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Black Boy Joy

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Celebrate the joys of Black boyhood with stories from seventeen bestselling, critically acclaimed Black authors--including Jason Reynolds (the Track series), Jerry Craft (New Kid), and edited by Kwame Mbalia (the Tristan Strong series)! Black boy joy is… Picking out a fresh first-day-of-school outfit. Saving the universe in an epic intergalactic race. Finding your voice—and y Celebrate the joys of Black boyhood with stories from seventeen bestselling, critically acclaimed Black authors--including Jason Reynolds (the Track series), Jerry Craft (New Kid), and edited by Kwame Mbalia (the Tristan Strong series)! Black boy joy is… Picking out a fresh first-day-of-school outfit. Saving the universe in an epic intergalactic race. Finding your voice—and your rhymes—during tough times. Flying on your skateboard like nobody’s watching. And more! From seventeen acclaimed Black male and non-binary authors comes a vibrant collection of stories, comics, and poems about the power of joy and the wonders of Black boyhood. Contributors include: B. B. Alston, Dean Atta, P. Djèlí Clark, Jay Coles, Jerry Craft, Lamar Giles, Don P. Hooper, George M. Johnson, Varian Johnson, Kwame Mbalia, Suyi Davies Okungbowa, Tochi Onyebuchi, Julian Randall, Jason Reynolds, Justin Reynolds, DaVaun Sanders, and Julian Winters


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Celebrate the joys of Black boyhood with stories from seventeen bestselling, critically acclaimed Black authors--including Jason Reynolds (the Track series), Jerry Craft (New Kid), and edited by Kwame Mbalia (the Tristan Strong series)! Black boy joy is… Picking out a fresh first-day-of-school outfit. Saving the universe in an epic intergalactic race. Finding your voice—and y Celebrate the joys of Black boyhood with stories from seventeen bestselling, critically acclaimed Black authors--including Jason Reynolds (the Track series), Jerry Craft (New Kid), and edited by Kwame Mbalia (the Tristan Strong series)! Black boy joy is… Picking out a fresh first-day-of-school outfit. Saving the universe in an epic intergalactic race. Finding your voice—and your rhymes—during tough times. Flying on your skateboard like nobody’s watching. And more! From seventeen acclaimed Black male and non-binary authors comes a vibrant collection of stories, comics, and poems about the power of joy and the wonders of Black boyhood. Contributors include: B. B. Alston, Dean Atta, P. Djèlí Clark, Jay Coles, Jerry Craft, Lamar Giles, Don P. Hooper, George M. Johnson, Varian Johnson, Kwame Mbalia, Suyi Davies Okungbowa, Tochi Onyebuchi, Julian Randall, Jason Reynolds, Justin Reynolds, DaVaun Sanders, and Julian Winters

30 review for Black Boy Joy

  1. 5 out of 5

    Tina

    This is a collection of Middle Grade Short Stories and Poems. I have to say I really loved most of these stories and poems, and I am not someone that reads a lot of short stories and poems. There was about 4 of them out of the 19 that I did not love. I think these stories cover so much important types. This is a great book. I really loved reading this book. I was kindly provided an e-copy of this book by the publisher or author via NetGalley, so I can give honest review about how I feel about th This is a collection of Middle Grade Short Stories and Poems. I have to say I really loved most of these stories and poems, and I am not someone that reads a lot of short stories and poems. There was about 4 of them out of the 19 that I did not love. I think these stories cover so much important types. This is a great book. I really loved reading this book. I was kindly provided an e-copy of this book by the publisher or author via NetGalley, so I can give honest review about how I feel about this book. I want to send a big Thank you to them for that.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Kaytee Cobb

    This collection is a layered connection, where each essay builds upon the last and adds dimension and flavor, all while expanding the definition of joy. I loved it.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ms. Yingling

    E ARC provided by Edelweiss I always find it difficult to review short story collections, but this one is excellent. It's somewhat similar to Jon Scieskca's Guys Read books, in that there is a tantalizing array of authors. Some of these are favorites, and I immediately recognized and liked their stories (Giles' fantastic spin on super hero fandom, and Johnson's Definition of Cool, with its spot on depiction of hanging out and dressing the part). Others are new to me, like the YA author Julian Win E ARC provided by Edelweiss I always find it difficult to review short story collections, but this one is excellent. It's somewhat similar to Jon Scieskca's Guys Read books, in that there is a tantalizing array of authors. Some of these are favorites, and I immediately recognized and liked their stories (Giles' fantastic spin on super hero fandom, and Johnson's Definition of Cool, with its spot on depiction of hanging out and dressing the part). Others are new to me, like the YA author Julian Winters and his Jevon, who is trying to win a baking competition. The problem with short stories is that once I read them, I want an entire BOOK about the character! I really appreciated that there were several speculative fiction stories, since it has been so hard to find middle grade ones with Black characters, and I am definitely going to investigate a lot of these authors. It is helpful that there are biographies with some works listed at the back of the book, and the inclusion of photographs (something I'm not sure I've ever seen in similar compilations) is another good way for my readers to see themselves represented in books. The Kadir Nelson cover is great, and I can see this being a great present for middle school boys, who can use this as a starting place for a lot more reading.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Danielle

    "Joy is a fragile thing, my boy, and must be treated as such. Too harsh and it disintegrates. Rush, and it disappears. So we coax it forth. Feed it, like kindling to a fire." The anthologies coming out this summer are absolute fire. This collection is no different. I loved this collection of 17 short stories that celebrate being a young Black boy. Most of the authors I have either read or at least heard of before, and I have a lot of respect for their writing. These short stories made me laugh an "Joy is a fragile thing, my boy, and must be treated as such. Too harsh and it disintegrates. Rush, and it disappears. So we coax it forth. Feed it, like kindling to a fire." The anthologies coming out this summer are absolute fire. This collection is no different. I loved this collection of 17 short stories that celebrate being a young Black boy. Most of the authors I have either read or at least heard of before, and I have a lot of respect for their writing. These short stories made me laugh and cry and cheer and feel a little bit of everything. There is a short story for everyone as so many genres and formats are represented: contemporary, science fiction, fantasy, poetry, graphic novel, LGBTQ+ representation, it's all here. This is an incredible collection of short stories that can be enjoyed by readers of all ages. I think this book is being marketed for readers 8-12 but I think older readers will find just as much enjoyment from reading this collection. A must read, in my opinion. **Thank you to NetGalley, Random House Children's, and Delacorte Press for an advanced reading copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Katelynne

    Favorite stories were: • There’s Going to Be a Fight In the Cafeteria on Friday and You Better Not Bring Batman • The McCoy Game • The Legendary Lawrence Cobbler • Extinct • The Gender Reveal • But Also, Jazz • Our Dill • Percival and the Jab • Embracing My Black Boy Joy

  6. 5 out of 5

    Glenda Nelms

    Amazing short story collection celebrating Black Boyhood by a great group of Black male and non-binary authors. These are stories celebrate Black Joy. Here’s are my favorite quotes: “The world is harsh. Find your joy, Fortitude, and it’ll be your night-light when everything is dark.” “These same eyes that get all teary when I’m sad…Also see all the beautiful things around me.” “The life I want for me is the life I want for all kids like me.” “When there’s death, there will be life, where there used Amazing short story collection celebrating Black Boyhood by a great group of Black male and non-binary authors. These are stories celebrate Black Joy. Here’s are my favorite quotes: “The world is harsh. Find your joy, Fortitude, and it’ll be your night-light when everything is dark.” “These same eyes that get all teary when I’m sad…Also see all the beautiful things around me.” “The life I want for me is the life I want for all kids like me.” “When there’s death, there will be life, where there used to emptiness, there will be purpose. And where there is sadness there will be joy.” “Legs that will stand together to make sure others have joy in their lives, too” Thanks to Kwame Mbalia and the authors who collaborated to write this beautiful book! Thanks to Colored Page tours and Delacote Press for letting me join this book tour and celebrate this amazingly inspiring book.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca McPhedran

    This book is pure magic. A collection of short stories that highlight black boy joy, this book is exactly what the world needs! From science fiction, to celebrating the first day of school; from poetry to comics-this book really has it all. I loved it so so much! You definitely should read this one!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Lorie Barber

    Joy. Yup. Disrupted narratives. Yup. Incredible stories: realistic, fantasy, historical, in-verse, graphic. Yup. Yup. Yup. Yup. Yup. I loved everything about this anthology. Each short story took me to a different place - sometimes even to a different world - with characters with whom I wanted to be friends. Each character had their own unique story to tell, yet I don’t have a “favorite” because I was riveted, wanting to get the whole plot of each story in one bite. This book would be a great re Joy. Yup. Disrupted narratives. Yup. Incredible stories: realistic, fantasy, historical, in-verse, graphic. Yup. Yup. Yup. Yup. Yup. I loved everything about this anthology. Each short story took me to a different place - sometimes even to a different world - with characters with whom I wanted to be friends. Each character had their own unique story to tell, yet I don’t have a “favorite” because I was riveted, wanting to get the whole plot of each story in one bite. This book would be a great read aloud: one story a day, almost like a picture book a day. It is also is THE BEST book for Black boys to see themselves as heroes and bringers (one, literally) of joy, written by their literary heroes. A MUST ADD for all libraries.

  9. 5 out of 5

    La La

    I was extremely excited for this book, but sadly except for a couple of stories this book was disappointing. RTC

  10. 5 out of 5

    Whitney Campbell

    Yes to this book. This book feels so important that it exists. When I started, I didn’t know what to expect in terms of diversity and the different ways of being black boy joy. This book even included some no binary joy. What a beautiful book to exist that is positive, fun, silly, powerful, … joy and not just black pain or overcoming some kind of adversity. I hope that black youth can see themselves in this book.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Grace W

    Absolutely beautiful!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Never Without a Book

    Every story will either make you smile of cry. I absolutely love this collection.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Donna

    Absolutely a great anthology of stories! Looking forward to sharing this book with so many of my students. I had so many favorites.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    I loved this collection of stories, specifically aimed at black male kids, all written by black male authors. As a school librarian, black male children are the most difficult to find books for, because there is not a ton out there that they can relate to. However, with this book, and others like it (many written by the authors featured in this collection), that is changing. I loved that, even though all of these stories were written by different authors, there were several common threads among I loved this collection of stories, specifically aimed at black male kids, all written by black male authors. As a school librarian, black male children are the most difficult to find books for, because there is not a ton out there that they can relate to. However, with this book, and others like it (many written by the authors featured in this collection), that is changing. I loved that, even though all of these stories were written by different authors, there were several common threads among them. For example, I had never heard the term "homegoing" as meaning a person going to Heaven after they'd died, but it appeared in more than one of the stories in the book. I also found it interesting how many of the stories involved superheroes in some way. I think that, with the variety of authors and genres represented in the book, there is something here in which nearly every reader can see himself. My favorite story was "First Day Fly" by Jason Reynolds. Of course, there is very little, if anything, Jason Reynolds does wrong, in my opinion, but I felt his story would resonate the most with the black youth I encounter at my school. However, as I said, there is something here for everyone, and I will be ordering it for my library.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Krajewski

    “Where there’s death, there will be life. Where there used to be emptiness…there will be purpose. And where there is sadness, there will be joy.” In 2021, we need every bit of joy we can muster up, and this book will show readers how to find that joy for themselves. For some, this book will be a window* into the lives of fabulous Black kids, and for others they will see themselves in the characters. Black Boy Joy is a much-needed collection of all forms of joy—skateboarding, looking fly on a fir “Where there’s death, there will be life. Where there used to be emptiness…there will be purpose. And where there is sadness, there will be joy.” In 2021, we need every bit of joy we can muster up, and this book will show readers how to find that joy for themselves. For some, this book will be a window* into the lives of fabulous Black kids, and for others they will see themselves in the characters. Black Boy Joy is a much-needed collection of all forms of joy—skateboarding, looking fly on a first day of school, saving the universe, finding the strength to come out—centering around unforgettable Black, male and nonbinary characters. Included are short stories, poems, and a comic written by 17 of today’s best Black male and nonbinary authors. Writers include: B. B. Alston, Dean Atta, P. Djèlí Clark, Jay Coles, Jerry Craft, Lamar Giles, Don P. Hooper, George M. Johnson, Varian Johnson, Kwame Mbalia, Suyi Davies Okungbowa, Tochi Onyebuchi, Julian Randall, Jason Reynolds, justin a. reynolds, DaVaun Sanders, and Julian Winters. *term coined by Rudine Sims Bishop

  16. 4 out of 5

    Christine Chatelain Latimer

    These are incredible short stories highlighting black boyhood. I enjoyed and appreciated that this collection of works showcased different experiences of being a young black boy. I do feel all little black boys should pick up this book. Each short story have its own unique storyline which was an astonishing, beautiful, diverse collection of stories that brought me joy, laughter and so many memories. This is definitely a must read!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Ingle

    A collection of short stories all by Black male and non-binary authors celebrating Black male and non-binary characters and their JOY. There’s a little bit of something for everyone: realistic fiction, science fiction, low-fantasy, poetry, and even a graphic piece. If I were to rate each story separately, some would get 3, 4, or 5 stars. Some were super engaging and memorable while others were… meh (for me). I think this book would appeal to most elementary and middle school readers, and no doub A collection of short stories all by Black male and non-binary authors celebrating Black male and non-binary characters and their JOY. There’s a little bit of something for everyone: realistic fiction, science fiction, low-fantasy, poetry, and even a graphic piece. If I were to rate each story separately, some would get 3, 4, or 5 stars. Some were super engaging and memorable while others were… meh (for me). I think this book would appeal to most elementary and middle school readers, and no doubt it should be a fixture for many classroom and school libraries.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ricki

    I loved this book so, so much. I am excited to share the stories with my students. My 7 year old and I read a story each night, and we had so many phenomenal conversations. He's not the marketed age group, but I can say that this book is a great read for people of all ages. I loved this book so, so much. I am excited to share the stories with my students. My 7 year old and I read a story each night, and we had so many phenomenal conversations. He's not the marketed age group, but I can say that this book is a great read for people of all ages.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Carly Bohach

    I listened to this collection of short stories and really enjoyed them. They were filled with emotion, fun and magic.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Maraia

    4.5 stars

  21. 5 out of 5

    Mary Lee

    A must-read collection of sort stories. Such variety. So much...JOY!!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jean

    It's such a heart warming concept that black children now have books such as this one. They can see the portrayal of themselves and brothers, friends, and relatives who look and act like them. Kudos brothers for writing this anthology! It's such a heart warming concept that black children now have books such as this one. They can see the portrayal of themselves and brothers, friends, and relatives who look and act like them. Kudos brothers for writing this anthology!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Pine Reads Review

    What is joy made out of? Is it made of bubbles, talking lizards, spaceships and fun music? Is joy the love we feel for those closest to us, the love we feel for ourselves? Black Boy Joy, a collection of short stories, comics, and poems, opened my heart to finding what joy means, to feeling profound sadness, to feeling close to loved ones, and everything in between. These stories explore the power of love at an age where things are not always easy, where transitions are made, and where magic is f What is joy made out of? Is it made of bubbles, talking lizards, spaceships and fun music? Is joy the love we feel for those closest to us, the love we feel for ourselves? Black Boy Joy, a collection of short stories, comics, and poems, opened my heart to finding what joy means, to feeling profound sadness, to feeling close to loved ones, and everything in between. These stories explore the power of love at an age where things are not always easy, where transitions are made, and where magic is found. I have fallen in love, cried, laughed and smiled with all the characters as they explored what joy means to them, and how love can be truly transformational. Although every story in this collection was exceptional and profoundly joyful, there are four that tugged a little harder at my heart strings and that will stay with me for years to come. “Fear is just Forgetting Everything’s All Right” – The Legendary Lawrence Cobbler by Julian Winters This story has all the right ingredients: some chili powder, a dash of peaches, a sprinkle of cinnamon and a heaping cup of familial love, and self discovery. It was a perfect mix as I rode along through Von’s journey of accepting himself and his sexuality. When Von takes on his school’s baking championship, he makes mistakes and deeply crushes on his competitor Noah. Von takes on finding confidence in himself, and finding out what it means to be loved unconditionally for who he is inside, which was inspirational. As a girl around Von’s age I used to aspire to be a pastry chef, and I related to his struggles of finding his way through deep feelings and learning from his mistakes along the way. Although this one made me cry, (just a little), I found a joy in Von’s story that made me smile in the end. “They ain’t gonna mess up my groove…slick!” -The Definition of Cool by Varian Johnson Sometimes all you need is some good music and some cool moves to lift your spirits up. This story was exactly that. Desmond is desperate to be the cool kid in school, as I am sure everyone who has ever been young can relate to. He wanted to fit in, but more than that he wanted to dance and express his love for Juice Box Squad. This one hit close to home, because when I was his age, fitting in was everything. Even now as an adult, fitting in seems to be the easiest route. But with a little help from the adults in his world, and even his older brother, Desmond goes through a journey of self discovery and finds out what it means to truly be himself in a world that tried to make him fit in. For anyone who has ever felt like they were made to stand out, this story will make you realize the joy in being yourself. “My mother used to say we make mistakes and learn from them. Maybe making mistakes isn’t too bad after. Getting the best out of them—like making a new friend—is what matters, right?” -Five Thousand Light-Years to Home by Suyi Davies Okungbowa Although most of the stories in Black Boy Joy are contemporary YA, there are a few that bring in aspects of magic and science, that add another layer of fantasticalness that resonated deeply for me. This story follows Keziah as he goes through the motions of moving, something every child has experienced in one form or another. His parents are uprooting him from his familiar home, and he thinks there is no chance he could make friends in this new place. However, when a talking lizard from space takes him on a magical journey, Keziah finds a friend, and a chance to start anew in this unfamiliar apartment complex. As someone whose life was uprooted all at once at the same age as Keziah, I understood his struggles. Okungbowa wrote a story that tugged at my heart strings, and showed a younger me that I am not alone no matter where life takes me. Friends are life’s sweetest gift, and delving into Keziah’s magic journey allowed me to find courage in starting anew, just like he did. “Your truth. Go ahead and stand right there and say what you’ve always wanted to say!” -The Gender Reveal by George M. Johnson Throughout the entire collection, there are multiple stories that delve into representation for BIPOC characters, and stories of discovering queerness and dealing with police brutality, and so much more. This story was particularly powerful in telling the story of Malcom, and how they wanted to come out as nonbinary to the people they care about most. It delved into how Malcom found courage in understanding what his dad and grandmother had been through in the generation before him, and how they were loved no matter who they were. This story explores finding one’s self even when it is scary to be true to who you are at first. In the end, this story was profoundly joyful because it showed the importance of stepping into yourself and how powerful the love of a community can be. Every story deserves to be told, and this collection has changed my life in all the best ways. I journeyed through the book expecting to find happiness, but quickly realized that I had found something much more meaningful: love. Find yourself a copy of this collection, because you won’t want to put it down. In a world of darkness and troubles, these stories will bring light and understanding. Reading these stories has shown me that joy can be found anywhere; you just have to be open to feeling it. Content Warnings: Police brutality, death of a loved one, racism, anxiety, depression, COVID-19, pandemic discussions (Pine Reads Review would like to thank NetGalley and the publisher for providing us with an ARC in exchange for an honest review. Any quotes are taken from an advanced copy and may be subject to change upon final publication.) Follow us on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook @pinereadsreview and check out our website at www.pinereadsreview.com for reviews, author interviews, blogs, podcast episodes, and more!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Magaly C.

    A collection of vignettes/short stories from seventeen best-selling Black authors. Black Boy Joy is a lovely example of contributors working with a common theme. Kwame Mbalia opens and closes the book with the story of Fortitude Jones joining the Griot of Grover Street in the Between to capture joy. Though each contributor sticks to their respective genres from science fiction to fantasy to realistic fiction, the connection is finding those moments of Black boy joy. I loved Mbalia's opening and A collection of vignettes/short stories from seventeen best-selling Black authors. Black Boy Joy is a lovely example of contributors working with a common theme. Kwame Mbalia opens and closes the book with the story of Fortitude Jones joining the Griot of Grover Street in the Between to capture joy. Though each contributor sticks to their respective genres from science fiction to fantasy to realistic fiction, the connection is finding those moments of Black boy joy. I loved Mbalia's opening and close. It created space for contributing authors to demonstrate their respective talents without constrictions of having to include shared characters or settings. This book is a reminder that everyone needs joy, but that it can be a tenuous and fleeting state of being. Some of my favorite joy-related quotes that I think each author also demonstrate masterfully: "Joy is a fragile thing, my boy, and must be treated as such. Too harsh and it disintegrates. Rush, and it disappears. So we coax it forth. Feed it, like kindling to the fire." "Sadness is but one side of the coin. Necessary. Must be expressed if we're to rediscover the other three sides...fear, anger, and joy. All part of the same four-sided coin." This is a lovely middle-grade read that can also bring joy to older readers. We need more books like this!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Alicia

    This is close to perfect. The variety of stories included a graphic short story by Craft and verse by Atta which adds to the beauty of the collection (and I was secretly hoping the authors would share using their best talents). The stories are also very different from one another while the theme remains the same: Black boy joy. And that it accomplishes from every pore of the book. I can't wait to see it in print when it's finally published since this is an advanced copy from Netgalley. I'll have This is close to perfect. The variety of stories included a graphic short story by Craft and verse by Atta which adds to the beauty of the collection (and I was secretly hoping the authors would share using their best talents). The stories are also very different from one another while the theme remains the same: Black boy joy. And that it accomplishes from every pore of the book. I can't wait to see it in print when it's finally published since this is an advanced copy from Netgalley. I'll have copies on order as soon as I'm done writing here. Of course I have my favorites: Giles' "There's Going to be a Fight in the Cafeteria on Friday and You Better Not Bring Batman" that celebrates superhero geekdom, "The Gender Reveal" which is quintessentially George M. Johnson if you read All Boys Aren't Blue, "First Day Fly" by Jason Reynolds, "The MCoy Game" by Alston which was mysterious and puzzling, the sweetness of a kid who loves to cook and bake with Winters' "The Legendary Lawrence Cobbler", and the heartwarming sibling relationship (and generational conversation) about "The Definition of Cool" by Varian Johnson. "Joy is a fragile thing, my boy, and must be treated as such. Too harsh and it disintegrates. Rush, and it disappears. So we coax is forth. Feed it, like kindling to a fire."

  26. 4 out of 5

    Debb Adams

    How do I review a short story collection? I soooo want to talk about each of the works of the 17 authors represented in Black Boy Joy: 17 Stories Celebrating Black Boyhood, which was edited by Kwame Mbalia. There is such a diverse collection of realistic fiction, science fiction, fantasy, graphic short fiction, and LGBTQ stories (which I know is not a separate genre, but deserves to be highlighted) written by some of the hottest names in Young Adult and Middle Grades literature today. I did a “f How do I review a short story collection? I soooo want to talk about each of the works of the 17 authors represented in Black Boy Joy: 17 Stories Celebrating Black Boyhood, which was edited by Kwame Mbalia. There is such a diverse collection of realistic fiction, science fiction, fantasy, graphic short fiction, and LGBTQ stories (which I know is not a separate genre, but deserves to be highlighted) written by some of the hottest names in Young Adult and Middle Grades literature today. I did a “fangirl” squeal when I looked at the table of contents and saw the authors whose voices were represented. I can’t review each story, but I can say that I am very impressed by the stories themselves, the myriad of backgrounds represented by the characters, and the issues, problems, obstacles that the characters face. I will be purchasing multiple copies for my classroom because I can name 10-15 current students and dozens of former students that this book would appeal to. I love using short story collections, especially, with striving readers because they are smaller bites of complete narratives. I also can imagine giving the students a choice of stories to use for dramatic reading or for the students to practice adapting prose into scenes. (I teach drama.) *This is an honest, voluntary review written in exchange for and E-ARC. Thank you Random House Children’s and NetGalley.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Meagan

    Black Boy Joy is an instant classic. It should (and I'm sure will) be on the shelves of every library across the United States. It is an incredible collection of short stories by many of the biggest names in middle grades and young adult literature. We see stories by Jason Reynolds, Kwame Mbalia, and Jerry Craft among others. While the individual stories are captivating, and include something for every type of reader, from a graphic short story to poetry, to realistic fiction, to historical fict Black Boy Joy is an instant classic. It should (and I'm sure will) be on the shelves of every library across the United States. It is an incredible collection of short stories by many of the biggest names in middle grades and young adult literature. We see stories by Jason Reynolds, Kwame Mbalia, and Jerry Craft among others. While the individual stories are captivating, and include something for every type of reader, from a graphic short story to poetry, to realistic fiction, to historical fiction, to fantasy, what I love most about the collection is the overarching theme of "joy." There is so much to celebrate and to be proud of within the rich history of African American culture and I am so happy to see a book that so thoroughly rejoices in that pride and that joy.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Tin Minute

    Black Boy Joy grades away the dense sediment of pain and dismal prospects that the entertainment industry at large has placed on our childhood, and excavates out the pure jubilation that is our youthful existence. All authors capture the joyfulness that comes with childhood with the use of imagination, whimsy, finding happiness where ever it can be found, and just the pure bliss of knowing, being, and sometimes even the introduction of oneself. Black children, boys in particular, are often robbe Black Boy Joy grades away the dense sediment of pain and dismal prospects that the entertainment industry at large has placed on our childhood, and excavates out the pure jubilation that is our youthful existence. All authors capture the joyfulness that comes with childhood with the use of imagination, whimsy, finding happiness where ever it can be found, and just the pure bliss of knowing, being, and sometimes even the introduction of oneself. Black children, boys in particular, are often robbed of the public showcase of their joy, but this tome radiates rapture in its most idealized form. Some stories play to the imagination, while others ground the listener into the 'now,' but all are age appropriate, taking situations that are less than ideal, and finding the utter jocundity in them. No curses, no sexual situations, and no violence. HIGHLY RECOMMENDED for all ages.​

  29. 5 out of 5

    Margo Jantzi

    My favorite selection and the reason we should place in all our libraries. Embracing My Black Boy Joy by Jerry Craft

  30. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Boyd

    This was an excellent book, and accessible for everyone. I recommend

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