Hot Best Seller

We're Not Broken: Changing the Autism Conversation

Availability: Ready to download

“This book is a message from autistic people to their parents, friends, teachers, coworkers and doctors showing what life is like on the spectrum. It’s also my love letter to autistic people. For too long, we have been forced to navigate a world where all the road signs are written in another language.” With a reporter’s eye and an insider’s perspective, Eric Garcia shows w “This book is a message from autistic people to their parents, friends, teachers, coworkers and doctors showing what life is like on the spectrum. It’s also my love letter to autistic people. For too long, we have been forced to navigate a world where all the road signs are written in another language.” With a reporter’s eye and an insider’s perspective, Eric Garcia shows what it’s like to be autistic across America. Garcia began writing about autism because he was frustrated by the media’s coverage of it; the myths that the disorder is caused by vaccines, the narrow portrayals of autistic people as white men working in Silicon Valley. His own life as an autistic person didn’t look anything like that. He is Latino, a graduate of the University of North Carolina, and works as a journalist covering politics in Washington D.C. Garcia realized he needed to put into writing what so many autistic people have been saying for years; autism is a part of their identity, they don’t need to be fixed. In We’re Not Broken, Garcia uses his own life as a springboard to discuss the social and policy gaps that exist in supporting those on the spectrum. From education to healthcare, he explores how autistic people wrestle with systems that were not built with them in mind. At the same time, he shares the experiences of all types of autistic people, from those with higher support needs, to autistic people of color, to those in the LGBTQ community. In doing so, Garcia gives his community a platform to articulate their own needs, rather than having others speak for them, which has been the standard for far too long.


Compare

“This book is a message from autistic people to their parents, friends, teachers, coworkers and doctors showing what life is like on the spectrum. It’s also my love letter to autistic people. For too long, we have been forced to navigate a world where all the road signs are written in another language.” With a reporter’s eye and an insider’s perspective, Eric Garcia shows w “This book is a message from autistic people to their parents, friends, teachers, coworkers and doctors showing what life is like on the spectrum. It’s also my love letter to autistic people. For too long, we have been forced to navigate a world where all the road signs are written in another language.” With a reporter’s eye and an insider’s perspective, Eric Garcia shows what it’s like to be autistic across America. Garcia began writing about autism because he was frustrated by the media’s coverage of it; the myths that the disorder is caused by vaccines, the narrow portrayals of autistic people as white men working in Silicon Valley. His own life as an autistic person didn’t look anything like that. He is Latino, a graduate of the University of North Carolina, and works as a journalist covering politics in Washington D.C. Garcia realized he needed to put into writing what so many autistic people have been saying for years; autism is a part of their identity, they don’t need to be fixed. In We’re Not Broken, Garcia uses his own life as a springboard to discuss the social and policy gaps that exist in supporting those on the spectrum. From education to healthcare, he explores how autistic people wrestle with systems that were not built with them in mind. At the same time, he shares the experiences of all types of autistic people, from those with higher support needs, to autistic people of color, to those in the LGBTQ community. In doing so, Garcia gives his community a platform to articulate their own needs, rather than having others speak for them, which has been the standard for far too long.

30 review for We're Not Broken: Changing the Autism Conversation

  1. 5 out of 5

    Darlene

    DNF at 25% I’m really disappointed because I was so looking forward to reading this book. I think it is important to hear “own voices” perspectives. This book teased telling the stories of autistic adults, the hurdles they face, and how they navigate the world, but it just didn't deliver. The book starts out with a long-winded introduction that is mostly a really ugly political rant. When the author finally wandered back to the topic, he explained that the purpose of his book was to clear up seve DNF at 25% I’m really disappointed because I was so looking forward to reading this book. I think it is important to hear “own voices” perspectives. This book teased telling the stories of autistic adults, the hurdles they face, and how they navigate the world, but it just didn't deliver. The book starts out with a long-winded introduction that is mostly a really ugly political rant. When the author finally wandered back to the topic, he explained that the purpose of his book was to clear up seven common misconceptions about autism that may have been common in 1933, but really are not now at all. I was tempted to put the book down at that point, but it promised stories from others with autism and I looked forward to hearing those. Unfortunately, those stories never materialized. The author did start out with half a page about a politician with autism, but rather than a deep dive into her life, there was just a superficial mention of the rally she was speaking at. This was followed by a lot of history of the autism awareness movement where the author attempted to assign ill intentions to every person who ever took up the cause. Then there was a short blip about an attorney with autism that went only slightly deeper. I kept slogging through and the author did swing back to Jessica Benham, the aforementioned politician with autism, a couple of times but still fell short of the depth I needed to hear. Far from "changing the autism conversation" as the cover promised, this just rehashed old grievances and shut down any attempt at discussion. Thank you Houghton Mifflin Harcourt and NetGalley for the opportunity to read and review this advanced reader copy.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Katy

    This review is based on the ARC. Note that I am part of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. That being said, I hope everyone I know will read this book when it comes out in August. As an autistic person, this is the most all-inclusive guide to the autistic experience written by an autistic person that I have ever read. Eric Garcia combines his passion for policy and reporting with his lived experience to showcase the myriad intersectional issues (such as race, gender identity and sexual orientation, and This review is based on the ARC. Note that I am part of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. That being said, I hope everyone I know will read this book when it comes out in August. As an autistic person, this is the most all-inclusive guide to the autistic experience written by an autistic person that I have ever read. Eric Garcia combines his passion for policy and reporting with his lived experience to showcase the myriad intersectional issues (such as race, gender identity and sexual orientation, and income level) autistic people face and how so many misconceptions about it have come to be part of the popular consciousness. On a personal level, I could relate on a painful level to avoiding asking for accommodations in school to avoid being seen as weak or making excuses (which, despite avoiding accommodations after some bad special ed experiences in elementary school, people accused me of anyways simply for asking for help or having the gall to study), when these accommodations could've helped me and ultimately lead to less stress and pressure on myself. I also appreciated how Garcia was vulnerable and honest about his experiences, particularly as an autistic man who once invaded the boundaries of women. I wish more men could learn from their mistakes like Garcia has and really do the work to understand neurodivergence is not an excuse for sexism and lack of respect for boundaries. At the crux of Garcia's argument is the truth that we live in a world where autism is stigmatized and parents/advocates/"experts" focus more on a cure than accessibility. Garcia is humble about his own success (which still wasn't easy), acknowledging that there are so many other autistic people out there who could have meaningful careers but lack the support they need to do. This is a great starting point for those who want to know more about autism from its source, and for those who are neurodivergent, a great resource for finding diverse voices in the community.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kari

    This book did exactly what it was meant to do- change the conversation on Autism. Even as a young special education teacher equipped with an ASD endorsement on my teaching certificate, I learned so much. I learned the history of autism diagnoses, the gender gap, current challenges, etc. You name it- the book addressed it! Broken into different sections, this book hit all aspects of today’s world with the connection to Autism and people living with it. Definitely a great educational read!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Maddy Will

    I’m a little biased because Eric is a good friend, but I genuinely learned so much about autism while reading this book. Eric masterfully weaves policy discussions and history alongside interviews with people across the spectrum and his own reflections about life as an autistic man. The end result is a compelling, informative book that is essential reading for anyone who knows an autistic person — which is likely everyone.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Boyd

    Disability self advocate on Autism.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    We're Not Broken Changing the Autism Conversation by Eric Garcia Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Health, Mind & Body | Nonfiction (Adult) Pub Date 03 Aug 2021 | Archive Date 03 Aug 2021 As a School Nurse for a population that falls on the spectrum, I look for ways to improve my interactions with the students in my care. I jumped at the opportunity to read for review We're Not Broken with hopes of becoming a stronger support person for them. Inside I found helpful information within a somewhat biased viewpoi We're Not Broken Changing the Autism Conversation by Eric Garcia Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Health, Mind & Body | Nonfiction (Adult) Pub Date 03 Aug 2021 | Archive Date 03 Aug 2021 As a School Nurse for a population that falls on the spectrum, I look for ways to improve my interactions with the students in my care. I jumped at the opportunity to read for review We're Not Broken with hopes of becoming a stronger support person for them. Inside I found helpful information within a somewhat biased viewpoint and found myself waiting for the inclusion of others POV. It fell short in this area and at times I thought this would have been a great first draft instead of finished copy. Many thanks to Netgalley and Houghton Mifflin Harcourt for the opportunity to read for review this ARC.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Oxana Tomova

    We're Not Broken is about autism and misconceptions about autism. I have very mixed feelings about this book. I spent a lot of time trying to finish it, but I ended up only skimming the second half of the book, because it just felt SO LONG, even though it's a relatively short book. The author gets carried away a lot and some of his points seriously confused me. While he talks about how some people are very badly, if at all, informed about autism, and the glaring flaws in the help autistic people We're Not Broken is about autism and misconceptions about autism. I have very mixed feelings about this book. I spent a lot of time trying to finish it, but I ended up only skimming the second half of the book, because it just felt SO LONG, even though it's a relatively short book. The author gets carried away a lot and some of his points seriously confused me. While he talks about how some people are very badly, if at all, informed about autism, and the glaring flaws in the help autistic people get, the author promises that there's a pretty easy solution without ever giving it. Which annoyed me, because after all, some people with autism will never be able to enter the work-force and it's not from lack-of-trying from neurotypical people, rather, some people with autism just don't fit with any of the jobs available, just like some neurotypical people, and that's fine. We're also told we'll get stories from other people with autism, but rather than get their stories and outlook on life, they get mentioned in passing when the author tries to validate his points. For example, in the section about love, a couple where both parties are autistic is mentioned. However, we don't really learn much about them and how autism has affected their dating before and even now in their marriage. Overall, it feels like the author just misses the point most of the times. At times the book did provide interesting data about autism in the US specifically. There are many things that are just so different here in Europe, and that also lowered my interest in the book. *Thanks to NetGalley and Houghton Mifflin Harcourt for providing me with an ARC of this title in exchange for an honest review.*

  8. 4 out of 5

    Gara

    I am a retired teacher assistant from public schools, and three out of four of my grandchildren have been diagnosed as being on the spectrum. I was excited to read this ARC, and learn more about autism. When my first grandchild was identified as autistic, I worried about his future. If we can give him the support that he needs now and in his future, from what Mr. Garcia states, anything is possible. This is certainly positive. I was horrified by the “remedies” used in the past, but I have to con I am a retired teacher assistant from public schools, and three out of four of my grandchildren have been diagnosed as being on the spectrum. I was excited to read this ARC, and learn more about autism. When my first grandchild was identified as autistic, I worried about his future. If we can give him the support that he needs now and in his future, from what Mr. Garcia states, anything is possible. This is certainly positive. I was horrified by the “remedies” used in the past, but I have to confess that ABA therapy was not described fairly in this book. My grandson, diagnosed at 4, was unable to get a haircut without a meltdown due to sensory issues. ABA broke this task down little by little, and he is now able to endure haircuts without the tragic meltdowns of the past. This is a reasonable expectation for a child, and everyone was respectful and aware of the difficulty of this process, and his constant strength and resilience in difficult situations fill me with pride. ABA, when done by the right people for the right reasons, can be invaluable. It is simply one of many tools that can support my grandson, and although at this point he no longer needs this service, his parents have learned how to break down difficult tasks so that their son can navigate through life. As a mother I wanted my children to become good, kind adults with the ability to share their unique gifts and talents, and the strength and wisdom to make their own path in the world. I want this for all of my grandchildren as well! Reading this book was part of my effort to become more informed, and I would recommend it for the historical perspective offered by the author, as well as the many portrayals of neurodivergent individuals.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jordan

    This was a well-researched, empathetic, and personal look at autism from a journalist who is himself autistic. Also a third-generation Mexican American, Garcia gave a fantastic primer on the different intersections of identity that come into play with autism, looking at race, gender, sexuality, and more. He talked candidly and with honesty about his own past missteps, even as someone who has autism, offering a model for growth and increased understanding. This growth is even more important to co This was a well-researched, empathetic, and personal look at autism from a journalist who is himself autistic. Also a third-generation Mexican American, Garcia gave a fantastic primer on the different intersections of identity that come into play with autism, looking at race, gender, sexuality, and more. He talked candidly and with honesty about his own past missteps, even as someone who has autism, offering a model for growth and increased understanding. This growth is even more important to consider as we think about how (relatively) quickly nomenclature and verbiage around disabilities in general and autism in particular change. He interviewed a diverse group of autistic people, all with a range of different support needs, which a lesser journalist/writer (or even more egregiously, someone not in the community themselves) would have found it easy to not do. My one qualm is one that I'm not even sure is one with the book itself, or my mood, but there were some moments where I felt like the writing could have been tightened up a bit. It was especially poignant to read this as disability rights are in the news in a big way, with one of the most famous pop stars in the world fighting to regain control of her own life after over a decade of having decisions made for her by people who financially benefit from those decisions. I'm so frustrated and angered that this is the current situation, but I'm hopeful that we are moving towards disability justice with books like Garcia's and other texts like Alice Wong's edited Disability Visibility. I would highly recommend for anyone interested in learning more about autism from autistic folks directly. Thanks to HMH and Netgalley for the advance copy in exchange for an honest review.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    Thank you to NetGalley and Mariner Books for an advanced electronic copy of this book in exchange for an honest review! In this nonfiction book, the author, who is on the autism spectrum, discusses different aspects of the ASD experience, from jobs to education and housing and relationships. The author shares that people have preconceived notions about what autism looks like, without understanding that autism isn't just one thing. This is an interesting read for anyone who wants to learn more abo Thank you to NetGalley and Mariner Books for an advanced electronic copy of this book in exchange for an honest review! In this nonfiction book, the author, who is on the autism spectrum, discusses different aspects of the ASD experience, from jobs to education and housing and relationships. The author shares that people have preconceived notions about what autism looks like, without understanding that autism isn't just one thing. This is an interesting read for anyone who wants to learn more about the ASD experience from the perspective of someone who is living it

  11. 5 out of 5

    Lee-ann

    Thank you to netgalley for providing an e-galley for review. We're Not Broken by Eric Garcia is a different take on autism in America, namely because it's written by an autistic person, collecting different autistic stories. The most interesting and thought-provoking chapter, for me, was the chapter on gender identity. That autism resources still are sectioned off from different gender identities, instead of combing forces is sadly typical of most entities. There was a lot of information dumping Thank you to netgalley for providing an e-galley for review. We're Not Broken by Eric Garcia is a different take on autism in America, namely because it's written by an autistic person, collecting different autistic stories. The most interesting and thought-provoking chapter, for me, was the chapter on gender identity. That autism resources still are sectioned off from different gender identities, instead of combing forces is sadly typical of most entities. There was a lot of information dumping in the early chapters that made it difficult to follow and process. A person was introduced and then there was a tangent about the policies that were created, when I really want to know more about the person. The book read as uneven to me. Some chapters were very strong, while others were not.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Mallory Lozoya

    A well-written exploration of what being autistic looks like. As a teacher, I am always trying to learn more about the different populations and groups that I interact with, and this book taught me a great deal about the many different issues that autistic people deal with. I felt that this book had an engaging, conversational tone, and I appreciated the many different studies referenced, as well as the different stories shared throughout the chapters. Thank you to Netgalley for the eARC!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Becca Moser

    Essential reading. Will be buying copies for every SpEd teacher and para!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Betty

    I was thrilled to be invited by the publisher Houghton Mifflin Harcourt to review this book. The author himself is in the Spectrum Generation. Garcia emphasizes we need to hear from these people with autism themselves, not from their parents or professionals. I definitely understand his great point. I was born Deaf. Like other Deaf people, we do not appreciate it when professionals, interpreters and non-Deaf people speak for and about us. Garcia goes into detail about past misinformation, ste I was thrilled to be invited by the publisher Houghton Mifflin Harcourt to review this book. The author himself is in the Spectrum Generation. Garcia emphasizes we need to hear from these people with autism themselves, not from their parents or professionals. I definitely understand his great point. I was born Deaf. Like other Deaf people, we do not appreciate it when professionals, interpreters and non-Deaf people speak for and about us. Garcia goes into detail about past misinformation, stereotypes, and mythology about autism. Each chapter focuses on an issue such as government policy, education including accommodations, relationships, health care. At times the book is dry with its research. Garcia tells us about his own experiences and about others on the spectrum. Those tidbits are very interesting. I've taught quite a few students on the autism/Asperger spectrum. I fondly remember specific interactions with two. I'm tempted to tell about them here. I've also met other adults whom I recognized as having Aspergers. When asked, they confirmed this. I thank the publishers and Netgalley for inviting me to read this book. I now am wondering about the students I worked with, plus how and what they're doing in their adulthood. Memories memories.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jeff

    Mostly Solid Work A Bit Misguided By Its Own Biases. This is one of the more comprehensive books I've found about the actual issues facing Autistics in the current world (circa 2020) - well, in the US anyway. Discussions of education, gender, housing, personhood, etc are mostly solid and mostly problem free, focusing on numerous interviews the author has conducted over several years combined with well documented (roughly 32% of the text of this Advance Reader Copy I read) research. It even has tw Mostly Solid Work A Bit Misguided By Its Own Biases. This is one of the more comprehensive books I've found about the actual issues facing Autistics in the current world (circa 2020) - well, in the US anyway. Discussions of education, gender, housing, personhood, etc are mostly solid and mostly problem free, focusing on numerous interviews the author has conducted over several years combined with well documented (roughly 32% of the text of this Advance Reader Copy I read) research. It even has two *extremely* good points: 1) "We don't know what Autism in and of itself looks like. We only know how autism informed by trauma presents itself." -Cal Montgomery 2) From the close of Chapter 9: "People who are not Autistic often assume they are acting benevolently by hand-holding those on the spectrum. But despite their best intentions, there is an element of condescension in thse actions because it assumes that non-Autistic people know what's best. But it is Autistic people who live with the condition of Autism - for all of its positives and negatives - as well as the consequences of any collective action meant to help them. If there is going to be policy that has seismic impact on their lives, they deserve to have a say it in, no mater how they communicate. Furthermore, while many parent advocates, clinicians, and other "experts" may have good intentions, centering their voices continues to give them power that should lie with the Autistic community. To achieve any true sense of freedom, Autistic people need to take this power back." HOWEVER, the fact that the discussion routinely ignores and even outright dismisses the needs and challenges of white Autistics and/ or Autistics who *do* find meaningful employment in the science and/ or technology sectors means that the book fails to have truly the comprehensive discussion of the condition that it seems to seek to have. In ignoring these facets, it doesn't truly "change the Autism conversation" in any truly helpful manner, as it blatantly ignores and dismisses a key component that can actually do quite a bit of good in trying to address all of the other issues the narrative does go in detail on. We Autistic technologists can create the very technologies Garcia sometimes points to as being needed, in part because we ourselves truly do live with these very same issues - and thus, we don't actually need a neurotypical trying to approximate some solution, as we can create a solution that works for our own particular case and allow for it to be customized to fit other cases as well. Ultimately this truly is a very strong look at the state of Autistic society today and the issues Autistics face in trying to fully integrate into larger neurotypical societies, it simply missed its potential to be so much more. Very much recommended.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sean Loughran

    I felt compelled to read this book after reading Eric's article, I'm Not Broken, published by The Atlantic. I knew very little about autism before reading the article, aside from what I had seen portrayed in television and the media. Reading Eric's book, I was shocked to learn about the misinformation that’s spread about autism in recent years. In his introduction, Eric talks about the false link between vaccines causing autism, a claim that was popularized by celebrity Jenny McCarty on CNN and T I felt compelled to read this book after reading Eric's article, I'm Not Broken, published by The Atlantic. I knew very little about autism before reading the article, aside from what I had seen portrayed in television and the media. Reading Eric's book, I was shocked to learn about the misinformation that’s spread about autism in recent years. In his introduction, Eric talks about the false link between vaccines causing autism, a claim that was popularized by celebrity Jenny McCarty on CNN and The Oprah Winfrey Show, then later claimed by Donald Trump. I also learned that there are beliefs that autism only affects white males, that autistic people are incapable of holding jobs outside of the technology field, and that those on the spectrum are unable to have relationships or live independently. Perhaps most shocking are the claims that state a connection between autism and violent behaviour, with people referencing mass shooters in the United States, who they believe are on the spectrum. We're Not Broken is a well researched, fantastically written, and compelling book. I appreciated Eric's honesty and vulnerability when sharing his own story of living in America with autism. I loved reading about his passion for music, politics, and journalism, and how he interned at The White House and climbed the ranks to work at some of the biggest publications in Washington. He also profiles others from underserved communities outside of the typical stereotypes, highlighting and interviewing people of colour, LGBTQ+ people, women, people from low income households, and people in all lines of work. I’m not on the spectrum, but I am a gay male, and I related to the LGBTQ section of the book. Garcia talks about how a lot of the language used to discriminate against LGBTQ people match that used to discriminate against autistic people. Eric states, “None of us are failed versions of normal. We can love and be loved as is.” What is immediately clear from the book, and from those that Eric encounters, is just how misunderstood and mistreated autism is. Garcia has done a remarkable job at shedding a light on an extremely important topic, and it’s my hope that people can read this book and walk away with a new perspective and understanding of autism. I certainly learned a lot from this book. We’re Not Broken is an essential read not only for parents, friends, doctors, teachers, and researchers, but for everyone. I highly recommend it. Avocado Diaries

  17. 4 out of 5

    Lynn

    As someone who has autistic relatives, I never really thought about what it truly must be like and never thought to ask the question. It just seemed like another fact/part of them. In thinking this, I truly believe that it is easy to, for lack of a better phrase, forget about many of the difficulties that others have. This is especially true if it does not personally affect you, someone, you know, or is not presented in media regularly. I loved the fact that Gracia decided to not simply write a As someone who has autistic relatives, I never really thought about what it truly must be like and never thought to ask the question. It just seemed like another fact/part of them. In thinking this, I truly believe that it is easy to, for lack of a better phrase, forget about many of the difficulties that others have. This is especially true if it does not personally affect you, someone, you know, or is not presented in media regularly. I loved the fact that Gracia decided to not simply write a memoir. Instead, the stories of many people were incorporated to showcase the range of experience for those on the spectrum. I found the book incredibly insightful just by getting a glimpse into the lives and stories relayed. I appreciated the knowledge presented on many subjects including, healthcare, education, race, and many more. I learned so much that I didn’t know I didn’t know. I am grateful to Gracia for the way the information was presented. Not only did I find myself invested in what I was reading, but I also find that I look forward to learning more moving forward. Voluntarily reviewed after receiving a free copy courtesy of NetGalley, the Publisher, and the author, Eric Garcia.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Lynn

    As someone who has autistic relatives, I never really thought about what it truly must be like and never thought to ask the question. It just seemed like another fact/part of them. In thinking this, I truly believe that it is easy to, for lack of a better phrase, forget about many of the difficulties that others have. This is especially true if it does not personally affect you, someone, you know, or is not presented in media regularly. I loved the fact that Gracia decided to not simply write a As someone who has autistic relatives, I never really thought about what it truly must be like and never thought to ask the question. It just seemed like another fact/part of them. In thinking this, I truly believe that it is easy to, for lack of a better phrase, forget about many of the difficulties that others have. This is especially true if it does not personally affect you, someone, you know, or is not presented in media regularly. I loved the fact that Gracia decided to not simply write a memoir. Instead, the stories of many people were incorporated to showcase the range of experience for those on the spectrum. I found the book incredibly insightful just by getting a glimpse into the lives and stories relayed. I appreciated the knowledge presented on many subjects including, healthcare, education, race, and many more. I learned so much that I didn’t know I didn’t know. I am grateful to Gracia for the way the information was presented. Not only did I find myself invested in what I was reading, but I also find that I look forward to learning more moving forward. Voluntarily reviewed after receiving a free copy courtesy of NetGalley, the Publisher, and the author, Eric Garcia.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Shannon Wolf

    This isn't my usual kind of pick but I thoroughly enjoyed this book. Garcia does exactly what he sets out to do - change the conversation on autism. I loved the everyday minutiae that Garcia picked through to illustrate small challenges and microaggressions that people with autism endure; and I was interested to learn more about the history of autism which, frankly, I didn't know a lot about. I also enjoyed the way Garcia structures the text, weaving in personal stories of autistic people, their This isn't my usual kind of pick but I thoroughly enjoyed this book. Garcia does exactly what he sets out to do - change the conversation on autism. I loved the everyday minutiae that Garcia picked through to illustrate small challenges and microaggressions that people with autism endure; and I was interested to learn more about the history of autism which, frankly, I didn't know a lot about. I also enjoyed the way Garcia structures the text, weaving in personal stories of autistic people, their parents and carers, and organizations who have helped or hurt our understanding of autism. He did well to include his own experience as an autistic person without turning the work into a memoir. I definitely recommend this book to anyone looking to grow their understanding or change their perception of what life with autism looks like - Garcia notes that this work isn't exhaustive and there is still more to do or learn, and you can find many recommendations and suggestions within his study!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Watson

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I was sent a copy of this book via a Goodreads giveaway. I'm having a hard time rating it because the author's perspective seems perfectly valid, but he seems to show only one side of the argument. I do not live with autism myself, but I do want to understand those that do better. I learned a lot regarding Garcia's perspective and rationale, and I can get behind a lot of what he's saying. Overall, though I am left asking the question: how one can argue so strongly that autism is a disability tha I was sent a copy of this book via a Goodreads giveaway. I'm having a hard time rating it because the author's perspective seems perfectly valid, but he seems to show only one side of the argument. I do not live with autism myself, but I do want to understand those that do better. I learned a lot regarding Garcia's perspective and rationale, and I can get behind a lot of what he's saying. Overall, though I am left asking the question: how one can argue so strongly that autism is a disability that should be accommodated but also that money shouldn't be allocated to help find a cure? I'm all in favor of support being given, don't get me wrong, but I think we can support and accept the person and also want to find a cure/treatment/some way to help. (I do say this from the perspective of someone who has a disability, needs accommodation at times, and still *very much* wants to see a cure be found.)

  21. 5 out of 5

    Luisa Gatto

    This book is very important for whoever works with autistic people and/or their families. It is important to respect autistic views and inputs in any decisions about them and in this book the writer highlighted also that might have been true 20-30 years ago, it is not nowadays. His own carrier is an excellent example of this. I will suggest it to my supervises and all the families I work with. One great point for this book is that the author was really open-minded and reported various angles wit This book is very important for whoever works with autistic people and/or their families. It is important to respect autistic views and inputs in any decisions about them and in this book the writer highlighted also that might have been true 20-30 years ago, it is not nowadays. His own carrier is an excellent example of this. I will suggest it to my supervises and all the families I work with. One great point for this book is that the author was really open-minded and reported various angles without judgment (a real journalist). He also divided the book into chapters by subjects: very functional given the amount of information reported.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Mitra Salasel

    Very well researched, intriguing narrative and lofty aim. That the author is a journalist makes the storytelling compelling and easy to keep reading, but at times his flow is totally interrupted by what seems to be a glaring lack of a competent editor—many typos, inconsistencies in referring to sources/individuals that can be distracting or confusing, and frankly many of the chapters seem like they were written as completely separate essays and jammed into an arbitrary order, which made for a re Very well researched, intriguing narrative and lofty aim. That the author is a journalist makes the storytelling compelling and easy to keep reading, but at times his flow is totally interrupted by what seems to be a glaring lack of a competent editor—many typos, inconsistencies in referring to sources/individuals that can be distracting or confusing, and frankly many of the chapters seem like they were written as completely separate essays and jammed into an arbitrary order, which made for a reading experience that was less than ideal.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    This was such a good book. Of course I have a personal reason for loving it since my son and I have OCD, and at least one of my daughters is autistic. The book led to some good conversations with my eldest daughter (who is autistic) and gave words to some of what I’ve been trying to do/say in advocating for her and helping her. Anyway, whether you have an autistic person in your family or not, I recommend reading this. It’s a conversation that needs to happen so one day society can be more welco This was such a good book. Of course I have a personal reason for loving it since my son and I have OCD, and at least one of my daughters is autistic. The book led to some good conversations with my eldest daughter (who is autistic) and gave words to some of what I’ve been trying to do/say in advocating for her and helping her. Anyway, whether you have an autistic person in your family or not, I recommend reading this. It’s a conversation that needs to happen so one day society can be more welcoming of neurodivergent people.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Heather Jones

    This was well worth reading - I'd recommend it for anyone who wants to learn more about the ways people live with autism. Reading the first chapter, I felt like I was reading an intro-level primer, and almost put it aside as not saying anything I didn't already know. I'm glad I kept reading for a few chapters, because I ended up learning from the book after all. Good writing style. This was well worth reading - I'd recommend it for anyone who wants to learn more about the ways people live with autism. Reading the first chapter, I felt like I was reading an intro-level primer, and almost put it aside as not saying anything I didn't already know. I'm glad I kept reading for a few chapters, because I ended up learning from the book after all. Good writing style.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Rob

    I Felt that, that, that, and that too Being autistic, I tend to feel an inability to relate to a lot of others on the spectrum, but Garcias work is very much an exception. There were so many moments in this book that I felt what he said pretty hard. At the same time, it gave insight into autistic people I have trouble relating to.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Bethany

    Pros: - Written by an Actually Autistic, BIPOC person - Covers the gamut of how autism affects our housing, job prospects, relationships, and more - Includes BIPOC and LGBTQIA+ autistic people’s voices and stories - Well written! Cons: - A little dry (I’m biased though as I much prefer fiction over nonfiction)

  27. 4 out of 5

    Megan Anne Davis

    ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️💫 I found this book to be really well done and interesting. Each chapter is focused on a different issue that individuals with autism face daily- some of the issues I hadn’t even thought about as being a problem. I gained a lot of insight on the young adults I work with and feel better equipped to understand the challenges they face.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Katie

    We’re Not Broken is the book the neurodivergent community has been needing. Concise, historical, and up to date referencing even the most current issues autistic people face, this book will be taking a place on my shelf next to Neurotribes. I didn’t want it to end!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    This is a book by an adult man who is on the autistic spectrum. (I've read a ton of books by brothers, parents, occasionally by an autistic person himself or herself) and I enjoyed it. It's a new perspective. This is a book by an adult man who is on the autistic spectrum. (I've read a ton of books by brothers, parents, occasionally by an autistic person himself or herself) and I enjoyed it. It's a new perspective.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ruth

    An excellent follow-up to Steve Silberman's Neurotribes. Written by an autistic author, with personal anecdotes along with excellent factual statistics. An excellent follow-up to Steve Silberman's Neurotribes. Written by an autistic author, with personal anecdotes along with excellent factual statistics.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...