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Decorum

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The highly lauded, mouthwateringly illustrated miniseries Decorum from the bestselling, comics titan Jonathan Hickman (House of X, Powers of X, East of West) and acclaimed artist Mike Huddleston (Middlewest, House of X) now collected in its entirety in a stunning hardcover edition for the first time. Decorum blends the high impact, event level storytelling of Hickman's rece The highly lauded, mouthwateringly illustrated miniseries Decorum from the bestselling, comics titan Jonathan Hickman (House of X, Powers of X, East of West) and acclaimed artist Mike Huddleston (Middlewest, House of X) now collected in its entirety in a stunning hardcover edition for the first time. Decorum blends the high impact, event level storytelling of Hickman's recent re-envisioning of X-Men with the sprawling, addictive worldbuilding of the recently concluded East of West. In the world of Decorum, there are many assassins in the known universe. Decorum is the story of the most well-mannered one. The perfect standalone story for fans of epics like Star Wars and assassin action tales like John Wick-but set in a lush science fiction world where the stakes are even higher. Collects DECORUM #1-8.


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The highly lauded, mouthwateringly illustrated miniseries Decorum from the bestselling, comics titan Jonathan Hickman (House of X, Powers of X, East of West) and acclaimed artist Mike Huddleston (Middlewest, House of X) now collected in its entirety in a stunning hardcover edition for the first time. Decorum blends the high impact, event level storytelling of Hickman's rece The highly lauded, mouthwateringly illustrated miniseries Decorum from the bestselling, comics titan Jonathan Hickman (House of X, Powers of X, East of West) and acclaimed artist Mike Huddleston (Middlewest, House of X) now collected in its entirety in a stunning hardcover edition for the first time. Decorum blends the high impact, event level storytelling of Hickman's recent re-envisioning of X-Men with the sprawling, addictive worldbuilding of the recently concluded East of West. In the world of Decorum, there are many assassins in the known universe. Decorum is the story of the most well-mannered one. The perfect standalone story for fans of epics like Star Wars and assassin action tales like John Wick-but set in a lush science fiction world where the stakes are even higher. Collects DECORUM #1-8.

30 review for Decorum

  1. 4 out of 5

    Matty Dub

    This is an offensively obtuse story. Every issue has 18-20 pages of story and an extra 20 of useless incoherent shit that is an attempt at world building. Some of the same old tired celestial and cosmic themes that Hickman inserts in every series he works on appear too. If Hickman’s more successful series like East of West or Avengers are a perfectly cooked steak dinner, this is a half-frozen Microwaveable Mac and cheese, the store brand one. The art is sometimes amazing, sometimes ass. There’s n This is an offensively obtuse story. Every issue has 18-20 pages of story and an extra 20 of useless incoherent shit that is an attempt at world building. Some of the same old tired celestial and cosmic themes that Hickman inserts in every series he works on appear too. If Hickman’s more successful series like East of West or Avengers are a perfectly cooked steak dinner, this is a half-frozen Microwaveable Mac and cheese, the store brand one. The art is sometimes amazing, sometimes ass. There’s no rhyme or reason to it either, some pages are just amazing and others look like a sketch of what it’s suppose to be. The whole design of this book gave me headaches.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jess Bragg

    5 stars, 2 thumbs up, 10/10 book of the year candidate. Set in the future (of some universe) this is the most Hickmany Hickman to date (charts, graphs etc) and is about a scruffy courier taken under the wing of the galaxies deadliest assassin. I had to reread the first part after I finished to fully understand it but this is some sharp writing with brilliant art.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Alex Sarll

    All I knew going in was that this was a series about the galaxy's most polite assassin, so I was hoping for Hickman's underappreciated comic side, a la New Mutants or the Summers family outing issues of X-Men. Well, no. We're a tenth of the way through these 400+ pages before she appears, and even once she has she's still only one strand in a tapestry with all the hallmarks of his usual big picture storytelling: abstract diagrams of factions with key details redacted, rampaging AI theocracies, p All I knew going in was that this was a series about the galaxy's most polite assassin, so I was hoping for Hickman's underappreciated comic side, a la New Mutants or the Summers family outing issues of X-Men. Well, no. We're a tenth of the way through these 400+ pages before she appears, and even once she has she's still only one strand in a tapestry with all the hallmarks of his usual big picture storytelling: abstract diagrams of factions with key details redacted, rampaging AI theocracies, portentous statements. Hell, there are even terribly significant eggs, which after Krakoa is starting to feel a bit Histor's Eye. What makes it work, though - aside from slightly dialling down Hickman's habitual overuse of italics in dialogue - is Huddleston's art. Looking at his credits, I've read stuff he's worked on, but little where he was the headline act. Here, though, he's a showstopper, not least for his versatility, going from cosmic backgrounds worthy of Christian Ward to sparse, monotone conversations as expressively rendered as Dave McKean in his minimal mode, not to mention plenty of Sean Murphy in the fights. As a story, this is at once too long for a single volume, and too short for the Saga meets 40K vibe it's chasing. But as a thing on which to gaze, it's a winner. (Edelweiss ARC)

  4. 4 out of 5

    Anthony

    This is visually one of the best looking comics I’ve ever read. The change in art styles and designs are amazing. You’d think there was more than one artist working on this. And it has all the usual graphic pages that you come to expect from a Hickman book. But I honestly had no idea what was going on for the majority of it? Something about an egg? There was a training scene for something at one point? So I feel like I can’t go higher than 3 stars It’s Hickman at his most Hickman. Definitely sin This is visually one of the best looking comics I’ve ever read. The change in art styles and designs are amazing. You’d think there was more than one artist working on this. And it has all the usual graphic pages that you come to expect from a Hickman book. But I honestly had no idea what was going on for the majority of it? Something about an egg? There was a training scene for something at one point? So I feel like I can’t go higher than 3 stars It’s Hickman at his most Hickman. Definitely since his early work in Nightly News and Pax Romana. It’s worth reading for that alone but people who only know him from his superhero stuff might be in for a shock

  5. 5 out of 5

    GrilledCheeseSamurai (Scott)

    Loved it. I see many reviews here saying 'they didn't get it' or were 'lost' most of the time. That wasn't the case for me. I mean... it's Hickman, so I'm not saying they are wrong. He can be hella confusing sometimes...but Decorum, if you take your time and not rush through it is quite readable and understandable. Those Hickman infographics are there for a reason, and if you are skipping over them, you might be lost and confused? And the art. Incredible and one of the best put-together comics I Loved it. I see many reviews here saying 'they didn't get it' or were 'lost' most of the time. That wasn't the case for me. I mean... it's Hickman, so I'm not saying they are wrong. He can be hella confusing sometimes...but Decorum, if you take your time and not rush through it is quite readable and understandable. Those Hickman infographics are there for a reason, and if you are skipping over them, you might be lost and confused? And the art. Incredible and one of the best put-together comics I have read in a while. There are pages where you feel like you are looking at someone's sketchbook and other pages where it feels like a matte painting. It all made for an incredible reading experience. Lastly, I loved the characters and the world-building. I would love to see a lengthy ongoing series of Decorum exploring so so much more. For me, this is an easy 5/5 stars. :)

  6. 5 out of 5

    Peacegal

    Impressive illustrations coupled with some very creative character designs. The complaints about how much info/backstory the graphic novel attempts to cram in a short amount of time are understandable.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Bradley

    Not one of Hickman's best. I enjoyed it more for the great art. The story reminded me a little of The Incal. Not one of Hickman's best. I enjoyed it more for the great art. The story reminded me a little of The Incal.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

    I honestly didn’t get this at all but some of the art is really beautiful and striking. Individual issue reviews: #1 | #2 | #3 | #4 | #5 | #6 | #7 | #8 Total review score: 1.91 I honestly didn’t get this at all but some of the art is really beautiful and striking. Individual issue reviews: #1 | #2 | #3 | #4 | #5 | #6 | #7 | #8 Total review score: 1.91

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sesana

    Visually, a stunning book. The storytelling, on the other hand, is trying to squeeze 30 or so issues of world building and character development and plot in eight big issues, and it ends up feeling confusing and rushed. There were certainly parts of the story I enjoyed, particularly the sisterhood of assassins, but also parts that I didn't like or didn't quite get. And if you got tired of the white "information" pages in Hickman's X-Men, I have bad news for you. Not only are they more densely co Visually, a stunning book. The storytelling, on the other hand, is trying to squeeze 30 or so issues of world building and character development and plot in eight big issues, and it ends up feeling confusing and rushed. There were certainly parts of the story I enjoyed, particularly the sisterhood of assassins, but also parts that I didn't like or didn't quite get. And if you got tired of the white "information" pages in Hickman's X-Men, I have bad news for you. Not only are they more densely concentrated here, they're more dense period.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Josh

    "Opening with “The womanly art of assassination,” Decorum is a tale of an assassins’ guild, a church of artificial intelligence, and the mysterious being who will save or doom them all. Oh, and the fate of the universe—it’s in the hands of a girl who dislikes bad noodles and violence but is a pretty big fan of wearing shorts." Full review on No Flying No Tights: https://noflyingnotights.com/blog/202... "Opening with “The womanly art of assassination,” Decorum is a tale of an assassins’ guild, a church of artificial intelligence, and the mysterious being who will save or doom them all. Oh, and the fate of the universe—it’s in the hands of a girl who dislikes bad noodles and violence but is a pretty big fan of wearing shorts." Full review on No Flying No Tights: https://noflyingnotights.com/blog/202...

  11. 4 out of 5

    Bob

    Gems include Neha tardily deliverers a package, Imogen takes on an apprentice, orientation to the Sisterhood of Man, Ro Chi devastates a world, Neha’s 1st 3 contracts go awry, Ro Chi contracts the Sisterhood, Neha v. the Egg, & the lam

  12. 5 out of 5

    Trevor Paul

    This would have gotten a higher rating if it wasn’t for all the charts!!! I don’t care what the recipe of the noodle bowl was that she was eating. The dialogue was sharp and funny, just wished there were no charts and less dramatic art changes throughout.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Sonic

    I flippin LOVED this! The artwork is unbelievably Brilliant! And the story is amazing, expertly paced, with likable characters.... I hope this team does another one!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Peter Derk

    Mostly Enjoyable, Though I Understood Very Little of It You might be wondering why that's capitalized. It's because that's my Douglas-Adams-y title for my memoir. Mostly Enjoyable, Though I Understood Very Little of It You might be wondering why that's capitalized. It's because that's my Douglas-Adams-y title for my memoir.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Mark Schwaber

    5 star art, 3 star storyline. It only loses a bit due to its obtuseness. This series is worth every minute for the absolutely stunning artwork; frame to frame, cover to cover, there is not a moment that misses.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Alex E

    An AI species hires assassins to take out the only thing that can defeat them before they take over the universe.... the one thing they didn't count on was the humanity of the assassin. Hickman is a writer who is, first off, one of my current favorites. But he can also be very polarizing. He can be a writer that presents a lot of information and kind of bog you down in the details while world building. He also has a certain tone that is a bit "colder". And I totally get those criticisms, but for An AI species hires assassins to take out the only thing that can defeat them before they take over the universe.... the one thing they didn't count on was the humanity of the assassin. Hickman is a writer who is, first off, one of my current favorites. But he can also be very polarizing. He can be a writer that presents a lot of information and kind of bog you down in the details while world building. He also has a certain tone that is a bit "colder". And I totally get those criticisms, but for me, I really enjoy his writing style. And those - what some would call "weaknesses" - actually can work to Hickman's advantage. For example here, where he is dealing with a machine race, that cold tone matches perfectly with the world and habitat of the machines. The overabundance of details that he is known for works well in a series where the universe is massive and full of different types of beings and technology. In other words, I found this story to be a great match for his style, and a good vehicle for his story telling. And for the most part, I really enjoyed this. From the different characters, each with their own unique voice, to the slightly darker humor sprinkled throughout, this was really an enjoyable read. What I didn't really like is the ending. Not that the result was bad, it just seemed very very rushed. To the point that Hickman skips major battles opting instead for a dialogue box to explain what has just happened. I think another issue just for those - what seem to me crucial plot points - would've helped this book tremendously. And I'd be remiss to not mention the art which is, I think, the best part about this book. I mean Mike Huddleston does his best JH Williams III here by just mixing different styles, different techniques, different tones, and sometimes even on the very same page. The art is breathtaking and amazing, and if you are a art fan, this is worth it for the art alone. Overall, gorgeous art built around a story that ended far too abruptly, I would still recommend this for fans of big, sprawling sci fi stories.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Theediscerning

    Well, this went from "wow" to the complete opposite fast. The opening chapter begins wonderfully, with really rich art as some mechanised-looking life-form comes ashore to seemingly attack a desert island. The islanders fight back, and the way the story is told each side's viewpoint – the 'man' still in the wash and the armada he heralds, the repelling forces, and a third party – gets a completely different artistic style. Then the story goes right to pot. We then have a different story, of a me Well, this went from "wow" to the complete opposite fast. The opening chapter begins wonderfully, with really rich art as some mechanised-looking life-form comes ashore to seemingly attack a desert island. The islanders fight back, and the way the story is told each side's viewpoint – the 'man' still in the wash and the armada he heralds, the repelling forces, and a third party – gets a completely different artistic style. Then the story goes right to pot. We then have a different story, of a meet-cute between a bit of a stuck-up woman assassin, and a courier type hard on her luck. And while that might spark to life now and then, we get interruption after interruption after interruption. For yes, flooding the pages of this book and generally making it twice as long as it ever needed to be, we either get some inter-galactic cosmic wiffle that seems a leftover from the first episode, or utter, utter waste of space "world" "building" pages, that have swallowed everything good about the Designers Republic and turned it into spare, white, pretentious excreta. Unfortunately, this was heralded – like Esquire magazine and its ilk, if you struggle to find the contents because they're buried within pages barely worth the effort to recycle, you know something's wrong (I feel a new Law coming on...). In the end – hah, that's a laugh – long before the halfway point, the struggle to work out what the heck is going on, and how the two disparate strands might ever combine, gets too much. So it wants to be memorable, distinctive, meaningful to the creators and those few who like finding all the minutiae and piecing things together however they like, but you can use a pack of corn flakes to piece things together however you like, and it won't be a pretty jigsaw puzzle. Neither is this one, despite all the copious critics calling the schizophrenic art styles amazing. In the end, just too pretentious for its own good. DNF at white.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    Hickman just has the magic touch man. And you know what you get with his stories: big sweeping epics with small personal moments of humanity, as well as man vs machine. Decorum is a book I went into not knowing anything about it, and what I found was a story about a charming female bounty hunter who's pretty crap at her job involved in the biggest hunt in the galaxy. What threw me off to start was what felt like two separate storylines running congruent to each other that finally came together by Hickman just has the magic touch man. And you know what you get with his stories: big sweeping epics with small personal moments of humanity, as well as man vs machine. Decorum is a book I went into not knowing anything about it, and what I found was a story about a charming female bounty hunter who's pretty crap at her job involved in the biggest hunt in the galaxy. What threw me off to start was what felt like two separate storylines running congruent to each other that finally came together by the back third, and ending in a way some would say is Deus ex machina or even rushed, but I had no issue with. If anything is the star of this series it's impeccable and downright varied art presented by Mike Huddleston. What a absolute clinic of range in artistic styles and coloring throughout, as it constantly shifts from pure black and white when the AI's are present to full blown color on the sisterhood's planet. Huge sweeping wallpaper worthy spreads of landscapes and space, and amusing personal black and white conversations between characters. This book is worth experiencing for the art alone, even if occasionally it can be slightly hard to follow. I really enjoyed the ride this took, and half for the in depth world and systems Hickman had built. He loves a series of graphics and layouts, but he presents information on them that really immerses you. It even feels like a precursor to what he's doing with 3W3M currently. It might be a all timer from him, but it was a journey worth taking.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Aaron

    Hickman doing what he does best: build a vast, thoroughly explorable world with deep lore and then blasting through the story so fast that you don't get a real sense for any of it. This series could honestly be incredible if Hickman had more time to spend in its world and developing its characters. Instead, everyone feels much more like an archetype than a person, carrying out their specific Plot Duties with a vaguely defined personality and almost complete lack of motivation. I love a lot of Hi Hickman doing what he does best: build a vast, thoroughly explorable world with deep lore and then blasting through the story so fast that you don't get a real sense for any of it. This series could honestly be incredible if Hickman had more time to spend in its world and developing its characters. Instead, everyone feels much more like an archetype than a person, carrying out their specific Plot Duties with a vaguely defined personality and almost complete lack of motivation. I love a lot of Hickman's work, but I really would love for him to spend more time making me care about his characters one of these days. He's most successful with pre-existing franchises with built-in characters, like Fantastic Four or Avengers, where his insane plot webs can be the star of the show because we're already happy to watch these heroes get tangled in them. But when he decides to build an entire universe, explain all of its factions in detail, introduce a lead character and have her do multiple issues of "training" before she can actually act on the thing she's meant to do in this series, and pay off a full galaxy-hopping plot, all in 8 issues, you know it's gonna feel a little empty. There are some fantastic ideas in here and multiple scenes of brilliance, but overall this needed about 20 more issues to fully live in the world its created.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Villain E

    Disappointing. Buried beneath fantastic artwork and a ton of Hickman's graphic design pages and lengthy world building text pieces is a slow and mediocre sci-fi story you've probably already read before. So we're introduced to a robot culture, a courier and an assassin in scenes which are stylish and light on plot. About fifty pages in, we find out the machines are looking for some sort of magic egg. About 100 pages in, the assassin takes the courier to assassin school. About 250 pages in, the ma Disappointing. Buried beneath fantastic artwork and a ton of Hickman's graphic design pages and lengthy world building text pieces is a slow and mediocre sci-fi story you've probably already read before. So we're introduced to a robot culture, a courier and an assassin in scenes which are stylish and light on plot. About fifty pages in, we find out the machines are looking for some sort of magic egg. About 100 pages in, the assassin takes the courier to assassin school. About 250 pages in, the machines hire the ladies of the assassin school to find the egg, and what I would consider the actual plot begins (more than halfway through the book). The art is amazing. For no obvious reason, Mike Huddleston changes from scratchy pen-and-ink style, to stylized color, to fully painted images, somewhat randomly and often on the same page. I would read a full length comic in any one of these styles, but the randomness seems more style than substance. Which, of course, describes Hickman's writing also. I wish Hickman would just suck it up and do another full length graphic design graphic novel like The Nightly News. When inserted into a different book, it just distracts from the plot, messes with the pacing, and it's a crutch he uses for world building so he can avoid exposition.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Loki

    If you've enjoyed Hickman's Marvel work, but wondered what he might do if he didn't have to worry about corporate control, this is the book for you. And the art! Mike Huddleston draws and paints, sometimes on the same page, and gets Kirby cosmic in a few places. And sure, it takes a while to get used to, but not that long, and some truly amazing effects are achieved. This being a Hickman book, text pages matter, and Rus Wooton's lettering is superb, conveying variously character, authority and e If you've enjoyed Hickman's Marvel work, but wondered what he might do if he didn't have to worry about corporate control, this is the book for you. And the art! Mike Huddleston draws and paints, sometimes on the same page, and gets Kirby cosmic in a few places. And sure, it takes a while to get used to, but not that long, and some truly amazing effects are achieved. This being a Hickman book, text pages matter, and Rus Wooton's lettering is superb, conveying variously character, authority and emotion, sometimes simultaneously. Finally, Sasha E. Head is credited simply with "design" - which I assume means taking all this stuff and making it work together. She should get an Eisner for this, even if they have to invent a new category for it.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Online Eccentric Librarian

    More reviews (and no fluff) on the blog http://surrealtalvi.wordpress.com/ This is one of those incoherent messes that you either love or hate: high concept, visually confusing, narratively frustrating. Oddly enough, I felt like I had read this before and it just didn't stick with me through all the randomness within. It's something you want to spend a lot of time with or not at all; just be in the right mood for it. Reviewed from an advance reader copy provided by the publisher. More reviews (and no fluff) on the blog http://surrealtalvi.wordpress.com/ This is one of those incoherent messes that you either love or hate: high concept, visually confusing, narratively frustrating. Oddly enough, I felt like I had read this before and it just didn't stick with me through all the randomness within. It's something you want to spend a lot of time with or not at all; just be in the right mood for it. Reviewed from an advance reader copy provided by the publisher.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jake

    This thing was a damn blast and perhaps the most beautiful, truly varied artwork I've ever seen in a comic. I bought this collection of the series without knowing anything about it because I love Hickman's way of doing stories with ambient weird floating around a focused take on wildcard narrative, but Huddleston's design and illustration work here is honestly breathtaking in its range and skill (and how outstandingly well it suits the story itself). It's bonkers and yet it never feels out of pl This thing was a damn blast and perhaps the most beautiful, truly varied artwork I've ever seen in a comic. I bought this collection of the series without knowing anything about it because I love Hickman's way of doing stories with ambient weird floating around a focused take on wildcard narrative, but Huddleston's design and illustration work here is honestly breathtaking in its range and skill (and how outstandingly well it suits the story itself). It's bonkers and yet it never feels out of place. It's radical art for a radical story, and I had an absolute gem of a time with it all (even though the end wraps up way too fast and perplexingly breezy for such a detailed build-up).

  24. 4 out of 5

    Paul Allard

    Interesting but also confusing science fiction comic collection. A huge amount of work has obviously gone into this fantasy/science fiction story of assassins in a world of aliens, robots and god-figures. There's a lot of it with explanations, tons of illustrations and it's all beautifully-executed but it also comes over as a bit of a vanity project, overly-complicated and not always clear - a bit clever-clever. I enjoyed the experience, especially the varied artwork. It's a bit of an effort but Interesting but also confusing science fiction comic collection. A huge amount of work has obviously gone into this fantasy/science fiction story of assassins in a world of aliens, robots and god-figures. There's a lot of it with explanations, tons of illustrations and it's all beautifully-executed but it also comes over as a bit of a vanity project, overly-complicated and not always clear - a bit clever-clever. I enjoyed the experience, especially the varied artwork. It's a bit of an effort but worthwhile in the end. I received an advance review copy for free, and I am leaving this review voluntarily

  25. 4 out of 5

    David

    This was dope. This first volume is the classic tale of a courier turned assassin and then it escalates on a galaxy level scale. Im not big on scifi epics, but the world building is incredible. Parasitic corporations profiting off of manufactured diseases, sisterhoods of assassins, crusading robots! Excellent. Just Excellent. The art beautifully embraces the cosmic scale of the plot with trippy landscapes, and ever changing styles from vivid colors to moody blackwork. Aliens that actually feel a This was dope. This first volume is the classic tale of a courier turned assassin and then it escalates on a galaxy level scale. Im not big on scifi epics, but the world building is incredible. Parasitic corporations profiting off of manufactured diseases, sisterhoods of assassins, crusading robots! Excellent. Just Excellent. The art beautifully embraces the cosmic scale of the plot with trippy landscapes, and ever changing styles from vivid colors to moody blackwork. Aliens that actually feel alien! Nerdy ass planetary data! What more can you ask for?

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy Nedelka

    I really shouldn't have even finished this, it was not worth the time. One of the biggest piles of garbage I've ever read. The story didn't make sense the writing was pretentious and the art seemed unfinished, despite months and months of delays between issues. Please save yourself a few hours and do not read this. I really shouldn't have even finished this, it was not worth the time. One of the biggest piles of garbage I've ever read. The story didn't make sense the writing was pretentious and the art seemed unfinished, despite months and months of delays between issues. Please save yourself a few hours and do not read this.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Michael Schirle

    This is Hickman being Hickman. Lots of cool world building and story setup, gorgeous art and style, and the arc ends with open questions/the reader to fill in some blanks. I really enjoy reading Hickman stories, so I really enjoyed this one. If you're not already a Hickman fan, I'm not sure this is the best story to start with. Hope the tease at the end for a follow up actually happens. This is Hickman being Hickman. Lots of cool world building and story setup, gorgeous art and style, and the arc ends with open questions/the reader to fill in some blanks. I really enjoy reading Hickman stories, so I really enjoyed this one. If you're not already a Hickman fan, I'm not sure this is the best story to start with. Hope the tease at the end for a follow up actually happens.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    Mike Huddleston's work here is utterly stunning. As good as he's been, this is next-level work, combining multiple styles at a dizzying pace that truly helps the storytelling. The story itself is excellent Hickman - big organizations and ideas - but it's bursting at the seams at this point. I am looking forward to further volumes which might flesh things out more. Mike Huddleston's work here is utterly stunning. As good as he's been, this is next-level work, combining multiple styles at a dizzying pace that truly helps the storytelling. The story itself is excellent Hickman - big organizations and ideas - but it's bursting at the seams at this point. I am looking forward to further volumes which might flesh things out more.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Bryan

    I enjoyed it? I think I'd recommend it? The pacing was very odd, and I was left wondering "is that it?" at the end of it. There's a ton of world-building, most of which felt kind of unnecessary in the final analysis. But it's a really beautiful book, and I can tell that there are bits of it that my brain will continue chewing on for a while. I enjoyed it? I think I'd recommend it? The pacing was very odd, and I was left wondering "is that it?" at the end of it. There's a ton of world-building, most of which felt kind of unnecessary in the final analysis. But it's a really beautiful book, and I can tell that there are bits of it that my brain will continue chewing on for a while.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan Roberts

    Storyline was typical Hickman. Grand, crazy and confusing. But the art was just not to my liking. I am not sure what the plan was but large portions were just not finished art. I know he was going for some sort of style but it did not gel with me.

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