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It Fell from the Sky

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A picture book about community, art, the importance of giving back—and the wonder that fell from the sky. It fell from the sky on a Thursday. None of the insects know where it came from, or what it is. Some say it’s an egg. Others, a gumdrop. But whatever it is, it fell near Spider’s house, so he’s convinced it belongs to him. Spider builds a wondrous display so that insect A picture book about community, art, the importance of giving back—and the wonder that fell from the sky. It fell from the sky on a Thursday. None of the insects know where it came from, or what it is. Some say it’s an egg. Others, a gumdrop. But whatever it is, it fell near Spider’s house, so he’s convinced it belongs to him. Spider builds a wondrous display so that insects from far and wide can come look at the marvel. Spider has their best interests at heart. So what if he has to charge a small fee? So what if the lines are long? So what if no one can even see the wonder anymore? But what will Spider do after everyone stops showing up?


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A picture book about community, art, the importance of giving back—and the wonder that fell from the sky. It fell from the sky on a Thursday. None of the insects know where it came from, or what it is. Some say it’s an egg. Others, a gumdrop. But whatever it is, it fell near Spider’s house, so he’s convinced it belongs to him. Spider builds a wondrous display so that insect A picture book about community, art, the importance of giving back—and the wonder that fell from the sky. It fell from the sky on a Thursday. None of the insects know where it came from, or what it is. Some say it’s an egg. Others, a gumdrop. But whatever it is, it fell near Spider’s house, so he’s convinced it belongs to him. Spider builds a wondrous display so that insects from far and wide can come look at the marvel. Spider has their best interests at heart. So what if he has to charge a small fee? So what if the lines are long? So what if no one can even see the wonder anymore? But what will Spider do after everyone stops showing up?

30 review for It Fell from the Sky

  1. 5 out of 5

    Kat

    I don’t often review children’s books here, though they’re a regular part of my job, but I have to admit I’m a HUGE sucker for a good picture book and this new one by Canadian author-illustrator team the Fan Brothers, Eric and Terry, is a gorgeous, whimsical story about what happens when a mysterious object falls from the sky. As the insects humorously debate what this object could be and where it came from, a shrewd spider crafts his own plan for this “Wonder from the Sky”. As long as the o I don’t often review children’s books here, though they’re a regular part of my job, but I have to admit I’m a HUGE sucker for a good picture book and this new one by Canadian author-illustrator team the Fan Brothers, Eric and Terry, is a gorgeous, whimsical story about what happens when a mysterious object falls from the sky. As the insects humorously debate what this object could be and where it came from, a shrewd spider crafts his own plan for this “Wonder from the Sky”. As long as the other insects are willing to pay him a small fee, they can enjoy this and other wonders too. Will his plan work? Needless to say, things are never that easy. It’s a beautifully illustrated book with one of my very favorite art styles, monochromatic with splashes of color, and the personalities of each of the insects comes through in the drawings and words. The themes, including community, selfishness versus generosity, and patience are ones that people of all ages can appreciate. Whether you have kids, grandkids, nieces, nephews or you’re just a big kid at heart like me, this is a short, charming, thought-provoking book with great character-building themes that young and old can enjoy! ★★★★★ This will be published September 28, 2021. Thanks to Simon & Schuster and Edelweiss for this review copy in exchange for my honest opinions.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Debbie

    I recently read this picture book to a class of Grade 4 students, and we were all delighted by: 1. the moral intelligences depicted in this story's message; 2. how the creatures interacted with each other; and especially, 3. the illustrations! The extremely detailed monochromatic drawings are brought to life with pops of color, making this a stunning book to treasure! Thank you, Kat, for bringing this beautifully illustrated book (by Canadians, no less!) to my attention! I recently read this picture book to a class of Grade 4 students, and we were all delighted by: 1. the moral intelligences depicted in this story's message; 2. how the creatures interacted with each other; and especially, 3. the illustrations! The extremely detailed monochromatic drawings are brought to life with pops of color, making this a stunning book to treasure! Thank you, Kat, for bringing this beautifully illustrated book (by Canadians, no less!) to my attention!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Abigail

    When a wonderful thing falls from the sky, all of the insects in the garden marvel at its beauty, and wonder what it is. Frog thinks it is a gumdrop, Grasshopper that is it a fallen star or planet, and Luna Moth that it is a magical chrysalis. But when Spider arrives, he immediately perceives that what it truly is, is an opportunity. Spinning his web around the luminously colorful globe, he claims it as his own, and builds an amusement park attraction around it, raking in the "money" (AKA leaves When a wonderful thing falls from the sky, all of the insects in the garden marvel at its beauty, and wonder what it is. Frog thinks it is a gumdrop, Grasshopper that is it a fallen star or planet, and Luna Moth that it is a magical chrysalis. But when Spider arrives, he immediately perceives that what it truly is, is an opportunity. Spinning his web around the luminously colorful globe, he claims it as his own, and builds an amusement park attraction around it, raking in the "money" (AKA leaves) from all the other residents. But as he grows ever greedier, the other creatures lose interest in his show, and stop paying to see the thing that fell from the sky. Then, when a five-fingered creature from the sky snatches the wondrous globe away, Spider is left alone, with nothing. It is only when he perceives that the moon above shares her light with all, even a greedy spider, that he understands what he must do... I have been a great admirer of the Fan Brothers since the 2016 publication of their debut picture-book, The Night Gardener . I find the stories they tell magical, and the artwork they produce astonishingly beautiful. What a talented family! Needless to say, when I heard that It Fell from the Sky was due out this year, I was most eager to track it down. I'm happy to report that it did not disappoint, offering an enchanting story of a human object that finds its way into the animal world, with unexpected results; and absolutely gorgeous illustrations, as expressive as they are lovely. The story here - readers will immediately perceive that the "wonder," which is never named in the text, is a marble - reminded me a bit of Elsa Beskow's classic, The Sun Egg , in which a woodland elf comes upon an orange and thinks that it is a celestial body come to earth. Spider's reformation - inspired by the moon, he learns to share the wonders that come from the sky - provides a natural, and heartwarming conclusion to the tale. As for the visuals, the artwork here is breathtaking. Mostly black and white, with vividly colorful accents - the rainbow marble, the green leaves used by the insects as payment - it is immediately engrossing, playing with light and shade in a most beautiful way, and perfectly capturing the expressions and character of each insect. Highly, highly recommended, to all fellow Fan fans, and to picture-book readers who appreciate both engaging stories with heartfelt messages and beautiful artwork.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Erin Buhr

    This new book from the creators of THE NIGHT GARDENER is absorbing, creative and smart. The premise is simple enough, a marble "falls from the sky" into a garden and the insects around it react in different ways, but the resulting story and illustrations are clever and nuanced. The largely black and white illustrations are striking and the setting overs a fun perspective for children to consider. The story and illustrations leave gaps for the kids to fill, which adds an interesting layer through This new book from the creators of THE NIGHT GARDENER is absorbing, creative and smart. The premise is simple enough, a marble "falls from the sky" into a garden and the insects around it react in different ways, but the resulting story and illustrations are clever and nuanced. The largely black and white illustrations are striking and the setting overs a fun perspective for children to consider. The story and illustrations leave gaps for the kids to fill, which adds an interesting layer throughout. It is a book you will want to re-read, ponder, and talk about.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Ricki

    I cannot get enough of this book. I just want to hug it every time I see it. The story and illustrations work in a way that is simply magical. Their talent is simply remarkable. When an object falls from the sky ("A marble!" -My 7-year-old), the insects are convinced it must be from another world. Spider decides to develop a display and invites the insects far and wide. They merely need to pay a leaf to see the object. But spider learns an important lesson---one that serves as a good reminder to I cannot get enough of this book. I just want to hug it every time I see it. The story and illustrations work in a way that is simply magical. Their talent is simply remarkable. When an object falls from the sky ("A marble!" -My 7-year-old), the insects are convinced it must be from another world. Spider decides to develop a display and invites the insects far and wide. They merely need to pay a leaf to see the object. But spider learns an important lesson---one that serves as a good reminder to all of us. I loved this book and expect it to see some awards. It dazzled me.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Moonkiszt

    Featured in a grandma reads session. RTC. . .

  7. 5 out of 5

    Lata

    Beautiful drawings paired with a gently humourous story. (Though I did find all the top hats a bit weird.)

  8. 4 out of 5

    Mortisha Cassavetes

    Beautifully Illustrated children's book with a wonderful story! I loved it! After a colorful sphere falls from the sky into the critter garden, the insects are amazed. No spoilers! I highly recommend it! Great for all ages. Beautifully Illustrated children's book with a wonderful story! I loved it! After a colorful sphere falls from the sky into the critter garden, the insects are amazed. No spoilers! I highly recommend it! Great for all ages.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jill

    This is a cute picture book with gorgeous illustrations. I enjoyed it but found the usual assignment of gender and gender roles a bit frustrating. Every single creature in this book is male except the ladybug and the luna month (who is nurturing and motherly). The spider, the walking stick, the frog, the stinkbug, the grasshopper, etc. - all male. Why is this the default case in so many picture books? Sigh.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Heidi

    I love these illustrations and the message. Beautiful, and definitely a book to be shared.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Peacegal

    A gem and an absolute delight. This sweet and amazingly detailed little story will be an instant hit with bug fans and anyone who just enjoys looking at stunning artwork. I hope this one will be considered when Caldecott nominations come around.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Michele Knott

    A great book to use to talk about what is the book really about? What message does the author want us to know? Because the conversations surrounding those 2 questions will keep readers talking for awhile!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Marcia

    I am a huge fan of the Fan brothers and marvel at how they create one stunning book after another. This is a terrific story that focuses on the mystery of an object that fell from the sky and the sneaky spider that tries to capitalize on it. But those illustrations! The use of color, detail, and so much personality! One of the best of the year.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Emily K.

    A spider invents capitalism but his resources are destroyed when a larger eldritch beast arrives, nature takes over, more resources appear, does the spider remain a capitalist or does he share with his behatted bug brethren? He stayed a capitalist. That's why this book lost a star... c'mon. A spider invents capitalism but his resources are destroyed when a larger eldritch beast arrives, nature takes over, more resources appear, does the spider remain a capitalist or does he share with his behatted bug brethren? He stayed a capitalist. That's why this book lost a star... c'mon.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Kelsy Hatfield

    This was cute and gorgeous but I wanted the moral to be more expounded upon in the end. And we still supported materialism in the end instead of… friendship for example.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Elisabeth

    3.5 stars.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Yee Swope

    In the finest illustration tradition of Chris Van Allsburg and David Weisner, the Fan Brothers tell a story of a mysterious object landing and becoming a centerpiece in a PT Barnum-style, ticketed museum of wonders. Except... those attending the exhibits are insects, and people, being of a rather larger scale, may have a different perspective on these marvels. It's all in how you look at things, and luck is where you find it, so long as you set out your webs to look. In the finest illustration tradition of Chris Van Allsburg and David Weisner, the Fan Brothers tell a story of a mysterious object landing and becoming a centerpiece in a PT Barnum-style, ticketed museum of wonders. Except... those attending the exhibits are insects, and people, being of a rather larger scale, may have a different perspective on these marvels. It's all in how you look at things, and luck is where you find it, so long as you set out your webs to look.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Baby Bookworm

    This review was originally written for The Baby Bookworm. Visit us for new picture books reviews daily! Hello, friends! Our book today is It Fell From the Sky by The Fan Brothers, a wondrous parable about community and the unknown. On a Thursday, the object fell from the sky. None of the insects knew what it was – a chrysalis? A gumdrop? A flower? – but after some deliberation, most agreed: it was not of this earth. Sneakily staking his claim on “the Wonder”, The Spider builds a city around the ar This review was originally written for The Baby Bookworm. Visit us for new picture books reviews daily! Hello, friends! Our book today is It Fell From the Sky by The Fan Brothers, a wondrous parable about community and the unknown. On a Thursday, the object fell from the sky. None of the insects knew what it was – a chrysalis? A gumdrop? A flower? – but after some deliberation, most agreed: it was not of this earth. Sneakily staking his claim on “the Wonder”, The Spider builds a city around the artifact, charging visitors to observe it and overdeveloping their lovely garden. That is… until the Unexpected Disaster occurs… A marvelous fable. The Fan Brothers have an immense talent for creating fairytales out of the everyday, and this is a great example of it. From the deadpan, matter-of-fact narration, the gorgeously detailed artwork (complete with oddly and amusingly formal garden creatures in top hats and bowlers), and unexpected twists, this is a fun and entertaining tale for kids. Add in a surprisingly subtle, nuanced commentary on capitalist greed and cultural looting, and it becomes something strikingly clever and moving. The length is perfect for a storytime, and JJ loved the unique personalities of the different critters, as well as the humorous twists and mesmerizing art. Overall, a well-spun fable that kids and adults will enjoy, and it’s Baby Bookworm approved! (Note: A copy of this book was provided to The Baby Bookworm by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.) Be sure to check out The Baby Bookworm for more reviews!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Donald Scott

    1st Line: "It fell from the sky on a Thursday." Prose (Story): One day a remarkable, colorful sphere falls from the sky. Ladybug, Inchworm, the Walking Stick, Grasshopper - all the insects and animals living nearby gather to agree it's a strange and wondrous object ... though what, exactly, is it? No one knows, nor can even guess, but when Spider concocts a small fib to claim ownership of the mystical sphere, and makes plans to put it on a Grand Exhibit for all to view, he sets in motion what may 1st Line: "It fell from the sky on a Thursday." Prose (Story): One day a remarkable, colorful sphere falls from the sky. Ladybug, Inchworm, the Walking Stick, Grasshopper - all the insects and animals living nearby gather to agree it's a strange and wondrous object ... though what, exactly, is it? No one knows, nor can even guess, but when Spider concocts a small fib to claim ownership of the mystical sphere, and makes plans to put it on a Grand Exhibit for all to view, he sets in motion what may end up a hard-learned lesson in family, community, and giving back. Don's (Review): I go into every Fan Brothers picture book expecting to be dazzled, and the guys have yet to disappoint. Here, finely-drawn art, rendered in black and white to further highlight the wondrous color of the strange object that so has the insects bedazzled - takes your breath away on every page, as usual. From the way the fireflies light up the object as it sits on display, to the pristinely-detailed dandelions that look as if they could shed floaties right off the page, to the intricate patterns and textures of the insects and animals themselves (especially our anti-hero Spider) - as with most Fan Brothers books, you have to read through for the first time just finding glory in the art, before a second read-through to fully capture the story. Here, said story results in a lesson learned for Spider that leads to growth, and that's all I want to say to keep things spoiler-free. Needless to say, another beauty of a picture book that should be on the shelf of any kid, or kid at heart, with art and texture and characters all beautifully connected to a simple, inspiring message. Outstanding - at least for this Fan fan - as always. 5/5 stars

  20. 4 out of 5

    Tasha

    It fell from the sky on a Thursday. The insects gathered around to take a closer look at it. They debated how it had arrived and then all agreed that it was the most amazing thing they had ever seen. Some of the tasted it, others tried to move it, and then Luna Moth tried to hatch it all night in case it was a chrysalis. The next morning, the spider insisted that it had fallen right into his web. He proposed creating a Grand Exhibit to show off the Wonder from the Sky properly. The Grand Exhibit It fell from the sky on a Thursday. The insects gathered around to take a closer look at it. They debated how it had arrived and then all agreed that it was the most amazing thing they had ever seen. Some of the tasted it, others tried to move it, and then Luna Moth tried to hatch it all night in case it was a chrysalis. The next morning, the spider insisted that it had fallen right into his web. He proposed creating a Grand Exhibit to show off the Wonder from the Sky properly. The Grand Exhibit opened and Spider charged one leaf per insect to see it. He raised the price and soon was wealthier than anyone else. But Spider was left alone with his leaves and Wonder. Then a giant reached down and took back the Wonder, demolishing the Exhibit too. But Spider knew what to do. He was busy and patient and soon more Wonders arrived from the sky. The Fan Brothers have once again created a gorgeous picture book. Here the questions raised are about greed and wealth. The craftiness of Spider is delightful, toned just right to have children immediately wondering at his motives but still likeable enough to cheer on at the end of the book as his patience is rewarded. The community of insects is detailed and interesting, each with their own personality and perspective. Perfect for sharing aloud, the story arc is strong and readers will enjoy watching greed play out, though the ending keeps the book from becoming didactic at all. As always, the Fan Brothers’ illustrations are noteworthy. Here, they do much of the book in soft pencil grays. It allows the wonder of the marble to take over the page, even while keeping the beauty of the natural miniature world full of its own magic. Full of its own Wonder. Appropriate for ages 3-5.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Tonja Drecker

    Vivid grays and whites create a capturing world and setting the perfect background for a wonder, which changes everything. It fell from the sky, a glorious ball of color. None of the insects and other creatures living in the grass and weeds know what it is, but they know it's amazing. After various attempts to figure it out, the spiders steps up with an idea, which allows everyone to watch it in a wondrous setting...one that can be seen after paying a small entrance fee of a leaf. As things grow Vivid grays and whites create a capturing world and setting the perfect background for a wonder, which changes everything. It fell from the sky, a glorious ball of color. None of the insects and other creatures living in the grass and weeds know what it is, but they know it's amazing. After various attempts to figure it out, the spiders steps up with an idea, which allows everyone to watch it in a wondrous setting...one that can be seen after paying a small entrance fee of a leaf. As things grow and grow, all seems spectacular, but then, disaster strikes. To say that the illustrations are amazing is an understatement. The details of the grass world comes to life with vibrant exactness thanks to the defined grays and whites. Not only are these well done, but it allows the marvelous object, which fell from the sky, to truly capture the attention. This is as masterful play as it also demonstrates why and how the insects can find this item so miraculous. It stays at the center until it's not. It's a visual tale in and of itself. But to say the tale isn't just as capturing would simply be wrong. Various creatures from the grass play with ideas of what the item could be. It's entertaining and curious to watch them marvel over an object listeners will recognize. As the spider comes in and changes everything, the story grabs and keeps listeners waiting to see how it all turns out. It's a capturing tale with a very good message and is sure to become a favorite. I'm definitely adding this one to my list of favorite picture books for 2021. I received an ARC copy and would give this one 6 stars if I could because it completely won me over

  22. 4 out of 5

    Amy Farris-Stojsavljevic

    IT FELL FROM THE SKY by Terry Fan and Eric Fan I’ll start by saying I’m a fan of the Fans (sorry). THE BARNABUS PROJECT was one of my and my daughter’s favorites last month, and I was thrilled to see a new Fan book on the shelves. IT FELL FROM THE SKY tells of a strange orb that falls from the sky and the resulting speculation and reactions of the insect community that finds it. The Neo-Victorian dress and mannerisms of the insects are well-served by the monochromatic palette with pops of color fo IT FELL FROM THE SKY by Terry Fan and Eric Fan I’ll start by saying I’m a fan of the Fans (sorry). THE BARNABUS PROJECT was one of my and my daughter’s favorites last month, and I was thrilled to see a new Fan book on the shelves. IT FELL FROM THE SKY tells of a strange orb that falls from the sky and the resulting speculation and reactions of the insect community that finds it. The Neo-Victorian dress and mannerisms of the insects are well-served by the monochromatic palette with pops of color for objects of interest. The main character, a swindling spider, bides his time in the first few spreads as the other insects (bedecked in top hats and monocles) attempt to suss out the mysterious object’s origins. The spider follows a PT Barnum-esque character arc as he swoops in to claim the object for himself and attempts to reap the rewards. My only nit came from the spider’s big revelatory moment, in that I wanted something slightly more concrete to ground his redemption. I won’t spoil the plot or ending, but I will say that I appreciated the sparse text that allows the reader to infer the themes of wonder, patience, and atonement. IT FELL FROM THE SKY rewards re-readings both through the illustrations and the words and will prompt different discussions based on the age of the child experiencing the book.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    The fabulous Fan Brothers make a subtle moral statement with “It Fell From the Sky” the tale of an iridescent, pastel ball that lands in a garden, perplexing insects and a frog nearby. “It fell on a Thursday…And everyone agreed it was the most amazing thing they’d ever seen.” Eyewitnesses Ladybug and Inchworm had differing observations to report about its shocking appearance, and Dung Beetle tried in vain to roll it. For advice about what the object was, wise Stinkbug was consulted. He didn’t th The fabulous Fan Brothers make a subtle moral statement with “It Fell From the Sky” the tale of an iridescent, pastel ball that lands in a garden, perplexing insects and a frog nearby. “It fell on a Thursday…And everyone agreed it was the most amazing thing they’d ever seen.” Eyewitnesses Ladybug and Inchworm had differing observations to report about its shocking appearance, and Dung Beetle tried in vain to roll it. For advice about what the object was, wise Stinkbug was consulted. He didn’t think the thing came from the sky but instead had sprung from a flower. “Crafty Spider” didn’t give a hairy leg about its origin. He had an ulterior motive, cashing in to establish WonderVille, a glitzy exhibit rivaling any Disney theme park, placing the object on display and charging his peers to peer in for a peek. Finally fate dropped in and put a stop to that, leading Spider to have a change of heart. Fantastical illustrations grace the pages of this creative, entertaining story, the wonder of nature keenly portrayed in idyllic scenes, each creature with its own distinct, personality traits.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Linda

    It feels like people wait and wait for a new book by the Fan Brothers. They do not disappoint with stories you want to read more than once and turn the pages slo-o-owly in order to catch all the interesting details. This time, something (according to the insects on the ground) did fall from the sky. They marvel over it. Some guess it's a comet from the sky; the walking stick "was happy to find something even stranger than himself in the garden." "The dung beetle tried to roll it, but it was too It feels like people wait and wait for a new book by the Fan Brothers. They do not disappoint with stories you want to read more than once and turn the pages slo-o-owly in order to catch all the interesting details. This time, something (according to the insects on the ground) did fall from the sky. They marvel over it. Some guess it's a comet from the sky; the walking stick "was happy to find something even stranger than himself in the garden." "The dung beetle tried to roll it, but it was too heavy." Everyone thought it was the most amazing thing. Spider took a step further and the next morning claimed it was his. See, it sits in his web! With some help, he opens Wonderville for all to come to view this thing. He charges one leaf and as more come, he raises his prices. Perhaps it's a fable that will bring much discussion about the spider's actions. You will be happily surprised at his change of heart. The Fan Brothers bring another tale to us readers, perhaps they call it a Wonderville for us?

  25. 4 out of 5

    Karleigh

    This story is about a marble that falls from the sky into a small ecosystem of creatures. All of the creatures marveled at its magnificence and they were all wondering what it might be. The next day, there was a spiderweb constructed right next to the Wonder From The Sky and the spider claimed that it belonged to him since it was right next to his home. He started construction of Wonderville and the next day everyone was lined up to see the exhibit. The spider charged them each one leaf and as t This story is about a marble that falls from the sky into a small ecosystem of creatures. All of the creatures marveled at its magnificence and they were all wondering what it might be. The next day, there was a spiderweb constructed right next to the Wonder From The Sky and the spider claimed that it belonged to him since it was right next to his home. He started construction of Wonderville and the next day everyone was lined up to see the exhibit. The spider charged them each one leaf and as the demand increased, he would raise the price. Eventually, no one showed up anymore because it was too pricey, but Spider was now rich. One night, the marble was taken by a creature from the sky and the spider devised a plan. He spun many webs to catch all of the fallen treasures from the sky and once he had enough, he set up a new exhibit and everyone loved it. I gave this book 4 stars because it is a very fun book for children. I think that this is an educational book for kids to learn about the supply and demand market. This is a really fun book and I would recommend it.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Holly Pretzel

    I bought this book online from the cover art alone so my first impressions were high. They leaned into the whimsy by putting a rainbow holo sheen over the marble on the cover, which was a delightful addition to an already magical illustration style. I was taken by the story, enjoying the perspective of bugs speculating about a foreign object. It was an excellent concept and I appreciate that it was open-ended enough that I truly didn't know the route this story would take. My only critique, and I bought this book online from the cover art alone so my first impressions were high. They leaned into the whimsy by putting a rainbow holo sheen over the marble on the cover, which was a delightful addition to an already magical illustration style. I was taken by the story, enjoying the perspective of bugs speculating about a foreign object. It was an excellent concept and I appreciate that it was open-ended enough that I truly didn't know the route this story would take. My only critique, and it may be a personal one, is that the ending felt kind of abrupt. Though I also feel that only a line or two more would have been all that was needed to fix the flow. Easily top ten illustrated books of my lifetime. This is the first book I've read by the Fan Brothers and I'll now be snatching up every book I find from them. Highly recommend.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kayah

    The book "It Fell from the Sky" by Terry Fan is about a spider who decides to create a museum regarding special objects found in a garden where other insects can pay to come see them. This picture book has beautiful illustrations. The illustrations lack color besides certain objects on each page, which causes the reader to be drawn more to those areas of the illustrations and pay closer attention to the pages. The text length on each page varies, but it is an easy read. I wish this story had mor The book "It Fell from the Sky" by Terry Fan is about a spider who decides to create a museum regarding special objects found in a garden where other insects can pay to come see them. This picture book has beautiful illustrations. The illustrations lack color besides certain objects on each page, which causes the reader to be drawn more to those areas of the illustrations and pay closer attention to the pages. The text length on each page varies, but it is an easy read. I wish this story had more of exaggerated plot with a more critical climax, but it is still an engaging picture book. This book would be a great read aloud for students when teaching about the economy, fairness, and feelings. I truly think that everyone should check this book out as it is truly a masterpiece that should be shared with every single reader.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Becky B

    When a beautiful orb falls from the sky into the garden on a Thursday, the insects, spiders, and other small garden residents are astounded. What is it, and where did it come from? They each have their ideas. But by the next day, Spider says the object fell into his web so it is his, and he comes up with a grand plan for the orb. But where will his greed get him? The illustrations in this are so stunning. I love the little hats the bugs all wear, and having the orb be the only thing in color make When a beautiful orb falls from the sky into the garden on a Thursday, the insects, spiders, and other small garden residents are astounded. What is it, and where did it come from? They each have their ideas. But by the next day, Spider says the object fell into his web so it is his, and he comes up with a grand plan for the orb. But where will his greed get him? The illustrations in this are so stunning. I love the little hats the bugs all wear, and having the orb be the only thing in color makes it stand out all that much more. I also like the point of view of the book. It reminds me a bit of Van Allburg's Two Bad Ants with how well it imagines the world from an insect's perspective. I like the change of heart in the Spider too. Another winner from the Fan brothers.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Alissa Tsaparikos

    I really enjoyed this whimsical exploration of objects not known to our protagonists but obviously pretty familiar to the reader. The jaunty hats add appeal to the insects of the story, and the eye-catching color of the objects against the sepia tone of the rest of the page is just what is needed to really draw readers in. The narrative carries forward with an understated humor, and ties up nicely with a moral that feels not heavy handed, but just right. A fun lap sit story that will be sure to I really enjoyed this whimsical exploration of objects not known to our protagonists but obviously pretty familiar to the reader. The jaunty hats add appeal to the insects of the story, and the eye-catching color of the objects against the sepia tone of the rest of the page is just what is needed to really draw readers in. The narrative carries forward with an understated humor, and ties up nicely with a moral that feels not heavy handed, but just right. A fun lap sit story that will be sure to find some fans in children who love the insect world, or delight in seeing things from a different point of view.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Pam

    Gorgeous illustrations bring this story to life. A round object falls from the sky and the bugs all gather to figure out what it is. The Spider claims it fell in his web so he owns it. He builds a huge exhibit and charges everyone else to see this colorful wonder. Eventually, insects stop coming, the garden is empty, and the wonder is taken by a five fingered creature. The spider realizes what he needs to do and spins webs to catch more wonders. The museum reopens with new wonders all the time. Gorgeous illustrations bring this story to life. A round object falls from the sky and the bugs all gather to figure out what it is. The Spider claims it fell in his web so he owns it. He builds a huge exhibit and charges everyone else to see this colorful wonder. Eventually, insects stop coming, the garden is empty, and the wonder is taken by a five fingered creature. The spider realizes what he needs to do and spins webs to catch more wonders. The museum reopens with new wonders all the time. The insects return and celebrate with Spider. Readers will guess what the wonder is and have fun identifying all the wonders at the end of the book.

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