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Framers: Human Advantage in an Age of Technology and Turmoil

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The essential tool that will enable humanity to find the best way through a forest of looming problems is defined in Framers by internationally renowned authors Kenneth Cukier, Viktor Mayer-Schönberger and Francis de Véricourt. From pandemics to populism, AI to ISIS, wealth inequity to climate change, humanity faces unprecedented challenges that threaten our very existence The essential tool that will enable humanity to find the best way through a forest of looming problems is defined in Framers by internationally renowned authors Kenneth Cukier, Viktor Mayer-Schönberger and Francis de Véricourt. From pandemics to populism, AI to ISIS, wealth inequity to climate change, humanity faces unprecedented challenges that threaten our very existence. To frame is to make a mental model that enables us to see patterns, predict how things will unfold, and make sense of new situations. Frames guide the decisions we make and the results we attain. Science has long focused on traits like memory and reasoning leaving framing all but ignored. But with computers becoming better at some of those cognitive tasks, framing stands out as a critical function--and only humans can do it. This book is the first guide to mastering this innate human ability. Illustrating their case with compelling examples and the latest research, authors Cukier, Mayer-Schönberger and de Véricourt examine: - Why advice to "think outside the box" is useless. - How the Wright brothers, with no formal physics training, enabled humanity's first flight. - What enabled the 1976 Israeli commando raid on Entebbe to rescue over 100 hostages. - How the #MeToo twitter hashtag reframed the perception of sexual assault. - The disaster of framing Covid-19 as equivalent to seasonal flu, and how modeling it on SARS delivered New Zealand from the pandemic. Framers shows how framing is not just a way to improve how we make decisions in the era of algorithms but will be a matter of survival for humanity in a time of societal upheaval and machine prosperity.


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The essential tool that will enable humanity to find the best way through a forest of looming problems is defined in Framers by internationally renowned authors Kenneth Cukier, Viktor Mayer-Schönberger and Francis de Véricourt. From pandemics to populism, AI to ISIS, wealth inequity to climate change, humanity faces unprecedented challenges that threaten our very existence The essential tool that will enable humanity to find the best way through a forest of looming problems is defined in Framers by internationally renowned authors Kenneth Cukier, Viktor Mayer-Schönberger and Francis de Véricourt. From pandemics to populism, AI to ISIS, wealth inequity to climate change, humanity faces unprecedented challenges that threaten our very existence. To frame is to make a mental model that enables us to see patterns, predict how things will unfold, and make sense of new situations. Frames guide the decisions we make and the results we attain. Science has long focused on traits like memory and reasoning leaving framing all but ignored. But with computers becoming better at some of those cognitive tasks, framing stands out as a critical function--and only humans can do it. This book is the first guide to mastering this innate human ability. Illustrating their case with compelling examples and the latest research, authors Cukier, Mayer-Schönberger and de Véricourt examine: - Why advice to "think outside the box" is useless. - How the Wright brothers, with no formal physics training, enabled humanity's first flight. - What enabled the 1976 Israeli commando raid on Entebbe to rescue over 100 hostages. - How the #MeToo twitter hashtag reframed the perception of sexual assault. - The disaster of framing Covid-19 as equivalent to seasonal flu, and how modeling it on SARS delivered New Zealand from the pandemic. Framers shows how framing is not just a way to improve how we make decisions in the era of algorithms but will be a matter of survival for humanity in a time of societal upheaval and machine prosperity.

30 review for Framers: Human Advantage in an Age of Technology and Turmoil

  1. 4 out of 5

    Katie Oeschger

    This was a really interesting book. It's all about our mental models (aka how we view the world) and their impact. As a user experience professional, I love how it ties how the frames we use impact our ability to innovate. If you like cognitive psychology, I highly recommend this book! This was a really interesting book. It's all about our mental models (aka how we view the world) and their impact. As a user experience professional, I love how it ties how the frames we use impact our ability to innovate. If you like cognitive psychology, I highly recommend this book!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Nelson Zagalo

    A light book about mental models, with many examples from current news of the world. I expected more depth on the psychological issues, but the tone is more journalistic and less scientific. Análise em Português no blog Virtual Illusion: https://virtual-illusion.blogspot.com... A light book about mental models, with many examples from current news of the world. I expected more depth on the psychological issues, but the tone is more journalistic and less scientific. Análise em Português no blog Virtual Illusion: https://virtual-illusion.blogspot.com...

  3. 5 out of 5

    Nils

    Proposes a theory of human distinctiveness based on the capacity to build and apply "mental models" (or "frames"). Such models are "a cognitive muscle" we can use to increase our alternatives and achieve better outcomes. Lots of business examples as well as "social justice" ones. A plea for cognitive pluralism as a way to recast the foundations of classical political liberalism, but one that relies heavily on a human exceptionalism which may no longer be sustainable. Proposes a theory of human distinctiveness based on the capacity to build and apply "mental models" (or "frames"). Such models are "a cognitive muscle" we can use to increase our alternatives and achieve better outcomes. Lots of business examples as well as "social justice" ones. A plea for cognitive pluralism as a way to recast the foundations of classical political liberalism, but one that relies heavily on a human exceptionalism which may no longer be sustainable.

  4. 4 out of 5

    MIKE Watkins Jr.

    "Humans think using mental models. These are representations of reality that make the world comprehensible. They allow us to see patterns, predict how things will unfold, and make sense of the circumstances we encounter." The author points out that the mental modes we choose to apply are called frames. Frames, "determine how we understand and act in the world. Frames enable us to generalize and make abstractions that apply to other situations". Frames, enable us as humans, to choose a frame to pro "Humans think using mental models. These are representations of reality that make the world comprehensible. They allow us to see patterns, predict how things will unfold, and make sense of the circumstances we encounter." The author points out that the mental modes we choose to apply are called frames. Frames, "determine how we understand and act in the world. Frames enable us to generalize and make abstractions that apply to other situations". Frames, enable us as humans, to choose a frame to provide new options or focus our mind and reduce options. Lastly, framing or cognitive analysis consists of causality, counterfactuals, and constraints. In other words, framing is basically meant comprehending things by first discovering the cause...and then using counterfactuals (within a constrained boundary) to formulate a game plan or an idea. The authors did a great job of presenting analogies that help bring out this concept in more depth throughout the book. In fact, this is what I would call a book with no flaws...as I read the book I can't say there was much to complain about in terms of mess-ups/ not good moments. The only problem with this book...is that it lacked a wow factor to it in my opinion. Now, for someone who doesn't read books like that, this book will amaze you. But if you've read at least 30 non-fictional informative books in your lifetime...this book will not change the way you think or well uh... "frame" things. The book organizes an idea that most critical thinkers/readers already know about and apply subconsciously. Moreover, like i said the book has no flaws...but it doesn't have anything that makes it stand out either. I'm not sure I'll remember this book within the next few months. It's a solid book that's worth the read...but nothing memorable.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Craig Beyers

    This is a book that organizes and characterizes how we look at the world and make decisions. Plenty of interesting examples of frames, how people changed frames, and how those changed frames changed things for them and others (e.g., the #MeToo movement). I would like more “how too” information on using frames in decision making; that was the weakest part of the book.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Erikka

    This book was interesting as a concept, but tended to reiterate points it had already made. I feel like this could have been a pamphlet or a long-form essay. Basically, learning to view problems through a different lens (or “frame”) is oftentimes better than getting hung up on the question itself. Finding a range of ways to look at a problem, narrowing it down by the impossible and improbable, narrowing it down more by your own set of rules and limitations, and then testing out the frames that r This book was interesting as a concept, but tended to reiterate points it had already made. I feel like this could have been a pamphlet or a long-form essay. Basically, learning to view problems through a different lens (or “frame”) is oftentimes better than getting hung up on the question itself. Finding a range of ways to look at a problem, narrowing it down by the impossible and improbable, narrowing it down more by your own set of rules and limitations, and then testing out the frames that remain will usually lead to a sustainable answer. If not, start over and reconsider your limits. My main problems with this book were threefold: 1) the repetition. I feel like there was a lot of dead horse beating. 2) the obsession with alliteration and cutesy memory tricks. Once or twice is fine. Not every list has to have a schtick. 3) the mother of all issues. It is simply “myriad.” I swear to all the gods, it is not “a myriad of”. “Myriad” means “many”. You wouldn’t say “a many of”. So just say “myriad.” This happened myriad times throughout this book. (Speaking of which, take a second to educate yourself on the proper use of “comprise”. Guarantee you’re probably using it wrong. But that’s forgivable because it sounds so strange to use it correctly. This is by no means a judgment, simply letting you know. It’s a weird word. “The band comprises 13 members”. So weird). Anyway, skim this. If anything, take a few seconds to review the guide at the back. It’s basically the whole book, stupid cutesy naming and all.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Rakesh Vajpai

    I picked up this book with a lot of expectations based on its reviews, only to be underwhelmed by "packaged common sense". There is not a single statement in this book that one can disagree with. And that is the unfortunate problem with this book. You read books to be shocked, surprised, challenged, provoked. Before picking up the book, I had read some reviews talk about the insights this book offers about how humanity will cope with the looming AI era. The book comes nowhere near fulfilling tha I picked up this book with a lot of expectations based on its reviews, only to be underwhelmed by "packaged common sense". There is not a single statement in this book that one can disagree with. And that is the unfortunate problem with this book. You read books to be shocked, surprised, challenged, provoked. Before picking up the book, I had read some reviews talk about the insights this book offers about how humanity will cope with the looming AI era. The book comes nowhere near fulfilling that promise. That the ability to construct mental models aka "frames" is human ability, difficult for machines to emulate is not news. The 3Cs - Causality, Counterfactuals and Constraints - are good explainers of framing and "reframing" in hindsight but do little to enhance one's "framing" ability. The five point advice in the last chapter "A guide to working with frames" is probably the most disappointing ending I have come across in any book. Here are those five points - a) Harness mental models, b) Dream with constraints, c) Reframe wisely, d) Conditions matter, e) Think beyond yourself. Seriously?

  8. 5 out of 5

    Luis

    Okay book to learn how to better problem solve or be innovative with something that looks like a practical framework, as supposed to other "feel good" business book. Could have been shorter/less repetitive. Key points for me where to acknowledge that no one really sees the world as it is, but we all have frames (lenses) that help us interpret the world. This will help you be more understanding of others perspectives and humble to accept when your framework is wrong. I like the point that "thinkin Okay book to learn how to better problem solve or be innovative with something that looks like a practical framework, as supposed to other "feel good" business book. Could have been shorter/less repetitive. Key points for me where to acknowledge that no one really sees the world as it is, but we all have frames (lenses) that help us interpret the world. This will help you be more understanding of others perspectives and humble to accept when your framework is wrong. I like the point that "thinking outside the box" is a useless advice, because what counts as outside the box is actually part of someone else randomly framed box. Instead, more practical tips are given to decide what constraints are useful and which ones are better to remove. It's only important to understand that key constraints will always be needed to define the end result. Lastly, I like his reminder that even when you come with a great framework that is completely new, you still need to remember that you may have to change your framework when evidence points to do so. The author ij particular calls out Albert Einstein for his ability to think about spacetime and his inability to accept quantum phenomena.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Mark Vukovic

    I read this from the perspective of an educator and in educational leadership. I think that it’s a very useful book and does a great way of explaining the importance of Diversity in thinking. There are a lot of great examples and I need to think about this more when planning. I tend to shut out the negative voices, but I realize that they are more important than the sycophants. This was a good summer read and I wonder if I could make a PD presentation about it. The lockdown made everyone reframe I read this from the perspective of an educator and in educational leadership. I think that it’s a very useful book and does a great way of explaining the importance of Diversity in thinking. There are a lot of great examples and I need to think about this more when planning. I tend to shut out the negative voices, but I realize that they are more important than the sycophants. This was a good summer read and I wonder if I could make a PD presentation about it. The lockdown made everyone reframe their teaching and I wonder what changes will be permanent now.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Peter O'Kelly

    Related resources: • Book site: http://framers-book.com/authors.php • Reviews and interviews: ○ https://www.kirkusreviews.com/book-re... ○ https://www.economist.com/books-and-a... ○ https://www.forbes.com/sites/calumcha... ○ https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articl... ○ http://blog.lareviewofbooks.org/inter... Related resources: • Book site: http://framers-book.com/authors.php • Reviews and interviews: ○ https://www.kirkusreviews.com/book-re... ○ https://www.economist.com/books-and-a... ○ https://www.forbes.com/sites/calumcha... ○ https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articl... ○ http://blog.lareviewofbooks.org/inter...

  11. 4 out of 5

    Paulo Peres

    O livro é bom, tem diversos insights e frases poderosas. Especialmente nos primeiros 4 capítulos, mas acho que de uma maneira geral ele estende algumas explicações que não precisavam. Para designers, pessoas de negócios, para pessoas que buscam olhar por outras lentes é um livro bom para aumentar a musculatura mental para outras lentes e até imaginar um processo de ampliação de frames.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Juarez Poletto Jr.

    Nothing new on the subject, just a repackaging of content from other books

  13. 5 out of 5

    Michael Williams

    I enjoyed this book and found it helpful. But it’s 40% longer than necessary.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Peter

  15. 5 out of 5

    Marco

  16. 4 out of 5

    John Mord

  17. 5 out of 5

    Johna Rutz

  18. 5 out of 5

    Riloai

  19. 5 out of 5

    Faisal Risq

  20. 4 out of 5

    Nakul LP

  21. 5 out of 5

    Nick McLachlan

  22. 5 out of 5

    Francis Kelly

  23. 4 out of 5

    Athul

  24. 4 out of 5

    Peter Hussey

  25. 5 out of 5

    Mate Raspovic

  26. 5 out of 5

    Zita Orozco

  27. 5 out of 5

    Sabina Peskin

  28. 5 out of 5

    M

  29. 4 out of 5

    Katarina Janoskova

  30. 5 out of 5

    Maezel Dimaculangan

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