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A Spartan's Sorrow

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All murders must be avenged. While the rest of Greece mourns for the war that has taken their husbands away, Clytemnestra fears the day it will bring hers back. When her husband willingly sacrifices their eldest daughter to appease the Gods, Clytemnestra vows to do whatever it takes to protect her remaining children. But in doing so she faces losing them altogether. A story All murders must be avenged. While the rest of Greece mourns for the war that has taken their husbands away, Clytemnestra fears the day it will bring hers back. When her husband willingly sacrifices their eldest daughter to appease the Gods, Clytemnestra vows to do whatever it takes to protect her remaining children. But in doing so she faces losing them altogether. A story of love, loss and bitter betrayals, A Spartan’s Sorrow shows that sometimes you must risk it all to protect the ones you love. If you are a fan of vengeful Gods and fierce family rivalries you will love Hannah Lynn’s epic tale of ancient Greece’s most formidable Queen.


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All murders must be avenged. While the rest of Greece mourns for the war that has taken their husbands away, Clytemnestra fears the day it will bring hers back. When her husband willingly sacrifices their eldest daughter to appease the Gods, Clytemnestra vows to do whatever it takes to protect her remaining children. But in doing so she faces losing them altogether. A story All murders must be avenged. While the rest of Greece mourns for the war that has taken their husbands away, Clytemnestra fears the day it will bring hers back. When her husband willingly sacrifices their eldest daughter to appease the Gods, Clytemnestra vows to do whatever it takes to protect her remaining children. But in doing so she faces losing them altogether. A story of love, loss and bitter betrayals, A Spartan’s Sorrow shows that sometimes you must risk it all to protect the ones you love. If you are a fan of vengeful Gods and fierce family rivalries you will love Hannah Lynn’s epic tale of ancient Greece’s most formidable Queen.

30 review for A Spartan's Sorrow

  1. 4 out of 5

    Helena Jones

    In the traditional tale we learn very little of Clytemnestra's life. She was a sister to Helen, yes that Helen, but Clytemnestra is overshadowed by Helen and by her husband, Agamemnon. She is his queen, the mother of his children and ultimately his murderer. We forget the childhood she would have experienced, a princess of Sparta and a valuable pawn on the marriage mart. We forget that like most Spartan women she would have been trained in the arts of war, so that she might give birth to strong In the traditional tale we learn very little of Clytemnestra's life. She was a sister to Helen, yes that Helen, but Clytemnestra is overshadowed by Helen and by her husband, Agamemnon. She is his queen, the mother of his children and ultimately his murderer. We forget the childhood she would have experienced, a princess of Sparta and a valuable pawn on the marriage mart. We forget that like most Spartan women she would have been trained in the arts of war, so that she might give birth to strong warriors herself. This retelling lets Clytemnestra shine through the myth and step forward to tell her own story.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Manuel Gómez-Ortigoza

    Very well crafted A deep knowledge of the myth and the intelligent creativity to dress it as a novel. Spellbinding! Kept me trying to guess how she was plotting the story. Beautifully crafted!

  3. 4 out of 5

    The FountainPenDiva, Old school geek chick and lover of teddy bears

    Yay, Clytemnestra gets her say. My only issue was with Electra. How did she become such a daddy's girl in the worst way possible? Yay, Clytemnestra gets her say. My only issue was with Electra. How did she become such a daddy's girl in the worst way possible?

  4. 4 out of 5

    Suanne

    In the first of the Grecian Women Trilogy books, Athena's Child, Hannah Lynn retells the story of Medusa and Perseus. In the second of the trilogy, Lynn revisits the Trojan War, focusing on Clytemnestra. As in her depiction of Medusa, in A Spartan's Sorrow, Lynn again handles the persistence of the male hierarchy and how women, even other women, blame the victim for her plight rather than blaming the perpetrator. Clytemnestra, the wife of Agamemnon and the sister of Helen of Troy, remains at home In the first of the Grecian Women Trilogy books, Athena's Child, Hannah Lynn retells the story of Medusa and Perseus. In the second of the trilogy, Lynn revisits the Trojan War, focusing on Clytemnestra. As in her depiction of Medusa, in A Spartan's Sorrow, Lynn again handles the persistence of the male hierarchy and how women, even other women, blame the victim for her plight rather than blaming the perpetrator. Clytemnestra, the wife of Agamemnon and the sister of Helen of Troy, remains at home, governing their kingdom well, while he goes off to fight the Trojan War. Lynn gives us a strong, complex woman with fierce maternal instincts, brought about by Agamemnon’s murder of her beloved first husband and her first son. Her protective, perhaps overly-protective, instincts determine her future. The prose here is less simplistic than in the prior Athena’s Child, but still far less poetic that that in Madeline Miller's Circe or Pat Barker's The Silence of the Girls. Lynn does ask us to listen to the stories of women that the patriarchy sees as villains and to reevaluate their lives in view of the #MeToo movement. However, as in Athena’s Child, Lynn ends in the male point of view, as she follows the life of Clytemnestra’s son, Orestes, thus diluting her efforts at feminism. Because A Spartan’s Sorrow runs fifty pages beyond the length of Athena’s Child, Lynn has more room to focus on characterization, thus Clytemnestra is more fully realized, and the rest of the cast is better developed as well.

  5. 4 out of 5

    John

    I knew almost nothing of Greek Myths so found this very interesting and easy to follow. Also really enjoyed authors previous novel Athena’s Child

  6. 5 out of 5

    Benni

    The characters really came alive in this retelling...absolutely loved it and couldn't put it down! The characters really came alive in this retelling...absolutely loved it and couldn't put it down!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Elena

    Clytemnestra has always been one of my favourite mythological figures, despite the fact she is mostly portrayed as a negative character. In A Spartan's Sorrow, Hannah M. Lynn does a great job rehabilitating her character. I felt so much for Clytemnestra through the story. From the very first page, her relationship with her daughter Iphigenia was beautifully portrayed, and her death hit me very hard even though I knew it was going to happen. Apart from that, Clytemnestra had to face a lot of hards Clytemnestra has always been one of my favourite mythological figures, despite the fact she is mostly portrayed as a negative character. In A Spartan's Sorrow, Hannah M. Lynn does a great job rehabilitating her character. I felt so much for Clytemnestra through the story. From the very first page, her relationship with her daughter Iphigenia was beautifully portrayed, and her death hit me very hard even though I knew it was going to happen. Apart from that, Clytemnestra had to face a lot of hardships and heartbreaks during the story and I always felt for her and rooted for her. Her evolution through the story was very well done, and I also adored how her relationship with Aegisthus was portrayed. Similarly with the first book in this trilogy, I started to lose interest in the story after we started following Orestes. I didn't mind him as a character, but he wasn't very compelling either, and, while I understood why the author decided to follow him, I would have preferred if the story had ended sooner after (view spoiler)[Clytemnestra's death. Also, I was expecting more from this scene: it ended way too suddenly for me, while I would have liked some sort of confrontation between mother and son. (hide spoiler)] But apart from that, I really enjoyed the book and I would definitely recommend it.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Lenny Cavallaro

    I could have gone either way — four stars or five — with this excellent novel. In the end I opted for four, to which I append my endless lament that GoodReads should offer us the “half-star” option: 4.5 is far more accurate! The author presents a marvelously sympathetic Clytemnestra: a woman far more sinned against than sinning. This is not the monstrous villain of Aeschylus, and she is treated even more kindly than Euripides’ Medea. Indeed, if Medea can be seen as a proto-feminist, Lynn’s protag I could have gone either way — four stars or five — with this excellent novel. In the end I opted for four, to which I append my endless lament that GoodReads should offer us the “half-star” option: 4.5 is far more accurate! The author presents a marvelously sympathetic Clytemnestra: a woman far more sinned against than sinning. This is not the monstrous villain of Aeschylus, and she is treated even more kindly than Euripides’ Medea. Indeed, if Medea can be seen as a proto-feminist, Lynn’s protagonist is clearly cut from the same fabric. Aegisthus is developed similarly. He, too, seems a gentle soul, and quite removed from the conniving accomplice of Aeschylus. [In some renditions of the myth, it is he — not Clytemnestra — who slays Agamemnon.] Where THE ORESTEIA treats the aftermath of Orestes’ revenge in a separate drama, Lynn makes him the focal character for the back half of the book. He has no desire to avenge his father’s murder, and but for the vindictive Electra, he would never even have left Mycenae. After the murder, he is ruthlessly persecuted by the Furies, until Athena’s trial resolves the matter. This is familiar territory for those familiar with the myths and Greek tragedies, although once again Lynn contrives to interpolate an imaginative, new element. All of these details “worked,” and the novel was fast-paced: an enjoyable “page-turner.” Nevertheless, I had some difficulties with parts of the narrative, including:
 (1) The friction between Clytemnestra and Electra seems a little “over-the-top” on occasion, both physically and emotionally. (2) The arrival of Aegisthus and his initially clandestine meetings with Clytemnestra beg the obvious question: where does he stay when he is not courting her or sleeping with her? (3) Why does the brutal, violent Agamemnon, who is fully aware of the adultery, not deal with Clytemnestra immediately? (4) The homosexual relationship between Orestes and Pylades has been suggested by writers as early as Lucian (in the second century). However, I feel that it is belabored in Lynn’s treatment. ***** What more can I add? I truly enjoyed the work despite its flaws, and I extend a hearty recommendation. In many ways it is a 5-star effort, and 4.5 is far closer to the mark.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Heather Copping

    A story set in the times of ancient Greece, Helen of Troy and times when life was so much different to now. You may think that you know these stories but there's a lot still to be learnt and I think reading this book will maybe answer some of these questions. Clytemnestra was ordered to take her eldest daughter Iphigenia away go be married, but unbeknown to her, her husband wants to sacrifice the girl to the gods. When she realised what has happened she is rightly distraught and from that moment A story set in the times of ancient Greece, Helen of Troy and times when life was so much different to now. You may think that you know these stories but there's a lot still to be learnt and I think reading this book will maybe answer some of these questions. Clytemnestra was ordered to take her eldest daughter Iphigenia away go be married, but unbeknown to her, her husband wants to sacrifice the girl to the gods. When she realised what has happened she is rightly distraught and from that moment she makes a vow to protect her other children, whatever it takes to do so, so that they will not suffer as her daughter suffered. This is just the start of things and as matters come to a head it is left to Clytemnestra to protect her family. As we follow the families, their troubles and happiness I found myself being drawn into their lives and I have learnt so much about this period of history that I never knew before. A tale of sorrow, revenge and a mothers love for her children which was just as strong then as it is now, as she does her utmost to protect them but will it be enough? Written by Hannah Lynn whose work I have previously enjoyed reading in The Sweetshop of Second Chances, a completely different genre but just as good to read and definitely an author to keep an eye out for.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Ursula

    Another novel dealing with the events of the Trojan War. And it's a good one! Clytemnestra played a unique and tragic role in the stories of those times. She was the sister of Helen and the mother of the princess sacrificed by Agamemnon to get a fair wind to enable the Greek fleet to set sail for Troy. Hannah M Lynn has a whole early life to explore as well as events in Mycenae throughout the 10 year duration of the war. She then continues the story with the homecoming of the warriors and up to Another novel dealing with the events of the Trojan War. And it's a good one! Clytemnestra played a unique and tragic role in the stories of those times. She was the sister of Helen and the mother of the princess sacrificed by Agamemnon to get a fair wind to enable the Greek fleet to set sail for Troy. Hannah M Lynn has a whole early life to explore as well as events in Mycenae throughout the 10 year duration of the war. She then continues the story with the homecoming of the warriors and up to (and beyond) Clytemnestra's death as the fous shifts to her son Orestes. The values and responsiblities of a royal family in the Bronze age come across very well, together with some details of daily life. This story shows Clytemnestra as a very relatable person dealing with personal tragedy, domestic abuse and the day-to-day running of a household and estate. She is mother to a moody teenager and a sensitive child. She faces losing her fitness and battles to get in shape solely for her own sense of self-worth. She finds and gives love and friendship. She is fiercely protective. The modern reader can feel familiar with Clytemnestra right up until she acts and reacts in an alien manner because she really isn't the same as us after all. A very enjoyable read illuminating a fresh perspective.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Joni Janice Mielke

    As with Athena's Child, A Spartan's Sorrow opens up the world of Greek mythology in a way that's easy to understand, easy to follow, and absolutely engrossing as it explores the events of one of the Trojan war from an unusual and unexpected point of view. Clymenestra is the wife of Agamemnon, but far from being recognised simply by her relation to the King of Mycenae, she is also a strong and deeply complex woman whose fiercely protective maternal instinct determines her path more than any marit As with Athena's Child, A Spartan's Sorrow opens up the world of Greek mythology in a way that's easy to understand, easy to follow, and absolutely engrossing as it explores the events of one of the Trojan war from an unusual and unexpected point of view. Clymenestra is the wife of Agamemnon, but far from being recognised simply by her relation to the King of Mycenae, she is also a strong and deeply complex woman whose fiercely protective maternal instinct determines her path more than any marital alliance would. This is a story wherein names and characters from ancient mythology become people, with all the inherent flaws and weaknesses that come with it. Here are the beautiful and ugly things, the pride and shame, the loss and love, the life and death of things, the torture and the bliss, and the newfound joy and heartbreaking endings that make up life as we know it. No decision is ever easy, and few choices are clean cut, and thus a series of events that otherwise appears so far removed from the challenges of day to day life suddenly seems all the more relatable. These books are quickly becoming my favourite renderings of mythological tales, I would highly recommend this, and I look forward to reading further books by this author.

  12. 4 out of 5

    LKay

    The first half of this book did not hold my attention as well as Athena's Child, Hannah Lynn’s first book in The Grecian Women Trilogy, probably because I have already read quite a few different takes on this story. There were many times that I opted to spend my time on a different activity rather than with this book. I think perhaps I just don’t like Clytemnestra very much, so I wasn’t really interested. It finally came down to a Saturday where I really didn’t have much else to do that I picked The first half of this book did not hold my attention as well as Athena's Child, Hannah Lynn’s first book in The Grecian Women Trilogy, probably because I have already read quite a few different takes on this story. There were many times that I opted to spend my time on a different activity rather than with this book. I think perhaps I just don’t like Clytemnestra very much, so I wasn’t really interested. It finally came down to a Saturday where I really didn’t have much else to do that I picked this book up again, and I’m glad I did! For me the pace of this book totally changed once the perspective shifted to Orestes’, and I found myself so engrossed in his part of the book that I finished it all in one sitting. I’ve really enjoyed both of Lynn’s retellings of Greek myths, she finds a way to tell the stories in a new way that we haven’t heard before. Really eager to find out what story she’ll tackle in the final book of this trilogy!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kara

    I think it would beneficial if you already know this (literal) Greek tragedy going in, to appreciate the amount of foreshadowing laid out here, ironies and red flags all over the place. Every time Clytemnestra thinks of how sweet and kind and non-violent Orestes is makes you shudder, knowing what's going to happen. But Lynn also manages to show actions that the audience sees as written in stone (again, literally) here we see them as the fluid moments they were, often unplanned, or by accident, or I think it would beneficial if you already know this (literal) Greek tragedy going in, to appreciate the amount of foreshadowing laid out here, ironies and red flags all over the place. Every time Clytemnestra thinks of how sweet and kind and non-violent Orestes is makes you shudder, knowing what's going to happen. But Lynn also manages to show actions that the audience sees as written in stone (again, literally) here we see them as the fluid moments they were, often unplanned, or by accident, or clearly of someone's own will. With a story as old as this, sometimes it can feel the characters are reading a script, doing something just because that's way the play told them to, but here it feels fresh and - despite the appearance of a few gods - all too human and real. Lynn does an excellent job clearly showing quite a twisted family tree, tightening the spotlight to just a few in this sprawling epic drama of curses rolling down the generations.

  14. 5 out of 5

    MBenzz

    While I would have to say I enjoyed 'Athena's Child' just a SMIDGEN more, I still absolutely loved this book. What an awful, heartbreaking tragedy this story is. Queen Clytemnestra has suffered so much loss and abuse in her short life, but she has done the best she can to protect her surviving children and fill their lives with love and laughter. Orestes, the heir to the Mycenae throne, is a sweet boy who loves all living creatures. The complete opposite of his murderous father, Agamemnon. Tasked While I would have to say I enjoyed 'Athena's Child' just a SMIDGEN more, I still absolutely loved this book. What an awful, heartbreaking tragedy this story is. Queen Clytemnestra has suffered so much loss and abuse in her short life, but she has done the best she can to protect her surviving children and fill their lives with love and laughter. Orestes, the heir to the Mycenae throne, is a sweet boy who loves all living creatures. The complete opposite of his murderous father, Agamemnon. Tasked with murdering the mother he loves to avenge a death no one mourned over, then being cursed on top of it, Orestes is such a tragic soul, and my heart broke for just how unfair his life was. Overall, I loved this book and would absolutely recommend it. You don't need to know anything about Greek Mythology going into it, but I bet you, by the end, you'll have fallen down the rabbit hole of Googling ALL THE THINGS!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Fiona Atay

    Hannah Lynn's brilliant retelling of the story of Clytaemnestra and Agamemnon is an absolute must-read for any fan of Ancient Greek myth and legend, but even for those not so inclined, it is a compelling and beautifully written piece. Taken from the feminine perspective of Clytaemnestra, Lynn's consideration of the Spartan queen'spredicament and her struggle to keep her children and her sanity safe in a harsh, male-dominated world is engrossing and with ever-present contemporary relevance. Curre Hannah Lynn's brilliant retelling of the story of Clytaemnestra and Agamemnon is an absolute must-read for any fan of Ancient Greek myth and legend, but even for those not so inclined, it is a compelling and beautifully written piece. Taken from the feminine perspective of Clytaemnestra, Lynn's consideration of the Spartan queen'spredicament and her struggle to keep her children and her sanity safe in a harsh, male-dominated world is engrossing and with ever-present contemporary relevance. Currently relocated to a foreign shore myself - and not so very far from Troy - I recently found myself looking out from the ruins of Erythrai, contemplating the fishing boats sitting placidly on becalmed waters and wondering how desperate Agamemnon must have been for the winds upon which the armies of Greece relied. What wouldn't you do to hold onto power? What wouldn't you do for your children or to your children in such a world? Superb!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    Once again Hannah Lynn has created an unputdownable read. This is the second book of hers that I have read and I’m again drawn to the characters in her novel. She’s taken a mythological story and created within it protagonists that I would want to be friends with. They may have killed their mother or brother or run off with a lover but somehow they all seem “whole” and real so quite frankly their foibles are easily forgiven. As a complete pacifist and a rule abiding citizen, this has made me scr Once again Hannah Lynn has created an unputdownable read. This is the second book of hers that I have read and I’m again drawn to the characters in her novel. She’s taken a mythological story and created within it protagonists that I would want to be friends with. They may have killed their mother or brother or run off with a lover but somehow they all seem “whole” and real so quite frankly their foibles are easily forgiven. As a complete pacifist and a rule abiding citizen, this has made me scratch my head once or twice. I’ve concluded that Lynn also likes and befriends her subjects so the sensitivity with which she handles these rather “delicate” issues leads us to sympathise with our new friends. An all together 5 * read. Fabulous characters, brilliant story and I’m off to find my next Hannah Lynn novel.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Luisa A.

    As a former Classical Studies teacher who loved the Oresteia and particularly Clytaemnestra as a schoolgirl, I jumped at the chance to read this retelling of the myth. I found it engaging and a refreshing, modern take on Clytaemnestra's story. Whereas the ancient Greeks saw her as a monstrous figure, Hannah Lynn shows the reasons why modern women can sympathise with her situation and her actions. The story is well-paced and enjoyable, and the setting is described in such a way that I wished I co As a former Classical Studies teacher who loved the Oresteia and particularly Clytaemnestra as a schoolgirl, I jumped at the chance to read this retelling of the myth. I found it engaging and a refreshing, modern take on Clytaemnestra's story. Whereas the ancient Greeks saw her as a monstrous figure, Hannah Lynn shows the reasons why modern women can sympathise with her situation and her actions. The story is well-paced and enjoyable, and the setting is described in such a way that I wished I could fly off to Greece. Occasionally the use of modern idiom jarred a little for me (especially when used by the gods) but not enough to spoil my overall enjoyment of the book. I hope to read more of Hannah Lynn's retellings of Greek myths in the future, and would recommend this to anyone as an engaging read, whether you are familiar with mythology or not.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Alana

    I love Greek mythology so any story based around a myth will always have my interest – and this book was no exception, especially as it was telling a tale from the other side of a very well known story. I’ve read a lot about Troy, and Helen and Paris, but very little about Clytemnestra. I knew a little about Orestes and where the story was going to end up; but I almost forgot that as I was reading as the book did such a good job of weaving a great tale. I enjoyed the building of Clytemnestra’s c I love Greek mythology so any story based around a myth will always have my interest – and this book was no exception, especially as it was telling a tale from the other side of a very well known story. I’ve read a lot about Troy, and Helen and Paris, but very little about Clytemnestra. I knew a little about Orestes and where the story was going to end up; but I almost forgot that as I was reading as the book did such a good job of weaving a great tale. I enjoyed the building of Clytemnestra’s character and the way she reacted to the loss of Iphigenia I found hard to read as it was powerful. It helped underpin for me why she did the things she did; and even if I didn’t agree with them, the writing was such that I understood why. I really enjoyed this book; it’s so nice to be able to have the stories from the female slant. Looking forward to more!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Nisha Joshi

    We know Clytemnestra is the sister of Helen of Troy and wife of Agamemnon. But do we know who she really is? In A Spartan's Sorrow, we see Clytemnestra in her full glory. What her wishes were, how she lived before she was taken by Agamemnon, what happened after her marriage to him, why she killed him, and how she was killed in the end by her own son. I find Greek mythology very fascinating, perhaps as fascinating I find Indian mythology which I have been listening to since I was a child. I have al We know Clytemnestra is the sister of Helen of Troy and wife of Agamemnon. But do we know who she really is? In A Spartan's Sorrow, we see Clytemnestra in her full glory. What her wishes were, how she lived before she was taken by Agamemnon, what happened after her marriage to him, why she killed him, and how she was killed in the end by her own son. I find Greek mythology very fascinating, perhaps as fascinating I find Indian mythology which I have been listening to since I was a child. I have also read Fiona and the Whale by Hannah Lynn which made me reach out for this book. I liked it quite a lot. At some places, I think it could have gotten deeper into the emotions of the characters. For example, I couldn't understand why Electra loved her father so much and hated her mother. 3.5 stars.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Mrs A & Mr R Robinson

    Having been a student of Latin at senior school in the 1970’s, I have always avoided this genre of book as I thought they would be boring. How wrong was I? This book has completely changed my thinking and now I am on a mission to read more to make up for 40 years of avoidance! I had heard of many of the characters but if I’m honest I couldn’t remember much about them. However, I’m glad about this as I was able to enjoy the tale without any preconceptions. I absolutely loved the charming way this Having been a student of Latin at senior school in the 1970’s, I have always avoided this genre of book as I thought they would be boring. How wrong was I? This book has completely changed my thinking and now I am on a mission to read more to make up for 40 years of avoidance! I had heard of many of the characters but if I’m honest I couldn’t remember much about them. However, I’m glad about this as I was able to enjoy the tale without any preconceptions. I absolutely loved the charming way this book was written and felt connected to the main character and her family instantly. How wonderful to read this story from a woman’s point of view. I’m not going to mention the plot but if you are hesitating about reading this book, I’d say go ahead. I loved it. 5* from me.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Betty

    Review Excellent retelling of the house of Atreus. Unlike the myth and the play, it tells the story from the point of view of Clytemnestra. Instead of condemming her for killing her husband it told the story of how he had murdered her first husband and infant son, forced her to marry him against her will, killed their daughter , Iphigenia,as a sacrifice to appease Artemis ,and then desert her for 10 years to fight a war to recover his brother's unfaithful wife. Seems to me she had a pretty good c Review Excellent retelling of the house of Atreus. Unlike the myth and the play, it tells the story from the point of view of Clytemnestra. Instead of condemming her for killing her husband it told the story of how he had murdered her first husband and infant son, forced her to marry him against her will, killed their daughter , Iphigenia,as a sacrifice to appease Artemis ,and then desert her for 10 years to fight a war to recover his brother's unfaithful wife. Seems to me she had a pretty good case for doing what she did. I always thought the original view of her as an evil wife was pretty sexist and one sided. Good book.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Nikki

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Lordy, I have no idea how to even begin to review this book. It was literally amazing up until the last 60ish pages of the book. Then it went to hell. I’m not sure how to explain the word fuc*ary that this had. It legit made sense til the last bit. And murder is ok? The son isn’t guilty of killing his mom? He doesn’t end up with his gay lover who he murdered for? His horrible sister doesn’t get any sort of karma? It was so absurd that it literally took away any sort of decent feelings I had for Lordy, I have no idea how to even begin to review this book. It was literally amazing up until the last 60ish pages of the book. Then it went to hell. I’m not sure how to explain the word fuc*ary that this had. It legit made sense til the last bit. And murder is ok? The son isn’t guilty of killing his mom? He doesn’t end up with his gay lover who he murdered for? His horrible sister doesn’t get any sort of karma? It was so absurd that it literally took away any sort of decent feelings I had for the book. Lame. Lame lame lame

  23. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca Augustine

    An Absorbing Retelling of a Tragic Family Saga Of course, I would have liked Clytemnestra to have prevailed and lived a long, happy life surrounded by her grandchildren and to have handed over the scepter to Orestes when he was mature enough to rule. However, one cannot rewrite history or even mythology -- although a lot of liberties certainly get taken with both! Well done, Hannah Lynn! Whether Athena's verdict was just or fair in regard to Orestes, Agamemnonon should have been "taken out" befo An Absorbing Retelling of a Tragic Family Saga Of course, I would have liked Clytemnestra to have prevailed and lived a long, happy life surrounded by her grandchildren and to have handed over the scepter to Orestes when he was mature enough to rule. However, one cannot rewrite history or even mythology -- although a lot of liberties certainly get taken with both! Well done, Hannah Lynn! Whether Athena's verdict was just or fair in regard to Orestes, Agamemnonon should have been "taken out" before he returned from Troy!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kel

    So much better than Athena’s child - the character development is fabulous, and the length is so much better for a telling of such depth. The three parts help to highlight the passage of time and almost distinct characters and their journeys. A beautiful retelling of a story I, for one, had not heard much of beforehand.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jen

    Wonderful storytelling This book is so smartly written. It's a wonderful retelling/expanding of the myths you may have heard growing up, and the characters are so compelling. It's emotional and intense and you can feel what each character is going through. I also read the authors Medusa book. Both excellent. Wonderful storytelling This book is so smartly written. It's a wonderful retelling/expanding of the myths you may have heard growing up, and the characters are so compelling. It's emotional and intense and you can feel what each character is going through. I also read the authors Medusa book. Both excellent.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Al Cate

    Excellent research into the lives of ancient Greeks and gods After a lifetime of reading about the early Greek stories, myths and outright lies I found this book and its historic chronology new and informative urging me to dig further into the Greek and Spartan eras Thankfully the typos were minor and did not break up the story like e

  27. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Methvin

    This one started a little slow for me. Really enjoyed the storytelling and emotion behind everyone's journey. I am not as familiar with this myth as I am Medusa but I enjoyed it thoroughly. I wasn't expecting to feel as emotional as I was reading it. This one started a little slow for me. Really enjoyed the storytelling and emotion behind everyone's journey. I am not as familiar with this myth as I am Medusa but I enjoyed it thoroughly. I wasn't expecting to feel as emotional as I was reading it.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Claire

    A harrowing tale, as so many Greek tales are, but refreshing to hear it from the woman's point of view. I felt bad for Orestes as well when the latter part of the book was narrated from his POV. Well written, interweaving history with personal sacrifice and emotion. A harrowing tale, as so many Greek tales are, but refreshing to hear it from the woman's point of view. I felt bad for Orestes as well when the latter part of the book was narrated from his POV. Well written, interweaving history with personal sacrifice and emotion.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Beccy Thompson

    I love a good Greek read and this was perfect! Beautifully written with a content rich in historical facts I enjoyed every page. A fabulous read that I would fully recommend to anyone the story will stay long after the final page

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jerry D.

    Difficult subject Treated well. As the author herself describes there are multiple ancient tellings of this myth. It is a morality play of immoral and whimsical gods, probably told in modern terms as well as could be done. Deserves five stars it was just so damn sad.

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