigi aren't working to "unravel the truth before their safe haven becomes a place of death." They're trying to figure out who they are, where they fit in this world at war, and where they'll fit in a post-war world. So, Death at Greenway wasn't the novel I was expecting, but it was quite a good read all the same. Bridey is an interesting character, the sole survivor of a fire that killed her mother and siblings. Her working-class background adds to the challenge of trying to become a nurse. Basically, Bridey feels she deserves nothing and is determined to build close bonds with no one. There's also death at Greenway and an on-again-off-again bit of amateur investigation, but this is a novel for readers of WWII and (dare I say it?) women's fiction, not for fans of suspense, who might well enjoy Death at Greenway, but will find the suspense only occasional. I received a free electronic review copy of this title from the publisher via Edelweiss; the opinions are my own.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Sigrid A

    I picked this up on impulse from Libro.fm's advanced listener program, and I'm really glad that I did. This was the perfect audiobook to listen to on a long car trip. The narration is very well done, and the story is absorbing right from the beginning. One point: Although this story takes place at Agatha Christie's estate, and it's based on several real people that the author discovered through her research, Christie herself is only a very minor character. With books like this, I wonder if the Ch I picked this up on impulse from Libro.fm's advanced listener program, and I'm really glad that I did. This was the perfect audiobook to listen to on a long car trip. The narration is very well done, and the story is absorbing right from the beginning. One point: Although this story takes place at Agatha Christie's estate, and it's based on several real people that the author discovered through her research, Christie herself is only a very minor character. With books like this, I wonder if the Christie hook is primarily there to give the book a way to stand out in a crowded market. Even if that's the case, this historical mystery is well done. The main character, Bridie, is complex and interesting, and the situation she finds herself makes for a great read.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Diane S ☔

    3.5 thoughts soon.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Dan Myatt

    I read this whilst at Greenway so the books descriptions of the house and gardens were easy to imagine. Evacuated children and they carers take over Greenway and are there when a murder occurs, nobody really investigates it, then a nurse disappears and nobody really investigates it and there are a spate of mysterious deaths (and yeap nobody investigates them either) The book for me plodded on with no real focus and a lot of the chapters added nothing to the story (it was as if the author had a lis I read this whilst at Greenway so the books descriptions of the house and gardens were easy to imagine. Evacuated children and they carers take over Greenway and are there when a murder occurs, nobody really investigates it, then a nurse disappears and nobody really investigates it and there are a spate of mysterious deaths (and yeap nobody investigates them either) The book for me plodded on with no real focus and a lot of the chapters added nothing to the story (it was as if the author had a list of historical events and they wanted to get them in rather then progress the mystery) In all one of those usual historical mystery stories that's okay but not great.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Carla Johnson-Hicks

    3.5 stars. This is an historical mystery, set during World War II at Greenway, Agatha Christie’s holiday estate. Bridey Kelly has arrives at Greenway House to care for children wo were evacuated from London for their safety. Bridey was a nurse trainee, who was dismissed from the program, but those working at the house believe she is a nurse. The home is wonderful with a library full of mysteries, but Bridey is more concerned about getting to know the other nurse, Gigi. Not only is Bridey concern 3.5 stars. This is an historical mystery, set during World War II at Greenway, Agatha Christie’s holiday estate. Bridey Kelly has arrives at Greenway House to care for children wo were evacuated from London for their safety. Bridey was a nurse trainee, who was dismissed from the program, but those working at the house believe she is a nurse. The home is wonderful with a library full of mysteries, but Bridey is more concerned about getting to know the other nurse, Gigi. Not only is Bridey concerned about caring for the children, but she is constantly worried about being bombed, with the estate being so close to the English Channel. When a body washes ashore, who it turns out was murdered, there is a mystery to solve. Death at Greenaway is told from Bridey’s perspective. Gigi, the other nurse, has plenty of secrets that Bridey tries to find out and they are gradually revealed as the story progresses. There are also secrets among the villagers that help to sort out who Gigi is and perhaps what happens to her. I was a bit disappointed that Agatha Christie was not in the story, just one cameo appearance, but that didn't impact the story much. So as I said at the beginning, it is a historical fiction story, has a mystery, but is more of a coming of age story for Bridey, as a nurse during WWII. Bridey is an interesting character. Her mother and siblings were killed in a fire and she is a working class woman trying to become a nurse. Bridey has low self-esteem and not only feels she doesn't deserve much in life, but she doesn't want to get close to anyone either. It is nice to see her confidence grow as she investigates. This book has well crafted characters, plenty of subplots and an abundance of twists that will leave you guessing. I always enjoy seeing everyday people during the war and how they deal with situations as they arise. Make sure you read the author's notes about her research and how this book came about. Moira Quirk narrated this book and although this is the first I have listened to that she performed, it won't be the last. She gave voice to the characters with tone, accents and expression. The audiobook definitely added to my enjoyment of the story. If you are interested in historical fiction, coming of age, WWII and those who stayed at home and all with a bit of intrigue, then I recommend this one. The publisher generously provided me with a copy of this audiobook upon request. The rating and opinions shared are my own.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jess

    I really feel like the summary of this book is false advertising. I thought Death at Greenway would have something to do with Agatha Christie. Perhaps she would solve a mystery, or be writing one, or speak to characters about mysteries ... In the entire book, the famous novelist shows up for one scene in which she *checks notes* plays the piano. That's it. Otherwise, this book has absolutely nothing whatever to do with Agatha Christie. I would have been willing to forgive the random background s I really feel like the summary of this book is false advertising. I thought Death at Greenway would have something to do with Agatha Christie. Perhaps she would solve a mystery, or be writing one, or speak to characters about mysteries ... In the entire book, the famous novelist shows up for one scene in which she *checks notes* plays the piano. That's it. Otherwise, this book has absolutely nothing whatever to do with Agatha Christie. I would have been willing to forgive the random background setting which is little more than name dropping and click bait, had the book been at all interesting. It's boring. It's really, really boring. There are too many characters that are indistinguishable from one another and major problems with changing narrative voice. It almost seems like the book is an Oprah Giveaway: "You get a chapter! And you get a chapter!" Not to mention the bizarre approach to omniscience where we are offered the thoughts of different characters in the same scene. Aside from all of that, the murder mystery is lackluster at best and contrived at worst. I was really disappointed with this book. I always feel a bit badly when I negatively review an ALC. I am grateful for the advanced copy! Hopefully this review saves the time of someone who may not enjoy this book. If others love the book, I am sure they will find solidarity in the positive reviews.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Dan Radovich

    Rader-Day delves into the realm of 'historical thriller' with DEATH AT GREENWAY, and what a great job she does. We are walking around the coastal home of Agatha Christie with a group of children who have been evacuated from London to escape The Blitz. The two nurses, Bridey & Gigi, sent to care for the children have little time to get to know each other and the staff at Greenway before a body is found floating near the estate. The game's a foot... sorry wrong detective, so begins the search for Rader-Day delves into the realm of 'historical thriller' with DEATH AT GREENWAY, and what a great job she does. We are walking around the coastal home of Agatha Christie with a group of children who have been evacuated from London to escape The Blitz. The two nurses, Bridey & Gigi, sent to care for the children have little time to get to know each other and the staff at Greenway before a body is found floating near the estate. The game's a foot... sorry wrong detective, so begins the search for the killer. Populated with well crafted characters, plenty of subplots and an abundance of twists that will leave you guessing. Dame Christie pops into the tale, it is after all her home, just enough to lend an air of mystery. I felt very comfortable believing everything that happens in this story, great research job by Rader-Day to bring the era to life. I highly recommend this for all suspense/thriller fans.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Sherry Harris

    DEATH AT GREENWAY is superb. Lori Rader-Day layers in what I call the "oh, no" factor ratcheting up the suspense and combines that with beautiful writing and an amazing setting. I loved it. DEATH AT GREENWAY is superb. Lori Rader-Day layers in what I call the "oh, no" factor ratcheting up the suspense and combines that with beautiful writing and an amazing setting. I loved it.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Nancy Price

    I received a copy of this book in a Goodreads giveaway. Two of my favorite genres are historical fiction and mysteries, but somehow this combination of the two didn't work well for me. The author did an excellent job of creating atmosphere, but the pace of the book was slow and meandered from one situation to another. It was hard to keep track of the multitude of characters and subplots, and the "mystery" seemed to be almost an afterthought in the retelling of the historical events. I seemed to b I received a copy of this book in a Goodreads giveaway. Two of my favorite genres are historical fiction and mysteries, but somehow this combination of the two didn't work well for me. The author did an excellent job of creating atmosphere, but the pace of the book was slow and meandered from one situation to another. It was hard to keep track of the multitude of characters and subplots, and the "mystery" seemed to be almost an afterthought in the retelling of the historical events. I seemed to be left with multiple unresolved questions. The book presented many different points of view, and these were clearly delineated in the chapter headings, but some of these points of view were from fairly minor characters. It was obvious that the author had done a lot of research, and I enjoyed the parts dealing with the evacuated children from London - but overall, this was just not for me.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kathy

    Lori Rader-Day always gives readers a unique story, something different from anything else they’ve read. I love that freshness, and the characters that help create that uniqueness. I’ve been introduced to dark sky parks, handwriting expertise, and a character who beat the odds of being kidnapped as a baby. And, in Death at Greenway, Lori Rader-Day takes a leap into another whole pond. Well, she actually leaps across the pond to merry old England when it wasn’t so merry during WWII. Historical my Lori Rader-Day always gives readers a unique story, something different from anything else they’ve read. I love that freshness, and the characters that help create that uniqueness. I’ve been introduced to dark sky parks, handwriting expertise, and a character who beat the odds of being kidnapped as a baby. And, in Death at Greenway, Lori Rader-Day takes a leap into another whole pond. Well, she actually leaps across the pond to merry old England when it wasn’t so merry during WWII. Historical mystery fiction! Oh, but she doesn’t stop there with delighting me. The setting is Agatha Christies’ Greenway home and South Devon, with London as the starting and ending points. As part of her research, Rader-Day visited Greenway and stayed there. She brings the authenticity of having walked the house and grounds to this story. Is it little wonder I’ve been looking forward to reading Death at Greenway. After a beginning chapter in which Agatha Christie is at Greenway with her husband and house staff listening to the radio announcement from Prime Minister Chamberlin that England was officially at war with Germany (the listening world encapsulated in that kitchen scene), focus is changed to London, April 1941. London and its inhabitants are suffering greatly from the daily bombings of the German planes, with whole families dying in their homes, despite the air raids and shelters. There is a general consensus that the children of London must be saved, taken away from the city to the country, where they will be safe. Parents are handing over their children to organized evacuation operations, while the parents stay and work in London. Bridget Kelly, who is training to be a nurse, finds herself part of such an operation due to an egregious error she has made in treating a patient. Bridget is given the choice to give up her nurse’s training completely or be a part of an evacuation of ten children to an undisclosed country location. Bridget chooses to lend her services to the evacuation movement. War is hell and chaotic, and Bridget starts her journey with the evacuated children, their sponsors, and another nurse in a crowded train station, with much shouting and hurrying and immediate caring for the children. As if the chaos of soldiers and children and parents saying goodbye to their children weren’t enough, the second nurse in the party introduces herself as Bridget Kelly, too. It seems everything in our protagonist Bridget’s life is surreal at this point. Mrs. Arbuthnot, who is in charge of the group, insists that they choose two dissimilar names, so protagonist Bridget becomes Bridey, and the new Bridget becomes Gigi. Bridey finds out quickly that Gigi is happy to let Bridey handle the children by herself for long periods of time while Gigi socializes with a group of other young people on the train. With two babies in the mix to care for, it’s quite the challenge. It’s a long train ride to their destination, which they finally learn is Greenway, home of the famous author Agatha Christie, in South Devon. Greenway is beautiful, but the evacuation team and their wards are kept to several rooms and told not to enter others. However, they have lots of space outdoors to walk and explore. Agatha Christie is in residence at Greenway when the group arrives, but she doesn’t interact with the evacuee group. She leaves for London not long after. This story does not include or involve the Grand Dame of Mystery, but we do get some peeks at a habit or two of hers. I enjoyed learning more about the evacuation of children from London and the ten children or vacs, as they were called, at Greenway. Rader-Day weaves a fascinating story into the historical facts of this evacuation, and she even talked to one of the vacs still alive, little Doreen. The two nurses, Bridey and Gigi, carry a heavy responsibility, to keep these children healthy and safe, which is more of a challenge than Bridey thought it would be. Although Greenway is far from London, the German planes are still a danger, as they bomb nearby locations, causing the house and earth around the group to tremble in response. Bridey wonders why they were evacuated to somewhere on the coast and to a large white house on a hill. So, what is this story? An historical fiction book or a mystery? For me, it was historical fiction with lots of mysteries running through it. There is murder, but everyone is so busy with the war that a full investigation is not forthcoming. But, still the murder adds to the mystery of what is happening in the small village of Galmpton, where healthy men are dying disproportionate to statistics. What is important in the story? What direction should the reader be focusing on? Oh, Rader-Day requires our undivided attention, so readers read closely and remember that characters tend to appear in a Lori Rader-Day book for a reason. Keep those little gray cells sharp, as the many threads introduced do have connections. Some of the threads: Nurses who aren’t really nurses. Travelers from the train from London to Greenway whom Gigi talks to and who end up in South Devon, too. Man found dead in the River Dart, murdered. Other men in the village who seem healthy and too young to die are dying. Somebody is stealing jam and leaving a muddy boot print. Gigi’s wisht man has been seen by little Doreen. Mrs. Poole, the mother of a child kept by her from evacuating arrives at Greenway in distress, and then she is missing. Bridey is friendly with the local doctor, but when he makes a romantic move, she can’t respond. Gigi has hidden money and hidden motives in her role as an evacuation nurse. And much more. Rader-Day keeps it all flowing toward resolution, both on the worldly stage and the smaller one starring Bridey. The first month or so of this story goes a bit slower than the rest of the time forward, but it doesn’t drag. It is an important time of setting up characters and mysteries and daily life of the evacuation, including what goes on in the village below Greenway. The reader is learning about who is who and who does what and that the Germans aren’t the only destructive force to fear. And then, a year has soon passed at Greenway, and lots of changes are taking place again. To tell beyond the early days at Greenway would deprive readers of discovering all the intrigue and revelations for themselves. There is so much good story still to come, and I was quite happy with the way it all wrapped up in the end, threads coming together and mysteries solved. I think the author was very much in tune with what ending was consistent with a WWII story, and it shows great judgment not to try and rewrite history. Multiple characters are used to voice the narration of the book, which gives readers the edge of knowing more of what’s going on than any one of the characters. It’s Bridey’s voice we hear the most, which is fitting, as her journey is the one we are following to fruition. I enjoy this use of multiple voices in separate chapters. They’re like the different puzzle pieces used to make the picture whole. And, oh those characters, they are pure Lori Rader-Day magic, one of the things she does best. She brings characters to life with a deftness born of raw talent but perfected by hard work. The character of Bridget/Bridey shows such growth that I am actually proud of her, like she’s someone I really know. That’s how well-developed characters are supposed to affect readers. And, Gigi is a character who shows me not to judge too quickly or assume you know her too soon. So many characters have poignant stories in this book, and readers will follow them all through the sadness and the joy they invoke. Death at Greenway tells the stories of ordinary people inside the extraordinary story of war, and it feels very intimate. That’s the accomplishment of a skillful storyteller. I thoroughly enjoyed Death at Greenway, and I think readers are in for a treat. Don’t get hung up in what category to pigeon-hole this book. Just enjoy the read. I thank NetGalley and the William Morrow Publishers for an advanced reader’s copy of this book.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Lynn

    4-1/2 stars. I will start by saying I do not usually read mysteries. I enjoyed this historical fiction/mystery story, although it was slow at certain points and I ended up a bit confused with some of the plot twists. That not withstanding, the character development of the many characters was quite good, and I loved the creativity of a mystery story set at Greenway, Agatha Christie's home during World War II, which I knew nothing about. The author seems to have done quite a bit of research into G 4-1/2 stars. I will start by saying I do not usually read mysteries. I enjoyed this historical fiction/mystery story, although it was slow at certain points and I ended up a bit confused with some of the plot twists. That not withstanding, the character development of the many characters was quite good, and I loved the creativity of a mystery story set at Greenway, Agatha Christie's home during World War II, which I knew nothing about. The author seems to have done quite a bit of research into Greenway and the Mass Observation Project, etc.- and I loved the Author's Note at the end. All in all, I felt this was a good read, with a thought-provoking mindset of what the uncertainty and fears would have been like for those living during wartime in England, whether they were adults or young children. Thank you to Goodreads for my Advance Reader's Edition. The review above is totally my own and not influenced by anyone else.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Tessa

    No question about it: suspense author Lori Rader-Day's foray into historical fiction paid off. This atmospheric story of nurses Bridey and Gigi in WWII Britain and their time working at Agatha Christie's summer home -- to which a number of London children have been evacuated -- blends history with espionage, mystery, and murder in a way that echoes Christie's stellar work. With captivating characters and a setting that's expertly drawn, Rader-Day does a brilliant job of blending fiction with rea No question about it: suspense author Lori Rader-Day's foray into historical fiction paid off. This atmospheric story of nurses Bridey and Gigi in WWII Britain and their time working at Agatha Christie's summer home -- to which a number of London children have been evacuated -- blends history with espionage, mystery, and murder in a way that echoes Christie's stellar work. With captivating characters and a setting that's expertly drawn, Rader-Day does a brilliant job of blending fiction with real-world events and plunging readers into the past. A must-read for Agatha Christie devotees and historical mystery fans.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Joy O’Toole

    While I went in thinking this was going to be more of a mystery and have more of Agatha Christie in it, I found that instead it’s her house and it’s inhabitants that are the focus of this historical fiction novel—their back stories, their current living situation, and the results of living during World War 2. The author had clues that I remembered after she showed what they meant, similar to Agatha Christie. The hardest part was the changing narrators but the chapter headings helped there so don While I went in thinking this was going to be more of a mystery and have more of Agatha Christie in it, I found that instead it’s her house and it’s inhabitants that are the focus of this historical fiction novel—their back stories, their current living situation, and the results of living during World War 2. The author had clues that I remembered after she showed what they meant, similar to Agatha Christie. The hardest part was the changing narrators but the chapter headings helped there so don’t ignore those. And I really found myself sympathetic to the main protagonist, Bridey. If you like more literary mysteries and/or historical fiction, this may be a book for you.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Heather Gudenkauf

    Death at Greenway by Lori Rader-Day is an immersive, expansive WWII tale of murder and revenge. Set at Agatha Christie’s real-life country home, disgraced nurse-in-training, Bridey Kelly, is tasked to help care for a group of children seeking safety from war-torn London. Still, danger is everywhere and with unseen evil lurking, Bridey has to navigate a mysterious web of lies. Well-crafted and multi-layered, Death at Greenway is a vivid portrait of a woman trying to outrun her past in hopes of fi Death at Greenway by Lori Rader-Day is an immersive, expansive WWII tale of murder and revenge. Set at Agatha Christie’s real-life country home, disgraced nurse-in-training, Bridey Kelly, is tasked to help care for a group of children seeking safety from war-torn London. Still, danger is everywhere and with unseen evil lurking, Bridey has to navigate a mysterious web of lies. Well-crafted and multi-layered, Death at Greenway is a vivid portrait of a woman trying to outrun her past in hopes of finding her place in a broken world.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Cook Memorial Public Library

    Recommended by Ellen J. and Jo. Check our catalog: https://encore.cooklib.org/iii/encore... Recommended by Ellen J. and Jo. Check our catalog: https://encore.cooklib.org/iii/encore...

  21. 5 out of 5

    Christina

    I very much enjoyed this novel. It takes place at Greenway, the home of the Queen of Mystery, Agatha Christie. In this story, we meet Bridget Kelly, a nurse trainee who’s joined a group rescuing children from bombed out London during WWII, but she’s got a secret she’s hiding. When people start turning up dead, she begins to question whether something more sinister is beneath the surface. I loved the historical element, the homage to Christie, and the characters. I couldn’t put this one down. Than I very much enjoyed this novel. It takes place at Greenway, the home of the Queen of Mystery, Agatha Christie. In this story, we meet Bridget Kelly, a nurse trainee who’s joined a group rescuing children from bombed out London during WWII, but she’s got a secret she’s hiding. When people start turning up dead, she begins to question whether something more sinister is beneath the surface. I loved the historical element, the homage to Christie, and the characters. I couldn’t put this one down. Thank you, William Morrow, for the finished copy in exchange for my honest review.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Lori Sinsel Harris

    Not what I expected after reading the book description. I must say the way this book is described/advertised is a bit misleading. Yes, there are secrets and murder, but they seem to be secondary to the plot instead of leading the parade. Bridey Kelly is a probationary nurse who gets in trouble and is sent away from the hospital where she is training to Agatha Christie's home, Greenway to care for evacuated children from London during the Blitz. Christie herself only appears twice in the book, sp Not what I expected after reading the book description. I must say the way this book is described/advertised is a bit misleading. Yes, there are secrets and murder, but they seem to be secondary to the plot instead of leading the parade. Bridey Kelly is a probationary nurse who gets in trouble and is sent away from the hospital where she is training to Agatha Christie's home, Greenway to care for evacuated children from London during the Blitz. Christie herself only appears twice in the book, speaking a couple of words only once, she is a shadow figure and not involved in the plot or even any of the many subplots in the book. Bridey and another "nurse", Gigi, are the main focus of the storyline, with Bridey taking the lead role. Both have secrets they are hiding, but the book focuses more on the war and the consequences of war than on any great mystery. Yes, two bodies do appear, yes, almost every character, even secondary ones seem to have some kind of secret they are hiding, but there is no great focus on the murders or mysteries. Told by several different POV's the story was sometimes confusing. I kept waiting and waiting for this great thrilling mystery to develop but it never quite got there. The most exciting part was when Bridey suspects the town Doc of having sticky fingers! Sorry, though well researched and many of the characters are based on real people, this novel just does not deliver on the thriller/mystery objective, more a basic historical fiction novel about the London Blitz, the evacuated children and the effect of war on them all. I don't really know how to rate this one. The writing is good, the characters are very well developed, the story just does not meet its mark as far as what it was intended to be. That being said, it is not a bad story, just not the Agatha Christie type mystery you are lead to believe you are going to read. I will give 3 stars, letting everyone decide for yourselves. It is a nice story, but only that. Thank you to William Morrow Publishing and to Net Galley for the free ARC, I am leaving my honest review in return.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

    Death at Greenway may have it's foundations in factual events, but the story is an absolute mess. It seems like many authors who draw inspiration from Agatha Christie either in her real life or her writing style don't understand the brilliance in the simplicity of what she did. This is the case in this book, where Rader-Day tries to work in so many different storylines and mysteries that all she gives the reader a headache instead of a desire to keep turning pages. Bridey ends up as a children's Death at Greenway may have it's foundations in factual events, but the story is an absolute mess. It seems like many authors who draw inspiration from Agatha Christie either in her real life or her writing style don't understand the brilliance in the simplicity of what she did. This is the case in this book, where Rader-Day tries to work in so many different storylines and mysteries that all she gives the reader a headache instead of a desire to keep turning pages. Bridey ends up as a children's nurse for kids removed from London at the estate of Agatha Christie. With her is another Bridget Kelly who doesn't seem the slightest bit qualified for the job. Then things get stolen from Greenway. Healthier older people in the village end up dead. People Bridey met on the train to Greenway show up milling around the village. A man is found drowned near Greenway. Are you keeping up? If you are, good for you, because the story, while mostly told by Bridey, occasionally veers off and is periodically told by other characters, which does absolutely nothing to improve the cohesiveness of the story. I wish I could find something redeeming about this book but I was really just grateful that I finished it.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Tracee

    A wonderful read, especially for fans of Agatha Christie, but really for anyone. Agatha isn't really IN the book, but her presence is felt and there are 'easter eggs' for devotees. A wonderful read, especially for fans of Agatha Christie, but really for anyone. Agatha isn't really IN the book, but her presence is felt and there are 'easter eggs' for devotees.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Robin

    The most towering figure in mystery fiction is Agatha Christie. She created and influenced countless plots and tropes, and invented iconic detectives. Surely no mystery writer can set a pen to paper without feeling in her debt. Re-paying this debt with her impressionistic Death at Greenway is Lori Rader-Day, a writer known for multiple point of view novels and indirect storytelling. Her style could not be further from Agatha’s, but – there’s still that debt to be paid. The book is set during WWII The most towering figure in mystery fiction is Agatha Christie. She created and influenced countless plots and tropes, and invented iconic detectives. Surely no mystery writer can set a pen to paper without feeling in her debt. Re-paying this debt with her impressionistic Death at Greenway is Lori Rader-Day, a writer known for multiple point of view novels and indirect storytelling. Her style could not be further from Agatha’s, but – there’s still that debt to be paid. The book is set during WWII at Mrs. Christie’s summer home, Greenway, in Devon. During the war the Mallowans (for that was Agatha’s married name) lent their house to a war nursery – or to children evacuated from London, cared for by nurses. Rader-Day has chosen to focus her story on Bridget Kelly, a failed nurse in training, who takes up the war nursey job out of desperation. Bridget, or Bridey as she comes to be known, as her fellow nurse apparently has the same name (she’s called Gigi), is suffering from we would now call PTSD. Her entire family has been wiped out in a London bombing, and she’s not sure where she fits or belongs. Her trauma comes out at different points in the story, believably so, as she sees something awful or is simply overwhelmed at one time or another by her grief. This is more of a war novel than a mystery, though there are several deaths, red herrings, and plot twists. The power of the book lies in the writing, and the creation of an atmosphere and a feeling of being there with the characters as they live through war. What must it have been like to live through a war? Rader-Day gives the reader a vivid picture, from the bombs that do fall in Devon (the children and nurses huddled in the Mallowan’s living room), the traumatized man in the pub who has lost his son, the recollections and uncertainties of everyone in the small village who have all been touched, one way or another, by the war. The story has a long timeline, opening in 1941 and ending in 1946 (more or less, there are some codas), which gives scope not only to the war itself but to Bridey’s change and growth as she becomes more sure of her calling as a nurse, sorts out her feelings for the children – she’d been told not to love them, but of course she does – and gains some confidence as well as a true love for Greenway, even though she had went there reluctantly to begin with. She and her fellow nurse, Gigi, could not be more different. Bridey is green and young; Gigi is older, beautiful, and more sophisticated; but the two of them, mostly from shared experiences in close quarters, come to be fond of one another. The book is also a story of their friendship and what happens to friendship when tested by trauma. Reading the book, I gained a real picture of what Greenway must have been like, as well as a picture of the Devon countryside, which, then as now, was not untouched by trauma, grief and disaster. Every reading experience is different, and every reader is seeking a different experience when they read. If you’re looking for lovely prose, a feeling of the time, and an enigmatic if fascinating main character, this is the book for you.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Literary Lioness

    The year, 1941. Hitler has expanded his war on London. Air raids are occurring daily, destroying homes and businesses; taking loved ones. Parents are unable to care for their children, due to mandatory civic duty. Who will take care of the children? Bridey Kelly wants to be a nurse, and has begun her training. Yet, when she oversteps her duties, her supervisor encourages another assignment: assistance with healthy evacuee children. Desperate to return to her training, she does not correct the as The year, 1941. Hitler has expanded his war on London. Air raids are occurring daily, destroying homes and businesses; taking loved ones. Parents are unable to care for their children, due to mandatory civic duty. Who will take care of the children? Bridey Kelly wants to be a nurse, and has begun her training. Yet, when she oversteps her duties, her supervisor encourages another assignment: assistance with healthy evacuee children. Desperate to return to her training, she does not correct the assumption of being a certified nurse. Mrs. Arbuthnot is determined to save England by “molding children into proper British citizens”. However, she has to ensure their safety first. Therefore, when she has the ability to evacuate ten children to the secluded home of Agatha Christie, arrangements are made. In Death at Greenway, Lori Rader-Day brings the true story of Agatha Christie opening her home to evacuee children to life in this historical fiction. Mixing truth, imagination, and a little mystery to chronicle the “simple” people, this novel is history with a twist of “Clue”. With little to no profanity, sexual content, or spelling and grammatical errors, Lori is an exquisite writer. However, the tale is filled with lots of dialogue and not enough intrigue. This led to a slow-moving plot, and a struggle to finish. None the less, a rating of 4 out of 5 stars is awarded. All in all, Death at Greenway is a well-written and researched book with a slight unexpected curve. Recommended for those interested in the untold stories of World War II, the account of what happened in Greenway with astonish you. Thank you to #NetGalley, #SceneOfTheCrime, and #WilliamMorrow for the free advanced reading copy in exchange for my honest review.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Christine

    I didn't realize this book was inspired by true events and that children really were evacuated to Agatha Christie's holiday home during World War II. The author's note at the end of the story does a great job of explaining the background behind this book. In Rader-Day's novel, I love the character of Bridey, one of the nurses who is put in charge of the children. I like the friendship she forms with Gigi, the other nurse, who she teams up with to solve a murder in the home of the world-famous au I didn't realize this book was inspired by true events and that children really were evacuated to Agatha Christie's holiday home during World War II. The author's note at the end of the story does a great job of explaining the background behind this book. In Rader-Day's novel, I love the character of Bridey, one of the nurses who is put in charge of the children. I like the friendship she forms with Gigi, the other nurse, who she teams up with to solve a murder in the home of the world-famous author of murder mysteries. The middle part of the book moves slower than I would have likes, but things start to pick up and I thought the ending was wonderful. I would rate the book 3.5/4 stars and think it's an enjoyable book for historical fiction fans. Thank you to NetGalley, William Morrow Books, and Scene of the Crime early reads for providing an advance copy of this ebook. The book was provided to me at no cost, but my review is voluntary and unbiased.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Ranjini Shankar

    It’s a well written book but not my taste in content. It’s marketed as suspense/thriller whereas it’s more historic fiction and a character study. During WWII children are evacuated to the countryside and Bridget Kelly who is a failed nurse has been sent to take care of 10 children alongside another nurse, Gigi. Both these women hold secrets that they don’t want anyone to find out about but it’s all threatened when a dead body winds up at the foot of their country manor. For a book involving mul It’s a well written book but not my taste in content. It’s marketed as suspense/thriller whereas it’s more historic fiction and a character study. During WWII children are evacuated to the countryside and Bridget Kelly who is a failed nurse has been sent to take care of 10 children alongside another nurse, Gigi. Both these women hold secrets that they don’t want anyone to find out about but it’s all threatened when a dead body winds up at the foot of their country manor. For a book involving multiple dead bodies, very very little time is spent investigating them. The solve comes accidentally as the study of who Bridget is and who she wants to be unfolds. This is very much a book about an independent woman trying to figure out where she belongs during the war effort and beyond and it’s a slow burn.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Aranda

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I opened the book expecting a lovely mystery, but unfortunately, the plot left a lot to be desired. In the beginning, the characters sounded interesting, but they never developed into something likeable. They never developed into anything. I ended the book feeling no emotional connection to any of the characters. The mystery was a murder, but never felt like a mystery at all. The victim is a character that we barely get to know and who never really had much of a tie to anyone. I think there was I opened the book expecting a lovely mystery, but unfortunately, the plot left a lot to be desired. In the beginning, the characters sounded interesting, but they never developed into something likeable. They never developed into anything. I ended the book feeling no emotional connection to any of the characters. The mystery was a murder, but never felt like a mystery at all. The victim is a character that we barely get to know and who never really had much of a tie to anyone. I think there was another murder, too, but it was so forgettable that I don't remember who it was. There are really no interesting clues that lead you to suspect who the murderer is, and you get to a point when you are so bored with the story line that you don't even care. 418 pages, and nothing really happens. The plot is scattered, and there are a lot of parts that don't seem to connect with anything or anyone else.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Teresa Bateman

    It's WWII and Bridget Kelly is taking care of small children, evacuated from London for their own safety, to Greenway House--a home on the coast owned by Agatha Christie. Bridget is not alone. The other nurse, however, isn't much use. The small household staff isn't enthusiastic about the evacuees. Locals aren't necessarily friendly. Then a body shows up. It turns out everyone has secrets to hide, including Bridget. This is a thickly-layered, well-researched book that tells the story from many d It's WWII and Bridget Kelly is taking care of small children, evacuated from London for their own safety, to Greenway House--a home on the coast owned by Agatha Christie. Bridget is not alone. The other nurse, however, isn't much use. The small household staff isn't enthusiastic about the evacuees. Locals aren't necessarily friendly. Then a body shows up. It turns out everyone has secrets to hide, including Bridget. This is a thickly-layered, well-researched book that tells the story from many different viewpoints. Agatha Christie is a mere shadow in the background. I found the pace to be a tad plodding, at times, but it picked up speed toward the end. Good for those who love historical fiction, but not exactly my cup of tea.

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