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Corpsing: My Body and Other Horror Shows

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Nora Ephron meets Bram Stoker in Sophie White's vivid and ambitious literary non-fiction collection. White asks uncomfortable questions about the lived reality of womanhood in the 21st century, and the fear that must be internalised in order to find your path through it. White balances vivid storytelling with sharp-witted observations about the horrors of grief, mental ill Nora Ephron meets Bram Stoker in Sophie White's vivid and ambitious literary non-fiction collection. White asks uncomfortable questions about the lived reality of womanhood in the 21st century, and the fear that must be internalised in order to find your path through it. White balances vivid storytelling with sharp-witted observations about the horrors of grief, mental illness, and the casual and sometimes hilarious cruelty of life.


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Nora Ephron meets Bram Stoker in Sophie White's vivid and ambitious literary non-fiction collection. White asks uncomfortable questions about the lived reality of womanhood in the 21st century, and the fear that must be internalised in order to find your path through it. White balances vivid storytelling with sharp-witted observations about the horrors of grief, mental ill Nora Ephron meets Bram Stoker in Sophie White's vivid and ambitious literary non-fiction collection. White asks uncomfortable questions about the lived reality of womanhood in the 21st century, and the fear that must be internalised in order to find your path through it. White balances vivid storytelling with sharp-witted observations about the horrors of grief, mental illness, and the casual and sometimes hilarious cruelty of life.

30 review for Corpsing: My Body and Other Horror Shows

  1. 4 out of 5

    segosha

    Interesting topics but found the writing, on a sentence level, quite repetitive and almost redundant. I think it was a little muddy, and while the individual essays were in conversation in each other, they also talked over each other.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sinéad Cuddihy

    From the minute I started reading I thought, 'how on earth will I review this book and do it justice?!' Corpsing is a collection of essays by writer and podcaster, Sophie White, detailing the literal highs and lows of life, death, addiction, mental illness, motherhood, womanhood. It seems trite and clichéd to say I laughed, I cried, but I laughed, I cried. I’ve had to stop and google ’The Reincarnation of Saint-Orlan’, pause to listen with eyes closed to Blue by Joni Mitchell, and I can’t look at From the minute I started reading I thought, 'how on earth will I review this book and do it justice?!' Corpsing is a collection of essays by writer and podcaster, Sophie White, detailing the literal highs and lows of life, death, addiction, mental illness, motherhood, womanhood. It seems trite and clichéd to say I laughed, I cried, but I laughed, I cried. I’ve had to stop and google ’The Reincarnation of Saint-Orlan’, pause to listen with eyes closed to Blue by Joni Mitchell, and I can’t look at the Saxa salt the same way ever again. Looking at my notes, I’ve written honest, beautiful, relatable, raw, emotional, heartbreaking and funny. It is all of those things and more. Get it, read it, pass it on.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Aoife McMenamin

    A difficult one to review. A series of essays on grief, motherhood, addiction and mental illness, it makes for illuminating, stark and very sad reading at times. Throughout, I thought the writing was at its best when the author discussed her grief for her father and her alcoholism. There are a couple of really standout essays in there - most notably in Part I. The book drifted a bit for me from this point, with quite a bit of overlap and repetition, and social commentary that I found a bit jarrin A difficult one to review. A series of essays on grief, motherhood, addiction and mental illness, it makes for illuminating, stark and very sad reading at times. Throughout, I thought the writing was at its best when the author discussed her grief for her father and her alcoholism. There are a couple of really standout essays in there - most notably in Part I. The book drifted a bit for me from this point, with quite a bit of overlap and repetition, and social commentary that I found a bit jarring. It pulled me back in with “Drunk Mother”, which is brutal in its honesty. The last essay surprised me a little and made me feel there were some things left unsaid. Overall, a well written collection. 3/5 ⭐️

  4. 4 out of 5

    Stella

    I didn’t feel right giving this a star rating as it’s so deeply personal for the author. The first essay really dragged me in but I wasn’t so sure about the rest, up until the last one. An interesting read

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sine

    Right now it's easy to feel like we are floating through a weird life. Nothing to really talk about. This book makes me feel awake alive and weirdly optimistic. I've read the first few stories in one hungry sitting. I'm properly hooked and can't wait to read more. Marian keyes summed it perfectly. "It's extraordinary. Painful, powerful visceral and spiritual. A remarkable book" I also already see it is bursting with love too. Right now it's easy to feel like we are floating through a weird life. Nothing to really talk about. This book makes me feel awake alive and weirdly optimistic. I've read the first few stories in one hungry sitting. I'm properly hooked and can't wait to read more. Marian keyes summed it perfectly. "It's extraordinary. Painful, powerful visceral and spiritual. A remarkable book" I also already see it is bursting with love too.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Edel Green

    This is a powerful collection of essays that deal with White’s personal experiences of grief, mental illness and motherhood. At times some of the essays are so emotionally raw you feel you are trespassing in her brain even reading them. I have never read anything so honest - she describes pain so perfectly. Drunk Mother, Smotherhood and Bad Timings II made a massive impact on me. An unforgettable read.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Niamh

    This is a genuinely incredible book. It’s beautiful and painful and profound. I have no doubt that this is a book that will stay with me and I will continue to go back to

  8. 4 out of 5

    Mary O

    I really wanted to love this book, yes it is honest, I felt that it was at times more on the side of cringe then anything else. I felt like it was a diary of how to be authenic but it just felt fake.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Sophie

    A little repetitive in tone but very honest.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Eleanor

    Loved half of this book and really didn’t enjoy the other half. I found the first section almost barbaric and unbelievably uncomfortable - and the story about cravings, stomach churning. The rest was enthralling and well written. I felt huge empathy for her particularly the stories of motherhood.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Sorcha

    There is undoubtedly courage and strength seeping through each page of this book, embracing topics of grief and mental illness in a humourous way takes skill which the author clearly has. Unfortunately I felt the tone was in many of the essays rather overbearing, juvenile and repetitive at times. Drunk mother stuck with me, I felt this was the best essay by far.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Beth O'Riordan

    Brutal honesty and humour served up in a backet of grief and depression. It was one of those books that stays with you however I felt it many of the stories repeated the same sadness and self loathing which got a little bit repetitive for me towards the end.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Claire Kane

    "Pain will not be stamped down and neurtralised for an inburst instead of an outburst. If you don't address it, connect with it and accept it, it will become toxic and infect the people you love." We're great at talking about mental health, but how comfortable are we with talking about mental illness? I think the most important lessons we learn come from things that make us squirm, and Corpsing will make you squirm. This is Sophie White's reality and I've no doubt that if you are living, breathi "Pain will not be stamped down and neurtralised for an inburst instead of an outburst. If you don't address it, connect with it and accept it, it will become toxic and infect the people you love." We're great at talking about mental health, but how comfortable are we with talking about mental illness? I think the most important lessons we learn come from things that make us squirm, and Corpsing will make you squirm. This is Sophie White's reality and I've no doubt that if you are living, breathing, consuming human you'll see some of your reality in some of the pages. In this book of incredibly personal essays, Sophie White details her darkest and most private thoughts and moments, smattered with abstract comparisons and her trademark dark humour. The humour is there, isn't it? Or is my humour so dark that I saw humour in places it wasn't meant to be found? I digress. There is bravery and comfort in these pages. I know I saw myself in the lines that mention self-harm and self-disgust. I saw myself in the essay in which Sophie greedily revels in thinness and hunger and the careful measurement of what she consumed. I saw myself in the pages that talk about delayed grief and getting on with things too big too soon after an inevitable but painful loss. I saw myself a lot even thought my experiences have been to different to Sophie's. You'll see yourself. And even if you don't, you'll wonder if your friend or relative who went through something similar felt they way Sophie felt. You might see them through a different, more empathic lense. You'll recommend it to your friends. You won't let them borrow your copy, because it feels like a reference text that you can go back to and you won't want to lose it. It's the perfect example of why I love reading books of personal essays. This book has the potential to make big, haunted house lady-sized strides towards ending mental illness stigma. And it's really kind, actually, of Sophie to share some of her most private experiences with us even though it must have been a very scary thing to do.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Sarah O'Riordan | travelseatsreads

    This isn't a pleasant book to read. It isn't a book you'll cuddle up and relax into the couch in comfort with. But it is a very important one that I recommend everyone read. This book is a raw, and agonising pain. From the very first few lines Sophie is violently honest with the reader about everything. Within this collection of very personal essays she has allowed us to see the darkest inner most thoughts imaginable and that is one of the amazing things about this book. A lot of these thoughts y This isn't a pleasant book to read. It isn't a book you'll cuddle up and relax into the couch in comfort with. But it is a very important one that I recommend everyone read. This book is a raw, and agonising pain. From the very first few lines Sophie is violently honest with the reader about everything. Within this collection of very personal essays she has allowed us to see the darkest inner most thoughts imaginable and that is one of the amazing things about this book. A lot of these thoughts you don't need to imagine because I guarantee you, you will see yourself somewhere within this book. It is so honestly refreshing to see Sophie delve head first into her darkness and voice that "normal" people can have these dark sometimes warped thoughts or that people can laugh maniacally at the most inappropriate and twisted humour and still be good mothers, good friends and good people. It's so much easier to talk about mental health now than years previously but what isn't easy or comfortable to talk about is mental illness and the agony and impact struggling with that engulfing mental illness has on everyone involved. There is so much within this book that I could sit here and type for days praising and discussing the heartbreaking content. There is so much of myself within this book that at times it was deeply uncomfortable to read. This is a book that needed to be written and one that needs to be read. The only slight I had on the book was completely situational. I'm not a mother and certainly don't plan to be so I did find it hard to connect with one or two of the essays on motherhood. However, the stark agony of it still jumped from the pages. I took my time with it and it will be one I know I will jump back into for many years to come.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This is quite a difficult book to review. On the surface and even when you dive into the book, it strikes me as an intensely brave and honest book. I am filled with admiration for the author of this book for being able to address these issues and then articulate them. The content while often bleak and difficult to grapple with wasn’t the problem. I found the writing difficult to follow. There didn’t seem to be any linear aspect to the essays. Instead, multiple times the timeframe skipped and jum This is quite a difficult book to review. On the surface and even when you dive into the book, it strikes me as an intensely brave and honest book. I am filled with admiration for the author of this book for being able to address these issues and then articulate them. The content while often bleak and difficult to grapple with wasn’t the problem. I found the writing difficult to follow. There didn’t seem to be any linear aspect to the essays. Instead, multiple times the timeframe skipped and jumped until it was nearly impossible to follow. The result was that you had to read the essays in conversation with each other without reflection on how they interacted. The essays also talked over each other with different issues dominating and obscuring others. At times I wasn’t sure what the scope of the essay was or how to engage with it and while the essays are personal at times the viewpoint felt somewhat prescriptive. However, I did enjoy the frank and at times brutal tone of the collection. Having finished I’m just left with a somewhat odd taste in the mouth.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jenny

    I don’t even know how to begin to sum up Sophie’s collection of essays. They are so raw and open as she bares her profound grief and mental health for the world to see all entwined with the unrelenting demands of motherhood. Sometimes it feels very voyeuristic to be reading them but some essays I felt as if she had picked parts from my brain and printed it for the world to see. The pain is so visceral and in parts unyielding but there is a delicate thread of perseverance stitching it together. I I don’t even know how to begin to sum up Sophie’s collection of essays. They are so raw and open as she bares her profound grief and mental health for the world to see all entwined with the unrelenting demands of motherhood. Sometimes it feels very voyeuristic to be reading them but some essays I felt as if she had picked parts from my brain and printed it for the world to see. The pain is so visceral and in parts unyielding but there is a delicate thread of perseverance stitching it together. I’ve never in my life read anything so bone chillingly honest, I read it in two sittings as I wanted to sit with some of the essays for a little while longer and really digest them. I feel she’s a kindred spirit in a strange way, I applaud her bravery and her strength. I normally don’t annotate or mark any books but the compulsion was too strong with this one. It will live with me for the foreseeable future.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Cat

    This book is a raw collection of essays. I think Sophie is an incredible writer, so honest, funny and insightful. I read it in a short space of time and maybe I needed to take longer over it, but some of the essays did seem to run together (maybe that’s how it’s supposed to). My favourite were: Smotherhood, Needle Girls and Self-Soothing. I found it was a difficult time to read this book after a recent court case in Ireland, watching Dr Marie Cassidy’s casebook last night and I read Sophie speak This book is a raw collection of essays. I think Sophie is an incredible writer, so honest, funny and insightful. I read it in a short space of time and maybe I needed to take longer over it, but some of the essays did seem to run together (maybe that’s how it’s supposed to). My favourite were: Smotherhood, Needle Girls and Self-Soothing. I found it was a difficult time to read this book after a recent court case in Ireland, watching Dr Marie Cassidy’s casebook last night and I read Sophie speaking out in a paper yesterday “I have what she had” - mental illness / health supports in this country are on their knees. I think this book is really important for highlighting how important timely access to reliable supports (psychiatry, psychology) is for people. It’s a brilliant, timely, difficult and sometimes funny read. As others have said here, it’s quite a hard collection to ‘review’ really, but I would definitely recommend you read it.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Tamara (CoffeeOnABookshelf)

    💭 ᴍʏ ᴛʜᴏᴜɢʜᴛꜱ: A series of essays on grief, motherhood, addiction and mental illness. It's not pretty, but it is honest, raw, ugly and very brave. It was quite revealing and very sad at times to read. Although I did love the essays a little later in the book, I found the beginning very dark and negative. It definitely gave me a big appreciation of my own life and a feeling that even though life is not always easy as White shows us, I am quite an optimist. Definitely a book that gets you thinking. 💭 ᴍʏ ᴛʜᴏᴜɢʜᴛꜱ: A series of essays on grief, motherhood, addiction and mental illness. It's not pretty, but it is honest, raw, ugly and very brave. It was quite revealing and very sad at times to read. Although I did love the essays a little later in the book, I found the beginning very dark and negative. It definitely gave me a big appreciation of my own life and a feeling that even though life is not always easy as White shows us, I am quite an optimist. Definitely a book that gets you thinking.. ⭐️⭐️⭐️ 🤓 ʀᴇᴀᴅ ɪꜰ ʏᴏᴜ ʟɪᴋᴇ: Honest Essays The ugliest truth ꜱʏɴᴏᴘꜱɪꜱ: 𝘚𝘰𝘱𝘩𝘪𝘦 𝘞𝘩𝘪𝘵𝘦'𝘴 𝘷𝘪𝘷𝘪𝘥 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘢𝘮𝘣𝘪𝘵𝘪𝘰𝘶𝘴 𝘭𝘪𝘵𝘦𝘳𝘢𝘳𝘺 𝘯𝘰𝘯-𝘧𝘪𝘤𝘵𝘪𝘰𝘯 𝘤𝘰𝘭𝘭𝘦𝘤𝘵𝘪𝘰𝘯. 𝘞𝘩𝘪𝘵𝘦 𝘢𝘴𝘬𝘴 𝘶𝘯𝘤𝘰𝘮𝘧𝘰𝘳𝘵𝘢𝘣𝘭𝘦 𝘲𝘶𝘦𝘴𝘵𝘪𝘰𝘯𝘴 𝘢𝘣𝘰𝘶𝘵 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘭𝘪𝘷𝘦𝘥 𝘳𝘦𝘢𝘭𝘪𝘵𝘺 𝘰𝘧 𝘸𝘰𝘮𝘢𝘯𝘩𝘰𝘰𝘥 𝘪𝘯 𝘵𝘩𝘦 21𝘴𝘵 𝘤𝘦𝘯𝘵𝘶𝘳𝘺, 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘧𝘦𝘢𝘳 𝘵𝘩𝘢𝘵 𝘮𝘶𝘴𝘵 𝘣𝘦 𝘪𝘯𝘵𝘦𝘳𝘯𝘢𝘭𝘪𝘴𝘦𝘥 𝘪𝘯 𝘰𝘳𝘥𝘦𝘳 𝘵𝘰 𝘧𝘪𝘯𝘥 𝘺𝘰𝘶𝘳 𝘱𝘢𝘵𝘩 𝘵𝘩𝘳𝘰𝘶𝘨𝘩 𝘪𝘵. 𝘞𝘩𝘪𝘵𝘦 𝘣𝘢𝘭𝘢𝘯𝘤𝘦𝘴 𝘷𝘪𝘷𝘪𝘥 𝘴𝘵𝘰𝘳𝘺𝘵𝘦𝘭𝘭𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘸𝘪𝘵𝘩 𝘴𝘩𝘢𝘳𝘱-𝘸𝘪𝘵𝘵𝘦𝘥 𝘰𝘣𝘴𝘦𝘳𝘷𝘢𝘵𝘪𝘰𝘯𝘴 𝘢𝘣𝘰𝘶𝘵 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘩𝘰𝘳𝘳𝘰𝘳𝘴 𝘰𝘧 𝘨𝘳𝘪𝘦𝘧, 𝘮𝘦𝘯𝘵𝘢𝘭 𝘪𝘭𝘭𝘯𝘦𝘴𝘴, 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘤𝘢𝘴𝘶𝘢𝘭 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘴𝘰𝘮𝘦𝘵𝘪𝘮𝘦𝘴 𝘩𝘪𝘭𝘢𝘳𝘪𝘰𝘶𝘴 𝘤𝘳𝘶𝘦𝘭𝘵𝘺 𝘰𝘧 𝘭𝘪𝘧𝘦.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Campbell

    I had a totally warped view of what this book was about, I thought it was going to be a kind of horror story/comedy which in some ways it is but not as I had expected at all. It’s a collection of essays sharing some of the most raw and honest moments of motherhood I’ve ever read. I feel that I would blush if I bumped into Sophie now. I had thought I had a good idea of who she was from listening to her excellent podcast with Jen “Mother of Pod” but this was next level. Thank you Sophie for openin I had a totally warped view of what this book was about, I thought it was going to be a kind of horror story/comedy which in some ways it is but not as I had expected at all. It’s a collection of essays sharing some of the most raw and honest moments of motherhood I’ve ever read. I feel that I would blush if I bumped into Sophie now. I had thought I had a good idea of who she was from listening to her excellent podcast with Jen “Mother of Pod” but this was next level. Thank you Sophie for opening yourself up as you have, you’re braver than the rest of us and I hope that as you say in the book “naming the frightening thing goes some way towards neutering it’s awful power.” And please, please be kind to yourself, some of your self criticisms brought me to tears.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Darcie Faccio

    I devoured this cover to cover in one sitting, I couldn't put it down even to sleep. So refreshingly honest and confessional. I read a lot of memoir, especially by other women, but something in this made me feel at time as though I was reading about myself. I was in tears by page 10 and in ribbons laughing by page 60. I bought this knowing Sophie from the Creep Dive and didn't know what to expect, the usual sense of humor in the face of the darkness of life is there of which I'm very much a fan I devoured this cover to cover in one sitting, I couldn't put it down even to sleep. So refreshingly honest and confessional. I read a lot of memoir, especially by other women, but something in this made me feel at time as though I was reading about myself. I was in tears by page 10 and in ribbons laughing by page 60. I bought this knowing Sophie from the Creep Dive and didn't know what to expect, the usual sense of humor in the face of the darkness of life is there of which I'm very much a fan but also so much more.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Fiona Carey

    Since the first essay, I've been struggling to put words on how I feel about this book. It's not something I can understand or process in my brain but something I feel in my body. This book cracked me open, got into my bones and my bloodstream and articulated feelings in a way I didn't think possible. The overwhelming feeling I have towards this book and towards Sophie White is one of gratitude for her generosity in being so honest and raw and putting the darkest, most unspeakable parts of the h Since the first essay, I've been struggling to put words on how I feel about this book. It's not something I can understand or process in my brain but something I feel in my body. This book cracked me open, got into my bones and my bloodstream and articulated feelings in a way I didn't think possible. The overwhelming feeling I have towards this book and towards Sophie White is one of gratitude for her generosity in being so honest and raw and putting the darkest, most unspeakable parts of the human experience out there so we can all feel less alone.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Mary Quigley

    It's so difficult to articulate pain, but Sophie White knits it up into a wonderful wonky jumper. This book is so open and vulnerable, cliché as it sounds it's one of the bravest things I've ever read. Mental illness, motherhood, addiction, death, these messy subjects don't often lend themselves to neat description but every word is crafted to perfection so everyone can feel heard in these pages. Much of it will feel all too familiar to many of us, but it is comforting to see it formed into some It's so difficult to articulate pain, but Sophie White knits it up into a wonderful wonky jumper. This book is so open and vulnerable, cliché as it sounds it's one of the bravest things I've ever read. Mental illness, motherhood, addiction, death, these messy subjects don't often lend themselves to neat description but every word is crafted to perfection so everyone can feel heard in these pages. Much of it will feel all too familiar to many of us, but it is comforting to see it formed into something almost beautiful.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Niamh Sheridan

    I always avoid writing reviews because I never feel qualified enough but here and now my fingers are compelled to type. This book is, in a very strange way an absolute delight. The honesty with which Sophie writes about mental illness is breath taking. Anyone who's ever battled any kind of addiction or mental illness needs to read this....every women needs to read this ...every mother too...feck it everyone with a pulse needs to read this book. I always avoid writing reviews because I never feel qualified enough but here and now my fingers are compelled to type. This book is, in a very strange way an absolute delight. The honesty with which Sophie writes about mental illness is breath taking. Anyone who's ever battled any kind of addiction or mental illness needs to read this....every women needs to read this ...every mother too...feck it everyone with a pulse needs to read this book.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Linda

    This is a difficult book to review. It wasn't a joy to read, and I felt relived when I finished the last page. It's confronting and harsh and vulgar, but incredibly truthful and poignant. I can see why others would rate 5 stars and they would not be wrong. For me, I struggled to understand or relate to some of the essays. Apart from the last essay, which I found deeply moving, I struggled to connect. This is a difficult book to review. It wasn't a joy to read, and I felt relived when I finished the last page. It's confronting and harsh and vulgar, but incredibly truthful and poignant. I can see why others would rate 5 stars and they would not be wrong. For me, I struggled to understand or relate to some of the essays. Apart from the last essay, which I found deeply moving, I struggled to connect.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jenni Holian

    Very enjoyable and different read. Some of her essays are brilliant, others not so much and with similar themes talk over the brilliant essays to some how make the book weaker overall. I will always be eternally grateful for her account of her alcoholism, I have a friend in the grips of this and Sophie's insight is extremely helpful for me. I will probably go back to those essays many times as my friend struggles through this. I am very thankful for Sophie's bravery and honesty. Very enjoyable and different read. Some of her essays are brilliant, others not so much and with similar themes talk over the brilliant essays to some how make the book weaker overall. I will always be eternally grateful for her account of her alcoholism, I have a friend in the grips of this and Sophie's insight is extremely helpful for me. I will probably go back to those essays many times as my friend struggles through this. I am very thankful for Sophie's bravery and honesty.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Lillypad

    Incredibly raw, personal and honest. I am a big fan of Sophie White in general (except for the fiction which is just not to my taste) so I was really excited to read this. I found the jumping back and forth a bit difficult to follow but it is a beautiful book about grief, mental health and addiction.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Aisling Doonan

    Interesting essays on grief, motherhood, addiction and mental illness. Particularly liked the last one on knitting. It sort of just ended without any resolution, the author was just after a breakdown, in the middle of a global pandemic and I am worried that she may still fall. So the ending left me a little chilled to the bone.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    Ok, so this was totally *not* what I was expecting. I'd say this book is about motherhood and daughterhood, if that makes sense. The way mental illness is put in there is incredibly privileged (as are so many other things, I would say). Also, super cisheteropatriarchal binary conception of womanhood. All in all, what I liked the most about this book was the cool cover picture. Ok, so this was totally *not* what I was expecting. I'd say this book is about motherhood and daughterhood, if that makes sense. The way mental illness is put in there is incredibly privileged (as are so many other things, I would say). Also, super cisheteropatriarchal binary conception of womanhood. All in all, what I liked the most about this book was the cool cover picture.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Fiona

    I think Louise O Neill says it best in her review on the back of Corpsing "flying honesty in every perfectly formed sentence". Some of this book hit so close to home and you can feel the emotion in every sentence. Lots of trigger warnings needed but a raw, beautiful book where Sophie doesn't shy away from addressing things I think Louise O Neill says it best in her review on the back of Corpsing "flying honesty in every perfectly formed sentence". Some of this book hit so close to home and you can feel the emotion in every sentence. Lots of trigger warnings needed but a raw, beautiful book where Sophie doesn't shy away from addressing things

  30. 4 out of 5

    Till Raether

    I find it interesting how the rating system hits a wall when it comes to the idea of reviewing a book about grief, death, trauma, and mental health . So: I think this book is a four-star-memoir generally speaking, but through the lens of my own idiosyncrasies and proclivities, I can only see two.

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